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MARKETING OF MEDIA

SERVICES
CLASSIFICATION
BROADCASTING MEDIA
• RADIO
• INTERNET
• TELEVISION
• WEBCASTING.
• SATELITE & CABLE
• IPTV. Etc.
• FILMS

WHAT IS BROADCASTING
• Broadcasting is the distribution of audio
and video content to a dispersed
audience via radio, television, or other,
often digital transmission media.
Receiving parties may include the
general public or a relatively large
subset of thereof.
CATEGORY OF BROADCASTING
SERVICES
• TRADITIONAL MATHOD IS TO CATAGORISE A
SERVICE IS THE “PROCESS” BY WHICH THE
SEVICES ARE CREATED & DELIVERD.

PEOPLE PROCESS
• PEOPLE PROCESS: CUSTOMARS
THEMSELVES ARE PRIMARY INPUTS
TO THE PROCESS. SERVICES
DIRECTED AT PEOPLE`S BODIES.
• PASSENGER TRANSPORTS,HEALTH
CARE,LODGING,BEAUTY
SALON,FITNESS CENTERS.
POSSESSION SERVICES
• SERVICES DIRECTED AT THE
PHYSICAL POSSESSIONS OF
PEOPLE.
• FRIEGHT TRANSPORT,OFFICE
CLEANING,RETAIL
DISTRIBUTION,LAUNDRY,REFUELIN
G.
MENTAL STIMULLI SERVICES
• “ANYTHING THAT TOUCHES PEOPLE`S
MINDS HAS THE POWER TO SHAPE
ATTITUDES AND INFLUENCE
BEHAVIOR” .
• ADVERTIESING, ART &
ENTERTAINMENT, BROADCASTING &
CABLE,MGMT.
COUNSULTANT,MUSIC
CONCERT,EDUCATION SERVICES.
INFORMATION PROCESSING
SERVICES
• SERVICES DIRECTED AT THE
INTANGIBLE ASSETS.
• ACCOUNT MGMT.,BANKING,DATA
PROCESSING,INSURANCE,LEGAL
SERVICES,RESEARCH,SOFTWARE
COUNSULTANTS.
Overview of Indian Broadcasting Scenario
M&E Industry (US$ 2008 2013 P CAGR %
Billion) (2009-13)

TV 5.01 9.85 14.5%


Print 3.60 5.54 9.0%
Film 2.28 3.51 9.1%
Radio 0.18 0.34 14.2%
Music 0.15 0.22 8.0%
Animation 0.36 0.82 17.8%
Gaming 0.14 0.57 33.3%
Internet Ad. 0.13 0.45 27.9%
Outdoor 0.34 0.61 12.8%
Total Size 12.17 21.92 12.5%
Sources : Group M , KPMG Interviews , KPMG
Analysis

 Over 16 Major Teleports ( Uplink and DTH)


 150+ channels uplinked out of India.

10
Overview of Indian Broadcasting
Scenario
 Indian Broadcasting Industry -
largest in Asia.
 >300 channels of different genres
viz. entertainment, movies, news &
current affairs, sports, music,
religious, infotainment are
available over Indian Sky.
 Channels in different languages are
also available to cater to the
requirements of regional viewers
viz. Tamil, Telgu, Marathi, Punjabi,
etc.
 In Radio segment besides All India
Radio (AIR), city specific licenses
have been given for FM Radio
11
channels e.g. Red FM, Radio Mirchi,
BROADCASTING

Terrestrial – under  Satellite –


exclusive domain of Parsar  Free To Air Channels –
Bharti - Public broadcaster source of revenue -
Doordarshan beaming about 28 advertisements
no. of channels started
transmission in 1959.  Pay Channels (subscription
based) e.g. Zee TV, Star, Sony,
ESPN, CN, etc. – source of
revenue – subscriptions &
TV Industry 2008 E 2013 P CAGR
(US$ bn) (2009-13) advertisements
 In analogue mode pay channels
are encrypted upto MSO/LCO
Subs.
and thereafter delivered to
3.29 6.61 14.9%
Revenues subscriber in FTA mode
through a single pipe.
Ad. 1.72 3.24 13.5%  In digital delivery like DTH
Revenues & CAS pay channels are
delivered in encrypted mode
and are decrypted through
Total Industry 5.01 9.85 14.5% STB at subscribers premises.
Size 

 Video channels through cable


 Mainly transmitted by MSOs and
cable operators at local12
level through cable
Structure of Television Broadcasting
Industry

13
Distribution Network
HFC Network Architecture cont.
15
Sources : Group M , KPMG Interviews , KPMG
Sources : Group M , KPMG Interviews ,
KPMG Analysis
16
FDI Limits in Broadcasting Industry
Sl. Segment Existing limit Entry Recommended Remarks
No. Route limit by TRAI

1. Teleport (Hub) 49% (FDI+FII) FIPB 74% (FDI+FII) In Carriage segment of


broadcasting sector i.e.
2. DTH 49% (FDI+FII) FIPB 74% (FDI+FII) cable TV, DTH, HITS,
FDI not to exceed teleport, mobile TV etc.
20% foreign investment up
to 49 percent should be
3. Satellite Radio No Policy as on FIPB 74% (FDI+FII) on the automatic route
date
4. HITS No Policy as on FIPB 74% (FDI+FII) and above 49% through
date FIPB . However for
5. Cable Network 49% (FDI + FII) FIPB 49% (FDI+FII) content segment FIPB
approval would be
6. FM Radio 20% (FDI + FII) FIPB 49% (FDI+FII) required
7. TV Channels 26% (FDI + FII) FIPB 49% (FDI+FII)
(News & Current
Affairs channel)

Press Note no . 2 ( 2009 Series ) – DIPP , Ministry of commerce & Industry , GOI
5 . 2 Counting of Indirect foreign Investment
§ The foreign investment through the investing Indian company would be considered
for calculation of the indirect foreign investment if the investing company
is owned or controlled by ‘non resident entities’ and in such an event the
entire investment by the investing company into the subject Indian Company
17
would be considered as indirect foreign investment.
DTH Systems around the world
DTH Service Satellites
MAIN BROADCASTERS
ZEE TURNER INDIA

• Zee
• Zee Turner Limited is the largest distribution
Network in India having more than 25
channels in its bouquet. A 74:26 joint
venture between Zee and Turner
International to distribute the Zee Turner
pay channel bouquet in India and
neighboring countries.
• Zee Network has a reach of more than 80
countries and access to more than 225
million viewers globally and Turner
International is the worlds biggest media
Example ; Zee’s connectivity

Areas covered
Africa
EUROPE
10,099,404 S.E.Asia
AMERICA Homes
577,281 MENAP
40,931,416
APAC India
Homes 5,447,523
Homes Homes Pakistan
Gulf region
AFRICA
180,254 INDIA UK/Parts of
Homes 72,000,000
Homes Europe
USA
Canada

The Largest Indian Television Network in the world

28 domestic channels , 18 international channels , across 167 countries ,


over 500 million homes
MENAT – Middle East, North Africa & 22
Pakistan
STAR INDIA
• Star Group
• Transforming Asia's media
landscape
• Launched in 1991 with five
television channels, STAR
pioneered satellite television in Asia
and in the process catalysed
explosive growth in the media
industry across the entire region.
STAR INDIA
• Coupled with the opening up of Asian
economies, access to satellite
television redefined the viewing
experience for millions. Providing
more people with more choice than
ever before, STAR set new standards
in content, production and variety.
• Today STAR broadcasts over 50 services
in eight languages and offers a
comprehensive choice of
entertainment, sports, movies, music,
news and documentaries.
STAR INDIA
• Reaching more than 300 million viewers in
53 countries across Asia, STAR is watched
by approximately 100 million viewers
every day.
• STAR controls over 20,000 hours of Indian
and Chinese programming and also owns
the world's largest contemporary Chinese
film library, with more than 600 titles,
featuring superstars including Jackie
Chan, Chow Yun Fat and Bruce Lee. In
partnership with leading companies in
Asia, STAR businesses extend to filmed
entertainment, television production,
cable systems and wireless and digital
services.
SONY+SET DISCOVERY
• One Alliance
• The One Alliance has proved to be one of
the strongest Alliances in the country and
has successfully managed to maintain 11
channels in its bouquet. The Alliance is a
Joint venture between Sony Pictures
Entertainment and Discovery Networks.
The One Alliance seeks to meet the needs
of middle class people and it is also very
responsive to their needs. The Alliance
showcases a judicious mixture of Action,
Comedy, Movies, News, Community,
Kids/Nature and of course the
Entertainment.
MOTHER OF ALL
BROADCASTERS(DOORDARSHAN &
AIR)
• National programme was introduced in 1982. In
the same year colour TVs were introduced in
Indian markets with the Live telecast of the
Independence day on 15th August, 1982,
followed by the Asian Games being held in
Delhi. The eighties were era of Doordarshan
with soaps like Hum Log (1984), Buniyaad
and mythological dramas like Ramayana
(1987-88) and Mahabharat (1988-89) glued
millions to Doordarshan. Other popular
programmes included Hindi film songs based
Chitrahaar and Rangoli and crime thrillers like
Karamchand (starring Pankaj Kapoor) and
Byomkesh Bakshi.
• Now more than 90 percent of Indian population
can receive Doordarshan (DD1) programmes
through a network of nearly 1400 terrestrial
THE MAIN BROADCASTER
• About 46 Doordarshan Studios are
producing TV software. Presently,
Doordarshan operates 19 channels - two
All India channels, 11 Regional
Languages Satellite Channels (RLSC),
four State Networks (SN), an
International channel, a Sports Channel
and two channels (DD-RS and DD-LS) for
live broadcast of parliamentary
proceedings.
DOORDARSHAN & AIR
• On DD-1 National programmes, Regional
programmes and Local Programmes are carried
on time-sharing basis. DD-News channel,
launched on 3rd November, 2003, which
replaced the DD-Metro Entertainment channel,
provides 24-Hour news service. The Regional
Languages Satellite channels have two
components - The Regional service for the
particular state relayed by all terrestrial
transmitters in the state and additional
programmes in the Regional Language in prime
time and non-prime time available only through
cable operators. Sports Channel is exclusively
devoted to the broadcasting of sporting events
REGULATORY ENVIORNMENT
(GOVT. OF INDIA)
MONEY CREATION IN
BROADCASTING SERVICES
Firms that provide broadcasting services are networks since
they can broadcast the same programs in different locations.

Governments generally limit the concentration of ownership


to protect pluralism and democracy

Broadcasting differs from cable TV or encrypted TV. The


latter can disconnect unpaying consumers from the network

Broadcasting companies cannot collect fees from their


viewers or listeners  they generate revenues only from
advertising  Revenues depend on “rating” (popularity,
audience, number of viewers or listeners).

Alternative: public radio or TV stations, supported by public


money and listeners’ contributions
Broadcasters are engaged in “non-price competition”, since
they cannot sell their services.

Their goal is attracting the highest number of viewers or
listener to raise their rating  maximize profits from
advertising.

§Scheduling of programs becomes their most important


strategic variable.

Each group of consumers has certain hours during which their


major audience turns on their TV sets

Examples:
Soap-opera lovers (1) early in the afternoon
üPeople interested in news (2) between 6.30 and 8.30
Type and nature of programs: this is the second
dimension of strategic competition among TV stations.

General remarks:

1.A monopoly offers a larger variety than an oligopoly:


competing stations can gain from concentrating only on
popular programs, where each station can capture
viewers from its rivals.
2.
3.If there is free entry all program types will be broadcasted
if it is socially optimal to do so. If there are barriers to
entry, the few broadcasters will concentrate only on the
most popular programs  suboptimal social allocation.
Example: 81% would like to watch talk shows
19% prefer to watch news
Each broadcaster has 2 channels
There is only a prime time scheduling option

Case 1. Monopoly: both news and a talk show will be broadcasted at the
same time (each on one channel)  81-19% = 100% viewers

Case 2. Oligopoly (with two broadcasters): all the existing four channels will
broadcast a talk show  81% / 4 = 20,25% > 19%

Loss of social welfare:


- the utility of 19% of viewers is = 0
- the profits on 19% of viewers are = 0
Cable TV
Cable TV operators rely on direct fees imposed on subscribers for transmitting a
bundle of TV stations to their homes.

The received policy view was based on the notion of “natural monopoly”: only one
operator per area was licensed

àLocal monopolies are harmful to consumers of cable TV more than other


monopolies in other industries!

This derives from the fact that cable TV operators control the price of many
channels and not only a single channel (or product in general).

This induces cable TV operators to sell packages of channels to extract more


consumer surplus than the surplus extracted by a monopoly selling a single
channel only.
Example
-A monopoly cable TV operator
-4 types of viewers
-3 channels (BBC, CNN, SHOPPING)
-Maximum willingness to pay of viewer groups:

Viewer CNN BBC Shopping


group
1 10 1 2

2 10 1 5

3 1 10 2

4 1 10 5
The monopoly provider’s profit-maximizing prices when he sells each channel
separately are:
- pCNN = 10
- pBBC = 10 (2 viewer groups are
- pSHOPPING = 5 excluded from
consumption of each
Total profit = 20 + 20 + 10 = 50 channel)

Viewer CNN BBC Shopping


group
1 10 1 2

2 10 1 5

3 1 10 2

4 1 10 5
Conclusion: local monopoly on cable TV is beneficial to
providers but in some cases (mixed tying) it is harmful for
consumers.

Technically they are not necessary with the introduction of


access pricing an fiber-optics lines that can provide many
services at the same time.
TREATMENT OF “7P`S”
• PRODUCT
• PRICE
• PLACE
• PROMOTION
• PEOPLE
• PROCESS
• PHYSICAL EVIDENCE

PRODUCT+PROMOTION+PLACE(3PS)

• IN BROADCASTING SERVICES
MARKETING FIRST THREE “P`S” ARE
DECIDED THROUGH CONTENT
ONLY.
• CORE PRODUCT IS SAME AND IS
DECIDED ACCORDING TO HUMAN
PSYCHOLOGY(EMOTIONAL
RESPONSE)
PRODUCT+PROMOTION +PLACE
• PLACE IMPORTANT ONLY IN FILM
TERITORRY DECISIONS
• PROMOTIONAL PART IS SHARED BY THE
REVENUE GENERATION PART.
• e.g. MOST REVENUE IS GENERATED BY
INSERTING THE ADVERTIESMENT BY
DISTRUPTING THE RUNNING OF
CONTENT. AND THIS TIME IS ALSO
SHARED BY THE BRAND PROMO OF
SELF AND THE CONTENT.
Advertising financed
broadcasters
Need for tight regulation of quality
also on public / regulated TV
The Program Supplier

• The program supplier is


responsible for delivering
program services to the
cable operator.
• A program supplier can
include both the
broadcast television
networks (CBS, ABC, NBC
and Fox as well as cable
network suppliers (CNN,
MTV, ESPN etc.)
• Program suppliers break
down into two major
Consumer Attitudes
Toward Media
(abbreviated)
Authoritative Influential
3% 2%
11 % 3%
9%
5%
20 %
57 % 81 %

9%

Television Newspapers Don ’ t know


Radio Magazines
PRICING DECISIONS 4ThP
• CONTENT PRICE
• PRICES CHARGED BY BROADCASTER
TO ADV.
• PRICES PERCEIVED BY THE
ADVERTIESER
• PRICE CHARGED TO
CONSUMER(DTH)
• PRICES CHARGED BY MSO-CABLE
NETWORK
• GOVT. DIRECTIVES ON PRICE(TARAI)
CONTENT PRICING
• IT IS SELECTED BY BROADCASTER
• MOST IMORTANT FACTOR IN
BROADCASTING
• EITHER SPONCERD BY ADVERTISER
• OR IN HOUSE PRODUCTION BY
BROADCASTER
• MOST OF COST IS BORN BY
BROADCASTER

MAKING OF CONTENT
• MADE ON THE FEEDBACK OF END
USER
• KEEPING IN MIND THE SATURATION
OF ALL EMOTIONAL RESPONCES
• IF TRP IS DECREASING CONTENT IS
CHANGED
• OFTEN PEOPLE ARE ASKED TO MOVE
THE STORYLINE & MAXIMUM
RESPONSE LINE IS SELECTED

KUCH HE DER ME DEKHEYE NARAK KE
KANKAAL
(THE SHORTENING OF COME BACK
TIME)
• Affection
Anger
Annoyance
Angst
Apathy
Anxiety
Awe
Contempt
Curiosity
Depression
Desire
ABHI HAZIR HOTE HAIN BREAK
KE BAAD
• Euphoria
Fear
Frustration
Gratitude
Grief
Guilt
Happiness
Hatred
Hope
Horror
Hostility
KAL ES SERIAL ME DEKHEYE
( THE TIME
APOINTMENT)
• Misery
Pity
Pride
Rage
Regret
Remorse
Sadness
Shame
Shyness
Suffering
Surprise
MEDIA RESEARCH FOR
CONTENT,VARIETY,QUALITY,PRICING,&SCHE
DULING
• PEOPLE
• PROCESS
• PHYSICAL EVIDENCE

PEOPLE
• PEOPLE ARE IMPORTANT FOR:
• 1.MKT. SEGMENTATION & TARGETING
• POSITIONING & PERCIVED
DIFFERENTIATION
• BRAND LOYALITY
• MKT.DEMAND BUT NOT CAPACITY
• TO ACHIVE CORRECT MKTING MIX

PROCESS
• PLANNING & SCHDULING OF
CONTENT
• TECHNOLOGY
• FEEDBACK
PHYSICAL EVIDENCE
• BRAND IMAGE OF BROADCASTER
• LOGOS & PROMOS
• MEDIA PERSONALITIES ATTACHED TO
BRAND
• TECHNOLOGY ADVANTAGE OF
BROADCASTER(MANIFESTED IN
CONTENT CLARITY)
• CONTENT ITSELF
SOCIO-ECONOMIC
CLASSIFICATION - URBAN
• A demographic indicator designed by the
Market Research Society of India to reflect
purchase behaviour.

• It is based on 2 parameters - Education and
Occupation of the Chief Wage Earner of
the Household.

• The SEC of the HH determines the SEC of
the family members.

• SEC A1+ is one category which also has an
income filter (Rs 10,000 + per month).
Broad SEC Classification -
Urban
 SEC By Education By Occupation

 A1 Grad & Post Grads B/I/SEP/Officer &Execs


 (General & Professional) (Sr & Mdl)

 A2 Grad & Post Grads Shop ownrs, Sup Level,


 (Professional) Ofiicers & Execs (Jr Lvl)
B1B2 SSC+ < Grad Skld wrkrs, Petty Trdrs,
Clerk,Salesmen
C Schooling 5-9 yrs Skld wrkrs, Petty
Trdrs, Clerk,Salesmen

 D Schooling upto 4 yrs Skld/Unskld, Petty Trdrs,


Clerks,Salesmen
 E Illiterate Skld/Unskld, Petty Trdrs,

Socio-Economic Classification -
Rural
• A demographic indicator designed by
the Market Research Users Council
(yet to be ratified by the Market
Research Society of India).

• It is based on 2 parameters - Education
of the Chief Wage Earner of the
Household and the Type of House

• The SEC of the HH determines the SEC
of the family members.

Broad SEC Classification Grid -
Rural
 SEC By Education By Type of House

 R1 Some College but not Grad., Pucca


 Grads & Post Grads

 R2 SSC/HSC Semi Pucca


 R3 No formal school, Semi Pucca


 Schooling upto 9th Std

 R4 Illiterate Kuchha

DATABASE USED BY PLANNERS
Readership & Circulation
• NVS - National viewership Survey
• IRS - Indian Readership Survey
• Product profiles - Data on product
and brand usage
• ABC - Circulation figures
Some Definitions
 Urban & Rural Classification

According to the Census of India 1991, the following


criteria were adopted for treating a place as urban :
1. All statutory towns, i.e., all places with a municipality,

corporation, cantonment board or notified town area


committee, etc.

 2. All other places which satisfied the following criteria :


 - A minimum population of 5000
 - At least 75% of the male working population
engaged in non-agricultural pursuits, and
 - A density of population of at least 400 per sq km

Contd..
Some Definitions

 Household- A person living alone or a group of


persons staying together & sharing
food from the same kitchen

 CHIEF WAGE EARNER -The member of the family who


makes highest contribution to the
HOUSEHOLD income

 MONTHLY HOUSEHOLD INCOME The sum of income of


all members of the family

 Housewife- The female or the male member of


the HH who is chiefly responsible for
HH tasks and decides what should be
purchased for the HH, for products such as
soaps/ toothpastes, etc.
The National Readership
Survey
 Conducted by National VIEWERSHIP Studies Council

 - Advertising Agencies Association of India


 - Audit Bureau of Circulations
 - Indian Newspaper Society

• NVS has been strictly an Urban survey


• 6 NVS studies have been conducted till date.
• From 1995, it was decided to make it a once in 2
years survey
• From 1997 plans are to make NVS a 6-monthly
survey and would also cover rural areas like the
IRS.

Television Households - Changing Scenario

 Growth over Change in


 NVS V Absolute Nos.

 Total HHs 08% 38 Lac


TV HHs 24% 66 Lac


C&S HHs 62 % 57 Lac
Col TV HHs 43% 33 Lac
Remote HHs 105% 35 Lac

Over 50% of the new TV HHs added over NVS V


have colour TV sets and remote controls



Cable and sattelite Penetration
 NRS V NRS VI
Sec A 48% 61%
 B 39% 51%
 C 33% 42%
 D 29% 38%
 E 21% 31%

Total
 34% 45%

C&S Penetration has grown across the board
Cable & sattelite Penetration

 NRS V
NRS VI

 Pop strata 25 Lac 31% 47%


 10-25 Lac 38% 41%
 5 - 10 Lac 34% 40%
 1 - 5 Lac 31% 42%
 < 1 Lac 40% 47%

Maximum growth in 25 L+ towns



Cable&Sattelite Penetration

 Zone Total

West 52%
South 60%
East 31%
North (Less UP/Raj) 38%

 UP/Raj 27%
South
 & West are very clearly Satellite markets
Cable&Sattelite Penetration
Socio. Economic. Class. A,B,C.

 C&S Penetration States


High
 Maharashtra, Gujarat, MP, TN, (50%
+) AP, Karnataka

Medium Orissa, Haryana, Punjab,


(45-50%) Chandigarh, HP, Delhi

Low North East, Bihar, West Bengal,


(30 - 40%) Rajasthan, UP, Kerala


Colour TV, B/W TV, Multiple TV sets...

 NVS V
NVS VI

TV HHs 270 LAC 336 LAC


Multiple TV HHs 3% 4%
Colour TV HHs 29% 33%
B/W TV HHs 71% 67%
Remote Control HHs12.5% 21%
Remote Controls
 % of TV HHs with REMOTE CONTROL
• SEC NVS V NVS VI

• A 32% 46%
• B 16% 28%
• C 8% 17%
• D 5% 10%
• E 2% 5%
• Total 13% 21%

• 67% of all remotes are in AB HOUSEHOLD
Radio Reach

 NRS V NRS VI

 SEC A 47% 35%


 B 46% 33%
 C 45% 31%
 D 41% 29%
 E 34% 24%

Total
 42%
29% A dramatic fall for Radio
Cinema
Cinema Reach
TownclassNRS V
 NRS VI

25 LAC+ 61% 52%


10 - 25 LAC66% 55%
5 - 10 LAC 68% 52%
1 - 5 LAC 66% 54%
< 1 LAC 58% 46%

Total
 62% 51%
Contrary to popular belief Cinema Going is still on the decline
Cinema Reach

 NRS V NRS VI

SEC A 69%
61%
 B 67% 57%
 C 64% 52%
 D 62% 49%
 E 56% 43%

Total
Cinema 62%
Reach has declined across SEC categories
51%
HOW TO KNOW & CALCULATE WHAT
PEOPLE ARE WATCHING FOR CONTENT
EFFECTIVENESS
• PEOPLEMETER
• DAIRY MATHOD


Peoplemeter Types
 Tuner Substitution
 These meters work by substituting the tuner inside
the TV set with their own tuner. Thus these meters have
a direct control over what is happening on the TV set

 Tuner Monitoring
 Monitoring meters work by placing a small antenna-
like probe near the tuner inside the TV set to detect the
channel being viewed.

 Picture Matching
 Meters that capture the picture on the TV set which is
later matched with the pictures collected at the master
control station.


Calculation of TRP
- The Diary Method
 Suppose there are 150 Diary HHs in Kanpur

 30 people indicate in the diary that they watched Boogie


Woogie

 Therefore the TRP for Boogie Woogie : (30/150 )x100 = 20


 100 people indicate that they watched the Sunday Hindi Film

 Therefore the TRP for Hindi Film : (100/150)x100 = 66.6



Calculation of TRP
- The Peoplemeter Method
Universe : 10 people (A,B,C,D,E,F,G,H,I,J)
Programme : Kasauti Zindagi Ki telecast at 8.30 - 9.00 pm
Duration : 30 minutes
Viewership of KZK

Viewer Start TimeEnd Time Minutes Watched


A 8:30 8:40 10
B DNW - -
C DNW - -
D 8:46 8:50 4
E DNW - -
F 8:30 8:35 5
G DNW - -
H DNW - -
I DNW - -
J 8:33 8:58 25


Calculation of TRP
- The Peoplemeter Method

 TRP of KZK :

 10 4 5 25
 + + +
 30 30 30 30 x 100 = 15

 10

 The corresponding TRP under Diary Method : (4/10)x100 = 40


TV - Advertising
Monitoring
• Coverage
– All TV advertising across categories
• Information
– Time of telecast of ad
– Spot duration
– Estimate of spend
• Reporting
– Category/Brand/Channel
• Periodicity
– Weekly
• Utility
– Keeping track of competition

The Planning Process
Various Steps in Media
Planning
• Studying the Target Audience and its Media
preferences
• Review of our previous year’s performance
• Competitive Analysis
• Identifying Media Tasks/Setting Objectives
• Framing a Media Strategy
• Channel Selection
• Progs/Dlys/ Selection
• Developing the Final Plan
• Plan Evaluation
These do not necessarily happen sequentially
• Post Campaign
- there are overlapsReview
between these steps

Identifying Media Tasks/Setting
Objectives
• Given the marketing objectives, one
needs to identify Media Tasks and set
objectives accordingly

• The Media Objectives should be more a
reflection of the Marketing Objectives
• The marketing objectives provide
direction for the planner in selecting
Media. Media objectives should give
further leads based on this.
Examples of Marketing
Objectives and
Media Objectives
Marketing Objective

• To increase share with special effort


directed only to the existing
customer base

Examples of Marketing
Objectives and
Media Objectives
Marketing Objective

• To increase share with special effort


directed only to the existing
customer base

Media Objective

• Focus on the Core Target segment in


the existing markets and increase
frequency of exposure to our
advertising
Examples of Marketing
Objectives and
Media Objectives
Marketing Objective

• To regain lost volume - target 14%


market share

Examples of Marketing
Objectives and
Media Objectives
Marketing Objective

• To acquire 20% market share in year


1 after national launch, 25% in the
next year and 30% in the 3rd year

Examples of Marketing
Objectives and
Media Objectives
Marketing Objective
• To acquire 20% market share in year
1 after national launch, 25% in the
next year and 30% in the 3rd year

Media Objective

• Focus on markets where there is a


higher return in value for every
rupee spent. Focus on growth
markets and capture market share

Framing a Media Strategy
• Media Strategy is all about concrete
steps taken to achieve Media
Objectives

• This would include steps like setting
quantifiable media targets,
finalising Media Mix, taking
decisions on scheduling, market
prioritization, identifying role for
each element in the Media Mix, etc.
Market Prioritization - The
Need
• All markets might not be of equal
importance

• The client might want to focus on
some markets for strategic reasons

• Budget constraints - therefore cover
markets with the available money
on a priority basis

Factors Considered in Market
Prioritization
• Dispersion of Brand Sales
• Competitive Activity
• Dispersion of Target Audience
• Growth rates in various markets
• Category Sales Dispersion
• Sales Targets


• Affection
Anger
Annoyance
Angst
Apathy
Anxiety
Awe
Contempt
Curiosity
Depression
Desire
Thank You