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NAVAIR 01-1A-505 (USAf) T.O.

l-lA-14



TABLE OF CONTENTS

Title

INTRODUCTION

I-I. General .

1-5. Purpose of Manual .

1-7. Source of Information .

1-9. Scope... .

1 12. Intended Use .

1-16. Arrangemen t of M a terial .

1-21. Revisions .

II WIRE AND CABLF PREPARATION

}-1. Introduction .

24. Reference Specifications and Drawings

2 5 Definitions 0 •••••••• -

2-6. Cutting Wire and Cable - .

2-i.3. Identifying Wire and Cable .

2-36. Stnpping Wire and Cable .

247. Tinning Copper Wire and Cable

2-~'i Terminating Shielded Cable -

III

(JrNLRAL PURPOSE CONNECTORS

3-1. Introduction .

:'-4. Reference Specifications,

Drawings, and Documents .

3-5. De<.cription... .

3-7. General Practices 0 ••••••••••••••

3-8. Soldering. . . . .. . - ..

3-24. Crimp Contacts .

3-32. Shielded Connections .

342. ANjMS Connectors .

348. Disassembly, Reassembly, and

Installation of Connectors .

3-70. Installation of MS3057 Series

Connector Cable Clamps .

-' 75. Interchangeability of US/AN and

UK/BMS Connectors .

3-76. Miniature MS Connectors .

.)-89. MIL-C -8) 511 Connectors .

3-91. MIL·C-83723 Connectors .

399. MIL·C·38999 Connectors .

3·104. MIL-C·816S9 Connectors .

3-111. Special Purpose Connectors .

Page

)-) )-1 )·1 1-1 I·' 1-2 1·2

2-1 2·1 2-2 2·3 2·6 2·21 2·27 2·29

3-\

3-1 3-2 3·2 3-0)

3·9 3-20 3·25

3-32

3·57

3·61 3-61 3·74 3-80 3-84 3-90 3-106

IV RF CONNECTORS AND CABLING

4.1. Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 4-1

44. Reference Specifications and Drawings 4-1

4-5. Description . . . . . .. 4-1

4-8. General Precautions and Procedures ... , 44

4-11. Soldering Coaxial Cable to

RF Connectors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 4·6

4-15. BNC Series Connectors 4·7

4-19. C Series Connectors.. . . . . . 4-11

Section

Title

Page

4-13 4·16 4·19 4·24 4-26 4-16 4-28

5-1

5-1 5-2 5·2

54

5·J 5 5-24 5-27

5-29

5-32 5-35

6·] 6-1 6-1 6-6 6·7

VII THERMOCOUPLE WIRE SOLDERING AND INSTALLATION

7.1. Introduction .. _ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 7-1

7.5. Reference Specifications and Drawings 7-1

7.6. Description _ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7·1

7-10. Definitions.... . . . . .. 7·5

7.J I. Thermocouple Wire Preparation - 7·5

7 -15. Hard Soldering Thermocouple Wire . . . . 7-6

7.25. Soft Soldering Thermocouple Wire 7·11

7 -31. Thermocouple Wiring Installation 7-12

4·22. 4-26. 4-30. 4-34. 4·37. 4-38. 4Al.

liN Series Connectors

N Series Connectors .

Pulse Series Connectors -

TNC Series Connectors .

SC Connectors .

Miniature RF Connectors .

Subminiature RF Connectors .

V

SOLDERLESS TE RMINA TI ONS AND SPLICES

5-1. Introduction .

54. Reference Specifications,

Drawings, and Documents . - .

Description ..

Types and Styles of Terminals .

Terminating Small Copper Wires

(Sizes No. 26 through No.1 0) with Preinsulated Terminal Lugs

5·18. Terminating Large Copper Wires

(Sizes No.8 through No. 4/0) .

High Temperature Terminal Lugs .

Terminating Aluminum Wire .

Splicing Small Copper Wires

(Sizes No. 26 through No. 10)

5-54. Splicing Large Copper Wires

(Sizes No.8 through No. 4/0)

5-62. Inspection of Crimped Connections ....

5-5. 5-7.

5-8.

5·32. 542. 5-50.

VI

TAPER PIN TERMINATIONS

6-1. Introduction .

65. Taper Pin Tools .

6-10. Crimping Procedures .

6-14. Insertion of Taper Pins .

6·17. Extraction of Taper Pins .

NAVAIR 01-1A-505 (USAF) T.O. 1-1A-14

Table (If Contents

Section

Tide

VIII BONDING AND GROUNDING

8-1. Introduction .

84. Reference Specifications" .

8-5. Definitions .

8-6. General Precautions and Procedures .

8-7. Selection of Hardware .

8-13. Preparation of Bonding or

Grounding Surfaces .

8-17. Methods of Bonding or Grounding .

8-23. Bonding anJ Grounding Jumpers .

8-26. Testing Bonds and Grounds .

8-29. Refinishing .

IX SOLDERING

9-1. Introduction .

9-5. Reference Specifications

and Standards .

9-6. Definitions and Descriptions .

9-]4. Heat Application Methods .

9-] 9. Preparation and Maintenance

of Soldering Iron .

9-24. Soldering Operation - General

Precautions and Procedures .

941. Inspecting a Finished Solder Joint .

X ELECTRIC CONNECTOR SEALING

10-1. Introduction .

104. Reference Specifications .

10-5. Description .

10-6. General Precautions .

10· to. Preparation of Sealing Compound .

10-15. Storage of Sealing Compound .

10-19. Preparation of Fluorocarbon

Insulated Wire for Potting .

10-20. Special Instructions for

Use ofMIL-M-24041 Molding

and Potting Compound .

Xl CONDUiT FABRICATION

II-I. Introduction ..

11-5. Reference Specifications and Drawings .

11-6. Metallic Conduit .

11- J 9. Nonmetallic Conduit .

11-22. Use of Heat-Shrinkable Tubing .

XII SPECIAL ELECTRICAL WIRING HARNESSES

12-1. Introduction.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 12-1

124. Reference Specifications 12-1

J 2-5. Molded Hard Harness . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 12-1 12-16. Compact Wire Bundles . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 12-5 12-19. Rework and Repair of

Compact Wire Bundles . . . . . . . . . . .. 12-8

Page

8-1 8-1 8-1 8-1 8-1

8-2 8-6 8-8 8-8 8-10

9-1

9-1 9-1 9-3

9-3

9-6 9-8

10-1 10-1 10-1 10-1 io-z 104

10-7

10-8

11-1 11-1 11-1 11-18 11-19

Section

Title



13-1 13-1 13-1 13·3 134 13-6 13·8

14-1 14-1 14-1 14-1 14-1 144

14-11 14-18 14-' .-

It .. 14 ,.,

15-1 15-1 15-1 15-1 15-2 15·2 154 15-5

15-7

16-1 16-1 16-1

16-1

16-2

XVII LAMPS USED IN AIRCRAFT ELECTRICAL SYSTEMS

17-1. Introduction 17-1

174. Reference Specifications 17-1

17-5. Lamp Types 17-1 ...

17-6. Abbreviations. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 17-1 WI'

17-7. General Precautions , 17-1

XIII INSTALLATION OF BUSBARS, CONDUIT, JUNCTION BOXES, PROTECTIVE DEVICES, AND TERMINAL BOARDS

13-1. Introduction .

134. Reference Specifications and Drawings 13-5. Preparation and Installation of Busbars

13-15. Installation of Conduit .

13-23. Installation of Junction Boxes .

13·33. Installation of Protective Devices .

1345. Installation of Terminal Boards .

XIV ELECTRICAL WIRING INSTALLATION

14-1. Introduction , ..

14-3. Reference Specifications and Drawings

144. Definitions .

]4-5. Wire Types .

14-6. Wire Groups and Bundles .

14-15. Routing and Installation .

14-35. Connections to Terminal

Boards and Busbars .

14-53. Installation of Wires in Conduit .

14-57. Installation of Connectors .

14-64. Installation of Wires in Junction Boxes

14-68. Terminal Junction System .

xv LACING AND TYING

15-1. Introduction .

154. Reference Specifications and Drawings

15-5. Definitions , .

15-6. Materials .

15-9. General Precautions .

15-10, Lacing .

15-14. Tying .

15-20. Self-Clinching Cable Straps , .

15·22. Lacing and Tying in

High Temperature Areas .

XVI WIRING; LOCK, SHEAR, AND SEAL

16-1. Introduction .

164. Reference Specifications and Drawings

] 6-5. Definitions .

16-9. General Procedures for Lock,

Shear, and Seal Wiring .

16-16. Specific Procedures for Lock,

Shear, and Seal Wiring ., .

ii

NAVAIR 01-1A-505 (USAF) T.O. 1-1A-14

e 'e of Contents

Section

Title

1II FUSES USED IN AIRCRAFT ELECTRICAL SYSTEMS

18-1. Introduction 18-1

184. Reference Specifications and Drawings . 18-1

18-5. Definitions and Descriptions 18-1

18-8. Identification..... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 18-11

18-9. General Precautions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 18-11

Page Section

Title

Page

XIX EMERGENCY REPAIRS

19-1. Introduction IY-I

194. Reference Specifications 19·1

19-5. Repairing Broken or Damaged Wires 19-1

19-12. Repairing Shielded Cable 194

19-15. Repairing Coaxial Cable 19-7

19-16. Repairing Damaged MS Connectors , 19-7

19·20. Replacement of Connectors " 19-K

19-23. Replacing Terminal Board Cover, 19·8

LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS

Figure Title

2-1 Wires Commonly Used in Aircraft .

2-2 Cables Commonly Used in Aircraft .

2-3 Wires After Cutting .

24 Wire Cutting Tools .

2-5 Examples of Wire Identit1cation Coding .,.

2-6 Spacing of Identification Stamping

on Wire and Cable .

2-7 Location of Identification Sleeve .

2-8 Multi-Conductor Cable Identification .

2-9 Coaxial Cable Identification .

2-10 Wire Identification at Terminal Board .

2-11 Wire Marking Machines - Automatic .

2-12 Marking Machines - Hand .

2-13 Electric Oven for Heat-Setting

Identification Marking .

2-14 Marking on Sleeves .

2-15 Marking Machine for Sleeving .

2-16 Identification of Wire Bundles

and Harnesses .

2-17 Typical Wire Stripping Tools .

2-18 Stripping Wire in a Hot Blade Stripper .

2-19 Substitute Hot Blade Stripper .

2-20 Inside View of Rotary Wire Stripper .

2-21 Stripping Wire With Hand Stripper .

2-22 Knife Stripping .

2-23 Dip-Tinning in Solder Pot .

2-24 Alternative Dip Tinning Method .

2-25 Tinning Wire With a Soldering Iron .

2-26 Stripping Outer Jacket

From Shielded Cable .

2-27 Two-Piece Grounding Connection for

Terminating Shielded Wire .

2-215 Alternative Procedure for Two-Piece

Grounding Sheath Connector .

Page

2-2 2-3 2-6 2-7 2-9

2-13 2-14 2-14 2-14 2-15 2-16 2-17

2-18 2-19 2-20

2-20 2-22 2-23 2-24 2-25 2-26 2-26 2-28 2-28 2-29

2-29

2-33

2-33

Figure

2-29 2-30

2-31 2-32 2-33 2-34 2-35

3-1

3-2 3-3

34

iii

Title

Pigtail Termination lor Shielded Wire Alternative Pigtail Termination for

Shielded Wire .

Comb for Combing Out Shield ..

Dead-Ending Shield With Tape Wrap .

Dead-Ending Shield With Permanent Splice.

Solder Sleeve Shield Termination .

Solder Sleeve Floating Shield Termination

3-5 3-6 3-7 3-8 3-9 3-10

Insulating Sleeving Installed

Over Solder Cup .

Soldering Iron Tip Shapes .

Resistance Soldering Pliers for

Large Contacts .

Resistance Soldering Pencil for

Small Contacts .

Torch Soldering Large Contact .

Soldering Large Site Contacts .

Soldering Small Size Contacts .

Soldering Medium Size Contacts .

Soldering Iron in Safety Screen .

Connector Assembly Tool

(MS3480, MS3481, MS3482) .

Connector Soldering Sequence .

Insulating Sleeve Bottomed Against Insert ..

Tying Sleeves and Preshaping Wires .

Crimping Tool M22520/1-01 With

M22520/l-02 Turret Head .

Crimping Tool M2..'520/2-01 With M22520/2-02 Positioner. . . . . . . .. . ..

Crimping Tools:vlS3191·] and MS31l} 1·3 Crimping Toul MS278!8(USAF) With

MS27828-2 Universal Head. . .. . .

Gaging MIL-C-22520 Crimping Tools .

Page

2-.H

2·34 2-34 :'35 2-35 2-37 2-:,8

~-3

3-4

34 ~)-5 3-5 3-6 3-6 3-6

3-11

l-12 '-13

314 'I. IS

3-11 3-12 3-13 3-14

3-15

3-16 3-17

3-18

NAVAIR 01-1A-505 (USAF) T.O. 1-1A-14

List of Illustrations

.'igure

3-19 3-20

3-21 3-22

3-23 3-24

3-25 3-26

Title

3-27 3-28 3-29

Gaging MS3191-1 Crimping Tool .

Typical M22520 Positioner and

Turret Head .

M22520 Crimping Tools .

Contact Insertion 111

M22520 Crimping Tool .

Assembling Wires to Crimp-Type Contacts Terminating Shielded Wire at

MS Connector .

Grounding Shields Outside Connector .

Terminating Shielded Wires at

Potted Connector .

Installing AN311 1 Bonding Ring .

Terminating Two Wires at One Contact .

Permanent Splice for Terminating

Two Wires at One Contact .

Reducing Wire Size at MS Connector .

Multimeter for Continuity Test

(TS 352 B/U) .

Typical Protective Connector Caps .

Typical AN(MS) Connectors .

AN(MS) Connector Marking .

Insert Arrangements - AN Type

Connectors, MIL-C-5015 .

Alternative Positions of Connector Inserts .. MS3057 Connector Cable Clamp Types .... Typical Manufacturer's Variations in

AN/MS Connectors .

Potting Connectors .

Removal of Solid Back Shell .

Removal of Cannon Split Back Shell .

Class E Connector - Cannon

(Exploded View) .

Typical Class R Connectors .

Class R Connector - Bendix

(Exploded View) .

Installation of Amphenol

Class A Connector .

Location of End of Retaining Ring .

Installation of Amphenol

Class B Connector .

Safety Wiring Class B Connector .

Installation of Amphenol

Class C Connector .

Installation of Amphenol

Fireproof Connector .

Spare Wires for Potting Connector .

Cleaning Connector Prior to Potting .

Filling and Curing Potting Connector .

Installation of O-Ring on

Potted Connector .

Installation of Bendix

Class A and C Connector .

Page

3-16

3-17 3-17

3-18 3-19

3-21 3-21

3-21 3-22 3-23

3-23 3-24

3-25 3-25 3-27 3-28

3-29 3-31 3-31

3-32 3-32 3-33 3-33

Figure

3-56

3-57 3-58 3-59

3-60

3-61

3-62 3-63 3-64 3-65

3-66

3-67 3-68 3-69

3-70

3-71

3-72 3-73 3-74 3-75 3-76 3-77 3-78

3-34 3-35~

3-36 3-80

3-36 3-81

3-37

3-38

3-38 3-83

3-39 3-84

340 3-85

341 3-86

342

342 3-87

3-88

343 3-89a

3-89b

344 3-89c

iv

Title

3-82

Reinstalling Contact in Bendix

Resilient Insert .

Installation of Bendix Class E Connector .

Installation of Bendix Class R Connector .. Bendix Fireproof Connector

Partial Disassembly .

Installation of Bendix

Fireproof Connector .

Torque Wrench Used on Bendix

Fireproof Connector .

Installation of Cannon Class B Connector Installation of Cannon Class C Connector Installation of Cannon Class E Connector Cannon Class E Connector -

Grommet Installation .

Installation of Cannon

Fireproof Connector .

Removal of Cannon Clip-Held Contacts .

Removal of Amphenol Insert Assembly .

Amphenol Contact and Insert Assembly -

Exploded View .

Removal of Solder Contacts from

Resilient Insert .

MS3057 Connector Cable Clamp Types -

Exploded View .

Installation of MS3057 Cable Clamp .

Installation of MS3057 A Cable Clamp .

Installation of MS3057B Cable Clamp .

Lubrication of MS3057B Cable Clamp .

Typical MS Connectors - Miniature .

MS Connector Plug - Exploded View .

MS Connector Receptacle -

Exploded View .

Insert Arrangements - MS Miniature

Connectors, MIL-C-26482 .

Insert Arrangements - MS Miniature

Connectors, MIL-C-26500 .

Insertion and Extraction Tools for Front-Release Crimp-Type Contacts ....

Insertion and Extraction Tool for Rear-Release Crimp-Type Contacts .....

Assembling Wired Contacts

Into Connector .

Removing Crimp-Type Contacts

From Connector .

Insert Arrangement Summary .

Color Marking for Individual Release

MIL-C-0081511 Connectors .

MIL-C-83723 Contact Arrangements .

Typical MIL-C-38999 Connector .

MIL-C-38999 Insert Arrangements .

MIL-C-38999 Insert Arrangements .

MIL·C·38999 Insert Arrangements .

345 3-46 347

348

349

3·50 3-50 3·51 3·52

3·53

3·54 3·55 3-55

3·56

3·56

3·57 3·58 3·59 3-60 3-61 3·63 3-64

3-64

3-65

3·67

3-69

3·70

3·72

3·73 3·77

3·79 3·82 3·86 3·87 3·88 3·89

3·30 3-31

3-32 3·33 3·34 3-35

3·36 3·37 3·38

3·39 340 341 342

343 344

345

346 347

348 349

3·50

3·51 3·52 3·53 3·54

3·55

NAVAIR 01-1A-505 (USAF) T.O. 1-1A-14

List of Illustrations

Figure

Title

3-90 Typical MIL-C-81659 Duplex Connector ...

3-91 Assembly of MIL-C-81659 Connectors

With Standard Contacts .

3-92 Assembly ofMIL-C-81659 Connector

Polarization (Keying) Posts and Inserts ..

3-93 Assembly of MIL-C-81659 Connectors

With Coaxial Contacts .

3-94 Insertion of Standard Contacts in

MIL-C-81659 Connectors .

3-95 Removal of Standard Contacts From

MIL-C-81659 Connectors .

3-96 Installation of Sealing Boot and

Ferrule on Coaxial Cable Before

Crimping Contacts .

3-97 Stripping Dimensions for

Coaxial Cable in Table 3-27 .

3-98 Crimping Center Contacts With the

MIL-C-22520/2-01 Crimping Tool ....

3-99 Crimping Center Contacts With the

AMP 220015-1 Crimping Tool .

3-100 Contact Assembly Using Seal Ring .

3-101 Crimped Center Contact of

Braided Coaxial Cable Inserted in

Contact Body .

3-102 Contact-Ferrule Assembly in Ferrule Crimping Die of Crimping Tool

AMP 220015-1 Ready for Crimping 3-103 AMP 220066-1 Ferrule Crimping Tool

Showing the Three Crimping Dies ..... 3-104 Contact-Ferrule Assembly in Crimping Die of AMP 220066-1 Ferrule Crimping

Tool Ready for Crimping .

3-105 Crimped Center Contact of

Semi-Rigid Coaxial Cable

Inserted in Contact Body .

3-106 Semi-Rigid Cable-Contact Assembly in Crimping Die of AMP 220066-1 Ferrule Crimping Tool Ready for

Backshell Crimping .

3-107 Insertion of Rear-Release Coaxial

Contacts in MIL·C-81659 Connectors .. 3-108 Removal of Rear-Release Coaxial Contacts

from MIL·C-81659 Connectors .

3-109 Subminiature Connectors .

3-110 Rectangular Shell Connectors .

3-111 Miniature Rectangular Connectors .

3-112 Rectangular Shell Connector -

Cannon DPD (Exploded View) .

3-113 Installation of Cannon DPD Connector .

3-114 Soldering Coaxial Cable to

Contacts for DPD Connector .

3-115 Subminiature Connector _.

Exploded View .

Page

3-93

3-96

3-97

3-97

3·99

3-99

3-101

3-101

3-102

3-102 3-103

3-103

3-104

3-104

3-104

3-104

3-105

3-105 3-106 3-107 3-107

3-109 3-110

3-111

3-112

Figure

4-1 4-2 4-3 44 4-5 4-6 4-7 4-8

4-9 4-10 4-11 4-12 4-13 4-14 4-15

v

Title

4-16

Typical BNC Connectors .

Typical HN Connectors .

Typical N Connectors .

Typical C Connectors .

Typical Pulse Connectors .

Typical TNC Connectors .

Typical Coaxial Cables .

Stripping Outer Jacket From

Coaxial Cable .

Improvised Dielectric Stripper .

Tinning Center Conductor .

Tinning Inside of Contact .

Soldering Contact to Coaxial Cable .

Tightening Nut Into Plug or Jack Body .

Correct Shape for Soldering Iron Tip .

Improved BNC Connectors -

Exploded View .

BNC Connectors With Captivated Contacts -

Exploded View .

Attaching Improved BNC Connectors

to Coaxial Cable .

Attaching BNC Connectors With Captivated

Contacts to Coaxial Cable .

C Connectors - Exploded View .

Attaching C Connectors to Coaxial Cable .. Improved HN Connectors

Exploded View .

HN Connectors With Captivated Contacts -

Exploded View .

Attaching Improved HN Connectors

to Coaxial Cable .

Attaching HN Connectors With Captivated

Contacts to Coaxial Cable .

Improved N Connectors -

Exploded View .

N Connectors With Captivated Contacts --

Exploded View .

Attaching Improved N Connectors

to Coaxial Cable .

Attaching N Connectors With Captivated

Contacts to Coaxial Cable .

Pulse Connector - CeramicInsert .

Pulse Connector - Rubber Insert .

Assembly of Ceramic Insert

Pulse Connector .

Assembly of Rubber Insert

Pulse Connector .

TNC Connectors _. Exploded View .

Attaching TNC Connectors

to Coaxial Cable .

MB Connectors -- Exploded View .

Attaching MB Connectors

to Coaxial Cable .

Page

4-2 4-2 4·2 4-2 4-3 4·3 44

4-5 4-5 4-5 4-5 4-6 4-6 4-6

4-7

4-8

4-9

4-10 4-11 4-12

4-13

4-14

4-14

4-15

4-16

4-17

4-18

4-19 4-20 4-20

4-22

4-23 4-24

4-25 4-26

4-27

4-17

4-18

4-19 4-20 4·21

4-22

4-23

4-24

4-25

4-26

4-27

4-28

4-29 4-30 4-31

4-32

4-33 4-34

4-35 4-36

NAVAIR 01-1A-505 (USAF) T.O. 1-1A-14

List of Illustrations

437 Subminiature RF Connector -

exploded View .

·~~b Attaching Subminiature RF Connectors

to Coaxial Cable .

~·39 Crimping Subminiature RF Connectors .

440 Attaching Avien 163·088 and 163·089

Connectors to Coaxial Cable .

441 Attaching Avien 163·07 and 163·027

Connectors to Unshielded Wire .

442 Attaching Liquidometer 9100 Series

Connectors to Coaxial Cable .

443 Attaching Nu-Line 1200 Series Connectors

to Coaxial Cable .

444 Attaching Liquidometer S·62 and S·63

Connectors to Coaxial Cable .

5·1 Solderless Terminal Lugs and Splices .

5.2 Preinsula ted Terminal Lug - Cut-Away .

5·3a Tool MS90413 for Hand Crimping

Preinsulated Copper Terminal Lugs

(Fully Open Position) .

5·3b Tool MS90413 for Hand Crimping Preinsulated Copper Terminal Lugs

(Fully Closed Position) .

5·3c Tool MS90413 for Hand Crimping

Preinsula ted Copper Terminal Lugs

(Wire Side Fully Closed) .

54 Tools for Power Crimping Small

Preinsula ted Copper Terminal Lugs .....

5·5 MS90413 Crimping Tool With

Terminal Lug Inserted .

5·6 MS3316 Hand Crimping Tool .

5.7 Proper Insertion of Stripped Wire in

Insulated Terminal Lug for Crimping .

5·8 Insulating Sleeves .

5·9 Tools - Hand Crimping Large Copper

Terminal Lugs .

5·) 0 Tools - Power Crimping Large Copper

Terminal Lugs .

5.11 Positioning Flag-Type Terminal Lugs .

5·12 AMP Crimping Tool for

High-Temperature Terminal Lugs .

5·13 Positioning Aluminum Terminal Lugs

in Die Nests .

5·14 Single Crimp on Aluminum

Terminal Lugs .

5·15 Reducing Wire Size With

Permanent Splice .

5·16 Special Splices .

5·17 Locating MS25181 Splice in

MS90413·2 Crimping Tool .

5·18 Insulating Sleeves for Splices

Size 8 and Larger .

Page

4·29

4·30 4·30

4·31

4·31

4·32

4·33

4·34

5·3 54

5-6

5·7

5·8

5·10

5·12 5·13

5·13 5·15

5·17

5·18 5·22

5·26

5·29

5·29

5·29 5·30

5·31

5·32

Figure

5·19

5·20 5·21

6·1 6·2

vi

Title

Positioning Aluminum Splice

in Die Nest .

Indent Inspection .

Modifying Hand Micrometer for

Indent Inspection .

6·3

Crimping Tools for Taper Pins .

Insertion and Extraction Tools

for Taper Pins .

AMP Combination Insertion-Extraction

Tool No. 380565 .

Crimping Tool Insulation Adjustment .

Positioning Taper Pin in

AMP Crimping Tool .

Pull Test Tool (Burndy TR) .

Page

5·33 5·35

5-36

6·2

6·3

6-3 64

6·5 6·7

7·3 7·3

74

7·5

7-5

7·6 7·6

7·7 7·7 7·8

7·9

7·9 7·9 7·10

7·12 7·12 7·13

8·3

84

8·5

8·6 8·6

64 6·5

6·6 7·1 7·2 7·3

Thermocouple Wire -

Thermocouple Terminals .

Thermocouple Connector Assembly

(AN5537) .

Stripping Thermocouple Wire for Terminal and for AN5537

Connector Installation .

Stripping Thermocouple Wire for

Splice Installation .

Stripping Thermocouple Wire for

MS Connector Installation .

Torch Tinning Thermocouple Wire .

Dip Tinning Thermocouple Wire

in Silver Solder .

Resistance Heating to Tin Wire .

Resistance Tinning of Terminal .

Silver Soldering Thermocouple Wire

to Terminal .

Modified Crimping Tool for

Thermocouple Terminals .

Reinforcing Solder on AN5539 Terminals ..

Serving Thermocouple Wire .

Torch Soldering Thermocouple Wire to

MS Connector Contact .

Connecting Thermocouple Splices .

Distributing Slack in Thermocouple Wire

74

7·5

7-6

7·7 7·8

7·9 7·10 7·11

7·12

7·13 7·14 7·15

7·16 7·17

8·1

Stud Bonding or Grounding

to Flat Surface .

Plate Nut Bonding or Grounding to

Flat Surface .

Bolt and Nut Bonding or Grounding to

Flat Surface .

Steel Wire Brush With Pilot for

Cleaning Aluminum Surfaces .

Bonding Tab Riveted to Structure .

8·2

8·3

84

8·5

NAVAIR 01-1A-505 (USAF) T.O. 1-1A-14

List of Illustrations

Figure

8-6

8-7

8-8 8-9

9-1 9-2 9-3

9-4 9-5 9-6 9-7 9-8

Title

Aluminum Jumper Connection to

Tubular Structure .

Copper Jumper Connection to

Tubular Structure .

Bonding Conduit to Structure .

Special Milliohmmeter and Clip Leads for

Testing Bond Resistance .

Types of Hand Soldering Irons .

Resistance Soldering .

Soldering Iron Tip

Before and After Cleaning .

Tinning Soldering Iron Tip .

Soldering Iron Tip Shapes .

Correct Solder Application .

Soldering Iron Holder .

Good and Bad Soldered Connections .

10-1 10-2 10-3a 10-3b 10-3c 10-4

Handmixing Potting Compound .

Mixing Paddle for Potting Compound .

Machine for Mixing Potting Compound .

Machine for Mixing Potting Compound .

Machine for Mixing Potting Compound

Tube Dispenser for Potting Compound ....

Page

8-7

8-7 8-8

8-9

9-4 9-5

9-5 9-5 9-7 9-7 9-8 9-8

10-2 10-3 104 10-5 10-6 10-7

11-2 11-3 11-4 11-4

11-5 11-5 11-6

11-6

11-6

11-8 11-11

11-11 11-11

11-12

11-12 11-13 11-13 11-13 11-14

11-16

Figure

11-21

11-22 11-23

11-24 11-25

12-1 12-2 12-3 124 12-5 12-6 12-7 12-8 12-9 12-10 12-11 12-12 12-13 12-14

12-15 12-16 12-17 12-18 12-19

12-20 12-21 12-22 12-23 12-24

12-25

12-26 12-27

13-1

13-2 13-3

13-4

13-5 13-6 13-7 13-8 13-9

vii

Title

Final Position of Collar on

Rubber-Covered Conduit .

Soldering Ferrule to Brass Conduit .

Installing Two-Piece Ferrule on

Nonmetallic Conduit .

Typical Electric Hot-Air Gun .

Shop Air Heater .

Example of Harness Usage Chart .

Typical Molded Hard Harness Assembly .

Typical Rigid Section .

Typical Cross Section .

Typical Wire Identification Number .

Typical Dimensional Layout .

Dimensional Layout Symbols .

Heat Shrinkable Boot Installation .

Fabricating Boot From Silicone Tape .

Braid Repair .

Use of Heat Shrinking Tool .

Connector Location and Wire Trimming .

Parallel Connector Crimping .

Shrinkable End Caps and

Sleeve Installation .

Shielded Stub Splice .

Stub Splice Area .

Construction of Parallel Butt Splices .

Modifying Self-Sealing End Cap .

Construction of Alternative

Parallel Butt Splices .

Shielded Wire Stripping .

Bonding Jumper .

Shielded Wire Termination .

Use of Ferrule Crimping Tool .

Termination of Ungrounded

(Floating) Shield .

Adding Wire to Spare Wire (Pigtail),

Existing Wire, and Splice Construction ..

Adding Shielded Wire .

Damaged Wire Repair .

Scratch Brushing Unplated

Aluminum Alloy Busbars .

Mounting Busbars to Structure .

Installation of Supporting Clamps

for Conduit .

Spacing Clamps for

Rigid Metallic Conduit .

Attaching Junction Box to Structure .

Attaching Cover to Junction Box .

Wire Entry Holes in Junction Box .

Mounting Protective Devices .

Typical Mounting Hardware for

Protective Devices .

Page

11-18 11·18

11-19 11-20 11-20

12-2 12-3 12-4 12-4 12-5 12-6 12-7 12-8 12-12 12-13 12-14 12-16 12-17

12-17 12-18 12-18 12-21 12-22

12-23 12-24 12-24 12-25 12-26

12-27

12-29 12-30 12-33

13-2 13-2

13-4 13·5 13-5 13-6 13-7

13·7

11-1 11-2 11-3 11-4 11-5

Capacity Limits for Conduit .

Bending Rigid Metallic Conduit .

Good and Bad Conduit Bends .

Cutting Rigid Metallic Conduit .

Installing Nut and Ferrule on

Rigid Metallic Conduit .

Flaring Rigid Metallic Conduit .

Cutting Flexible Conduit .

Trimming Frayed Ends of

Flexible Conduit .

Stripping Rubber Cover From

Flexible Conduit .

Mandrel and Collet for

Amphenol Machine .

Retracting Mandrel Shaft .

Installing Mandrel and

Lower Half Collet .

Locking Mandrel in Place .

Bare Flexible Conduit

Ready for Swaging .

Rubber-Covered Flexible Conduit

Ready for Swaging .

Placing Conduit Assembly in Machine .

Crimping Ferrule .

Good Crimped Ferrule .

Breeze Ferrule Swaging Machine .

Rubber-Covered Conduit Prepared

for Breeze Machine .

11-6 11-7 11-8

11-9

J 1-10

11-11 11-12

11-13 11-14

II-IS

11-16 11-\7 11-18 11-19 11-20

NAVAIR 01-1A-505 (USAF) T.O. 1-1A-14

List of Illustrations

13-10

13-11 13-12 13-13 13-14

14-1 14-2 14-3 144 14-5 14-6 14-7

14-8 14-9 1410 14-11

14-12 14-13 14-14

14-15 14-16 14-17

Title

Determining Screw Length for

Mounting Into Blind Holes .

Mounting of Terminal Board .

Alternative Mounting of Terminal Board .

Insulation of Terminal Board .

Identification of Terminal Board .

Group and Bundle Ties .

Comb for Straightening Wires in Bundles .

Staggered Splices in Wire Bundle .

Slack Between Supports .

Routing Bundles .

Cable Clamp at Bulkhead Hole .

Cable Clamp and Grommet at

Bulkhead Hole .

Drainage Hole in Low Point of Tubing .

Separation of Wires From Plumbing Lines ..

Preferred Angle for Cable Clamps .

Typical Mounting Hardware for

MS21919 Cable Clamps .

Attaching Cable Clamp to Structure .

Tool for Installing Cable Clamp .

Installing Cable Clamps to

Tubular Structure .

Split Grommet .

Cutting Caterpillar Grommet .

Connecting Terminals to

Terminal Board .

Hardware for Wiring Terminal Boards

With Copper Terminals .

Hardware for Wiring Terminal Boards

With Aluminum Terminals .

Hardware for Wiring Terminal Boards

With Combination of Terminals .

Connecting Aluminum Terminal to

Aluminum Busbar .

Connecting Copper Terminal to

Aluminum Busbar .

14-23 Connecting Aluminum Terminal to

Copper Busbar .

14-24 Connecting Copper Terminal to

Copper Busbar .

14-25 Connecting Two Terminals to

Same Point on Busbar .

14-26 Vinyl Tubing Around Busbar .

14-27 Conduit Capacity .

14-28 Leader for Conduit .

14-29 Support for Wire at Conduit End .

14-30 Installing Conduit on

Connector Back Shell .

14-31 Support Inside Junction Box .

14-32a Feedback Terminal Junction Assembly 14-32b Feedback Terminal Junction Assembly 14-32c Feedback Terminal Junction Assembly

14-18

14-19

14-20

14-21

14-22

Page

13-8 13-9 13-9 13-9 13-10

14-2 14-2 14-3 14-3 144 14-6

14-6 14-7 14-7 14-8

14-9 14-9 14-10

14-10 14-11 14-11

14-11

14-13

14-13

14-14

14-15

14-16

14-16

14·16

14-17 14-18 14-18 14-19 14-19

14-20 14-21 14-22 14-22 14-23

Figure

Title

Page

14-33a Feedthrough Terminal Junction Modules. .. 14-23 14-33b Feedthrough Terminal Junction Assembly

(Exploded View) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 14-24 14-33c Feedthrough Terminal Junction Assembly.. 14-24

14-34 Removable Contact Wire Splices 14-25

14-35 Components of Terminal

Junction System. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 14-26 14-36 M83723-31 Contact Insertion -

Extraction Tools. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 14-27 14-37 Contact Insertion in Removable

Contact Wire Splices. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 14-28 14-38 Contact Removal From Removable

Contact Wire Splices. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 14-28

15-1 Single Cord Lacing , 15-2

15-2 Double Cord Lacing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 15-3

15-3 Lacing a Branch-Off 154

154 Making Ties .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 154

15-5 Securing With Tape 15-5

15-6 Installing Self-Clinching Plastic

Cable Straps 15-6

15-7 MS90387 Adjustable Hand Tools

for Installing Self-Clinching Plastic

Tie-Down Straps. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 15-6

16-1 Double Twist Lock Wiring. . . . . . . . . . . . .. 16-2

16-2 Single Wire Method 16-2

16-3 Use of Wire Twister . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 16-3 164 Wiring AN Type Connector . . . . . . . . . . . .. 16-3

16-5 Drilling Hole in Coupling Nut 16-3

16-6 Lock Wiring Connector to Structure. . . . .. 164

16-7 Wiring Split Shell Assembly Screws , 164

16-8 Seal Wiring Switch Guard 16-5

17-1 Lamps Used in Aircraft

Electrical Systems , 17-3

17 -2 Aircraft Lamps - Sealed Beam Type . . . . .. 174

18-1 18-2 18-3 184

Basic Construction, Views A, B, and C .

Typical Aircraft Fuses .

Typical Fuse Holders .

Military Fuse Designations,

Views A, B, C, and D .

18-3 184 184

18-12

19-1 19-2 19-3

Permanent Splice Repair of Wire .

Terminal Lug Barrel Repair of Wire .

Repairing Broken Wire by

Soldering and Potting .

Bolted Terminal Lug Repair of

Large Wire .

Insulation Repair With Sleeving .

Repair of Shielded Wire .

Alternative Method for

Repair of Shielded Wire .

19-2 19-3

19-3

194

194 194 19-5

19-5 19-6 19-7

19-6

viii

NAVAIR 01-lA-505 (USAF) T.O. ~-lA-14

LIST OF TABLES

able Title

2-1 Wire Used in Aircraft

Electrical Installations .

2-2 Function and Designation Letters .

2-3 Sizes of Identification Sleeving .

24 Recommended Sizes of Marking Type .

2-5 Recommended Marking Temperatures .

2-6 Speed Settings for Heat-Setting

Electric Oven .

2-7 Wire Strippers for Use on Copper Wire .

2-8 Allowable Nicked or Broken Strands .

2-9 Approximate Soldering Iron Sizes

for Tinning .

2-10 Shielded Wire Terminations -

Inner Sleeves .

2-11 Shielded Wire Terminations- Uninsulated

Outer Sleeves and Installing Tools .

2-12 Shielded Wire Terminations - Insulated

Outer Sleeves and Installing Tools .

3-1 Stripping Lengths for Solder Connections ..

3·2 Insulating Sleeving Material .

3-3 Insulating Sleeving Sizes .

34 Installation Tools for

Wire-to-Contact Adapters .

3-5 MIL-C-5015 Connector Classes .

3-6 Amphenol Fireproof Connector Fittings .

3-7 O-Ring Sizes for AN Type Connectors .

3-8 Wire End Caps and Crimping Tools .

3-9 Contact Removal Tool Diameter .

3-10 Sizes of Grommet Sealing Plugs .

3-11 Torque Value for Fireproof Connectors .

3-12 Telescoping Bushings .

3-13 Miniature MS Connector Type

and Class Availability .

3-14 Contacts and Their Wire Size Range .

3-15 Connectors With Crimp-Type

Contacts and Assembly Tools .

3-16 Tools for Unwired Contacts .

3-17 MIL-C-81511 Connectors .

3-18 MIL-C-81S11 Contact

Insertion and Removal Tools .

3- 19 MIL-C-83723 Connectors .

3-20 Availability of MIL-C-38999 Connectors .

3-21 Special Tools .

3-22 MIL-C-81659 Connectors .

3-23 Contact Insert Arrangements

for MIL-C-81659 Connectors .

3-24 Insert Arrangements, MIL-C-81659

Electric Connector, Series 1 and 2 .

3-2S Polarization (Keying) Positions .

3-26 Tools for MIL-C-81659

Standard Contacts .

Page

24 2-10 2-15 2-17 2-17

2-19 2-21 2-21

2-29

2-30

2-31

2-32

3-2 3-3 3-3

3-24 3-26 340 343 344 345 347 349 3-59

3-62 3-68

3-68 3-70 3-75

3-78 3-81 3-85 3-90 3-91

3-92

3-94 3-95

3-98

Table

3-27

ix

Title Page

3-28

Stripping Lengths, Crimping Tools, Contacts, and Cables for MIL-C-81659

Coaxial Connectors. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-100 Installation Tools for Crimp-Type

Contacts - Amphenol #69 Series . . . . .. 3-108 Crimping Tools for Crimp-Type Contacts -

Bendix #10-214000 Series 3-108

Installation Tools for Crimp-Type

Contacts - Bendix CE Series 3-108

Stripping Dimensions for Coaxial Cable. . .. 3-111

3-29

3-30

3-31

4-1

BNC Series Connectors With

Associated Cables 4-7

C Series Connectors With

Associated Cables 4-11

Assembly Dimensions for

C Series Connectors 4-12

HN Series Connectors With

Associated Cables 4-13

N Series Connectors With

Associated Cables 4-16

Pulse Series Connectors

With Associated Cables. . . . . . . . . . . . .. 4-21 TNC Series Connectors

With Associated Cables , 4-25

MB Series Connectors

With Associated Cables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-26 Stripping Dimensions for Coaxial Cable

Assembled to MB Connectors , 4-28

Stripping Dimensions and

Crimping Tool Positions for

Subminiature RF Connectors 4-29

Stripping Dimensions for Coaxial Cable

Assembled to Liquidometer S62

and S63 Series Connectors 4-34

4-2

4-3

44

4-5

4-6

4-7

4-8

4-9

4-10

4-11

5-1

Military Standard Solderless

Terminals for Aircraft Use 5-2

Color Coding of Copper

Terminal Lug Insulation 54

Nonstandard (Class 2) Crimping Tools for

Small Copper Terminal Lugs , 5-5

Gaging Dimensions for AMP Nonstandard

Crimping Tools for Small Terminals .... 5-11 Gaging Dimensions for T &B Nonstandard

Crimping Tools for Small Terminals .... 5-11 Wire Stripping Lengths for

Small Copper Terminal Lugs. . . . . . . . .. 5-14

Copper Terminal Lugs (Large)

and Crimping Tools. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 5-16

5-2

5-3

54

5-5

5-6

5-7

NAVAIR 01-1A-505 (USAF) T.O. 1-1A-14

List of Tables

Table

Title

5-8 Dies and Gages for Military

Standard Power Tool MS25441 .

5-9 Indenters and Nests for

T&B Hand Tool WT-117 .

5-10 Dies for AMP Power Tools

69061 and 69066 .

5-11 Die Sets for Burndy Power Tools

Y29B and Y29NSC .

5-12 Die Sets for Burndy Power Tools Y29B and Y29BUC for Preinsula ted

Copper Terminal Lugs .

5-13 Die Sets for T&B Power

Tools 13586A and 13597 .

5-14 Gaging Dimensions for AMP Tools .

5-15 "G" Dimensions for Burndy Power Tools .. 5-16 High-Temperature Terminal Lugs

and Crimping Tools .

5-17 Dies Used on Military Standard

Power Tool for Crimping

Aluminum Terminal Lugs .

5-18 Gages for MS25442 Crimping Dies .

5-19 Stripping Lengths for Aluminum Wire .

5-20 Stripping Length for Small Copper Splices

5-21 Length of Insulating Sleeves .

5-22 Die Sets Used on Burndy Tools

Y29B and Y29NC for Crimping

Large Copper Splices .

5-23 Die Sets Used on T&B Head 13642

for Crimping Large Copper Splices ..... 5-24 Wire Stripping Lengths for

Large Copper Splices .

5-25 Wire Size Combinations (per Splice End)

for Multi-Splices .

5·26 "T" Dimensions for Burndy Uninsulated Copper Splices and Straight and

Right-Angle Terminal Lugs .

5-27 "T" Dimensions for MS25189

Copper (Flag) Terminal Lugs .

6·1

Stripping Lengths for

Taper Pin Terminations. . . . . . . . . . . . .. 64 Taper Pin Tooling - AMP

Standard 53 Series, Noninsulated 64

Taper Pin Tooling ._ AMP

Standard 53 Series, Preinsulated . . . . . . . 64 Taper Pin Tooling - Burndy 0.053 Series .. 6-5 Taper Pin Tooling -

Special AMP 53 Series. . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 6·6

6·2

6-3

64 6-5

Page

5-17

5-17

5·19

5-20

5·20

5-21 5-21 5·21

5·24

5·27 5·28 5·28 5·30 5·32

5·32

5·32

5·33

5·34

5·36

5·36

7·1 7·2 7·3

Thermocouple System. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-2 Thermocouple Terminals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-3 Coding for Thermocouple

Contacts in MS Connectors . . . . . . . . . . . 74

Code for Markings on AN5537 7·12

74

Table

Title

Page

8·1 Hardware for Stud Bonding or

Grounding to Flat Surface 8·3

8·2 Hardware for Plate Nut Bonding or

Grounding to Flat Surface 84

8·3 Hardware for Bolt and Nut Bonding

or Grounding to Flat Surface 8·5

11·1 Bend Radii for Rigid Conduit 11·2

11·2 AN Fittings for Rigid Conduit . . . . . . . . . .. 114 11·3 Stripping Length for Rubber-Covered

Flexible Conduit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 11-6 114 Collars for Rubber-Covered Flexible

Aluminum Conduit Used With

Breeze Swaging Machine. . . . . . . . . . . .. 11·7

11·5 AN Fittings for Bare Aluminum

(Type I) Flexible Metallic Conduit ..... 11·9 11·6 AN Fittings for Rubber-Covered Aluminum

(Type II) Flexible Metallic Conduit 11·10

11·7 Accessories for Breeze Swaging Machine 11·15

11·8 Ferrule Diameter After Swaging 11·15

11·9 Collar Punches and Dies for

Breeze Swaging Machine .. . . . . . . . . . .. 11-16

11·10 Fittings for Flexible Brass Conduit 11·17

11·11 Sizes of Heat-Shrinkable Tubing 11·19

12·1 Special Tools and Test Equipment 12·9

12·2 Boot-Connector Combination 12·11

12·3 Splices, Caps, and Sleeving of

Wires of Same Gage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 12·15 124 Splices, Caps, and Sleeving of

Wires of Mixed Gage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 12·15

12·5 Splices and Self-Sealing End Caps 12·16

}2·6 Ferrule-Wire Combination . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 12·26

13·} Support Clamps for Rigid or Flexible

Bare Aluminum Conduit . . . . . . . . . . . .. 13·3 13·2 Support Clamps for Rubber-Covered

Flexible Aluminum or Brass Conduit ... 13·3 13·3 Minimum Bending Radii for Flexible

Aluminum or Brass Conduit 134

14·} Wire Types. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 14·2 14·2 Twists Per Foot. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 14·3 14·3 Grommets - Temperature Limitations

of Material 14·11

144 MS27212 Terminal Boards and Covers 14·12

14·5 Washers for Use With

Aluminum Terminal Lugs 14·12

x

NAVAIR 01-1A-505 (USAF) T.O. 1-1A-14

list of Tables

Table

14-6

Title

Page

Table

xi

Title

Page

]4·7

Installation Torques for

Copper Terminals. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 14·14 Installation Torques for

Aluminum Terminals 14·14

Wire Range Accommodations 14·25

Module Identification 14·25

Crimping Tools for TJS Terminals. . . . . . .. 14·27 Insertion-Extraction Tool Designations. . .. 14·28

16·1

Safety Wire Size, Material,

and Color Code . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 16·)

14·8 14·9 14·10 14-11

15·) 151

Cable Strap Colors. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 15·5 Self-Clinching Plastic Cable

Straps and Installation Tools. . . . . . . . .. 15·7

17-1

Lamps Used in Aircraft

Lighting - Exterior. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 17-2 Lamps Used in Aircraft

Lighting - Interior 17·2

Military Fuse Blow-Time Characteristics 18-2

Fuses Used in Aircraft Electrical Systems .. 18-5 Cross Reference of Military and

Commercial Fuse Designations 18· 7

Voltage Code (Old) )8·13

Current Code (Old) 18·)3

17-2

18-1 18·2 18-3

18-4 18-5

Subject/Paragraph

Adapters, Wire Well, 3·37

Bonding and Grounding, 8·5 Hardware, 8·7

Jumpers, 8·23

Methods, 8·17 Procedures, 8·6

Surface Preparation, 8·13 Surface Refinishing, 8·29 Testing, 8·26

Bundles, Wire, Compact, 12·16 Types of Rework, 12·19

Busbars

Installation, 13·12, 13·14 Preparation, 13·7, 13·11 Protection, 14·50

Wiring Connection to, 14·35

Cable, 2·5b (See Also Wire and Cable) Coaxial, 4·7

Caps, Protective, Connector, 341

Caps, Wire End, 3·58b

Clamps, Cable, 14·29, 14·33

Clamps, Cable, Connector, 345 Installation, 3·70

Compound, Potting, 10·5 Dispensers for, 10·18 High Temperature, 10·6 Preparation, 10·10 Storage, 10·15

Conduit, 114 Installation, 13·15 Metallic, 11·6 Nonmetallic, 11·19

NAVAIR 01-1A-505 (USAF) T.O. 1-1A-14

Page

3·23

8·1 8·1 8·8 8·6 8·1 8·2 8-10 8·8

12·5 12-8

13-2 13·1,13-2 14·17 14·11

2·2 4·3

3-25

344

14-8,14-10

3·31 3·57

10-1 10-7 10-1 10-2 104

11-1 13-3 11·1 11-18

INDEX

Subject/Paragraph

Connections, Multiple, 3-36

Connectors, General Purpose, 3-1 to 3-110 ANjMS Connectors, 3-6, 342

Cable Clamp,

Connector, 345, 3-70 to 3-74 Contact-Crimping Tools, 3·25 to 3·30 Contact Installation and

Removal, 3-79 to 3-85 Continuity Testing, 3·38 to 340 Crimp-Contact Connectors, 3-24 Crimp Contacts, Installation, 3-79 Crimp Contacts, Removal, 3-79 Disassembly, 348 to 3·68 Grounding Shields, 3·35 Identification, 343

Installation, 348, 14-57 Interchangeability With

UKjBMS Connectors, 3-75 Manufacturers' Variations in

MS Connectors, 346 Marking, 3-44

MIL·C·5015 Connectors, 3-43 MIL-C-38999 Connectors,

3-99 to 3-103 MIL-C-8151 I Connectors, 3-89 to 3-92 MIL-C-81659 Connectors, 3-104 to 3-110 MIL-C-83723 Connectors, 3-93 to 3-98

Miniature MS Connectors. 3-76 to 3-103 Minia ture Rectangular

Connectors, 3-120

Multiple Connections, 3-36

Nonstandard Connectors With Removable

Crimp Contacts, 3-113 to 3-118 Potting Connectors, 3-47,3·58 Protection of Connectors, 341 Reassembly, 348

Reducing Wire Size, 3-37

Shield Connections, 3-32 Soldering, 3·8 to 3-23

Special Purpose, 3 ·11 1 Subminiature, 3·119

UKjBMS, Interchangeability, 3-75

Page

3-22

3·1 t03-105 3-2,3-25

3-31,3-57 to 3-60 3-9 to 3-20

3-67 to 3-71 3-23 to 3·25 3-9 3·67t03-71 3-67 to 3·71 3-32 to 3-54 3-22

3-25 3.32,14-19

3-61

3-31 3-28 3-25

3·84 to 3-90

3-74 to 3-80

V)ot, ;-105

3-80 to .j-·3 3-61 to ~ 0

3-112 3-22

3-108 to 3·109 3-32,341

3-25

3-32

3-23

3-20

3-2 to 3-9 3-106 3-IP 3-61

Index 1

NAVAIR 01-1A-505 (USAF) T.O. 1-1A-14

Subject/Paragraph Page Subject/Paragraph Page
Connectors, RF, 4-6 4-1 Lamps, 17-5 17-1
BNC,4-15 4-7 Identification, 17-6 17-1
C,4-19 4-11 Replacement, 17-7 17-1
Fuel Quantity Indicating, 445 4-29
HN,4-22 4-13 Lugs, Terminal, Solderless, 5-5 5·2
Miniature, 4-38 4·26 Aluminum, 544 5·27
N,4-26 4·16 Copper, Small, 5-8 54
Procedures for, 4·8 44 Copper, Large, 5-18 5·15
Pulse, 4-30 4-19 High Temperature, 5·32 5·24
SC,4-37 4-26 Inspection of Crimp, 5-62 5-35
Soldering, 4-11 4-6
Subminiature, 441 4-28 Plugs, Grommet Sealing, 3-61m
TNC,4-34 4-24 346
Crimping Potting
J MIL-M-24041 Compound,
Connector Contacts, 3-24 3·9
Eyesight, 3-31 3-20 10-20 to 10-26 10-8 to 10-9
Splices, 5-5, 5-57 5-30,5·33 MIL-S-8516 Compound,
Taper Pins, 6-10 6-1 10-5 to 10-19 10-1 to 10·7
Terminal Lugs, 5-14, 5-17, 5-26, 5-31 5-14,5-15 MIL-S-23586 Compound,
Tools (see Tools) 10-5 to 10-19 10-1 to 10-7
Preparation of TFE Wire for, 10-19 10·7
Procedure, Connectors, 3-58 341
Ferrules, Grounding Protective Devices, 13 -33 13-6
One-Piece, 2-60 2-34 (See Also Fuzes)
Two-Piece, 2-58 2-29 Identification, 13-44 13-8
Installation, 13-33 13-6
Fuzes, 18-5 18-1
Identification, 18-8 18-11
Installation, 13-33, 18-9 13-6,18-11 Repairs, Emergency
Coaxial Cable, 19-15 19·7
Connectors, 19-16 19-7
Grounding Shielded Cable, 19-12 194
See Bonding and Grounding Terminal Board Covers, 19-23 19-8
Wire, 19-5 19-1
Grommets, 14-34 14-11
Safety Wiring, 16-5 16-1
Lock Wire, 16-6 16-1
Harnesses, Molded Rigid, 12-5 12-1 Procedures, 16-9, 16-16 16·1, 16·2
Compact Wire Bundles, 12-19 12-8 Seal Wire, 16-8, 16-22 16-1,16-5
Repair, 12-14, 12-15 12-5 Shear Wire, 16-7 16-1
Sealing, Electric Connector
Junction Boxes (See Potting)
Installation, 13-23 134 Shielded Wire and Cable
Dead-Ending, 2-62 to 2-65 2-35
Grounding Connections, 3-32, 3-35 3·20,3-22
Lacing and Tying, 15-5 15-1 Terminating, 2-55 2-29
High Temperature Areas, 15-22 15-7
Lacing Procedure, 15 -10 15-2 Sleeving
Materials, 15-6 15-1 Heat-Shrinkable, 11-22 11·19
Self-Clinching Cable Straps, 15-20 15-5 Identification, 2-25 2-15
Tying Procedure, 15-14 154 Insulating, 3-12, 5-20 3-2,5-15
Index 2 NAVAIR 01-1A-606 (USAF) T.O. 1-1A-14

Subiect/Paragraph SUbjectJPa ..... 1Ph p ..
Solder Terminals
Hard Solder, 9 -11 9-2 Aluminum Wire, 542 5-27
Soft Solder, 9-9 9-1 High Temperature. 5-32 5-24
Inspection, 5-62 5-35
Soldering, 9-6 9-1 Preinsulated, for Large Copper Wires
Connectors, Electric, 3-15 3-3 (Wire sizes 8 Through 4/0), 5-18 5-15
Connectors, RF, 4-11 4-6 Preinsulated, for Small Copper Wires
Inspection of, 941 9-8 (Wire sizes 26 Through 10),5-8 54
Methods, 9-14 9-3 Thermocouple, 7-8 7-3
Procedures, 9-24 9-6 Types and Styles, 5-7 5-2
Thermocouple Wiring, 7-15, 7-25 7-6, 7-11
Tools
Soldering Iron, 9-15 9-3 Cable Clamp, 14-32 14-10
Preparation and Maintenance, 9-19 9-3 Crimping, Connectors, 3-24 3-9
Selection of, 9-29 9-6 Crimping, Taper Pins, 6-6 6-1
Crimping, Terminal Lugs, 54,5-16,
Splices 5-9,5-21,5-52,5-56 5-30,5-32,
Aluminum, 5-59 5-33 Extraction, 3-81,3-82.6-8,6-9 3-68,3-70,6-1
Copper, 5-50, 5-54 5-29,5-32 Insertion, 3-80, 3-82, 6-7, 6-9 3-67,3-70,6-1
High Temperature, 5-58 5-33 Soldering, 9-15, 9-17 9-3
Multi-Splices, 5-60 5-33 Wire Stripping, 240 2-21
Strap, Cable, Self-Clinching, 15-20, 15-21 15-5,15-6 Tubing
Identification, 2-35b 2-19 (See Sleeving)
Taper Pins, 64 6-1 Wire and Cable, 2-5,14-15 2-2, ]44
Crimping, 6-10 6-1 (See Also Cable)
Extracting, 6-17 6-7 Cutting, 2-6 2-3
Inserting, 6-14 6-6 Marking, 2-13 2-6
Tools, 6-5, 6-20 6-1,6-7 Reducing Size of, 3-37 3-23
Stripping, 2-36 2-21
Terminal Boards Thermocouple, 7-6 7-1
Connecting Wires to, 14-35 14-11 Tinning. 247 2-27
Covers, 13-52, 14-36 13-10, 14-11
Installation, 1345 13-8 Wire Groups and Bundles, 14-6 ]4-1
Terminal Junction System Wiring, Electrical. 144 14-1
(MIL-T-81714),14-68 14-2] Installation in Conduit, 14-53 14-18
Identification, 14-71 14-26 Installation in Junction Box, 14-64 14-21
Module Installation and Protection, 14-19 to 14-26 14-5 to 14-7
Removal, 14-72 14-26 Routing, 14-15 144
Pin Terminals. Insertion and Safety, 16-5 16-1
Extraction of, 14-74 14-27 Thermocouple Wiring
Terminal Crimping, 14-73 14-27 Installation, 7-31 7-12 t,.U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE:1U2-TH-6U/6128

Index 3

NAVAIR 01-1A-505 (USAF) T.O. 1-1A-14

SECTION I INTRODUCTION

1-1. GENERAL

1-2. This is one of a series of manuals prepared to assist military personnel engaged in the general maintenance and repair of aircraft. The area covered by this manual is that of the aircraft electrical system. Since many airborne missiles remain with their aircraft for long periods of time and are subjected to the same environment and stresses as the aircraft, it is recommended that the coverage of this manual be extended to airborne missile electrical systems.

1-3. The satisfactory performance of present-day aircraft depends to a very great extent on the continuing reliability of its electrical system. Improperly or carelessly installed Wiring can be a source of both immediate and potential danger, and many malfunctions and failures of the electrical system can be traced to this cause. The performance of the system depends on the quality of the design, plus the workmanship used in making the installation. The continued proper performance of the system depends on the "know-how" of the men who do the inspection, repair, and maintenance.

1-4. It is highly important therefore that maintenance and repair operations, as well as the original installation, be made in accordance with the best available techniques in order to eliminate possible failures or at least to minimize them.

1-5. PURPOSE OF MANUAL

1-6. The purposes for which this manual Was written are as follows:

a. To gather together under one cover the recommended practices and techniques to be used for installing, repairing, and maintaining aircraft electrical wiring.

b. To standardize these techniques and methods so that electrical installations will be done in a uniform manner.

c. To indoctrinate all personnel with the importance of good workmanship.

d. To point up the failures which may result from poor workmanship.

e. To promote safety by pointing out and prohibiting unsafe practices.

1-7. SOURCE OF INFORMATION

1-8. The information contained in this manual represents the best current knowledge and practice in the aircraft electrical field. It has been compiled with the cooperation and assistance of the country's leading airframe manufacturers, airline operators, and military overhaul and repair bases. Many of the illustrations have been provided by the manufacturers of electrical accessories used in aircraft.

1-9. SCOPE

1-10. This manual covers all general purpose wiring and wiring devices used for the interconnection of equipment in aircraft. It also includes thermocouple systems and coaxial cabling installed in aircraft.

1-11. The manual is not concerned in any way with design problems, or with the selection of wire, cable, connections, etc. However, in some cases, materials are noted as meeting specific temperature or environmental requirements.

1-12. INTENDED USE

1-13. This manual is intended primarily for use by personnel engaged in maintenance and repair under government contract or at military bases. Its use is mandatory for such personnel, except where any procedure contained in it conflicts with any government specification or document, in which case the government specification or document shall take precedence and a report describing the conflict shall be submitted. The manual will also be available to contractors, other than in connection with maintenance and repair, as a guide and as recommended practice, but its use by these con tractors is not mandatory. However, the practices used by the contractor should always be compatible with those of this publication so that modern techniques may be used to maintain the aircraft regardless of the manufacturer.

1-14. The procedures described in this manual are compatible with those currently used by airframe manufacturers. Repair and maintenance accomplished in accordance with this book should result in a quality equivalent to that in the original installation.

1-1

NAVAIR 01-lA-606 (USAF) T.O. l-lA-14

1-15. For specific installations, this manual is intended to be used in conjunction with the applicable handbook of maintenance instructions. (It supplements but does not supersede the handbook of maintenance instructions.) Copies of government specifications and other official documents referenced herein may be obtained upon application to the Commanding Officer, Naval Supply Depot, 5801 Tabor Avenue, Philadelphia, Pa. 19120. Copies of the Department of Defense Index of Specifications and Standards may be obtained by directing requests as follows:

For Department of the Navy - to the Commanding Officer, U. S. Naval Supply Depot, 5801 Tabor Avenue, Philadelphia, Pa. 19120.

For Department of the Air Force - to the Commander, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, USAF Engineering Specification and Drawing Branch, Administrative Services Office, Attn: EWB, Wright.Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio.

For other than official use - to the Superintendent of Documents, U. S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D. C. 20402.

1-16. ARRANGEMENT OF MATERIAL

1-17. The material comprising the manual is divided into sections. Each section describes and illustrates the recommended procedure for a single operation, or for a series of related operations.

1-18. The first six sections contain procedures for preparing and identifying wire, and for assembling it to connectors, terminals splices, and taper pins. Later sections deal with procedures for thermocouple wiring, bonding and grounding, soldering, potting, routing and support of wire bundles, and preparation and installation of conduit, busses, terminal blocks, junction boxes, lamps, and protective devices. Directions for emergency repairs are found in the final section.

1-2

1-19. The material in each section is arranged as far as possible in the general order in which the operations are performed. Illustrations and tables are located as near as possible to the related text. Each section is headed by an introduction containing a short description of the subject and its function in the aircraft electrical system. Where necessary for clarity, a list of definitions is included.

1-20. Also included in the introduction of each section is a listing of applicable government specifications for the various materials required. and design procedures on which these installation techniques are based. The latest applicable revision of the listed specifications will apply.

1-21. REVISIONS

1-22. Revisions and additions will be made from time to time to insure that the material in the manual will always reflect the best current techniques and keep abreast of the new developments in the field. Suggestions for correcting and improving this manual are invited and should be sent to:

By Naval activities:

Commander, Naval Air Systems Command Department of the Navy

Washington, D. C. 20360

By Air Force activities:

Headquarters, San Antonio Air Material Area/MMST U. S. Air Force

Kelly Air Force Base

San Antonio, Texas 78241

NAVAIR 01-1A-505 (USAF) T.O. 1-1A-14

SECTION II

WIRE AND CABLE PREPARATION

2·1. INTRODUCTION

2-2. GENERAL.ln order to make installation, maintenance, and repair easier, runs of electric wire and cable in aircraft are broken at specified locations by junctions such as connectors, terminal blocks, busses, etc. Before assembly to these junctions, wires and cables must be cut to length, identified, stripped, and if required, tinned.

2-3. SCOPE. This section describes and illustrates the recommended procedures for preparing wire and cable for attachment to junctions, and for terminating shielded cable.

2-4. REFERENCE SPECIFICATIONS AND DRAWINGS

QQ-T-2S

QQ8-S7l

MIL-I-63I

MIL-T-713

MIL-C-1140

MIL-I-31S8

MIL-I-3190

MIL-W-S086

MIL-W-S088 MIL-A-6091

MIL-S-6872

MIL-W-7072B

MIL-C-7078

,.

Tape, Electrical Wire, Flexible Insulating Sleeving, Marking Machine, (Foil, Wire Identification Marking)

Solder: Lead Alloy, Tin Lead Alloy, and Tin Alloy

Insulation, Electrical, Synthetic-Resin Composition, Non-Rigid

Twine and Tape, Lacing and Tying, for Use in Electrical and Electronic Equipment

Glass Fiber; Yarn, Cordage, Sleeving, Cloth and Tape

Insulation Tape, Electrical Glass-Fiber (Resin Filled); and Cord, Fibrous Glass

Insulation, Electrical, Sleeving, Flexible, Treated

Wire, Electric, Hook-Up and Interconnecting, PVC Insulation

Wiring, Aircraft, Installation of

Alcohol; Ethyl, Specially Denatured, Aircraft

Soldering Process, General Specification for

Wire, Electrical, 600 Volts, Aluminum, General Specification for

Cable, Power, Electrical, 600 volts, Shielded

MIL-W-7139B

Wire, Electrical, Polytetrafluoro-

ethylene-Insulated, Copper, 600V

Insulation Sleeving, Electrical, Flexible Wire, Electrical, Silicone-Insulated Copper, 600V, 200°C

Insulation Tape, Electrical, Pressure Sensitive Adhesive

MI!.A-7444 MIL-W-8777C

MIL-I-15126

I WARNING I

MIL-I-15126 insulation tape (including the glass fabric type) is highly flammable and should not be used in a high-temperature environment. MIL-I-23S94 insulation tape is designed for high temperature operation (suitable for continuous operation at 500°F) and should be used for all high-temperature environments.

MIL-I-23S94 Insulation Tape, Electrical, High Temperature, Polytetrafluoroethylene, Pressure Sensitive

MIL-W-16878D Wire, Electrical, Insulated, High Temperature (Navy)

MIL-F-21608 Ferrule, Shield Grounding, Insulated, Crimp Style

MIL-W-227S9C Wire, Electric, Fluorocarbon-Insulated, Copper or Copper Alloy

MIL-I -23053 Insulation Sleeving, Electrical, Flexible, Heat Shrinkable

MIL-C-2S038 Wire, Electrical, High Temperature and Fire Resistant, Aircraft

MIL-T-22910 Tools, Crimping, Hand, for Crimp-Style Electric Terminals and Shield Ferrules

MIL-W-81044A Wire, Electric, Crosslinked Poly alkene Insulated, Copper

MIL-W-81381 Wire, Electric, Polyrnide-Insulated, Copper and Copper Alloy

MS 18114 Wire, Electric, Extruded TFE Fluorocarbon-Insulated, Nickel-Coated Copper, 1000 volts

MS 21986 Wire, Electric, Extruded TFE Fluorocarbon-Insulated, Nickel-Coated Copper, 600 volts

2-1

NAVAIR 01-1A-505 (USAF) T.O. 1-1A-14

2-5. DEFINITIONS

a. Insulated Wire. For purposes of electric and electronic installation in aircraft, an insulated wire consists of a metal conductor covered with a dielectric or insulating material (see figure 2·1). Insulated wire is usually referred to as "wire" and will be so designated in this manual. Wires used in aircraft contain stranded conductors for flexibility. Insulations may consist of several materials and layers to provide dielectric insulation, thermal protection, abrasion resistance, moisture resistance, and fluid resistance. Wires commonly used in aircraft are described in table 2·1.

b. Cable (see figure 2·2). The term "cable," as used in aircraft electrical installations, includes the following:

1. Two or more insulated conductors, contained in a common covering, or twisted together without a common covering (multi-conductor cable).

2. One or more insulated conductors with an overall shield, or with an overall shield and a jacket over the shield (shielded cable).

3. Two conductors twisted together (twisted pair).

4. A single insulated center conductor with a metallic braided outer conductor (coaxial cable). The concentricity of center and outer conductor is carefully controlled during manufacture to insure that they are coaxial.

1 = ! A ! ! fuga


CD CD CD CD CD
TYPE 1 e. M!L-W-16878 (T.YP ES E AND EE)
l K\\(Z<Z~ ; ..!i

CD CD CD CD CD CD
TYPE II MS25190 MS17411, MS17412, MS18000, MS18001
a. M!L-W-5086 MS18104, MS18105, MS21985
~ ~/~//YY/I it d)! h 1~7!/J/~! I ..ii

, ~).}. >.\,\ )., '\'»» c:
CD CD CD CD CD CD CD CD
b. MIL-W·7on MS25191 f. MIL-W-22759 MS17410, MS90294
1 I ,iii ~ [~(~~I !
*&4

CD CD CD CD CD CD CD CD CD
c. M!L-W-7139 g. MIL-W-25038 MS27125
h RCC:X(;1 ... ; { I -s

CD CD CD CD CD CD
d. MIL·W-8777 MS25471, MS27110 h. M!L·W·22759 MS18114 MS21986
CD Conductor CD Outer Jacket
CD Primary Insulation CD Finisher
ffi T.p., Supperted ,"'1·, Unsupported CD
Insulation, Impregnated Fibrous Inorganic
Gloss Fiber Braid 2·2

Figure 2·1. Wires Commonly Used In Aircraft

NAVAIR 01-1A-605 (USAF) T.O. 1-1A-14

L ~
: >--
-4

CD CD
a. UNSHIELDED MULTI-CONDUCTOR CABLE
, - ! I

CD CD CD CD CD
b. SHI ELDED SINGL E CONDUCTOR CABLE
mm»)~~
CD CD CD
c. SHI ELDED MULTI-CONDUCTOR CABLE
EO>: =-:--as::3~

NOTE: MAK E AS REQUIRED BY TWISTING
SINGL E CONDUCTORS
d. TWISTED PAIR
CD Conductor
CD Primary Insulation
CD Wire Jocket
CD Braided Tinned Copper Shield
CD Protective Outer Jacket
CD Color Coded Wires (MIL-W-5086, -7139,
-8777, -22759, -,25038, -27300) Figure 2-2. Cables Commonly Used In Aircraft

Cables commonly used in aircraft are:

MS 25313

Single or multiple conductor using MS25190 wire, shielded with thin copper braid and covered with a nylon jacket.

MIL-C-27500 Single or multiple conductor, using any wire in table 2-1, shielded with tinned, silver-coated, or nickel-coated copper braid as appropriate and covered with appropriate jacket.

MIL-C-5756 Single or multiple conductor, rubber insulated conductor, rubber jacket.

MIL-C-17 Coaxial cable.

NOTE

Instructions for coaxial cable are in section IV.

c. Soft Solder. For use in aircraft electrical installations, soft solder is a mixture of 60% tin and 40% lead, SN 60, as described in Federal Specification QQ-S-571. It may be in bar form to be melted for tinning, or in the form of rosin core wire solder for use with soldering iron.

d. Flux. For use with soft solder, flux is water-white rosin, dissolved to paste-like consistency in denatured alcohol.

2-6. CUTTING WIRE AND CABLE

2-7. GENERAL. Cut all wires and cables to lengths given on drawings or wiring diagrams. Cut wire and cable so that cut is clean and square and wire is not deformed. (See figure 2-3.) After cutting, reshape large diameter wire with pliers, if necessary.

Make sure that blades of cutting tools are sharp and free from nicks. A dull blade will deform and extrude wire ends.

2-3

NAVAIR 01-1A-505 (USAF) T.O. 1-1A-14

Table 2-1_ Wires Used In Aircraft Electrical Installations

Applicable Specification

Title/Description

MIL-W-5086

Wire, Electric, Hook-Up and Interconnecting, PVC Insulation.

Tin, copper, or copper alloy conductors with ~olyvinyl chloride insulation and nylon or glass braid and nylon jacket, 105 C temperature rating.

MIL-W-7072B

Wire, Electric, Aluminum, Aircraft, General Specification for

Aluminum conductor, PVC, glass braid. nylon braid jacket, 600V insulation, 105°C temperature rating.

MIL-W-7139B

Wire, Electrical, Polytetrafluoroethylene-Insulated, Copper, 600V

Silver or nickel coated copper conductors, TFE fluorocarbon and glass insulation, high temperature interconnecting. self extinguishing, 200°C and 260°C, respectively.

MIL-W-8777C

Wire, Electrical, Silicone-Insulated, Copper, 600V, 200°C

Silver coated copper conductors, silicone rubber insulation, glass braid, polyester braid or FEP fluorocarbon jacket.

MIL-W-16878D

Wire, Electrical, Insulated, High Temperature (Navy)

Silver or nickel coated copper conductors, extruded TFE insulation, 600 and 1000V, 200°C or 260°C.

MIL-W-22759C

Wire, Electric. Fluorocarbon-Insulated, Copper or Copper Alloy

Silver and nickel coated copper conductors with TFE and FEP insulation in various types for: general hookup, abrasion, and fluid resistance; silver coated conductors, 200°C maximum temperature; nickel coated conductors, 260°C maximum temperature.

MIL-W-25038

Wire, Electrical, High Temperature and Fire Resistant, Aircraft

Nickel clad copper (27 percent nickel), asbestos, glass, TFE insulation,

600V, 260°C.

MIL-W-81044A

Wire, Electric, Crosslinked Polyalkene Insulated, Copper

General purpose wire with tin coated or silverplated copper, or silverplated high-strength copper alloy conductors. Maximum operating temperatures: 125°C and 150°C.

MIL-W-81381

Wire, Electric, Polyimide-Insulated, Copper and Copper Alloy

General purpose wire for use in high voltage applications. Insulation is tape wrapped of polyimide, or polyirnide-fluorocarbon films. Conductors are silver or nickel plated copper or high-strength copper alloy.

2-4

NAVAIR 01-1A-606 (USAF) T.O. 1-1A-14

Table 2-1. Wires Used In Aircraft Electrical Installations (continued)

NOTES: (Paragraph 1-11 applies.)

Conductor - Stranded conductor wire is used for flexibility in installation and service. Wire sizes approximate AWG gages, but vary sufficiently so that it is improper to refer to ~craft wire as "AWG". In low temperature wire, strands are tinned to facilitate soldering. In wire rated at 200 C conductor temperature, silver is used to coat strands to protect copper from oxidation and to facilitate soldering. Wires for high temperatures use nickel-coating to prevent oxidation. Nickel-coated wire is more difficult to solder than silver-coated wire, but makes satisfactory solder connections with proper techniques. Nickel-coated wire has less tendency to wick solder and become brittle than silver-coated wire.

Insulation:

Primary Insulation

PVC (polyvinyl Chloride) - PVC is a common wire insulation. It has good insulation properties and is self-extinguishing after flame.

Silicone Rubber - Silicone rubber is rated at 200°C. It is highly flexible. It is self-extinguishing after flame except in vertical runs. The ash is nonconducting.

TFE-Fluorocarbon (polytetrafluoroethylene) - TFE is widely used as a high-temperature insulation. It will not bum but will vaporize in flame. It will not melt at soldering temperatures. TFE is resistant to most fluids.

FEP-FIuorocarbon (Fluorinated ethylene propylene) - FEP is rated at 200°C, but will melt at higher temperatures. FEP has properties similar to TFE, but is melt-extrudable. It will melt at soldering temperatures.

Thermal and Abrasion Resistant Materials Used in Intermediate and Outside Layers:

Glass Braid - Widely used to provide thermal resistance and cut-through resistance. However, it may absorb moisture and its use is becoming less prevalent.

Asbestos - Asbestos and other mineral fibers are used to provide high temperatures and flame resistance. Moisture absorption is high, but silicone rubber, TFE, or other saturants are used.

Nylon - Widely used in low temperature wires for abrasion resistance and fluid resistance.

Polyimide - A new material with excellent thermal, abrasion, and cut-through resistance characteristics. Jackets - Extruded nylon, nylon braid, polyester braid, FEP-fluorocarbon, and TFE-impregnated glass braids are used as jackets for fluid and abrasion resistance. Smooth extruded jackets are preferred on wires to be used with grommet-seal connectors.

Hook-up Wire - Hook-up wire is normally used for wire in chassis and other enclosed areas. This wire may be used for interconnection wiring in compact wire harnesses when protected by molded or braided coverings. The term "hook-up" is sometimes used to include interconnecting wire, and the term "chassis wire" is then used to distinguish non-abrasion resistant insulated wire from interconnecting wires.

Interconnecting Wire - Interconnecting wire is designed to withstand all normal aircraft environment (including limited scuffing) without sleeving, jacketing, or other protection. However, no wire insulation will withstand continuous scuffing or abrasion and must be installed to minimize such abuse. Medium-abrasion-resistant wire such as MS 18000 and MS 18001 must be installed with ex tra care.

Fire Resistance - MIL-W-25038 wire is used in circuits such as fire detection and fire extinguishing circuits where insulation properties during flame are required. This wire may also be used in areas where intermittent temperatures above 260°C are encountered. It will withstand 400°C (750°F) for periods totalling up to 100 hours, during which time it will gradually lose moisture resistance. Its continuous duty rating (10,000 hours) is 260°C.

2-5

NAVAIR 01-1A-505 (USAF) T.O. 1-1A-14

GOOD

BAD

NEEDS RESHAPING

Figure 2·3. Wires After Cutting

2·8. CUITING COPPER WIRE AND CABLE. To cut a large number of heavy wires or cables, use a circular saw with a cable cutting blade. A cable cutting blade is similar to a meat slicing blade (no teeth). (See figure 24a.)

I WARNING I

Do not use a circular saw without an adequate guard over the blade.

Heavy or light copper wires can also be cut with bench shears such as shown in figure 24b.

2·9. To cut a few heavy gage copper wires or cables, use a fine tooth hack saw. A fine tooth hack saw has 20 or more teeth per inch. See figure 24c for use of hack saw and saw vise which protects heavy wire during cutting.

2·10. To cut a few light gage copper wires, use diagonal pliers as shown in figure 24e. Do not attempt to cut wires larger than AN·8 with diagonal pliers.

2·11. CUTTING ALUMINUM WIRE. Be careful when cutting aluminum wire to avoid deforming the conductors. Aluminum wire is more brittle than copper, and if deformed, aluminum wire should be reshaped carefully.

Never cut aluminum wire with tools which have reciprocating motion, such as a hack saw. Reciprocating cutting action "work hardens" aluminum. This will lead to broken and torn strands.

2-6

2·12. To cut a large number of aluminum wires, use a power circular saw with cable cutting blade as shown in figure 24a. Do not use toothed blade for cutting aluminum wire.

If cutting tool has been used for other metals, wipe blades clean before cutting aluminum. Copper or steel chips will cause aluminum to corrode.

Special cable shears with concave cutting edges such as pruning or dehorning shears may also be safely used to cut aluminum wire. A cable shear of this type is illustrated in figure 24d.

2·13. IDENTIFYING WIRE AND CABLE

2·14. GENERAL. To make maintenance easier, each interconnecting wire and cable installed in aircraft is marked with a combination of letters and numbers which identify the wire, the circuit it belongs to, its gage size, and other information necessary to relate the wire to a wiring diagram. This marking is called the cable identification code. Details of the code are given in Military Specification MIL·W·5088. Some general information is given in 2·15 and 2·16. Wire received from the manufacturer is printed with the manufacturer's code designation in a light green color at intervals of one to five feet, the MS number and dash number of the wire, and a one-, two-, or three-digit number indicating the color of the basic wire insulation and the color of the stripes (if present). The color code is as follows:

Black 0 Blue 6
Brown I Violet 7
Red 2 Gray 8
Orange 3 White 9
Yellow 4 (includes also
Green 5 uncolored insulations) For example, a wire printed with number MS25190A20913 would designate a wire constructed in accordance with Military Standard drawing MS25190, Type I, size 20, having white insulation (9), a first stripe of brown (l), and a second stripe of orange (3).

NOTE

When marking wire with the identification code described in 2·15 and 2·)6, it is permissible to overstamp the manufacturer's printing.

NAVAIR 01-1A-505 (USAF) T.O. 1-1A-14

FOOT PE'DAL

b.

~ BENCH CABLE SHEAR

CABLE CUTTING BLADE (NO TEETH)

a. CIRCULAR SAW FOR CUTTING WIRE AND CABLE

TWENTY OR MORE TEETH PER INCH

c. HACK SAW WITH SAW VISE

d. CABLE SHEARS - PRUNING TYPE

o. DIAGONAL CUTTING PLIERS

Figure 2-4. Wire Cutting Tool.

2-7

NAVAIR 01-1A-505 (USAF) T.O. 1-1A-14

2-15. WIRE IDENTIFICATION CODE (BASIC). The basic wire Identification code used for all circuits except those having the circuit function letters R, S, T, or Y (see figure 2-5a) is as follows, reading from left to right:

a. Unit number: Where two or more identical items of equipment are installed in the same aircraft, the unit numbers "I", "2", "3", "4", etc., may be prefixed to differentiate between wires and cables when it is desired that the equipment have the same basic cable identification. To facilitate interchangeability requirements, identical wiring located in left and right wings, nacelles, and major interchangeable structural assemblies may have identical cable identification and the unit number is not required. The unit number for circuit functions "R", "S", "T", and "Y", are used only where duplicate complete equipments are installed, and do not apply to duplicate components within a single complete equipment such as duplicate indicators or control boxes.

b. Circuit function letter (except R, S, T, and V): The circuit function letter is used to identify the circuit function specified in table 2-2. Where a wire or cable is used for more than one circuit function, the circuit function letter of that circuit which is functionally predominant applies. When functional predominance is questionable, the circuit function letter for the wire or cable having the lowest wire number is used.

c. Wire number: The wire number consisting of one or more digits is used to differentiate between wires in a circuit. A different number shall be used for wire not having a common terminal or connection.

I . Wires with the same circuit function having a common terminal connection or junction have the same wire number but different segment letters.

') Numbers 2,000 to 4,999, inclusive, are reserved

for use by the procuring activity to identify wires installed by service modifications, except for those wires with circuit function letters of R, S, T, and Y.

3. Beginning with the lowest number, a number is assigned to each wire in numerical sequence, insofar as practicable.

2-8

d. Wire segment letter: A wire segment is a conductor between two terminals or connections. The wire segment letter is used to differentiate between conductor segments in a particular circuit. A different letter is used for wire segments having a common terminal or connection. Wire segments are lettered in alphabetical sequence. The letter "A" identifies the first segment of each circuit starting at the power source. If a circuit contains only one wire segment, the wire segment is marked "A". The letters "I" and "0" are not used as segment letters. Double letters "AA", "AB", HAC", etc., are used when more than 24 segments are required. Two permanently spliced wires do not require separate segment letters if the splice is used for modification or repair.

e. Wire size number: The wire size number is used to identify the size of the wire or cable. For coaxial cables and thermocouple wires, the wire size number is not included. For thermocouple wires, a dash (-) is used in lieu of the wire size number.

f. Ground, phase, or thermocouple letter(s):

1. Ground cable letter "N" is used as a suffix to the wire identification code to identify any wire or cable that completes the circuit to the ground network. Such wires and cables shall be capable of being connected to the ground network of aircraff electrical systems without causing malfunctioning of any circuit. For critical and sensitive electronic systems which have interconnecting "ground" leads, but only one segment actually grounded to structure, only the segment actually grounded to structure is identified with the "N" suffix.

2. Phase letter "A", "B", or "C" shall be used as a suffix on the wire identification code to identify the phase of wires that is in the three-phase power distribution wiring of AC systems. The phase sequence shall be "A-B-C".

3. Phase letter "V" shall be used as a suffix on the cable identification code to identify the ungrounded wire or cable that is in a single-phase system.

4. For thermocouple wire, the following suffixes shall be used as applicable:

CONS - Constantan COP - Copper

CHROM - Chromel ALML - Alumel IRON - Iron

g. For aluminum wire, ALUMINUM or ALUM shall be added as a suffix to the wire identification code.

NAVAIR 01-1A-505 (USAF) T.O. 1-1A-14

&~! P 215 A 4 N

A I I .. J 1 ,,",L..VIYI n

P 2 I

GROUND, PHASE, OR THERMOCOUPLE LETTER 5

A 4 N

" ,_

2-9

T -1'""- r- -r- - ... -,.. - I
I I
I L ___
I
I
I
I
I
I
I SUFFIX

WIRE SIZE NUMBER WIRE SEGMENT LETTER

WIRE NUMBER

I CIRCUIT FUNCTION LETTER

L_ - - --- - - - ---- UNIT NUMBER

A- AS APPLIED TO ALL CIRCUIT FUNCTIONS EXCEPT R, S, T, AND Y

A. ""' I

....

I I v

lA

,.,

" t.

A

~c~ ARC52 - 46 8 20 N9 R

T -r-- ... ,.. TIl C

: L GROUND, PHASE, OR THERMOCOUPLE LETTER 5

I WIRE SIZE NUMBER 2

: L- WIRE SEGMENT LETTER

I

I EQUIPMENT IDENTIFICATION

I

'- - - - - - - - - -- - - - - UNIT NUMBER

L-. WIRE NUMBER

4 6 8 2 o

~I I~

B- AS APPLIED TO CIRCUIT FUNCTIONS R,S, T, A~

Figure 2-5. Examples of Wire Identification Coding

NAVAIR 01-1A-505 (USAF) T.O. 1-1A-14

Table 2-2. Function and Designation LettersV

Circuit Function

Letter Circuits

Circuit Function Letter

A ARMAMENT:

Bomb suspension and release Torpedo

Depth charge

Guns

Gun heater Chemical Rocket Sight Turret Warning

External pylons and stores Jettison fuel tanks

PHOTOGRAPHIC:

Gun camera

Mapping camera Reconnaissance camera Camera intervalometer Camera doors

Camera heaters Warning

CONTROL SURFACE:

B

C

D

Automatic pilot Booster

Control tabs Diving brakes Flight

Horizontal stabilizer Landing flaps Water-rudder position Trim tabs

Wing flaps

Warning

INSTRUMENT (other than flight or engine instruments):

Ammeter

Oil-flap position Cowl-flap position Coolant-flap position Air pressure

Free air temperature Landing-gear position Hydraulic pressure

Cabin pressure

Carbon monoxide Landing-flap position Propeller pitch position Instrument vacuum pump Horizontal-stabilizer position Trim-tab position

Water pressure

Voltmeter

Clock

Warning

Circuits

E

ENGINE INSTRUMENT:

Carburetor air pressure Bearing temperature Tailpipe temperature

Carburetor anti-icing fluid quantity Fuel mixture

Torque meter

Brake mean effective pressure Fuel flow

Fuel quantity

Fuel capacity

Cylinder head temperature Oil temperature

Coolant temperature

Oil pressure

Manifold pressure

Fuel pressure

Propeller anti-icing fluid quantity Engine oil quantity

Tachometer

Synchroscope

Warning

F

FLIGHT INSTRUMENT:

Bank and turn Rate of climb Directional gyro Air position Ground position

Compass (including flux gate and

other stabilized compasses) Gyro horizon

Attitude gyro

Driftmeter

Altimeter

Airspeed

Accelerometer

Pitot-static tube heater Warning

G

LANDING GEAR, WING FOLDING:

Actuator Retraction Wheel brakes Down lock Wing folding Ground safety Arresting hook Wheel steering Up lock

Wheel spinning Warning

11 Circuit function and circuit designation letters of electrical and electronic wires and cables shall be as specified herein. Typical circuits are listed under their respective circuit functions.

Y Unassigned circuit function or circuit designation letters shall not be used until formally assigned by joint action of the Air Force and the Navy.

Circuit Function Letter

NAVAIR 01-1A-505 (USAF) T.O. 1-1A-14

Table 2·2. Function and Designation Letters (continued)ll

Circuits

H

HEATING, VENTILATING, AND DE·ICING:

Anti·icing (general) Battery heater Cabin heater Cigarette lighter De-icing (general) Heated flying suits Gallery

Windshield defroster Windshield defogger Windshield de-icer Heater blanket

Oil immersion heater Refrigeration

Cabin supercharger Ventilation

Water heater

Oxygen heater Warning

Circuit Function Letter

Circuits

L

LIGHTING:

Approach Flasher-coder Cockpit

Drift

Cabin

Formation

Cargo

Interior Instrument Section (fuselage) Landing

Exterior

Running, position, navigation Passing

Search

Taxi

Anchor

Warning

In order to avoid confusion with the numeral one, the letter "I" shall not be used for circuit or cable identification.

J

IGNITION:

Booster Vibrator Distributor Electronic

Jet assist takeoff Magneto ground wiring Warning

M

MISCELLANEOUS ELECTRIC:

Windshield spray Bilge pump Cargo door Water distillation Windshield wiper Hoist

Enclosure operation Positioner; seat, pedal Special test equipment Winches; target, glider

K

ENGINE CONTROL:

Carburetor air flap Blower ratio

Cowl flap,-air shutter Intercooler flap

Oil cooler shutter Propeller feathering Propeller synchronizer Propeller pitch Supercharger regulator Starter

Warning

N

UNASSIGNEDY

o

In order to avoid confusion with the numeral zero, the letter "0" shall not be used for circuit or cable identification.

P

DC POWER:

Wiring in the DC power or power-control system shall be identified by the circuit function letter "P".

11 Circuit function and circuit designation letters of electrical and electronic wires and cables shall be as specified herein. Typical circuits are listed under their respective circuit functions. lJ Unassigned circuit function or circuit designation letters shall not be used until formally assigned by joint action of the Air Force and the Navy.

2·"

Circuit Function Letter

NAVAIR 01-1A-505 (USAF) T.O. 1-1A-14

Table 2-2_ Function and Designation Letters (continued)1J

Circuits

Circuit Function Letter

Circuits

TG - GM homing TH - Infrared

TK - Telemetering

TL - A ttitude indicator TM - Chaff dispenser TN - Navigation

TP - Beacon (crash and locator) TQ - Transmitters and receiven TR - Receivers

TS - Anti-submarine (ASW) IT - Transmitters

TU - Reconnaissance

TW - Weather devices

TX - Television transmitters TY - Television receivers

TZ - Bombing devices

U MISCELLANEOUS ELECTRONIC:

Electronic wiring for which no "R", "S", or "T" designation has been assigned by the procuring activity shall have the circuit function letter "U" assigned. Examples of wiring for which the circuit function letter "U" will be assigned are common leads to electronic equipments and systems interconnection wiring such as antenna or power

circuits common to more than one equipment or system.

v

DC POWER and de control cables for AC systems shall be identified by the circuit function letter "V".

WARNING AND EMERGENCY (in addition to those listed under other circuit functions):

Enclosure release and locks Fire extinguishers

Flare release

Submersion actuator Bailout alarm

Seat ejector

F ire detector

Oxygen detector No-smoking sign Fasten-belts sign

Intercrew buzzer or light

ACPOWER:

Wiring in the AC power system shall be identified by the circuit function letter "X".

Q

FUEL AND OIL:

Fuel valves

Fuel booster-pump motor Mixture control

Oil dilution

Engine primer

Fuel-transfer-pump motor and control Fuel-loading-pump motor Oil-transfer-pump motor and control Oil-booster pump

Oil-scavenger pump

Throttle control

Fuel-pump motor

Oil diverter

Oil valves

Water iI>j'~ction

Warning

RADIO (navigation and communication):

RA - Instrument landing RC - Command

RD - Radio direction finding RF - VHF liaison

RH - Homing

RL - Liaison

RM - Marker beacon RN - Navigation

RP - Special systems RS ~ SHF command RT - Radio teletype RU - UHF command RV - VHF command RX - Recorder

RZ - Interphone, headphone

W

x

Y

ARMAMENT SPECIAL SYSTEMS:

Y*A - Air to air Y*B - Air to surface y*C - Multimode

Y*M - Missile-guidance Y*T - Turret

.. Armament special system number

R

S

RADAR:

SA - Altimeter SF - Intercept SG - Gunlaying SM - Mapping SN - Navigation SQ - Bombing SR - Recorder SS - Search

SV - Special systems SW - Warning

SX - Recognition (IFF)

z

UNASSIGNEDY

T

SPECIAL ELECTRONIC:

TA - Adapter

TB - Radar control TC - Radio control

TD - Airborne announcing

TE - Electronic countermeasures TF - Repeat back

1/ Cir( uit function and circuit designation letters of electrical and electronic wires and cables shall be as specified herein. Typical circuits are listed under their respective circuit functions.

Y Unassigned circuit function or circuit designation letters shall not be used until formally assigned by joint action of the Air Force and the Navy.

2-12

NAVAIR 01-1A-505 (USAF) T.O. 1-1A-14

2-16. WIRE IDENTIFICATION CODE (R, S, T, and Y CIRCUITS). The wire identification code for wires and cables having function letters "R", "S", "T", and "Y" is assigned by the equipment contractor as follows and as illustrated in figure 2-Sb. The wire identification code is derived by utilizing that portion of the military type designation (AN nomenclature) following the /, but excluding the hyphen and any sufflx letters. The block of wire numbers for each equipment shall start with 1 and continue for as many numbers as are needed to identify all wires. For example, wires of the AN/APS4S would be identified APS4S-lA20 - APS4S-97SC22, those of the AN/ARC-S2A would be ARCS2-lA22 - ARCS2-9C22, and the MX-94 would be the MX-94-lA20, etc. For equipment for which a type designation (AN nomenclature) will not be assigned, such as commercial equipment, a block of numbers is obtained from the procuring activity.

2-17. IDENTIFlCA TION METHODS. The identification code may be stamped on wires either horizontally or vertically, as shown in figures 2-Sa and 2-Sb. The preferred method of identification is to stamp the identification marking directly on the wire or cable with a hot foil stamping machine. Use this method wherever possible. If the wire insulation or outer covering will not stamp easily, lengths of insulating tubing (sleeves) are stamped with the identification marking and installed on the wire or cable. The following types of wire are usually identified by means of sleeves:

a. Unjacketed shielded wire

b. Thermocouple wires

c. Multiconductor cable

d. High temperature wire with insulation difficult to mark (such as asbestos, TFE, fiberglass, etc.).

Do not use metallic markers or bands for identification. Do not use any method of marking that will damage or deform the wire or cable.

Use sleeves only if wire cannot be marked directly. With care, some wires previously thought to be unsuitable for direct marking can be stamped with a standard marking machine using special foils.

2-18. MARKING OBJECTIVES. Whatever method of marking is used, be sure marking is legible, and that color of stamping contrasts with the wire insulation or sleeve. Use

. black stamping for light colored backgrounds. Use white on dark colored backgrounds. Make sure that markings are dry so they do not smear.

2-19. SPACING OF STAMPED MARKS. Stamp wires and cables at intervals of not more than IS inches along their entire lengths. (See figure 2-6.) In addition, stamp wires within three inches of each junction (except permanent splices), and at each terminating point. Stamp wires which are three to seven inches long in the center. Wires less than three inches long need not be stamped.

ROTATE 1800

Figure 2-6. Spacing of Identification Stamping on Wire and Cable

2·13

NAVAIR 01-1A-605 (USAF) T.O. 1-1A-14

2-20 LOCATION OF SLEEVE MARKING. When wire or cable cannot be stamped directly, install a plastic sleeve marked with the identification number over the outer covering at each terminating end (see figure 2-7)_ For Air Force planes, also install marked sleeves at not more than six foot intervals on the entire length of such wire or cable.

Do not use sleeves to change identification of wire or cable which has already been marked, except in the case of spare wires in potted connectors.

FOR AIR FORCE ONL Y EXTRA SLEEVES EVERY 6 FEET

r~~1 tlitl r~~1 ~::-=::S~

Figure 2·7. Location of Identification Sleeve

2-21. MULTICONDUCTOR CABLE IDENTIFICATION. Identify multiconductor cables with marked sleeves installed as described in 2-20 (see figure 2-8). Stamp sleeves with identification marking of each wire in the cable. Immediately following the identification code, stamp letters indicating the conductor color, using the following abbreviations:

BLK - Black BLU - Blue BRN -Brown GY -Gray GRN -Green

ORN - Orange PR - Purple RED - Red WHT - White YEL - Yellow

At each terminating end, strip back outer covering as far as necessary and stamp color code letters on insulation of each

conductor. .

2·14

Figure 2-8. Multi-Conductor Cable Identification

2-22. COAXIAL CABLE IDENTIFICATION. Identify coaxial cable by direct stamping on the cable (see figure 2-9) or with sleeves. If sleeves are required, install them as indicated in 2-20. In addition, mark coaxial cable on the end terminating in a piece of equipment to match marking on equipment terminal,

When marking coaxial cable, take care not to flatten the cable as this may change the electrical characteristics of the cable.

3"4-+1s"t1S"+I H- 3" MAX I IMAX MAX I I I MAX

t :. .. tl.... "

Z MARKING ON MATING RS

Figure 2·9. Coaxial Cable Identification

2-23. THERMOCOUPLE WIRE IDENTIFICATION. Thermocouple wire which is usually duplexed (two insulated conductors laid side by side) is difficult to mark legibly. Sleeves are installed as described in 2-20. The wire size of the identification code is replaced by a dash. The material designation shall be as follows: CHROM . chromel; ALML . Alumel; IRON· iron; CaNST - constantan; COPcopper.

2·24. IDENTIFICATION AT TERMINAL BOARDS AND ENCLOSURES. If possible, mark wires attached to terminal boards and equipment terminals between termination and point where wire is brought into wire bundle (see figure 2·10). Identify wires terminating in an enclosure inside enclosure if space permits.

NAVAIR 01-1A-505 (USAF) T.O. 1-1A-14

TB-'

Figure 2-10. Wire Identification at Terminal Board

2-25. SELECTION OF IDENTIFICATION SLEEVING. For general purpose wiring use flexible vinyl sleeving, either clear or white opaque. For high temperature applications (over 100 degrees C) use silicone rubber or silicone fiberglass sleeving. Where resistance to synthetic hydraulic fluids or other solvents is necessary, use nylon sleeving, either clear or white opaque. Select size of sleeving from

table 2-3. Heat-shrinkable polyethylene tubing may also be used to identify wire which cannot be marked directly. Available sizes are given in section XI, table 11-11.

2-26. IDENTIFICATION MARKING MACHINES. See figures 2-11 and 2-12 for typical marking machines. For stamping a large number of long wires, use an automaticwire marking machine. In machines of this type (figure 2-11), wire sizes No. 26 through No. 14 are fed through and stamped automatically. Wires larger than No. 14 are fed through by hand, but stamped automatically. For short wires, on repair or maintenance work, a hand-operated wire marking machine is more convenient and economical (figure 2-12). In this type of machine, the desired amount of wire is fed through by hand, and stamped by operating the handle for each marking. Wire guide holders in sizes to fit wires, and slot holders to hold appropriate size type, are furnished to fit the machines. Type is supplied in three sizes to mark wire No. 26 through No. 0000, as shown in table 2-4. Marking foil is available in black or white (and other colors if needed for special applications).

NOTE

Store foils at approximately 70°F and 60% relative humidity.

Table 2.-3. Sizes of Identification Sleeving
Wire Size Sleeving Size
MIL-W-SOS6 MIL-W-SOS6 Mll..-W-7072
Types I and II Type III Nominal
AN AN AL No. I D (Inches)
1122 11 .095
;f20 1122 10 .106
illS 1120 9 .I1S
1tl6 illS S .133
1114 1116 7 .14S
1112 1114 6 .166
1110 1tl2 4 .208
liS 1110 2 .263
116 liS ttS 0 .330
114 116 tt6 3/S .375
tt2 114 114 1/2 .500
111 112 1t2 1/2 .500
itO Itl Itl 5/S .625
/tOO /to ItO S/8 .625
1t000 1t00 /tOO 3/4 .750
e /tOO 00 /tOO 0 /tOOO 3/4 .750
/tOOOO /tOOOO 7/8 .875
2·15 NAVAIR 01-1A-505 (USAF) T.O. 1-1A-14

PRES:;,URE CONTh!CL



WIRE GUIDE

\.

=:

. ~

TYP E HOLDER ~

___ d~·iIiiiI

Figure 2-11. Wire Marking Machines - Automatic

2-18

NAVAIR 01-1A~606 (USAF) T.O. 1-1A-14

,

Figure 2·12. Marking Machines - Hand

2.27. SET·UP OF MARKING MACHINES. FOR WIRE STAMPING. After selecting the proper machine for the job, set it up for the marking procedure as follows (refer to figures 2-11 and 2-12):

a. Select from table 24 the type of correct size for wire to be marked. Make up required identification code and insert into type holder, centering type in holder. Use spacers to prevent crowding letters and numbers.

b. Select marking foil of correct width for length of marking. Use black foil for light colored insulation, and white foil for dark insulations.

c. Select wire guide holder with wire hole to fit wire, and having a slot of same length as slot in type holder.

Table 24. Recommended Sizes of Marking Type

Wire Size

Height of Letters

(inches)

1/16 5/64 7/64

1126 & 1122 1120 thru 11 14

1112 thru 110000 & Coaxial Cable

Use smallest guide into which wire will fit. If guide is too large, wire will not be held firmly and will be off-centered.

d. Install wire guide and roll of marking foil on machine. Slide type holder into slot provided for it.

2.28. PROCEDURE FOR WIRE STAMPING BY MACH· INE. The procedure for stamping wire by machine is as follows:

NOTE

Good marking is obtained only by the proper combination of temperature and pressure, and is arrived at by trial.

Avoid excessive heat or pressure as it may damage the wire insulation.

a. Tum heat to high, then regulate downward to required temperature. See table 2-S for recommended temperatures.

Table 2-6. Recommended Marking Temperature.

lnsulation Material

Recommended Temperature

Kel-F Vinyl *TFE

Nylon "Silicone Polyester ·FEP

300 tel 325°F 400 to 425°F 425°F 400 to 450°F 400 to 450°F 500°F

550 to 600°F

=Using special foil

* =Prceecuve coating and short heat cure after marking recommended.

b. Insert piece of sample or scrap wire into wire guide, and adjust pressure control until mark is sharp and clear. Impression should be just deep enough to sink slightly below surface of insulation, but should not cut into it. The pressure adjustment also controls the length of dwell in automatic machines.

2-17

NAVAIR 01-1A-505 (USAF) T.O. 1-1A-14

c. When a satisfactory marking has been made, remove sample wire, and insert wire to be marked into wire guide far enough so that first marking will be made about three inches from end.

d. Operate foot pedal or hand lever to make mark.

e. It is desirable (but not mandatory) to rotate wire 180 degrees and mark again on opposite side.

f. Mark remaining wire length. If marks are to be spaced at intervals of eight inches or less, operate machine automatically. If intervals are greater than eight inches, or if wire is larger than size No. 8 (regardless of spacing), pull wire through by hand and operate machine at desired spacing. If practicable, rotate wire back and forth at each mark through 180 degrees to mark on opposite side. During marking' procedure, check permanence of mark from time to time by rubbing with a clean dry cloth. If mark smears or becomes hard to read, adjust machine to correct condition and remark wire.

2·29. SPECIAL INSTRUCTIONS FOR MARKING TFE· INSULATED WIRE. Because of the chemical nature of TFE, it is difficul to make a permanent marking on TFE-insulated wire. Marking machines as described in 2-26 will stamp a legible marking on TFE, but this has a

REAR ROLLERS

tendency to rub off. The marking may be set permanently by passing the marked wire through an electrically heated oven set at a specified speed and temperature. (See figure 2-13.)

2·30. PROCEDURE FOR HEAT-SETTING IDENTIFICATION MARKING ON TFE. The procedure for heat-setting identification marking on TFE-insulated wire is as follows:

a. Turn the temperature control to HIGH and allow oven to heat until temperature reaches 1900°F (approximately 30 to 4S minutes).

b. Tum the motor switch ON and set speed to the desired rate; select speed from table 2-6.

c. Insert the wire through the guide tube into the forward rollers. As the first part of the wire passes through the oven, depress the rear (exit) roller manually to allow free entry of the wire into the rear guide tube; this will prevent the wire from buckling. The rest of the wire length will pass automatically through the oven.

Provide a suitable exhaust hood over the oven to carry off fumes. Make sure there is adequate ventilation in the area where the oven is used.

FORWARD ROLLERS

GUIDE TUBE

Figure 2-13. Electric Oven for Heat-Setting Identification Marking

·2·18

NAVAIR 01-1A-505 (USAF) T.O. 1-1A-14

Table 2-6. Speed Settings for Heat-Setting Electric Oven

Wire Specification Wire OD.

Recommended Speed (Feet per minute)

15 to 20 10 to 15

15 to 20 12 to 15 10 to 15

MIL·W·7139 .070 - .090 .090· .125

MIL-W-16878

.050 - .070 .070· .090 .090· .125

2-31. SET·UP OF MARKING MACHINE FOR SLEEVE STAMPING. For stamping identification mark on tubing that has an OD of 1/4 inch or smaller, use the same machine that is used for stamping wire. Set up machine as follows:

a. Select type size and wire guide to suit OD of tubing.

b. Select mandrel (metal rod) of a diameter that will fit snugly inside tubing. Insert mandrel into tubing, and both into wire guide. If mandrel of proper size is not available, use piece of insulated wire of suitable diameter and length.

c. Prepare type as described in 2-27, step a.

d. Select foil and install wire guide, foil, and type holder on machine as described in 2·27, stepsb, c, and d.

2-32. PROCEDURE FOR STAMPING SLEEVES BY MACHINE. To mark tubing, follow procedure for marking wire as described in 2-28, steps a through e. After first mark, mark remaining tubing at intervals that will leave about one inch between marks (see figure 2-14). Rotate at each marking to mark again on opposite side.

rlH-'

I 1/2" I

I , I

~- H215A20--1- H215A20-iiiiJ

I I ,

\CUT HERE A.IER STAMP'NG!

Figure 2-14. Marking on Sleeves

2·33. MACHINE STAMPING FOR LARGE SLEEVING. To mark tubing that has OD larger than 1/4 inch, use a special machine that marks tubing flat, if it is available (see figure 2-15). Flat type rather than curved type is used on this machine. Otherwise, machine set-up and marking procedure is same as that described in 2-31 and 2·32.

2-34. INSTALLING IDENTIFICATION SLEEVES ON WIRING. Cut marked tubing into lengths so that marking is approximately centered (refer to figure 2-14). Install cut lengths of tubing over wire or cable at desired spacing, and tie at each end with clove hitch and square knot. See section XV for method of tying and knotting. When heat-shrinkable tubing is used, ties are not required. Before installing heat-shrinkable tubing on the wire, make sure that the wires are clean. Instructions for installation are given in section XI, paragraph 11-22.

2-35. IDENTIFICATION OF WIRE BUNDLES AND HARNESSES. Identify wire bundles and harnesses (see figure 2-16) by one of the following methods:

a. If bundle is not too large, select sleeving of proper size to fit snugly over wire bundle. Stamp with identification marking as described in 2-33 and install on bundle approximately 12 inches from each terminating end. Tie securely at both ends.

NOTE

Sleeving must be installed on bundle before soldering wires to connectors.

Heat shrinkable tubing, marked with the identification code, may also be used, installed as described in section Xl, paragraph 11-22.

b. Wire bundles up to 4 inches in diameter may be identified by means of an MS3368 cable identification strap which has a marking tab as part of it. (See figure 2-16.) The procedure is as follows:

I. Stamp the wire identification code on the marking tab as described in 2·33.

2. Pass the strap around the bundle with the ribbed side of the strap inside.

3. Insert the pointed end of the strap through the eye, and pull the strap snugly around the bundle.

2·19

NAVAIR 01-1A-505 (USAF) T.O. 1-1A-14

, ~ ...

GUIDE. fOR LARGE 5LEEvING

"-_ '-_

n .. \91C ~.286

Figure 2·15. Marking Machine for Sleeving

4. Feed the tail of the strap through MS30387·} tool. and slide tool up to eye of the cable identification strap.

5. Squeeze tool handles until strap is snug on bundle.

6. Close tool handles all the way to cut off the excess strap.

NOTE

Use of self-clinching adjustable plastic cable straps and installing tools is illustrated and described in section XV.

2-20

MARKER TIED IN PLACE

MS17822

Figure 2-16. Identification of Wire Bundles and Harnesses

NAVAIR 01-1A-505 (USAF) T.O. 1-1A-14

2-36. STRIPPING WIRE AND CABLE

2-37. GENERAL. Before wire can be assembled to connectors, terminals, splices, etc., the insulation must be stripped from connecting ends to expose the bare conductor: For attachment to solder-type connectors, enough insulation is stripped so that conductor will bottom in solder cup and leave a small gap between the top of the solder cup and cut end of insulation. Stripping dimensions for MS connectors will be found in section III, for RF connectors in section IV, and for terminals in section V. See figure 2·17 for typical tools used in wire stripping.

2-38. STRIPPING METHODS FOR COPPER WIRE. Copper wire may be stripped in a number of ways depending on size and insulation. See table 2-7 for a summary of wire strippers.

Table 2-7. Wire Strippers for Use on Copper Wire

Stripper Hot Blade

Insulations

AN Gage No. 1126 - 114

All except asbestos and glass braid All

All

All. except as nOted·

All

Rotary, electric Bench

Hand Pliers

1126 - 114 1120 - 116 1126 - 118

Knife

112 - 110000

Details of each method are given in 2-42 thru 2-46.

2-39. STRIPPING METHODS FOR ALUMINUM WIRE. Strip aluminum wires with a knife as described in 2-45. Strip aluminum wire very carefully. Take extreme care not to nick aluminum wire as strands break very easily when nicked.

2-40. GENERAL STRIPPING INSTRUCTIONS. When stripping wire with any of the tools mentioned in 2·38 and 2·39, observe the following precautions.

a. When using hot blade stripper, make sure blades are clean. Clean blades with a brass wire brush as necessary. The hot blade stripper will not strip wire with glass braid or asbestos insulation.

b. Make sure all stripping blades are sharp and free from nicks, dents, etc.

c. When using any type of wire stripper, hold wire perpendicular to cutting blades.

d. Adjust automatic stripping tools carefully; follow manufacturer's instructions to avoid nicking, cutting, or otherwise damaging any strands. This is especially important for all aluminum wires and for copper wires smaller than No 10. Examine stripped wires for damage and adjust tool as necessary. Cut off and restrip (if length is sufficient); or reject and replace any wires with more than the allowable number of nicked or broken strands given in table 2·8.

NOTE

Longitudinal scratches in copper wire arc not considered cause for rejection or rework.

e. Make sure insulation is clean-cut with no frayed or ragged edges. Trim if necessary.

f. Make sure all insulation is removed from stripped area. Some types of wires are supplied with a transparent layer between conductor and primary insulation. If this is present, remove it.

g. When using hand plier strippers to remove lengths of insulation longer than 3/4 inch, it is easier to do in two or more operations.

h. Retwist copper strands by hand or with pliers if necessary to restore natural lay and tightness of strands.

Table 2-8. Allowable Nicked or Broken Strands

Wire

Nicked or Broken Stands

Copper

AN 1122 - 1112 IHO

118 - 114 112 - 110

None 2

4

12

Aluminum, all sizes

None

2·21

NAVAIR 01-1A-605 (USAF) T.O. 1-1A-14

b. ROTARY WIRE STRIPPER

'i. ............ ,

.'-~;'-.{,f.

-,.;;.,

~~ .... .,(=:1-/ '"

c. BENCH WIRE STRIPPER

d. HAND WIRE STRIPPER. HEAVY DUTY

o. HOT BLADE WIRE STRIPPER

•• HAND WIRE STRIPPER· LIGHT DUTY

Figure 2-17. Typical Wire Stripping Tools

2-22

NAVAIR 01-1A-505 (USAF) T.O. 1-1A-14

2-41. PROCEDURE FOR STRIPPING WIRE WITH HOT BLADE STRIPPER. The procedure for stripping the wire with hot-blade stripper is as follows:

a. Adjust blades to correct opening for size of wire to be stripped (see figure 2-18).

b. Adjust stop by means of knurled brass nut on top of hood for desired stripping length between 1/4 inch and 1-1/2 inches.

c. Adjust each blade to proper heat by trying on sample pieces of wire. Use minimum heat that will remove insulation satisfactorily without damaging strands.

d. Insert wire until it butts against stop.

e. Press foot pedal to bring heated blades against insulation.

f. Twist wire with lay of strands about 90 degrees and pull out.

Make sure adequate ventilation is provided when a hot-blade stripper is used to strip TFE-insulated wire.

Figure 2-18. Stripping Wire in a Hot Blade Stripper

2-42. SUBSTITUTE HOT-BLADE STRIPPER. Where a hot-blade wire stripper is not available, a substitute can be made and used as follows (see figure 2-19):

a. In the end of a piece of copper strip, cut a sharp edged "V". At the bottom of the "V" make a wire slot of suitable diameter.

b. Fasten the copper strip around the heating element of an electric soldering iron as shown in figure 2-19.

c. Lay wire or cable to be stripped in the "V"; a clean channel will be melted in the insulation.

d. Remove insulation with slight pull.

2-23

NAVAIR 01-1A-505 (USAF) T.O. 1-1A-14

1/16" THICK HARD DRAWN COPPER STRIP

Figure 2-19. Substitute Hot Blade Stripper

243. PROCEDURE FOR STRIPPING WIRE WITH POWER ROTARY STRIPPER. The procedure for stripping wire or cable with a rotary stripper is as follows (refer to figure 2-20):

a. Select and install bushing of proper size for wire to be stripped. Bushings are available in 1/8, 1/4, and 3/8 inch sizes.

b. Set butt for length of strip desired from 1/4 inch to 1-3/4 inches.

c. Make adjustment for wire gage.

d. Set switch for clockwise or counterclockwise rotation according to lay of strands.

e. Insert wire through bushing until end of wire is stopped against butt.

2-24

f. Step on foot pedal to close blades on wire.

g. Pull sharply on wires to remove insulation.

h. Examine wire to be sure all insulation is removed and also that strands are not nicked or cut. Reset wire gage adjustment (step c) if necessary.

244. PROCEDURE FOR STRIPPING WIRE WITH HAND STRIPPER. The procedure for stripping wire with plier-type hand strippers is as follows (refer to figure 2-21):

a. Insert wire into exact center of correct cutting slot for wire size to be stripped. (Each slot is marked with wire size).

b. Close handles together as far as they will go.

c. Release handles, allowing wire holder to return to open position.

d. Remove stripped wire.

NOTE

Jaws will not snap back until wire is removed.

2-45. PROCEDURE FOR STRIPPING WIRE WITH A KNIFE. The procedure for stripping wire with a knife is as follows (see figure 2-22):

Take care not to nick or cut strands.

a. Make cut around wire at desired strip length. Do not cut completely through the insulation.

b. Make second cut lengthwise along stripping length.

Do not cut completely through insulation.

NOTE

When a wire has two or more layers of insulation, cut through outer layers and only score innermost.

c. Peel off insulation, following lay of strands.

NAVAIR 01-1A-505 (USAF) T.O. 1-1A-14

SET SCREW FOR ADJUSTMENT OF BUTT PLATE POSITION

BUTT PLATE SET FOR STRIPPING LENGTH

LOCK ING SCREW FOR ADJUSTMENT

WIRE GUIDE BUSHING

2·25

ADJUSTMENT FOR WIRE GAGE STOP

KEEP RODS CLEAN DO NOT OIL

COVER PLATE REMOVE TO CLEAN OR SHARPEN BLADES

Figure 2·20. Inside View of Rotary Wire Stripper

NAVAIR 01-1A-506 (USAF) T.O. 1-1A-14

SELECT CORRECT HOLE TO MATCH WIRE GAGE

STEP a

BLADES REMAIN OPEN UNTIL WIRE IS REMOVED

BE CAREFUL NOT TO NICK OR CUT STRANDS STEP b

STEP c

Figure 2·21. Stripping Wire With Hand Stripper

2·26

CUTTING AROUND INSULATION

BE CAREFUL NOT TO NICK OR CUT STRANDS STEP a

\ /

6 '-8

SLITTING INSULATION

STEP b

PEELING INSULATION

STEP e

Figure 2·22. Knife Stripping

NAVAIR 01-1A-605 (USAF) T.O. 1-1A-14

2-46. STRIPPING DIMENSIONS FOR ASSEMBLY TO CONNECTORS. Stripped length on wires which are to be attached to solder-type connectors should be such that when stripped conductor bottoms in solder cup there will be a gap of approximately 1/32 inch between the end of the cup and the end of the insulation, for inspection purposes.

2-47. TINNING COPPER WIRE AND CABLE

248. GENERAL. Before copper wires are soldered to connectors, the ends exposed by stripping are tinned to hold the strands solidly together. The tinning operation is considered satisfactory when the ends and sides of the wire strands are fused together with a coat of solder. Do not tin wires which are to be crimped to Class K (fireproof) connectors, wires which are to be attached to solderless terminals or splices, or wires which are to be crimped to removable crimp-style connector contacts.

249. TINNING METHODS. Copper wires are usually tinned by dipping into flux and then into a solder bath. In the field, copper wires can be tinned with a soldering iron and rosin core solder.

2-50. EXTENT OF TINNING. Tin conductor for about half its exposed length. This is enough to take advantage of closed part of solder cup. Tinning or solder on wire above cup causes wire to be stiff at point where flexing takes place. This will result in wire breakage.

2-51. PREPARATION OF FLUX AND SOLDER. The flux used to tin copper wire is a mixture of denatured alcohol and freshly ground water-white rosin in the proportion of eight ounces of alcohol to one ounce of rosin, mixed together thoroughly and well shaken. During use, the alcohol will evaporate and should be replaced. The solder used is a mixture of 60% tin and 40% lead. Maintain temperature of the solder pot between 450 and 500 degrees F; this will keep solder in a liquid state. Skim surface of solder pot as necessary with a metal spoon or blade to keep solder clean and free from oxides, dirt, etc.

Do not use any other flux or solder for tinning copper wires for use in aircraft electrical systems.

2-52. DIP-TINNING PROCEDURE. Dip-tin wires smaller than No.8 about eight Or ten at a time. Dip-tin wires size No.8 and larger individually. (See figure 2-23.)

During tinning operation, take care not to melt, scorch, or burn the insulation.

The procedure for dip-tinning is as follows:

a. Prepare flux and solder as described in 2·51.

b. Make sure that exposed end of wire is clean and free from oil, grease, and dirt. Strands should be straight and parallel. Dirty wire should be restripped.

c. Grasp wire firmly and dip into dish of prepared flux to a depth of about 1/8 inch.

d. Remove wire and shake off excess flux.

e. Immediately dip into molten solder. Dip only half of stripped conductor length into solder.

f. Manipulate wire slowly in solder bath until it is thoroughly tinned. Watch the solder fuse to wire. Do not keep wire in bath longer than necessary.

g. Remove wire and shake off excess solder.

NOTE

The thickness of the solder coat depends on the speed with which the wires are handled and shaken, and the temperature of the solder bath.

2·27

NAVAIR 01-1A-505 (USAF) T.O. 1-1A-14

DIP 1/8" DEEP ONLY

ROSIN-ALCOHOL PASTE FLUX

STEP a

DIP AND HOLD IN MOL TEN SOLDER TO 1/2 OF STRIPPED LENGTH

SPRINKL E POWDERED BORAX ON SURFACE TO RETARD OXIDATioN

STEP b

Figure 2·23. Dip·Tinning in Solder Pot

2·53 ALTERNATIVE DIP·TINNING PROCEDURE. If an electrically heated solder pot is not available, a small number of wires may be tinned by means of the following procedure (see figure 2·24):

a. Cut off beveled section of tip of a discarded soldering iron tip.

2·28

b. Drill hole (1/4 to 3/8 iach diameter) in cylindrical part of tip, about two-thirds through.

c. Heat up iron and melt rosin-core solder into hole.

d. Tin wires by dipping into molten solder one at a time.

e. Keep adding fresh rosin-core solder as the flux burns away.

CUT OFF OLD PITTED TIP

STEP a

3/8" HOL E 3/8" DEEP

STEP b

FILL WITH 60/40 . TIN-LEAD SOLDER

STEP c

Figure 2·24. Alternative Dip·Tinning Method

NAVAIR 01-1A-505 (USAF) T.O. 1-1A-14

2-54. PROCEDURE FOR SOLDERING IRON TINNING. In the field, wires smaller than size No. 10 may be tinned with a soldering iron and rosin-core solder as follows (see figure 2-25):

a. Select a soldering iron having suitable heat capacity for wire size from table 2-9. Make sure that iron is clean and well tinned.

b. Prime by holding iron tip and solder together on wire until solder begins to flow.

c. Move soldering iron to opposite side of wire and tin half of the exposed length of conductor.

/60/40 ROSIN CORE SOLDER

Figure 2-25. Tinning Wire With a Soldering Iron

Table 2-9. Approximate Soldering Iron Sizes for Tinning

Wire Size (AN Gage)

Soldering Iron Size (Heat Capacity)

1120 - tt16 1114 & 1112 1110 & 118

65 Watts 100 Watts 200 Watts

2·55. TERMINATING SHIELDED CABLE

2-56. GENERAL. Shielded cable has a metallic braid over the insulation to provide a barrier against electro-static interference. To obtain satisfactory result from shielded cable, the shield must be unbroken and must extend to a point as' near the end of the conductor as practicable. Shielded cable is either grounded or dead-ended at each end as required by the individual installation. The following paragraphs describe these procedures.

2-57. STRIPPING JACKET ON SHIELDED CABLE. Some shielded cable has a thin extruded plastic coating over the shielding braid. Strip this off as far as necessary with a hot blade stripper, as described in 241 or 242. Length of strip depends on method of shield termination and type of wire connection. Strip outer jacket back far enough for ease in working. If no hot-blade stripper is available, use plier type hand strippers for sizes No. 22 through No. 10, and a knife for sizes larger than No. 10. Be careful not to damage shielding braid. Extruded jacket of shielded twisted wires can also be stripped by holding a soldering iron, with tip removed, against jacket, and pulling off jacket with long nose pliers as iron melts jacket. (See figure 2-26.)

NYLON OUTER

Figure 2-26. Stripping Outer Jacket From Shielded Cable

2·58. TWO-PIECE GROUNDING SHEATH CONNECTOR METHOD OF SHIELD TERMINATION. The metallic braid of shielded cable can also be terminated with a two-piece grounding sheath connector, by crimping it, with or without a ground wire as required, between two ferrules (or sleeves). (See figure 2-27.) Use the standard MS inner and outer ferrules listed in tables 2-10, 2-11, and 2·12, and the tools listed in the tables. The procedure is as follows:

a. Strip off shielding braid (and outer jacket if present) with hand strippers or scissors. Length to be stripped is determined by length of unshielded conductor necessary for making connection.

b. Strip outer jacket (if present) 1/2 to 3/4 inch.

c. Measure 00 of insulation directly under shield.

2-29

NAVAIR 01-1A-505 (USAF) T.O. 1-1A-14

d. Add 0.005 inch minimum to OD obtained in step c, and select inner sleeve having the nearest larger ID from table 2-10.

e. Note OD of inner sleeve selected in step d, and add 0.025 inch minimum to it to allow for thickness of shielding braid. Add an extra 0.030 to 0.040 to allow clearance for a No. 20 or No. 18 ground wire if required. From tables 2-11 or 2-12 select an uninsulated or insulated outer sleeve as required. with the above dimensions as minimum ID.

f. Slide outer sleeve back over insulation and braid.

g. Rotate cable with circular motion to flare out braid.

h. Slip inner sleeve under braid so that about 1/16 inch of sleeve sticks out beyond braid.

i. If required, insert stripped ground wire under outer sleeve and slide both forward over braid and inner sleeve until only 1/32 to 1 II 6 inch of inner sleeve and braid protrude. (See figure 2-27.) Ground wire may extend from front or back of outer sleeve as required.

Examine assembly to make sure that shield braid and ground wire come through under the outer sleeve.

j. Crimp with hand tool selected from tables 2-11 or 2-12.

Table 2-10. Shielded Wire Terminations - Inner Sleeves
Inner Sleeve
Color Insulation 00 (nominal)
Part Number Code Under Shield ID 00
MS21981 - 046 Tin .031 - _041 .0116 .070
·058 Yellow .043 - .053 .058 .083
·063 Red .048 - .058 .063 .088
- 071 Green .056 - .066 .071 .096
- 080 Blue .065 - .075 .OBO .104
- 090 Orange .075 - .085 .090 .114
- 096 Purple .081 - .091 .096 .119
- 101 Yellow .091 •. 096 .101 .124
- 109 Red .096 - .104 .109 .131
- 115 Tin .104· .110 .115 .146
- 124 Green .1l0·.119 .124 .145
- 128 Tin .1l0 - .123 .128 .152
- 134 Orange .123 - .129 .134 .156
- 149 Blue .129-.144 .149 .17l)
- 156 Red .145-.151 .156 .192
- 165 Tin .151 - .160 .165 .194
- 175 Green .160 - .170 .175 .215
- 187 Yellow .175 - .182 .187 .227
- 194 Blue .182 - .IB9 .194 .225
- 205 Orange .189 •. 200 .205 .245
- 219 Tin .200 - .214 .219 .248
- 225 Yellow .214- .220 .225 .256
- 232 Red .220 - .227 .232 .263
- 250 Green .250 .281
- 261 Blue .227 - .255 .261 .297
- 266 Tin .261- .271 .266 .297
- 275 Orange .255 - .270 .275 .306
- 281 Yellow .270· .276 .281 .331
- 287 Tin .276 - .282 .287 .327
- 297 Red .282 - .292 .297 .336
- 312 Purple .292 - .307 .3] 2 .362
- 375 Blue .370 - .380 .375 .406
2-30 NAVAIR 01-1A-505 (USAF) T.O. 1-1A-14

Table 2.11. Shielded Wire Terminations - Uninsulated Outer Sleeves and Installing Tools
Sleeve ID
(Inches) Installing Tools
Part Number Color Code Nominal (Thomas & Betts)
MS21980 • 101 Tin .101 WT·219
• 128 Blue .126 • 200
• 149 Purple .149 • 201
• 156 Yellow .156 ·202
• 175 Blue .175 • 203
• 187 Orange .187 • 206
• 194 Red .194, • 206
- 199 Tin .199 - 206
- 205 Yellow .206 • 208
·219 Green .219 ·208
- 225 Purple .225 ·209
·232 Orange .233 • 210
• 261 Yellow .261 • 211
- 275 Tin .275 • 212
- 281 Purple .281 • 214
- 287 Blue .287 - 214
• 299 Green .299 • 214
- 312 Yellow .312 - 215
- 327 Tin .327 - 216
- 346 Orange .346 - 217
- 359 Purple .359 ·221
- 375 Yellow .375 - 222
- 405 Red .405 - 218
- 415 Blue .415 - 218
·460 Tin .460 • 220
- 500 Green .500 • 223 2·31

NAVAIR 01-1A-505 (USAF) T.O. 1-1A-14

Table 2-12. Shielded Wire Terminations - Insulated Outer SI.eves and Installing Tools
Sleeve ID
(Inches) Installing Tool s
Part Number Color Code Nominal (Thomas & Betts)

MS18121 - 101 Tin .101 WT - 200
- 128 Blue .128 - 201
- 149 Purple .149 683 - 51135
- 156 Yellow _156 WT - 206
- 175 Blue _175 - 208
- 187 Orange .187 - 210
- 194 Red .194 - 210
- 199 Tin .199 - 210
- 205 Yellow .205 - 211
- 219 Green .219 -211
- 225 Purple .225 - 211
- 232 Orange .232 - 212
- 261 Yellow .261 - 214
- 275 Tin .275 - 215
·281 Purple .281 - 217
- 287 Blue .287 - 217
• 297 Green .297 - 217
- 312 Yellow .312 - 222
- 327 Tin .327 - 222
- 348 Orange .348 683 - 51014
·359 Purple .359 WT - 216
- 375 Yellow .375 683-51-15
·405 Red .405 683 - 51141 - 1
·415 Blue .415 683·51141 - 1
·460 Tin .460 683 • 51141 • 2
·500 Green .500 683·51141 - 3 2-32

NAVAIR 01-1A-505 (USAF) T.O. 1-1A-14

FERRULE

........... .. "..,:· '". • .. ,,""v

ROTATE WIRE TO SPREAD SHIELDING BRAID

~ FERRULE PARTIALLY INSERTED

--_~~.;' ~ <;:~~~;.;.:.;] E~~~~:';i

INSERT GROUND LEAD -- ..... BETWEEN OUTER FERRULE AND SHIELD

INNER FLUSH

Figure 2-27. Two Piece Grounding Connection for Terminating Shielded Wire

2-59. The above procedure may be modified by sliding the inner ferrule over the braid. and folding the braid neatly back over the inner ferrule (see figure 2-28). If this is to be done, add an additional 0.025 inch to the dimension obtained in 2-58, step d, for the extra braid thickness.

~INNER FERRULE

• g 1

\ OUTER FERRULE

! _ 1

'--BRAID FOLDED BACK OVER INNER FERRULE

1

, I

'--CRIMP

Figure 2-28. Alternative Procedure for Two-Piece Grounding Sheath Connector

NAVAIR 01-1A-505 (USAF) T.O. 1-1A-14

2-60. PIGTAIL MEn~OD OF SHIELD TERMINATION. When grounding sheath connectors and tools are not available, terminate shield for grounding by making a pigtail as follows (see figure 2-29):

Take extreme care not to damage shielding or insulated conductor while forming pigtail.

a. Determine and mark point at which shielding is to terminate. This depends on the individual installation.

b. Push back shielding to form a bubble at the termination point.

c. Insert an awl or other pointed tool into shielding braid at termination point and work an open circular area in the shield. Be careful not to cut into wire insulation.

d. Bend cable, insert tool between shielding and wire, and pull insulated conductor through hole formed by tool.

e. Pull empty part of shield taut and tin last inch to prevent fraying.

f. On unjacketed shielded cable, spot tie shielding on cable with clove hitch and square knot. This' is not necessary if cable has extruded plastic jacket over shield.

LOOSENED SHIELD

STEPS band e

STEP d

THROUGH

STEP e

Z---TWIST AND TIN THIS AREA

Figure 2-29. Pigtail Termination for Shielded Wire

2-34

2-61. ALTERNATIVE PIGTAIL METHOD. Some shielding braids may be too stiff for the method described in 2-60. In this case, cut shielding wtth scissors approximately 1-1/2 inches forward of termination point. (See figure 2-30.) Comb out strands with comb (see figure 2-31) or pointed bakelite rod. Twist strands into pigtail, or separate strands into three parts; twist each part, and braid together. Tie with cord as described in 2-60, step f.

COMB OUT STRANDS

CORD SERVING

e

\

TWISTED AND TINNED

Figure 2-30. Alternative Pigtail Termination for Shielded Wire

STEEL WIRE CLOTH TAKEN FROM FILE BRUSH

CEMENT IN PLACE

MAKE FROM 1 INCH WOOD DOWEL

Figure 2-31. Comb for Combing Out Shield

NAVAIR 01-lA-505 (USAF) T.O. l-lA-14

2-62. DEAD-ENDING SHIELDED CABLE. When the

shielding is not to be grounded, it is dead-ended so as to gather all loose shield ends together to prevent them from puncturing insulation.

2-63. DEAD-ENDING WITH GROUNDING SHEATH CONNECTOR. When equipment is available, dead-end shielded cable with grounding sheath connector as described in 2-58, omitting ground wire. Refer to figure 2-27. Omit clearance allowed for ground wire when selecting outer sleeve.

2-64. DEAD-ENDING WITH TAPE WRAP. When grounding sheath connector and tools are not available, dead-end shielding as follows (see figure 2-32):

a. Cut shielding braid with scissors about 3/4 inch forward of termination point.

b. Loosen braid and turn back on itself 3/4 inch.

c. Wrap with two or three turns of plastic tape, making sure that all braid ends are covered.

d. Tie loose end of tape with clove hitch and square knot, or heat seal end of tape with untinned side of soldering iron. A plastic wire strap or tie, as described in section XV, may be used instead of tying cord to secure the loose end of the tape.

Ef 1Trc i&%~

TIE~NE:}~VINYL TAPE

Figure 2-32. Dead-Ending Shield With Tape Wrap

2-65. ALTERNATIVE METHODS OF DEAD-ENDING. As an alternative to method described in 2·63, make pigtail as described in 2-60 or 2-61 and trim pigtail so it is 3/4 inch long. Crimp trimmed pigtail into one end of preinsula ted permanent splice of suitable size, and tie back on shielded part of cable. (See figure 2-33.) If permanent splice is not available, Cll t tongue off solderless terminal of suitable size and crimp pigtail into it. Protect with sleeve and tie back on wire, similar to tie used with permanent splice.

Figure 2-33. Dead-Ending Shield With Permanent Splice

2-66. GROUNDED SHIELD TERMINATION PROCEDURE.

a. Strip the shielded wire and the ground lead as shown in figure 2-34.

b. Comb out the exposed shielding and fold back over the jacket.

c. Position the stripped end of the ground lead against and parallel to the exposed shielding.

NOTE

Make sure that the ground wire strands and shield braid strands are flat and smooth.

d. Select the size solder sleeve that will fit freely but will not be excessively loose over the folded back shielding and ground lead combination.

e. Position the solder sleeve over the assembly so that the solder ring is centered over the folded back shielding as shown in figure 2-34.

f. Hold the assembly horizontal and position the sleeve in the heat shield.

NOTE

The heat gun must have a thermal shield and must develop 550°F at the heat shield nozzle.

2-35

NAVAIR 01-1A-505 (USAF) T.O. 1-1A-14

g. Rotate the assembly while heating to achieve proper solder penetration and uniform sleeve shrinkage. About 10 to 30 seconds are required for the complete solder melt and flow.

NOTE

The solder band collapse does not indicate solder flow. Continue to apply heat until solder brightens and starts to flow toward thermoplastic inserts at either end of sleeve.

h. As soon as the solder flow is observed, withdraw the heat.

i. When the solder joint has been made, hold the work firmly in place until the joint has set. Disturbing the finished work will result in a joint mechanically weak, and with high electrical resistance. Allow solder joints to cool naturally. Do not use liquids or air blasts.

Conventional hot-air guns (see figure 11-24) must not be used on fueled aircraft because of exposed heating elements, exposed brushes of motor, and the fact that air from the immediate work area is passed over the heating element. Raychem CV-4S04 (see figure Il-2S) or explosion-proof equivalent is superior because the heated air comes from an external source and there are no moving parts. Therefore, only this type of hot-air gun is authorized for use on aircraft other than those defueled and purged for extensive maintenance, IRAN, or major modification.

2-67. UNGROUNDED (FLOATING) SHIELD TERMINATION.

a. Strip the shielded wire as shown in figure 2-3S.

b. Comb out the exposed shielding and fold back over the jacket as shown in figure 2-3 S.

c. Select the size solder sleeve that will fit freely but will not be excessively loose over the folded back shielding.

2-36

d. Make sure that the shield strands are flat and smooth.

e. Position the solder sleeve over the assembly so that the solder ring is centered over the folded back shielding.

f. Hold assembly horizontal and position sleeve in heat shield.

NOTE

The heat gun must have a thermal heat shield and must develop SSOoF at the heat shield nozzle.

g. Rotate assembly while heating to achieve proper solder penetration and uniform sleeve shrinkage. About '10 to 30 seconds are required for complete solder melt and flow.

NOTE

The solder band collapse does not indicate solder flow. Continue to apply heat until solder brightens and starts to flow toward thermoplastic inserts at either end of sleeve.

h. As soon as the solder flow is observed, withdraw the heat.

i. When the solder joint has been made, hold the work firmly in place until the joint has set. Disturbing the finished work will result in a joint mechanically weak, and with high electrical resistance. Allow solder joints to cool naturally. Do not use liquids or air blasts.

Conventional hot-air guns (see figure 11-24) must not be used on fueled aircraft because of exposed heating elements, exposed brushes of motor, and the fact that air from the immediate work area is passed over the heating element. Raychem CV -4S04 (see figure 11-2S) or explosion-proof equivalent is superior because the heated air comes from an external source and there are no moving parts. Therefore, only this type of hot-air gun is authorized for use on aircraft other than those defueled and purged for extensive maintenance, IRAN, or major modification.

NAVAIR 01-1A-505 (USAF) T.O. 1-1A-14

CONOUCTOR

COMI OUT $HIUD IIAID AND fOLD lACK OWl JACKET

.25 INCH MIN

GlOUNDLfAD MS21985

2·37

~j--

ASNEa Y

~ .25 INCH MIN

GlOUNDLfAD

GlOUND LfAD MAY LfAVE nlMlNATlON IN THIS DIIECTION IF IT IS TO " SOLDI'UD INTO A CONNECTOR PIN

Figure 2-34. Solder Sleeve Shield Termination

NAVAIR 01-1A-605 (USAF) T.O. 1-1A-14

-SHIELD

/INSULATION

/ rCONDUCTOI

,/ /

COMa OUT SHIELD MAID AND POLD MCK OIlEI JACKn

THEIMOPLAstlC INSEITS

Figure 2·35. Solder Sleeve Floating Shield Termination

2·38

NAVAIR 01-1A-505 (USAF) T.O. 1-1A-14

SECTION III

GENERAL PURPOSE CONNECTORS

3-1. INTRODUCTION

3-2. GENERAL. Connectors provide means of quickly connecting and disconnecting wires to simplify installation and maintenance of electric and electronic equipment.

3-3. SCOPE. This section describes and illustrates the types and classes of Military Standard connectors and the recommended procedures for attaching wires to connector contacts. AN type connectors were formerly designated with the prefix "AN", and older connectors may still be found with this prefix. The superseding connector has the same part number except that the "AN" has been replaced by "MS". Other connectors commonly used in aircraft, similar to MS connectors, are also described and illustrated in this section. RF connectors are treated separately in section IV.

3-4. REFERENCE SPECIFICATIONS, DRAWINGS, AND DOCUMENTS

W-P-236 QQ-S-57I

Petrolatum, Technical

Solder, Lead Alloy, Tin Lead Alloy and Tin Alloy

Insulation, Electrical, Synthetic-Resin Composition, Non-Rigid

Twine, Lacing and Tying, Electrical and Electronic Equipment

Connectors, Electrical, AN Type Wiring, Aircraft, Installation of

Cord, Cotton, Braided, Pre-Waxed Alcohol, Ethyl, Specially Denatured, Aircraft

Soldering Process, General Specification for

Dichloromethane, Technical Insulation Sleeving, Electrical, Flexible

Sealing Compound, Synthetic Rubber, Electric Connectors and Electric Systems, Accelerator Required

MIL-I-631

MIL-T-713

MIL-C-5015 MIL-W-5088 MIL-C-5649 MIL-A-6091

MIL-S-6872

MIL-D-6998 MIL-I-7444

MIL-S-8516

Insulation Sleeving, Electrical, Flexible, Glass Fiber, Silicone Rubber

Treated

Crimping Tools, Contact, Electric, Hand, General Specification for

Contacts, Crimp Type, Electric Connector, General Specification for

Connectors, Electric, Circular, Miniature, Quick Disconnect

Connectors, General Purpose, Electrical, Miniature, Circular, Environment

Resisting, 200°C Ambient

Contacts, Crimp Type, for Electrical Connectors

Connectors, Electrical, Circular, Miniature, High Density, Quick Discon-

nect, Environmental Resisting, Removable Crimp Type Contact, Reliability Assurance Program

Contacts, Electric, General Specification for

Connectors, Electrical, Circular, High Density, Quick Disconnect, Environ-

ment Resisting

MIL-C-81582(Navy) Connectors, Electric, Bayonet Coupling, RFI Shielded and Non-Shielded, Umbilical, General Specification for

MIL-I-18057

MIL-C-22520

MIL-C-23216

MIL-C-26482

MIL-C-26500

MIL-C-26636

MIL-C-38999

MIL-C-39029

MIL-C-81511

MIL-C-81659

Connectors, Electrical, Rectangular, Environment Resistant, Crimp Contacts

MIL-C-81703(Navy) Connectors, Electric, Circular, Miniature, Rack and Panel or Push-Pull Coupling, Environment Resisting

MIL-C-83723

Connectors, Electrical, Circular, Environment Resisting

Connectors, Electric, Circular, Miniature, Quick Disconnect, Environment Resisting, General Specification for

Connectors, Electrical, Circular, High Density, Quick Disconnect, Environment Resisting; and Accessories

Electric Connector Sealing

MIL-C-0026482F (Navy)

MIL-C-0081511 D (Navy)

Navy-BuWeps EMC No. 89-55

3-1

NAVAIR 01-1A-505 (USAF) T.O. 1-1A-14

3-5. DESCRIPTION

3-6. GENERAL DESCRIPTION OF AN-MS CONNECTORS. Each complete connector consists of two parts: a plug assembly and a receptacle assembly coupled by means of a coupling device which is part of the plug assembly. Standard connectors are coupled with a threaded coupling ring except for MS31 07, which has a friction coupling. Miniature connectors are coupled by means of a threaded ring. a bayonet lock, or a push-pull coupling.

The receptacle is usually the "fixed" part of the connector, attached to a wall, bulkhead, or equipment case. The plug is the removable part of the connector and includes the coupling device. When the two parts are joined, the electric circuit is made by pin-and-socket contacts inside the connector. The "live" or "hot" side of the circuit should have socket (female) contacts. The contacts are held in place and insulated from each other and from the shell by a dielectric insert. Insert and contacts are housed in a metal shell. Connectors may be grouped into types, classes, and series depending on their manufacture, assembly, and application.

The class is determined by the environment or application of the connector. All classes except Classes Hand K have aluminum alloy shells. Class H (hermetic) and Class K (fire resistant) connectors use steel shells. Connectors manufactured in accordance with military specifications are designated in one of two ways. In specifications MiL-C- 5015, MIL-C-264S2, and MIL-C~26500, the connector is designated by an "MS" number, such as MS3101. In specifications MIL-C-SI511, MIL-C-S3723, and later specifications, the connector is designated by the specification number followed by a slash and the connector number, such as MIL-C-SI511 /3. Descriptions of the various connectors are given in the sections dealing with the particular specifications.

3-7. GENERAL PRACTICES 3-8. SOLDERING

3-9. SOLDERS. Solders and other fastening means are rna tched to the wire type and to the installation as follows:

a. Soft solder - 60/40 tin-lead (Federal Specification 00-5-571, composition Sn 60) is used for tin-coated copper wire and for coaxial cable.

b. Soft solder - lead-silver (Federal Specification 00-S-57I , composition Ag 2.5 or Ag 5.5) is used for silver-coated copper wire.

3·2

c. Crimp connections are used for nickel-clad copper wire, and tin, silver, or nickel coated copper wire.

d. Thermocouple wires require special procedures which are detailed in section VII.

3-10. SOLDER CONTACTS. Solder cup contacts are silver or gold plated to provide low contact resistance. Silverplated contacts have pretinned solder cups. Goldplated contacts are not pre tinned because the gold prevents oxidation and is therefore always easy to solder.

3-11. PREPARATION OF WIRES BEFORE ASSEMBLY. The preparation of wires before assembly is as follows (see section II):

a. Cut wire to prescribed length.

b. Identify wire with proper coding.

c. Strip ends to the dimensions in table 3-1.

d. Tin wires which are to be soldered to contacts.

Table 3-1_ Stripping Lengths for Solder Connections

Contact Size

Stripped Length (inches)

20 16 12

8 4 o

1/8 1/4 5/16 5/8 5/8 3/4

3-12_ INSULATING SLEEVES. Insulating sleeves are used over soldered connections to help protect the connection against vibration and to lengthen the arc-over path between contacts. Insulating sleeves are not used under the following conditions:

a. Insulating sleeves are not used when connectors are to be moisture-proofed by potting.

b. Insulating sleeves are not used in miniature MS connectors, nor in AN type Class E or Class R connectors, as the sealing grommets cover the soldered connection. Class E connectors made by Bendix need insulating sleeves, as the grommets do not cover the soldered connection. The insulating sleeve should not exterid into the grommet.

NAVAIR 01-1A-505 (USAF) T.O. 1-1A-14

3·13. Selection of Insulating Sleeves. Select insulating sleeving from the materials listed in table 3-2 to suit the temperature conditions in the area where the connector will be installed. Select the proper size from table 3-3 so that the inside diameter of the sleeving will fit snugly over the solder cup.

3-14. Installation of Insulating Sleeves. Cut the sleeving into lengths, as given in table 3-3, to cover the soldered connection completely from the insert to a little over the wire insulation. (See figure 3-1.) Slip insulating sleeve of correct size, material, and length over each prepared wire, far enough back from the stripped end to avoid heat from soldering operation (about one inch).

3-15. SOLDERING PROCEDURE. Wires are soldered to contacts in electrical connectors by means of a soldering iron, resistance heating, or a torch. Safe connections are the result of clean parts carefully soldered together. See section IX for a description of soldering methods and procedures. When soldering wires to electrical connectors, observe the following precautions;

a. Make sure that the wire and the contact are clean and properly tinned.

b. Use a soldering iron, or other heating method, of a heat capacity sufficient for the work to be soldered. Resistance soldering is recommended for sizes 8 through o. A soldering iron is recommended for sizes 12 through 20; resistance soldering may also be used.

Table 3-2. Insulating Sleeving Material

Table 3-3. Insulating Sleeving Sizes TIE AT END
OF SL EEVING
AN Insulating Sleeving
Wire Size Number ID Length
(in inches)
16-14 7 .148 3/4
12 5 .186 3/4 TIED ON VINYL
10 3 .234 3/4 BEHIND CONTACT
8 1 .294 1
6 0 .330 1-1/ 4
4 7/16 .438 1-1/4
2 1/2 .500 1-1/4
0 5/8 .625 1-1/4 Temperature Range

Material

o Up to 160 F

1600F-4000F

Vinyl, transparent Nylon, transparent Silicone-impreg-

nated fiberglass Silicone-rubber fiberglass

Extruded TFE TFE-impregnated fiberglass

MIL Spec.

MIL-I-7444 or MIL-I-631

MIL-I-3190

MIL-I-18057

OVER SHOULD ER

Figure 3-1. Insulating Sleeving Installed Over Solder Cup

3-3

NAVAIR 01-1A-505 (USAF) T.O. 1-1A-14

c. Make sure that the iron has a smooth, well tinned tip. See section IX for detailed instructions on the care and maintenance of the soldering iron.

d. Keep electric resistance pliers clean and free from flux and solder splatter. Use a brass wire hand brush to clean contacting surfaces.

e. Select a soldering iron tip of a shape to provide good heat transfer. A large contact area touching the solder cut will help to produce a good connection quickly. See figure 3-2 for suitable soldering iron tips.

f. Use only rosin or rosin-alcohol as flux for soldering wires to connector contacts.

Do not use any corrosive flux for soldering in an electric connector.

g. Do not hold the hot iron against the solder cup longer than necessary; this will force solder up into the conductor and stiffen the wire. Stiff wires will break under vibration.

h. Avoid having solder run on the outside of solder cup or drip into insert face. Do not move the soldered connection until the solder has hardened.

i. Solder has little mechanical strength. Do not depend on solder to keep a wire from pulling out of a contact. Use a cable clamp, grommet seal, or potting to give mechanical strength.

FOR -a AND LARGER CONTACTS

FOR SMALL CONTACTS

FOR MEDIUM CONTACTS

Figure 3-2. Soldering Iron Tip Shapes

3-4

3-16. Electrical Resistance Soldering. Resistance soldering will yield excellent results for both very large and very small contacts.

a. Large contacts are soldered to wires by the use of resistance soldering pliers. (See figure 3-3.) The contact, removed from insert, is held in the jaws of the pliers and current is applied until the solder in the solder well has melted. Then the pre-tinned wire is inserted slowly into the solder cup while current is still being applied. After the wire is fully inserted, continue heating until the solder flows to form smooth fillet, Allow joint to cool and harden without movement.

Figure 3-3. Resistance Soldering Pliers for Large Contacts

b. Small contacts are heated for soldering by use of pencil type resistance soldering tool shown in figure 3-4. The two electrodes of the tool are placed in contact with the side of the solder cup so that the heating current will pass through the wall of the cup. When the solder in the cup flows, insert the pre-tinned wire. Continue to apply heat to connection until solder flows to form smooth fillet, then stop current and allow joint to cool without movement.

ELECTRODES CONTACT

BACK OF SOLDER CUP

Figure 3-4. Resistance Soldering Pencil for Small Contacts

NAVAIR 01-1A-505 (USAF) T.O. 1-1A-14

3-17. Torch Soldering. A torch can be used to solder wire into a large contact which has been removed from its insert. (See figure 3-5.) The contact is held in a non-metallic block to avoid heat loss, and the torch is played over the solder cup area until the solder melts.

Do not overheat. Excessive heat will destroy the plating and soften the contact.

When the solder in the cup has melted, insert the wire slowly into the cup and add more composition Sn 60 solder if necessary. Continue to heat the connection until the solder flows into a smooth fillet, then remove the flame. Allow the joint to cool without movement.

SOLDER

NON-METALL IC BLOCK PREFERABLY NOT WOOD

Figure 3-5. Torch Soldering Large Contact

3-18. Soldering Iron Procedure. Soldering with an electrically heated iron is the most common procedure. For convenience, either the iron or the connector is fastened to the bench as described in 3-19. Soldering is accomplished as follows:

a. Large contacts which have been removed from inserts are held in a non-metallic block and soldered by first heating the solder cup with the specially shaped tip as shown in figure 3-6. Then, while heat is still applied, the pre-tinned wire is slowly inserted into the solder cup until it bottoms. Extra composition Sn 60 solder is added to the solder cup if necessary. Hold the hot iron to the solder cup until the solder has flowed into a smooth fiilet, then allow to cool.

NON-METALLIC BLOCK PREFERABLY

NOT WOOD

Figure 3-6. Soldering Large Size Contacts

b. Contacts which have not been removed from inserts are soldered as shown in figures 3-7 and 3-8. The solder is flowed by placing the iron alongside the solder cup as the wire is being inserted into it. Medium size contacts such as No.8 and No. 12 will solder more easily if the iron is held at the point where the wire touches the cutaway of the solder cup as shown in figure 3-8. Adding a small quantity of composition Sn 60 solder at this point will aid in carrying the heat into the joint.

3-5

COMPOSITION SN60 SOLDER

Do not allow solder to collect outside of the solder cup. This will reduce the arc-over distance between contacts and can result in connector failure.

NAVAIR 01-1A-505 (USAF) T.O. 1-1A-14

NOTE: WIRES ARE PRE.TINNED

Figure 3-7. Soldering Small Size Contacts

COMPOSITION SN60 SOLDER

IRON TOUCHES JUNCTION BETWEEN SOLDER AND WIRE THEN IS MOVED TO CONTACT SIDE OF CUP

Figure 3-8. Soldering Medium Size Contacts

3-6

3-19. Holding Connectors for Soldering. To facilitate soldering wires to contacts which have not been removed from connectors, it is helpful to either work to a fixed soldering iron or to fasten the connector into a holding fixture. If the iron is fastened to the bench, secure it into a safety screen as shown in figure 3-9. The screen is made from expanding or perforated steel, painted to retard corrosion. To solder connectors with a fixed iron, it is necessary to hand-hold the connector. If the connector is to be fastened to the bench, a steel bracket bent to a 600 to 750 angle is very useful. The connector assembly tools MS3480 (for MIL-C-5015 connectors), MS3481 (for MIL·C- 26482 connectors), and MS3482 (for MIL-C-81511 connectors) are used to hold the connectors while soldering wires to the terminals. This assembly tool is illustrated in figure 3-10.

Figure 3-9. Soldering Iron in Safety Screen

NAVAIR 01-1A-505 (USAF) T.O. 1-1A-14

,-

Figure 3-10. Connector Assembly Tool (MS3480. MS3481. MS3482)

37

NAVAIR 01-lA-505 (USAF) T.O. l-lA-14

:l-20. SOLDERING SEQUENCE. Follow a rigid sequence III soldering wires to a connector. This helps avoid errors in wiring and also pI events burning or scorching the insulation of wires already soldered. Two useful sequences are shown in figure .;·11.

<I. The soldering of the connector in figure 3-11 a is started at the right or left lower edge, depending on whether the mechanic is left- or right-handed, and follows the bottom row across. The row above is next and is done in the same direction as the bottom row. This will permit the insert to cool between soldering operations. The operation is repeated for each row in sequence until all contacts are soldered.

NOTE

If wires are being soldered to a connector with a large number of .ontacts. plan the work to allow a cooling-off period after each series of twenty contacts in order to prevent heat build-up.

b. The Sl'qU'~lH:C for the connector shewn in figure 311 b also starts with the bot torn row rrom the right or left. Ti.; field step is to solder to the center contacts working out to each edge. The final operation is 1" solder wires to the top row of contacts.

The above two sequences are suggested procedures that work well in many aircraft plants. They are not mandatory. but it i-, important for the mechanic to develop a fixed sequence and then not to deviate from that sequence.

3-21. CLEANING SOLDERED CONNECTIONS. After all connections have been made. examine the connector for excess solder, cold JOHltS, and nux residues. Take following corrective measures if any of the above arc found:

a. Remove excess solder by USing a soldering iron

which was carefullv wiped deal! with a heavy clean cloth.

h. Disassemble cold joints. Shake out all old solder and remake the connections using new 60/40 rosm-core solder.

c. Remove nux residues wirh denatured ethyl alcohol or approved proprietary soluuons applied with a bristle brush. Blow the connector drvvith compressed air.

3-8

.~~

• ~.1

~. )

1

0 ..

~~~,

fI' • -~ • \

••• 5 •• t

3 4

+. !..2-.! •• !

\ ... • 'l ~7

----

b.

...... ---- ._. __ . __ . .J

Figure 3·11. Connector Soldering Sequence

Use unly approved military standard cleaning ,;0',:· pounds and approved procedures to clean ."".:! al ~ electric components. The lise ,)1' ordinary cleaumj, compounds or the failure to follow proncr pll.lcl'dl;Jl·!' may cause 'Ife~ OJ i.'xpiu.,iom

3-22. JNSULATING SLEEVE POSITIONING AJl ,(':111:(tors except C'ass R. E, F, P, and those specified II; .'-I:~ have insulating sleeves installed over the individual wires prior I.u assembly to solder cups. A fter the conncciions Me cleaned, push the insulating sleeves down over the ("'wlact until thev bottom against the inserts all shown .n figure 3-12. Tie the insulating sleeves in position w.th ny!on !;':,:d to prevent sliding back on the wires Tic nylou sit-eve': ind ividually because of nylon's stiffness .~ ie all orl:e: sleeves ill groups or as a complete bundle. MClI(!, ~lIrt: tLat tit' will not interfere with the MS3U:"7 cable clump.

NAVAIR 01-1A-505 (USAF) T.O. 1-1A-14

INSULATING SLEEVE MUST BOTTOM AGAINST INSERT

Figure 3-12. Insulating Sleeve Bottomed Against Insert

3-23. PRESHAPING· WIRES. Preshape large diameter wires (No. 14 and larger) before soldering to contacts. This will avoid strain on soldered connection when MS30S7 cable clamp is installed. See figure 3-13.

Preshaping is a necessity for connectors using resilient inserts. Side strain on the contacts will cause contact splaying and prevent proper mating of pin and socket contacts.

3·24. CRIMP CONTACTS.

Removable crimp-type contacts conforming to specifications MIL-C-23216, MIL-C-26636, or MIL-C-39029 are used with the connector types indicated in paragraph 34. The method of crimping wires to these contacts is essentially the same throughout the entire group of connectors, and standard military crimping tools conforming to MIL-C-22S20 are employed.

3-25. HAND CRIMPING TOOLS FOR CONNECTOR CONTACTS. Crimping tools used for crimping removable contacts to wire conductors for use in electrical connectors, terminal junction systems, and other electrical or electronic

PRESHAPE TO PREVENT STRAIN ON CONTACTS

Figure 3-13. Tying Sleeves and Preshaping Wires

components should conform to MIL-C-22S20. These tools are capable of crimping a range of contact wire barrel sizes 12 to 28 or a range of wire sizes 12 to 32. MIL-C-22S20 hand operated tools, cycle controlled by means of a ratchet which will not release until the crimping cycle has been completed, supersedes MS-3191, MS-3198, MS-27828 (USAF), and MS-27831(USAF). A brief description of each of these tools is given below:

a. MIL-C-22520/1 Crimping Tool. This tool, shown in figure 3-14, consists of a basic crimping tool, M22520/1-01, which is used with turret head M22S20/1-02, to crimp size 12, 16, and 20 contacts. This combination of tools can be used to crimp the following contacts: MS3192, MS3193, MSI8134, MS18136, MS242S4, MS242S5, MS9029/01-12- 12, MS9029/01-14-16, MS9029/01-16·20, MS3723/33, and MS3723/34. Other contacts can be crimped with M22S20/ 1-01 used with other turret heads. (See MIL-C-22520/1.)

b. MIL-C-22520/2 Crimping Tool. This tool, shown in figure 3-15, consists of a basic crimping tool, M22S20/2-0l, which is used with positioner M22520/2-02 to crimp size 20 contacts, and with positioner M22520/2·03 to crimp size 22 to 28 contacts. M22520/2-01 plus M22520/2·02 can be used to crimp MS3192-20, MS3193·20, MS24254·20P, MS242S5-20S, MSI8134·20, and MS18136-20 contacts. M22520/2·01 plus M22520/2-03 can be used to crimp MS3343-23-22, MS3343-23-28, MS90460·23·22, MS90460- 23·28, MS90461·23-22, and MS90461-23·28 contacts. Other contacts can be crimped with M22S20/2-01 used with other positioners. (See MIL·C·22520/2.) .

3·9

NAVAIR 01-1A-505 (USAF) T.O. 1-1A-14

c. MS3191-1 Crimping Tool. (Superseded by MIL-C- 22520/1.) This tool, shown in figure 3-16a, has one contact positioner installed in the tool, and the other two stored in a cavity in the tool handle. This tool will handle contact sizes 20, 16, and 12, and has the contact sizes, wire sizes, and color codes on a data plate on the face of the tool. The contact size and color code are given below:

#20 #16 #12

Red Blue Yellow

Do not disassemble this tool. Do not tighten or loosen nuts on back of tool.

d. MS3191-3 Crimping Tool. (Superseded by MIL-C- 22520/1.) In this tool, the color coded positioners are fixed in a rotating turret contained in the tool head. (See figure 3-16b.) Wire sizes are marked on a selector plate on the face of the tool. Correct indentor closure for wire size being used is set by moving thumb button pointer to desired wire size.

NOTE

Either MS3191-1 or MS3191-3 may be used to crimp contacts shown on Military Standard drawings MS-3190, MS-3192, MS-3193, MS-24254, MS-24255, MS-18134, and MS-18136.

Do not disassemble this tool. Do not tighten or loosen nuts on back of tool.

e. MS3198-1 Crimping Tool. (Superseded by MIL-C- 22520/2.) This tool is similar to the MS3191 tools described above, except that it is used for the smaller #22 and #28 size contacts in the miniature MS connectors.

f. MS27828(USAF) Crimping Tool. (Superseded by MIL-C-22520/1-01.) This tool is interchangeable with M2 25 20/1-0 I and is used with turret head MS27828-1 or M22520/1-02 to crimp MS contacts from size 12 to 20 as listed under 3-25a above or in table 3-15 below. (See figure 3-17.)

g. MS27831(USAF) Crimping Tool. (Superseded by MIL-C-22520/2-01.) This tool is interchangeable with M22520/2-01 and is used with positioner MS27831-1 or M22520/2-02 to crimp size 20 MS contacts as listed under 3-25b above or in table 3-15. MS2783 I (USAF) is also used

3-10

with positioner MS2783 1-2 or M22520/2-03 to crimp size 22 to 28 MS contacts as listed in 3-25b or table 3-15.

h. MS27828(USAF) or M22S20/1~1 Crimping Tools.

These tools may be used with MS27282-2 or M22520/1-05 universal heads, shown in figure 3-17, to crimp all of the contacts covered in 3-25f and 3-25g above and also to crimp nonmilitary standard contacts.

NOTE

The USAF crimping tools and positioners described above can be obtained in a kit (MS27426), which also contains all insertion and removal tools for the connectors listed in table 3-15.

3-26. TOOL INSPECTION. The standard MIL-C-22520 crimping tools are checked for proper adjustment of the crimping jaws by means of the MIL-C-22520/3 inspection gage. The crimping tools should be checked before each series of crimping operations.

NOTE

If tool fails to gage properly, or if the ratchet becomes inoperative, return the tool for repair.

a. Inspection of MIL-C-22S20 and USAF Crimping Tools. These tools are gaged with the MIL-C-22520/3 (or MS27832) gage. The procedure is as follows:

I. When gaging M22520/1 (or MS27828USAF) crimp tool, set crimp tool wire selector knob on No.4 wire setting.

2. When gaging M22520/2 (or MS27831USAF) crimp tool, set crimp tool wire selector knob on No.8 wire setting.

3. For any of these tools, close handles completely and hold.

4. The GO gage (green) should pass freely between the indentors (see figure 3-18).

5. The NO GO gage (red) should not enter between the indentors (see figure 3-18).

6. If NO GO gage (red) will enter between the indentors, return the tool for repair.

Do not crimp down on the gage pin as this will prevent the tool from cycling to ratchet release position.

NAVAIR 01-1A-505 (USAF) T.O. 1-1A-14

CONTACT INSERTED THIS SIDE

o fiji-

---- -

COLOA-CODED POSIT lONERS

3·11

SELECTOR KNOB

WIRE SIZE SELECTOR KNOB

"22520/1-02 TURRET HEAD

TURRET M22520/1-02 REMOVED

Figure 3·14. Crimping Tool M22520/1·01 With M22520/1-02 Turret Head

NAVAIR 01-1A-505 (USAF) T.O. 1-1A-14

3-12

M22520/2.o2 POSITIONER (SHOWN REMOVED)

/

INDENTOR SELECTOR KNOB

CONTACT INSERTED THIS SIDE

Figure 3-15. Crimping To ... ·' M22520/2-01 With M22520/2-02 Positioner

NAVAIR 01-1A-505 (USAF) T.O. 1-1A-14

3-13

AL TERNATE SIZE POSITIONERS (2) STORED IN HANDLE

POSITIONER LATCH ASSEMBL Y AND LOCK SCREW

POSITIONER RELEASE

a. CRIMPING TOOL MS3191-1

CONTACT INSERTED THIS SIDE

ROTATING TURRET

(SHOWN IN RELEASED POSITION)

WIRE SIZE SELECTER PLATE

TURRET REMOVED FOR EYESIGHT CRIMPING

Figure 3-16. MS3191-1 and MS3191-3 Crimping Tools

NAVAIR 01-1A-505 (USAF) T.O. 1-1A-14

ADJUSTMENT SCREW

MS27828-2 (M225 2011 -05) UNIVERSAL HEAD

MS27828 (M22520/1-01l CRIMP TOOL

LOCKNUT

3-14

CONTACT INSERTED THIS SIDE

Figure 3-17. Crimping Tool MS27828(USAF) With MS27828-2 Universal Head

NAVAIR 01-1A-SOS (USAF) T.O. 1-1A-14

311

RED

"NO GO" GAGE

CRIMP TOOL

"GO"GAGING

"NO GO" GAG ING

Figure 3-18. Gaga", MIL C 22S20 Crimping Tools

NAVAIR 01-1A-505 (USAF) T.O. 1-1A-14

b. Inspecting MS3191-1 Crimping Tool. This tool is gaged separately for each positioner. The procedure is as follows:

I. Make sure the positioner is locked in place.

2. Select the proper MS3196-3 gage for the positioner being used.

3. With the tool fully closed, insert the GO gage through the positioner and into the crimping dies. The GO gage should enter the positioner and dies freely so that the gage handle seats firmly on the top of the positioner (see figure 3-19).

4. The NO GO gage should not be able to enter into the crimping dies, and the gage handle should not seat on the positioner.

Do not crimp down on the gage pin as this will prevent the tool from cycling to ratchet release position.

NOGO GAGE NOT SEATED ON POSITIONER

POSITIONER"/

Figure 3-19. Gaging MS3191-1 Crimping Tool

c. Inspecting MS3191-3 Crimping Tool. Only the No. 20 wire size indentor setting is gaged for this tool. The procedure is as follows:

1. Slide the thumb button until the pointer is in line with the No. 20 wire size on the selector plate. (See figure 3-16b.)

2. Close the tool handles to fully closed position.

3-16

3. The GO pin of MS3196-20 gage should pass freely through the indentor tips.

4. The NO GO gage pin should not pass between indentor tips.

Do not crimp down on the gage pin as this will damage the indentors.

3-27. CRIMPING PROCEDURE FOR MIL-C-22520 (AND USAF) CRIMPING TOOLS. The procedure for crimping wires to contacts using the MIL-C-22520 and the USAF hand crimping tools is as follows:

a. Using the M22520/I-01 (MS27828USAF) crimping tool with the M22S20/ 1-02 (MS27828-1) turret head:

NOTE

The tool handles must be fully opened when inserting the turret head, and when changing the selector position.

1. To install the turret head, depress the turret trigger to release it to the indexing position as shown in figure 3-20.

2. Position the turret head over the retaining ring on the back of the tool. Make certain the turret head is seated on the tool; then secure the 9/64 socket head screws with an Allen wrench .

./

3. The turret has three positioners which are color

coded and marked with the applicable contact size (12,16, or 20). Select the positioner for the contact size that you are crimping. Rotate the turret until the correct positioner is lined up with the index mark on the turret head. (See figure 3-20.)

4. Push the turret into the turret head until it snaps into the locked position. (See figure 3-20.)

5. Lift and tum the wire size selector knob to the correct wire size setting and release (see figure 3-21). The proper wire size selector number is determined from the chart on the side of the turret head.

6. Strip wire as described in 3-28e.

NAVAIR 01-1A-505 (USAF) T.O. 1-1A-14

BAYONET PIN

SELECTOR ~ITION

(TOOL HANDLE)

POSITIONER (TYPICAL)

TRIGGER

DATA PLATE

Figure 3-20_ Typical M22520 Positioner and Turret Head

SAFETY CLIP

BASIC HAND TOOL

(MIlIlO/&-Ol,

BASIC HAND TOOL IMIII&O'I-OI)

TURRET HEAD

'-IP--~- SELECTOR (PULL OUT AND TURN)

SELECTOR LOCATOR PIN

SELECTOR (PULLOUT AND TURN)

BACK OF TOOL

BACK OF TOOL

PLASTIC HAND GRIPS

PLASTIC HAND GRIps·

3-17

Figure 3-21_ M22520 Crimping Tools

NAVAIR 01-tA-606 (USAF) T.O. 1~1A-'14

7. Insert the stripped wire into the contact until end of wire can be seen through the inspection hole. Tum the tool around so the front is facing you. Then insert the wire and contact through the indentors until it bottoms in till' positioner. (See figure 3-22.)

NOTE

When crimping size 20 contacts, make sure that the wire insulation extends into the insulation support of the contact.

R. Hold the wire in place and squeeze the tool \l:mdlcs until the ratchet releases and the tool opens.

l). Remove the crimped contact and inspect. Make S:lrc the wire strands are visible through the inspection hole til the contact.

h. (ising the M22520/2-01 (MS2783lUSAF) crimping (001 with the M22520/2-02 (MS2783 1-1 ) positioner or the ~L' 2520/2·03 (MS2783 1-2) positioner (see table 3-15):

NOTE

The tool handles must be fully opened when inserting the positioner, and when changing the selector position.

1. Seibel the correct positioner for the contact you are crimping (Bee 3·25b or g) and insert the positioner into the retaining ring in the back of the tool. The positioner is spring-loaded ahd must be pushed in and then rotated 90° clockwise until locked into position. (See figure 3-15.)

2. Insert the safety clip (if present) into the retainer ring to lock the positioner in place.

3. Choose the proper selector setting for the contact number and wire size being crimped from the table on the end of the positioner. (See figure 3-20.) Lift and rotate the selector knob to the proper setting.

4. Stnp wire as described in 3-28e.

5. J nsert the stripped wire into the contact until the end of the wire can be seen through the inspection hole. Turn the tool around until the front is facing you. Then insert the wire and contact through the indentors until it bottoms in the positioner. (See figure 3-22.)

NOTE

When crimping size 20 contacts, make sure that the wire insulation extends into the insulation support of the contact.

6. Hold the wire in place and squeeze the tool handles until the ratchet releases and the tool opens.

7. Remove the crimped contact and inspect. Make sure the wire strands are visible through the inspection hole in the contact.

TOOL HANDLES FULLY OPENED

FRONT OF TOOL

INDENTORS

CONTACT P'ULLYINSIRTED

3-18

Figure 3-22. Contact Insertion in M22520 Crimping Tool

NAVAIR 01-1A-505 (USAF) T.O. 1-1A-14

3-28. CRIMPING PROCEDURE FOR MS3191-1 TOOL. The procedure for assembling wires to contacts with the MS3191-1 hand crimping tool is as follows (see figure 3-23):

a. Open the crimping tool by exerting pressure on the handles until the ratchet releases.

b. Loosen the latch locking screw and pull the latch to the open position (refer to figure 3-16a).

c. Pull the positioner release all the way down against the spring pressure and insert the correct positioner for the contact being crimped. Insert the positioner so that the flat on its flange mates with the flat on the handles, and flange is flush with the handle.

NOTE

Positioners are stored in the tool handle, and are stamped with contact number, and color coded to match the color code on the data plate on the face of the tool. Pull the spring-loaded plug to remove (or replace) the positioners. Store positioners not being used in handle.

d. Push the positioner latch to the closed position, and tighten the latch locking screw.

e. Strip the wire using any of the methods described in section II. Stripping lengths are:

Contact size 20 - 0.157 to 0.186 Contact size 16 - 0.250 to 0.284 Contact size 12 - 0.250 to 0.284

f. Insert the stripped wire into the contact until end shows through inspection hole and insert both through the indentor opening into the positioner.

g. Squeeze the tool handles with one firm stroke until the positive stop is reached. The ratchet will then release and the tool will open. Remove the crimped contact and wire.

NOTE

When crimping size 20 contacts, make sure that insulation extends into insulation support of contact.

CONTACT

~ STRIPPED WIRE

INDENTOR OPENING

POSITIONER

WIRE VISIBLE THROUGH INSP ECTION HOl E

Figure 3-23. Assembling Wires to Crimp-Type Contacts

3-29. CRIMPING PROCEDURE FOR MS3191-3 TOOL. The procedure for assembling wires to contacts with the MS3191-3 hand crimping tool is as follows:

a. Release turret by depressing turret latch with thumb, and rotate turret until correct positioner for contact being crimped lines up with index line on head assembly. (Refer to figure 3-16b.)

b. Push turret down into latched position.

c. Slide thumb button until pointer is in line with wire size being used, as marked on selector plate.

3-19

NAVAIR 01-1A-505 (USAF) T.O. 1-1A-14

d. Strip wire as described in 3-2Se.

e. Insert the stripped wire into the contact until end shows through assembly hole. Insert wire and contact through the indentor opening into the positioner.

NOTE

When crimping size 20 contacts, make sure that insulation extends into insulation support of contact.

f. Squeeze the tool handles as far as they will go. The ratchet will then release and the tool will open.

g. Remove crimped contact and inspect.

NOTE

Provision is made for safety-wire locking both head and thumb button for production runs of same size contact and wire.

3-30. CRIMPING PROCEDURES FOR MS3198-1 TOOL. The procedure for crimping wires with the MS319S-1 crimping tool is as follows:

a. Select positioner according to size of contact to be crimped.

b. Screw positioner into the tool until it bottoms.

Tighten with hand pressure only. Do not use a wrench or drift pin.

c. Select dal setting in accordance with tool data plate for contact and wire size being crimped. Rotate the selector knob until recommended number is in line with the index mark.

d. Insert stripped wire into contact and both wire and contact into the crimp tool positioner.

e. Close jaws of the crimping tool by squeezing the handles. The handles should be closed until the ratchet mechanism trips allowing the handles to return to the open position.

The crimp tool is designed to release only after it has completed its cycle and the ratchet mechanism is released. Dc· not attempt to open the tool after a partial cycle Every cycle must be complete.

3-20

3-31. EYESIGHT CRIMPING. Short contacts may be crimped in the MS31914 tool (MS3191-3 with the turret removed). The procedure is as follows:

a. Release the turret by depressing the turret latch.

b. Loosen the two retainer screws with the l/S Allen wrench supplied with the tool. Remove the head from the tool frame.

c. Slide the thumb button until the pointer lines up with the wire size to be crimped.

d. Insert the contact into the tool and slowly close the handles, at the same time positioning the contact so the indentors will crimp midway on the crimp barrel.

e. Hold the contact lightly with the indentor tips and insert the stripped wire into the contact.

f. Make sure the wire is bottomed in the contact, and close the handles all the way.

g. Remove the crimped contact and inspect.

h. Check to make sure that the wire is visible in the inspection hole.

3-32. SHIELD CONNECTIONS

3-33. CONNECTING SINGLE SHIELDED WIRE TO MS AND POTTED CONNECTORS. Terminate shielded wires as described in section II paragraph 2-5S. For connection to Class A, B, C, or K connectors, shield must end inside back shell as shown in figure 3-24. For connection to Class E, Class R, or potted connectors, shield must end outside seal. Crimp pigtail into terminal lug and ground to screw as shown in figure 3-25, or use permanent splice to join pigtail to short length of AN wire which is then terminated inside connector to contact in regular manner, as shown in figure 3-26.

3-34. MULTIPLE SHIELD CONNECTIONS. Potted connectors which contain shielded wires and all other connectors which have many shields must terminate shields outside the connector. The procedure is as follows:

a. Form pigtail from shield outside connector area.

See section II, paragraph 2-60.

1. For potted connector, pigtail should start 1" from end of wire.

2. For other connectors, pigtail should start far enough back to remain outside cable clamp.

NAVAIR 01-1A-605 (USAF) T.O. 1-1A-14

INSULATING SLEEVES ON EACH CONDUCTOR

SHI ELD SOLDERED SHIELD FORMED

INTO CONTACT INTO PIGTAIL

Figure 3·24. Terminating Shielded Wire at MS Connector

SOLDERLESS TERMINAL LUG

Figure 3·25. Grounding Shields Outside Connector

b. Solder each wire to its contacts.

c. Crimp pigtails together into one end of permanent splice.

d. Crimp single wire (doubled if necessary; see section

V) into other end of permanent splice.

e. Slide insulating sleeve over splice and tie in place as shown in figure 3·26.

f. Solder single wire to proper contact in connector as shown in figure 3·26.

g. Complete connector assembly in normal manner.

An alternative method for grounding utilizes a screw on the cable clamp to ground the shields as follows:

a. Follow steps a and b above.

b. Crimp pigtails together into solderless terminal lug.

c. Attach terminal lug under screw, as shown in figure 3·25.

NOTE

If all shields will not fit into one solderless terminal lug, use several terminal lugs and distribute them under both screws.

3·21

PREINSULATED PERMANENT SP ICE

KEEP POTTING COMPOl.!ND BELOW

THIS LINE

NOTE: POTTING MOLD OMITTED FOR CLARITY

Figure 3·26. Terminating Shielded Wires at Potted Connector

NAVAIR 01-1A-505 (USAF) T.O. 1-1A-14

3-35. GROUNDING SHIELDS WITH BONDING RING. When specified r n the applicable engineering drawing, an AN3lll bonding ring may be used to ground eight or more shields at an AN i ype connector.

a. Remove washers from the connector cable clamp and slide clamp back on wire bundle.

b. Install the AN3lll bonding ring on the wire bundle between the connector back shell and the cable clamp, with the bonding ring lug toward the solder contacts.

c. Make a hole in one shield and expand it to hold up to three other shields as shown in figure 3-27. Tighten the expanded shield around the others and sweat solder together. Repeat as necessary for number of shields to be grounded.

d. Pull one of the shields through to form a jumper.

Install a length of insulating sleeving over the jumper shield.

e. Clamp the ears of the bonding ring lug around the jumper(s) and solder. Pull the insulating sleeve over the soldered connection.

3-36. MULTIPLE CONNECTIONS. Connect two wires to one contact by using one of the following methods:

a. If both wires can be fitted into contact solder cup, proceed as with single wire. Slide insulating sleeve over both wires together and insert them into solder cup. Make sure all strands are inside cup before soldering. When solder has cooled, push insulating sleeve down until it butts against insert. (See figure 3-28.)

Avoid connecting two wires to one contact in Class E and R connectors; this will cause loss of moisture proofing.

b. If both wires cannot fit into contact solder cup, use permanent splice to join both wires to a third wire which can fit into solder or crimp cup. See section V, paragraph 5-60, for splicing procedure and figure 3-29 for illustration of this connection.

The use of a single wire to terminate two wires at a connector must be approved by engineering.

3-22

Figure 3-27. Installing AN3111 Bonding Ring

NAVAIR 01-1A-505 (USAF) T.O. 1-1A-14

INSERT

SOLDER

Figure 3·28. Terminating Two Wires at One Contact

WIRE TO CONTACT

MS25181

USE SLEEVE TIED AT BOTH ENDS BECAUSE OF

1._-_.1 DIFFERENT WIRE

DIAMETERS

Figure 3-29. Permanent Splice for Terminating Two Wires at One Contact

3·37. REDUCING WIRE SIZE AT MS CONNECTOR. Reduction of wire size to enable a larger diameter wire to be soldered to a smaller diameter contact solder cup is sometimes required. A safe method of making the reduction is as follows:

a. Select a permanent splice which will accommodate the larger wire. Crimp this splice to the stripped wire as described in section V, paragraph 5·53.

b. Select a six-inch length of wire which will fit the cup of the contact. Strip one end sufficiently long to be able to double the stripped portion back on itself as shown in figure 3·30.

c. Crimp this doubled wire into the free end of the permanent splice.

Reduction of wire size needs engineering approval. Current-carrying capacity of smaller wire or contact must not be exceeded.

A second method for reducing wire size at an MS connector is by the use of an adapter as shown in figure 3·30. Select an adapter to suit the reduction requirements from table 34. The procedure is as follows:

a. Strip wire to a length that the adapter wire well will accommodate.

b. Crimp the wire into the adapter, using the tool listed in table 34 for that adapter.

c. Solder the adapter stem to the contact, following the soldering procedure described in 3·15 through 3·20.

3 .. 38. CONTINUITY TEST. Test all wires and wire groups as fabricated, with terminations attached, for short circuits as well as for continuity between the termination points specified on the applicable schematic. During the continuo ity test procedure, observe the following precautions:

a. Do not use lead pencils to count pins in connectors; points can break off and lodge in the connector, leading to arcing, shorting, and system malfunction.

b. Do not use oversize prods in connector sockets during testing; this may result in splayed or damaged sockets.

c. Do not puncture wire insulation with a probe, or attach clamps to wire insulation while continuity testing or trouble shooting.

3·23

NAVAIR 01-1A-505 (USAF) T.O. 1-1A-14

I AXIMUM WIRE SIZE

CONT \CT CAN ACCOMMODATE~~~;;;;;;;:;:=;;J

atqtem

PERMANENT SPLICE

DOUBLE IF NECESSARY

a. PERMAt-.ENT SPLICE METHOD

HEAVY WIRE

OVERSIZE WIRE

Table 3-4. Installation Tools for Wire·to·Contact Adapters Adapts

Wire Size To Contact Size Crimping Tool

ADAPTER FOR SOLDERLESS CRIMP

b. SPECIAL ADAPTER METHOD

Figure 3-30. Reducing Wire Size at MS Connector

Part Number

1. Thomas & Betts:

75-14'-86- 1 C 5-)3 75-14'86- 2 675-51588

2. Bendix: 10-741196 - 6 - 4

- 14

- 15

- 1

- 5

-12

-13

3. BI rndy:

YE SCl2 YE 1. 16 YE It 20 YE L 20

3·24

-s or 1110 12
1110 or 1112 16
1112 or 1114 16
q16 or 1118 20
1122 16
1116 12
illS 12
1120 12
1110 S
1112 8
1114 8
1116 8
liS or /110 12
1112 or 1114 16
1116 or illS 20
1112 or 1114 20 WT 130 WT 130 WT 130 WT 111M

M8NU, NSCT -4 Die YI4 MRP

Y 16 TMR

Y14 MRP

NAVAIR 01-1A-605 (USAF) T.O. 1-1A-14

3-39. Continuity Test Procedure. Use the ohmmeter section of an approved multimeter, such as the TS 352B/U shown in figure 3-31 to determine circuit continuity. Continuity for short runs, where conductor resistance is not a factor, is defined as "zero" resistance. The procedure for determining continuity, using the TS 352B/U or similar multimeter is as follows:

a. Set the function control to OHMS, and the range control to the 0 to 1,000 ohms range. Zero the instrument as directed in the operating manual for the instrument used.

b. Apply the test leads to the terminations of the wire run.

c. Note reading on the ohms scale. A reading of 0.25 ohms, ±0.25 ohms, is considered verification of circuit continuity.

NOTE

The test lead extremities contacting the terminations under test must provide adequate constant contact, and must not damage the termination.

Figure 3·31. Multimeter for Continuity Test (TS 352 BtU)

340. Test Leads. For ground points and terminal lugs, use test leads with alligator clips. For connector pins and sockets, use a special lead ending in a sleeve-insulated pin or socket of the same size as that being tested.

Do not insert an oversize test probe into a connector socket, as this will result in a splayed or damaged contact. Do not hang a test lead from a pin contact as this will result in a bent pin.

3-41. PROTECTION OF ELECfRICAL CONNECTORS. Protect all unmated MS connectors with protective covers. (See figure 3-32.) Military Standard protective covers for connectors are listed in the applicable MS connector specification. Use a protective cover with MS dash number corresponding to the shell size of the connector to be protected. Protective covers are available with or without an attaching chain. Plastic dust caps to fit MS plugs and receptacles are also available.

MS2S042-C

MS2S042

MS2S043-C MS25043

o. METAL CAPS

b. PLASTIC CAP

Figure 3-32. Typical Protective Connector Caps

3-42. AN/MS CONNECTORS

3-43. AN CONNECTORS, MIL-C-SOIS. MIL-C·5015 covers circular, electric connectors with solder or removable crimp contacts (both front and rear release). These connectors are for use in electronic, electric power, and control circuits. The type designations and class availability are given in table 3-5. See figure 3-33 for typical illustrations of AN type connectors.

3·25

T .... hl,.. ?c:: "~II ,f" Cn1C:: ("""""a."""',,,. ,...'~ecoc
Front Rear Service Life and Insulation Resistance Shell
Solder Release Release
Class Feature Contacts Crimp Crimp Environ. Fluid Minimum Insert
MS3100 Contacts Contacts Resistant Resistant Insulation Material
Series MS3400 MS3450 Hot Spot Service Resistance
Series Series Temp. (0C) Life (Megohms) Material Finish
A Solid shell X Limited 85 1,000 hrs. 30 Neoprene Aluminum Cadmium, olive drab
125 60 hrs. 1
B Split shell X Limited 85 1,000 hrs. 30 Neoprene Aluminum Cadmium, olive drab
125 60hrs 1
C Pressurized X Limited 85 1,000 hrs. 30 Neoprene Aluminum Cadmium, olive drab
125 60 hrs. 1
D High impact X X Partial 125 20 yrs. 1,000 Silicone Wrought Cadmium over nickel -Z
shock 200 10,000 hrs. aluminum C>
0<
E Without clamp X X Limited 85 1,000 hrs. 30 Neoprene Aluminum Cadmium, olive drab ~>
125 60 hrs. 1 --
85 1,000 hrs. 30 :-t::D
F With clamp X X Limited Neoprene Aluminum Cadmium, olive drab Oc
125 60 hrs. 1 . -
-,
H Hermetic seal X X Complete 175 1,000 hrs. 100 Silicone Ferrous alloy Electroless nickel I -
->
>,
J Gland seal for 85 1,000 hrs. 30 ,U'I
X X Limited Neoprene Aluminum Cadmium, olive drab -c
jacketed cable 125 60 hrs. 1 ~U'I
K Firewall X X X X Complete 175 1,000 hrs. 100 Silicone Ferrous alloy Electroless nickel
L Fluid resistan t X X X Complete 175 1,000 hrs. 100 Silicone Aluminum Electroless nickel
P Potting seal X X Limited 85 1,000 hrs. 30 Neoprene Aluminum Cadmium, olive drab
125 60 hrs. 1
R Grommet seal X X Limited 85 1,000 hrs. 30 Neoprene Aluminum Cadmium, olive drab
without clamp 125 60 hrs. 1
U High temperature X X X Partial 200 1,000 hrs. 1,000 Silicone Aluminum Electroless nickel
W Life X X X Partial 125 20 yrs, 1,000 Silicone Aluminum Cadmium, olive drab
200 10,000 hrs.
y Accepts large wire X X Partial 125 20 yrs. 1,000 Silicone Aluminum Cadmium, olive drab
insulation O.D. 200 10,000 hrs. NAVAIR 01-1A-505 (USAF) T.O. 1-1A-14

MS3100, MS3400, MS3450 WALL RECEPTACLE

MS3107

QUICK DISCONNECT PLUG

MS3108 (Typel ANGLE PLUG

MS3101, MS3401, MS3451 CABLE PLUG

MS3106, MS3406, MS3456 STRAIGHT PLUG

MS3102, MS3402, MSJ452 BOX RECEPTACLE

MS3106 STRAIGHT PLUG (WITHOUT ADAPTER)

. MS3108, MS3408 ANGLE PLUG

Figure 3-33. Typical AN(MS) Connectors

3-27

NAVAIR 01-lA-606 (USAF) T.O. l-lA-14

344. AN/MS CONNECTOR MARKING. Each AN/MS connector is marked on the shell or coupling ring with a code of letters and numbers giving all the information necessary to identify the connector. (See figure 3-34.) A typical code is as follows:

MS3106F-12-10 PW

Shell Insert Insert

MS Number Class Size Arrangement Style Position

a. The letters "MS" indicate that the connector has been made according to government standards.

b. Numbers such as 3106 indicate type of shell, and whether plug or receptacle. (Refer to table 3-5.)

c. Class letter indicates design of shell, and for what purpose connector is normally used. (Refer to table 3-5.)

d. Numbers following class letter indicate shell size by outside diameter of mating part of receptacle in onesixteenth inch increments, or by the diameter of the coupling thread in sixteenths of an inch. For example, size 12 has an outside diameter or a coupling thread of 3/4 inch.

3-28

INSERT ROTATION

Figure 3-34. AN/MS Connector Marking

e. Numbers following hyphen indicate insert arrangement. This number does not indicate the number of contacts. Military Standard drawings cover contact arrangements approved for service use. See figure 3-35 for illustrations of insert arrangements.

f. First letter following number indicates style of contact.

NAVAIR 01-1A-506 (USAF) T.O. 1-1A-14

1 Contact 2 Contact 2 Contact 3 Contact 4 Contact 5 Contact 6 Contact 7 Contact
0 • • • e • •
15·1
0 165·4 . 14S", *
• II·ZO
IOS·2 22-' zo..t e ZO·IS *
• 16·U 32-5 • • e •
125-4 • 11-12
• 11-29
16·13 3 Contact 2O-ZO • • D·.
12·5 22-21
0 e • • • •
20-14 * 20-.
1.·3 11-3 IOSl·3'" •
0 20-24 •
0 • D·II
145·4 24-14 •
• 11·1. 14S·1 22-12 20-17 •
16·2 - • 22-4 • •
0 I.S-7 * • 21-29
11·404 • 22·13 20-21 *
165·3 • 21·3 • •
0 16S-5 e 22-10 •
16·12 zo.S e • 22-34 D·D
0 • • 21·5
I6S·' 21·6 • •
II·' 20-12 22·22 '"
0 • •
• 2 .. 12 D·15 24·2
18·7 16·7 • •
0 ZO·23 • 24-4 •

11·16 16·10 * • 24-17 22·24
-- e • • 24·3
22·1 •
1I·4ZO • 11·5 24·22
0 e • It 24-23 21-22 '"
22·3 I2SL· ... e • 24-10
ZO·2 • 11·22 • •
0 • •

14S·2 *
22·1 32·17
22·7 • ZO·3 • 24·16
® • 16·'* •
22·11 e
• ZO·6
2",3S 24:27
• II ..
- e·
24-1
• ;0·1' . •
lOSl·. • 18·10 7 Contact
• e I.s.s 322 21·10
11S3 * 24·, e •
.
• • 2n 18 IJ 16S·8 165·1 *
12S·6 • 8 6) CD

14S·9 28·7 22·6 18·IS 11·11 * 36·2 11·9 3l-10
* INDICATES AIR STANDARDS COORDINATING COMMITTEE PREFERRED.
NOTE: FACE VIEW OF PIN INSERTS. ALL INSERTS SHOWN IN NORMAL POSITION
Figure 3·35. Insert Arrangements - AN Type ConnectOR. MIL-C·5015 (Sheet 1)
3-29 NAVAIR 01-1A-505 (USAF) T.O. 1-1A-14

8 Contact 9 Contact 11 Contact 14 Contact 16 Contact 23 Contact 30 Contact

o

18·8



20·1



20·9



22·18



.

.

22·23 *



-

22·36

A WI

22·404



.

24·6

e

.

.

32·15

9 Contact



20·16



20·18 *

CD

2021



.

n·16

e 32·101
18·1 * 13 Contact
" •
18·19
• 20·11
14 Contact
24·21 •

70-21
2819 . •
11 Contact ll-19
• •
20·33 28·2 36·403



326 *

32·8

J~ ~04

3-30

CODE OF CONTACT SIZES

o.e®oEB @

H ........

IRON CONSTANTAN

20 16 12 • 4 0 COAX

Figure 3-35. Insert Arrangements - AN Type Connectors, MIL-C-5015 (Sheet 2)

NAVAIR 01-1A-505 (USAF) T.O. 1-1A-14

g. Second letter indicates alternative insert position.

Insert position letters W, X, Y, or Z indicate that the connector insert has been rotated with respect to the shell a specified number of degrees from the normal position. Alternative positions are specified to prevent mismating when connectors of identical size and contact arrangement are installed adjacent to each other. These alternative positions are shown on governing military standard drawings. If no letter appears, the insert is in the normal position. On connectors with multiple keyways, the degree of rotation is measured from the widest keyway. See figure 3-36 for typical alternative position arrangements.

IN MULTIPLE-KEYWAY CONNECTORS REFERENCE IS TO WIDEST KEYWAY

e

NORMAL POSITION

W POSITION

X POSITION

Y POSITION Z POSITION

FRONT VIEW SOCK ET INSERT (PIN INSERT OPPOSITE) D EQUALS DEGREES OF ROTATION

Figure 3-36. Alternative Positions of Connector Inserts

3-45. MS CONNECTOR CABLE CLAMPS. Connector cable clamps are used at the back end ()f MS connectors, except potted connectors, to support wiling and to prevent twisting or pulling on soldered conneetions, There are three types of MS cable clamps as shown in figure 3-37. These are as follows:

a. MS3057 - consists of a clamp body, two washers, and a clamp saddle held on the clamp body by two screws and lockwashers.

b. MS3057 A - consists of a clamp body and two saddles held on by screws and lockwashers. Used with AN3420 telescoping bushing.

c. MS3057B - one piece clamp with no separate cap or saddles. Used with MS3420A bushings.

REMOVABLE SADDL E

Figure 3-37. MS3057 Connector Cable Clamp Types

3-46. MANUF ACTURERS' VARIATIONS IN MS CONNECTORS. Standard AN-MS plugs and receptacles made to the requirements of a Military Specification may show differences in appearance between one manufacturer and another. (See figure 3-38.) Also minor changes in disassembly and installation instructions may be required. The text and illustrations to follow will show differences in

detail.

3-31

MS3057

REMOVABLE SADDLES

MS3057A

GROUNDING SCREWS

MS3057B

NAVAIR 01-1A-505 (USAF) T.O. 1-1A-14

AMPHENOL

BENDIX

CANNON

Figure 3-38. Typical Manufacturer's Variations in AN-MS Connectors

347. MS POTIING CONNECTORS. These connectors are used only where potting is required. They are similar to other standard types, except that they have a shorter body shell and include a potting boot. MS potting connectors are available in the following types (see figure 3-39):

MS3103 - a receptacle with flange for mounting to a wall or bulkhead.

MS25183 - a straight plug used at the end of a wire or wire bundle.

MS25183A - similar to MS25183, with the addition of a grounding screw.

3-48. DISASSEMBLY, REASSEMBLY, AND INSTALLATION OF CONNECTORS

349. GENERAL. Solder type contacts size 8 and smaller are usually not removed for assembly purposes. Large solder contacts (size 4 and larger) are removed from connectors with hard inserts to protect the insert against the greater amount of heat necessary to properly solder wires to the larger contacts. Large solder contacts may be removed from connectors with resilient inserts provided the connector is not a pressurized assembly with the contacts bonded into the insert.

3-32

MS3103

MS25183

Figure 3-39. Potting Connectors

NAVAIR 01-1A-506 (USAF) T.O. 1-1A-14

3·50. REMOVAL OF BACK SHELLS. Remove back shells, if present, from all connectors before attaching wires. Solid back shells of Classes A, C, and K are removed by unscrewing from the front shell as shown in figure 340.

Split back shells of Class B connectors are held together either by an assembly ring or by captive screws. See figure 341 for details of disassembly.

STRAP WRENCH

RECEPTACLE

LEAD JAW PADS TO PROTECT CONNECTOR

Figure 3-40. Removal of Solid Back Shell

COUPL ING NUT

COUPLING NUT

ASSEMBLE D CONNECTOR

Figure 3-41. Removal of Cannon Split Back Shell

Class E and Class R connectors require a special disassembly technique which is described in later paragraphs.

X~~

3·51. DISASSEMBLY INSTRUCTIONS FOR AN·MS E AND F CONNECTORS. Class E and F (environment-resisting) connectors are made in two forms. Those made by Bendix have a separate cable clamp similar to MS3057B. Those made by Cannon use a cable clamp which is part of the back shell and similar to MS3057 A. (See figure 342.)

a. Disassembly of a Bendix Class E or F connector is accomplished as follows:

1. Unscrew cable clamp from back shell, using strap wrench or padded jaw connector pliers if necessary.

2. Remove tapered grommet compression sleeve and grommet from back shell.

3. Unscrew back shell from body assembly using strap wrench or padded jaw pliers if necessary .

4. Remove contacts size 8 and larger as described in 349.

NOTE

Avoid removing contacts from Class E and F receptacles.

b. Disassemble Class E connectors made by Cannon as follows:

1. Remove cable clamp saddle by removing two screws. Unscrew cable clamp if MS31 08E.

2. Unscrew back shell from body assembly using strap wrench if necessary .

3. Remove MS3420 telescoping bushing(s).

4. Remove grommet follower (grommet retainer) and grommet.

Do not remove inserts of moisture-proof connectors. Removal will destroy the moisture-proofing, Do not remove contacts smaller than size 8 except for replacement.

3·33

NAVAIR 01-1A-505 (USAF) T.O. 1-1A-14

BUSHINGS

SADDLE

Figure 3-42. Class E Connector - Cannon - Exploded View

3·34

NAVAIR 01-1A-505 (USAF) T.O. 1-1A-14

3-52. MS CLASS R CONNECTOR DISASSEMBLY. These new lightweight environment-resisting connectors differ in appearance from Class F connectors. (See figure 343.) Class R connectors have no separate cable clamp. A grommet, grommet compression nut, and ring are preassembled as a single unit, which is disengaged from the shell assembly before wiring contacts. The cable clamp has been replaced with a back nut and compression sleeve. The nut backs the grommet away from the contacts when removed. To disassemble, remove compression sleeve and grommet and unscrew back nut from body assembly. (See figure 3-44.) The cable clamp has been retained on the MS3108R angle plug which is identical with MS3108E except for improved sealing. Otherwise, disassembly instructions for Class R connectors are the same as for the Class E connectors. To effect a satisfactory seal, the grommet must seat against the rear face of the insert.

3-53. AMPHENOL AND CANNON MS CLASS A CONNECTORS. Amphenol and Cannon connectors are installed as follows (see figure 345):

a. Remove back shell by unscrewing from body assembly. If the back shell is too tight to be loosened by hand, attach connector to mating connector shell held in fixture as illustrated in figure 340, and use strap wrench to loosen back shell. Do not remove coupling nut from body.

Never use pliers to disassemble or reassemble connectors. Use strap wrench.

b. If all contacts are size 12 or smaller, no further disassembly is required. For removal of larger contacts, see 3-69.

c. Install the following items on wire bundle in listed order:

1. Cable clamp without saddle

2. Rubber bushing

3. Metal or plastic washer

4. Back shell

5. Retaining ring, if removed in step b.

d. Slide insulating sleeves over each wire in bundle.

Sleeves should be placed one inch back from wire ends to avoid burning during soldering operation. See 3-13 for data about insulating sleeves.

AMPHENOL

BENDIX

3·35

CANNON

Figure 343. Typical Class R Connectors

NAVAIR 01-1A-505 (USAF) T.O. 1-1A-14

Figure 3-44. Class R Connector - Bendix - Exploded View

3·36

BODY ASSEMBLY

CONTACTS

SLEEVES

SADDLE

CABL E CLAMP

Figure 3-45. Installation of Amphenol Class A Connector

NAVAIR 01-1A-505 (USAF) T.O. 1-1A-14

NOTE

Steps e through h apply only if large contacts were removed in step b.

e. Solder wires to large contacts removed in step b.

See 3-15 through 3-20 for soldering instructions.

f. Reinstall large contacts by threading through rear insert and inserting contacts into front insert.

g. Reassemble inserts and contacts into body assembly. Be careful to align keyway with key. Do not force the assembly because a damaged keyway will ruin a connector.

h. Replace retaining ring so that end of ring is about 1/4 inch from removal slot as shown in figure 346. This will simplify future disassembly.

i. Solder wires to remaining contacts using methods described in 3-15 through 3-20.

j. Clean soldered connections and slide insulating sleeves over contacts until they bottom against insert.

k. Tie sleeves to wires using nylon braid as shown in figure 3-13.

1. Slide back shell down over wire bundle and hand tighten to body assembly. Use strap wrench to tighten back shell 1/8 tum beyond hand tight.

m. Install cable clamp as described in 3-72 or 3-73.

RET AINING RING

Figure 346. Location of End of Retaining Ring

3-S4. AMPHENOL MS CLASS B CONNECTORS. Amphenol Class B connectors are installed as follows (see figure 347):

a. Remove back shell by loosening captive assembly screws. Do not remove coupling nut from body.

b. If all contacts are size 12 or smaller, no further disassembly is required. For larger contacts, see 3-69.

c. Install the following items on wire bundle in listed order:

1. Cable clamp without saddle

2. Rubber bushing

3. Metal or plastic washer

4. Back shell

5. Retaining ring, if removed in step b.

d. Slide insulating sleeves over each wire in bundle.

Sleeves should be placed one inch back from wire ends to avoid burning during soldering operation. See 3-13 for data about insulating sleeves.

NOTE

Steps e through h apply only if large contacts were removed in step b.

e. Solder wires to large contacts removed in step b.

See 3-15 through 3-20 for soldering instructions.

f. Reinstall large contacts by threading through rear insert and inserting contacts into front insert.

g. Reassemble inserts and contacts into body assembly. Be careful to align keyway with key. Do not force the assembly because a damaged keyway will ruin a connector.

h. Replace retaining ring so that end of ring is about 1/4 inch from removal slot as shown in figure 346. This will simplify future disassembly.

i. Solder wires to remaining contacts using methods described in 3;15 through3-20.

j. Clean connections and slide insulating sleeves over contacts until they bottom against insert.

3-37

NAVAIR 01-1A-505 (USAF) T.O. 1-1A-14

BODY ASSEMBL Y

BACK HALF

SPLIT

~

~ ~ADDLE

r

k. Tie sleeves to wires using nylon braid as shown in figure 3-13.

Figure 3-48. Safety Wiring Class B Connector

FOLD END OF LOCK WIRE BACK TO PROTECT PERSONNEL

Figure 3-47. Installation of Amphenol Class B Connector

I. Reassemble split shell. Be careful not to pinch wires.

NOTE

Angle back shell can be assembled at 45° angles. See engineering drawing for proper setting for each installation.

m. Install cable clamp as described in 3-72.

n. Safety wire the split back shell holding screws, if required by engineering, by passing the wire through screw heads (see figure 348), crossing it and completing with a twist.

3-38

NAVAIR 01-1A-505 (USAF) T.O. 1-1A-14

3-SS. AMPHENOL MS CLASS C CONNECTORS. Amphenol Class C connectors are installed as follows (see figure 349):

a. Remove back shell by unscrewing from body. If the back shell is too tight to be loosened by hand, attach connector to mating connector shell held in fixture as illustrated in figure 340, and use strap wrench to loosen back shell. Do not remove coupling nut from plug body.

Never use unpadded pliers to disassemble or reassemble connectors.

b. Large contacts (8, 4, and 0) are threaded into insert. Unscrew the contact for soldering. Do not twist or attempt to remove small contacts.

Do not remove Class C inserts. These connectors are pressurized and insert removal will break the pressure seals.

c. Install the following items on wire bundle in listed order:

1. Cable clamp without saddle

2. Rubber bushing

3. Metal or plastic washer

4. Back shell

d. Slide insulating sleeves over each wire in bundle.

Sleeves should be placed one inch back from wire ends to avoid burning during soldering operation. See 3-13 for data about insulating sleeves.

e. Reinstall large contacts. Tighten contact until it is seated firmly against lead pressure washer. Use curved long nose pliers if necessary.

f. Solder wires to remaining contacts using methods described in 3-15 through 3-20.

g. Clean connections and slide insulating sleeves over contacts until they butt against the insert.

h. Tie sleeves to wires using nylon braid as shown in figure 3-13.

INSERT

BACK SHELL

, ,

I

SADDLE

CABLE CLAMP

Figure 3.... Installation of Amphenol Class C Connector

3-39

NAVAIR 01-1A-505 (USAF) T.O. 1-1A-14

i. Slide back shell down over wire bundle and hand tighten to body assembly. Use strap wrench to tighten back shell j/q turn beyond hand tight.

j. Install cable clamp as described in 3-72.

.~·56. AM PHENOL CLASS E, F, AND R CONNECTORS. Amphenol Class E, f. and R connectors are installed as lollows:

a. Disengage the grommet compression nut assembly from the shell.

b. Thread pre tinned wires through the proper holes in the grommet.

,. Solder wires to contacts using the procedures described in 3-15 through 3-20.

d Work tile grommet compression nut assembly back

lip the wire bundle and engage nut with shell assembly, In::klllg sure that the grommet is drawn up flush with the ; Ii scr f.

c. Fill all unused grommet holes with grommet sealing plugs.

.~57. AMPHENOL

FIREPROOF

CONNECTORS.

a. Use spanner wrench to remove spanner nut. (See figure 3-50.)

b. Tap body assembly lightly in palm of hand to remove and separate contact and insertassembly.

c. Install the following items on wire bundle in listed order:

I. Conduit with coupling nut or other required fittings.

NOTE

Fitting threads are not identical with standard MS connectors of same size. Use fitting sizes listed in table 3-6.

2. Spanner nut

3 . Ceramic rear insert

4. Silicone rubber gaskets

Table 3-6. Amphenol Fireproof Connector Fittings

Connector Fitting
Size Size Thread
18 12 1-3/16 - 18
22 16 1-7/16 - 18
32 24 2 • 18
36 28 2-1/4 - 16 CONDUIT

COUPLING NUT

fRONT INSERT

Amphenol fireproof connectors have crimp type contacts I" withstand high temperature operating requirements. lustullation is as follows:

NUT

BODY AND BACK SHELL

ROTATE CONTACT 90° WHEN INSTALLING

IN FRONT INSERT

3-40

Figure 3-50. Installation of Amphenol Fireproof Connector

NAVAIR 01-1A-505 (USAF) T.O. 1-1A-14

d. Crimp wires into contacts using any of the methods described in section V.

e. Reassemble by: (1) sliding contacts into ceramic front insert; (2) pushing silicone rubber gasket down over contacts; and (3) sliding ceramic rear insert over contacts.

f. Examine contact and insert assembly to see that parts butt, and then slide assembly into body. Tighten spanner nut into place until flush with rear of body shell.

g. Tighten conduit coupling nut or other required fitting over body assembly. Use strap wrench to tighten 1/8 turn beyond hand tight.

3·S8. POITING CONNECTORS

a. Potting connectors are supplied with a plastic potting mold. Installation is as follows:

I. Slide the plastic mold over the wire bundle.

2. Solder wires to contacts. See 3-16 through 3-20 for soldering instructions.

Do not install insulating sleeves over individual wires. Potting compound will not cure properly in contact with vinyl sleeving.

3. Install spare wires on all unused pins. Use largest gage wire that would normally be attached to each contact. Spare wires are approximately 9 inches long. (See figure 3-51.)

4. Clean the complete connector assembly by scraping off rosin and then brush vigorously in new unused Stoddard's Solvent, followed by second rinse in clean Stoddard's Solvent. (See figure 3-52.)

5. Rinse area to be potted with methylene chloride applied from hand operated laboratory wash bottle or similar device.

Do not breathe methylene chloride fumes. Use only in well ventilated areas.

IDENTIFY SPARE WIRES WITH CODE LETTER TO CORRESPOND TO CONTACT

FILL ALL SPARE CONTACTS WITH MAXIMUM SIZE WIRES

MS25274 END CAPS

Figure 3·51. Spare Wires for Potting Connector

3-41

NAVAIR 01-1A-505 (USAF) T.O. 1-1A-14

SAFETY CAN WITH STODDARD'S SOL VENT

Figure 3-52. Cleaning Connector Prior to Potting

NOTE

Complete potting within two hours after cleaning.

6. Slide plastic mold into position.

Mate connectors before potting either part to avoid splaying contacts during the potting operation.

7. Insert potting compound prepared in accordance with directions given in section X. Fill back of connector by inserting nozzle down between wires until it almost touches back of insert (see figure 3-53). Fill slowly while moving nozzle back from insert and watch compound to be sure no air bubbles are trapped. Fill to top of mold. Tamp down the compound, if necessary, with a wooden or metal 1/8 inch dowel. Tap connector assembly on a resilient surface or vibrate mechanically to help flow the compound into all spaces and to release trapped air.

8. Insulate the ends of all spare wires. (See figure 3-51.) The preferred method of insulating a spare wire is to crimp it into an MS25274 wire end cap with tool MS25037-1A. Nonstandard end caps are also available for either stripped or unstripped wire.

3-42

POTTING COMPOUND DISPENSER FILLING CONNECTOR

POTTING MOL D

a. FILLING WITH COMPOUND

APPROX. 6"

b. CURING

Figure 3-53. Filling and Curing Potting Connector

NAVAIR 01-1A-605 (USAF) T.O. 1-1A-14

9. Immediately after filling each connector, tie the wires together loosely about 6 inches back from connector. Make sure that wires are centrally located in the connector so that each wire is completely surrounded by potting compound. Suspend the assembly by placing the tie over a nail so that the potting material remains level, as shown in figure 3-53, and allow to air cure for at least 1-1/2 hours at 75°F without any movement. Make sure that the tie is applied after potting.

WARNING

The accelerator contains a toxic lead compound. Avoid excessive skin contact. Clean hands thoroughly after using. Use gloves.

10. Carefully place assembly, still suspended from nail, into drying oven for 3 to 4 hours at lOO°F, or air cure at 75°F for 24 hours.

NOTE

Full cure with maximum electrical characteristics is not achieved until 24 hours after potting. Do not perform any electrical insulation resistance tests until this period has passed.

II. Apply a light film of lubrication oil to all exterior metal surfaces after potting compound is completely cured.

12. If the plug does not have an O-ring or gasket seal on the barrel, as shown in figure 3-54, then install an MS29S13 O-ring selected from table 3-7. Roll O-ring tightly against shoulder of plug inside coupling ring. Plug barrel and O-ring must be clean and dry before assembly.

Do not use two rings. The added thickness of a second ring will prevent proper mating of contacts.

POTTING COMPOUND

O-RING

T.bl.3-7. O-Ring Sizes for AN Type Connectors
MS29513
Plug Size O-Ring Thickness O-Ring ID Dash Nos,
8S .070 inches .312 inches -10
lOS & 108L .070 inches .364 -12
12 & 128 .070 .489 - 14
14 & 148 .070 .489 -14
16 & 168 .070 .614 -16
18 .070 .739 -18
20 .070 .864 -20
22 .070 .989 -22
24 .070 1.114 -24
28 .070 1.364 -28
32 .070 1.364 -28
36 .103 1. 737 -132
40 .103 1.987 -136
44 .103 2.237 -HO
48 .103 2.487 -144
3-43 COUPLING NUT

Figure 3-54. Installation of O-Ring on Potted Connector

NAVAIR 01-1A-505 (USAF) T.O. 1-1A-14

b. The procedure for crimping wire end caps with standard tool MS2S037-IA is as follows:

I. Select an end cap of the correct size for the wire to be insulated (see table 3-8), and crimp it to the wire with the MS2S037 tool.

2. Make sure the locator is properly positioned behind the lower nest. Position the wire end cap in the correct die nest (color of cap insulation matches color coding on tool handle) with the closed end of the cap resting against the locator.

3. Insert the stripped wire so that the end of the stripped wire is seated against the closed end of the cap, and the insulation against the metal sleeve of the cap.

4. Close tool handles to crimp end cap to wire, until ratchet releases and the tool opens. Remove the crimped assembly.

Table 3-8. Wire End Caps and Crimping Tools

MS Number

Color

Wire Size

3-59. BENDIX-SCINTILLA MS CLASS A CONNECTORS. Bendix Class A connectors are installed as follows (see figure 3-55):

a. Remove back shell by unscrewing from body. If the back shell is too tight to be loosened by hand, attach the connector to mating connector shell attached to fixture (as illustrated in figure 340) and use a strap wrench or padded jaw pliers to loosen back shell. Do not remove coupling nut from plug body.

Never use pliers with unpadded jaws to disassemble or reassemble connectors.

b. If all contacts are size ] 2 or smaller, no further disassembly is required. Larger contacts such as size 8,4. or o may be removed by applying pressure on solder well end by means of steel or bakelite rod slightly smaller in diameter than the solder well. See figure 3-70 for arbor press fixture suitable for this operation. Table 3-9 lists diameter of rods for removing contacts.

MS25274-1 MS25274-2 MS25274-3 MS25274-4

Yellow Red Blue Yellow

26 - 24 22 - 18 16 - 14 12 - 10

SLEEVE

COUPLING NUT

(DO NOT REMOVE FROM BODY ASSEMBLY)

DO NOT LUBRICATE THIS FACE

CLAMP

3-44

Figure 3-55. Installation of Bendix Class A and C Connectors

NAVAIR 01-1A-505 (USAF) T.O. 1-1A-14

Table 3·9. Contact Removal Tool Diameter

Contact Rod Diameter
Size ~inches~
0 .450
4 .312
8 .187 Hold the connector so that pressure is applied in a straight line with contacts. Pushing at an angle may damage the contacts. Bent contacts must be replaced. Do not attempt to straighten damaged contacts.

c. Install MS30S7B cable clamp as described in 3·74.

d. Slide insulating sleeves over each wire in bundle.

Sleeves should be placed one inch back from wire ends to avoid burning during soldering operation. See table 3·3 for sleeviog sizes.

e. Solder wires to larger contacts removed in step b.

See 3·16 through 3·20 for soldering instructions.

f. Reinstall large contacts by pushing them through rear of insert until seated. Use ethyl alcohol as a lubricant, if necessary. Install each contact, when cool, before proceeding to solder next contact. This will help avoid errors. Use a bakelite screwdriver to aid in seating contacts. (See figure 3·56.)

Use care not to fold thin lip of rubber into hole with contact.

g. Solder wire to remaining smaller contacts using one of the methods described in 3·15 through 3·20.

h. Slide insulating sleeves over cooled connections until they bottom against insert.

i. Slide back shell down over wire bundle and hand tighten to body. Use strap wrench or padded jaw pliers to tighten back shell until it bottoms.

j. Slide telescoping sleeves, if required, through gland until flush with inside edge. Hold telescoping sleeves in back of cable clamping nut while engaging threads. Do not release telescoping sleeves until gland seats on back shell.

Figure 3·56. Reinstalling Contact in Bendix Resilient Insert

k. Tighten cable clamp with strap wrench or padded jaw pliers until it bottoms. Mate connector with mating shell in fixture while tightening cable clamp.

Keep all parts free of dirt and foreign materia Clean dirty parts with ethyl alcohol and relubri ito all threads with Military Specification MI L·e; -32 7/s grease. Relubricate the indicated parts of gland an.I tapered sleeve, as shown in figure 3-75, with petrolatum.

3-60. BENDIX-SCINTILLA MS CLASS C CON~~H TORS. Bendix Class C connectors are pressurized and cal must be given to avoid breaking the pressure seal. Installtion procedure for Bendix Class C connectors is the same" for Bendix Class A connectors. (See figure V'S.)

Never remove insert or contacts from Class l' connector as this would break the pressure seal incorporated in the unit at the time of factory assembly.

NAVAIR 01-1A-505 (USAF) T.O. 1-1A-14

3-61. BENDIX-SCINTILLA MS CLASS E CONNECTORS. Bendix Class E connectors are installed as follows:

a. Remove cable clamp by unscrewing from back shell.

Slide cable clamp over wire bundle.

Do not remove contacts from receptacles for soldering.

b. Check tapered sleeve and grommet for thin film petrolatum lubricant on indicated surfaces. (See figure 3·57.)

h. Slide insulating sleeves over cooled connections until they bottom against insert.

c. Slide tapered sleeve over wire bundle.

i. Slide back shell down over wire bundle and hand tighten to body shell.

d. Insert pretinned wires through proper holes in grommet.

j. Examine insulating sleeves. They should not project over shoulder in back shell.

NOTE

k. Use strap wrench or padded jaw pliers to tighten back shell until it bottoms.

Grommet is coded to match insert coding.

1. Carefully push grommet down over wire until it is seated in shoulder of back shell.

Use alcohol as a lubricant if necessary. After wires are threaded through grommet, use air blast to dry alcohol.

e. Unscrew back shell from body assembly and slide over wire bundle. If coupling nut is removed, push nut back on wire bundle with threaded end forward.

Do not allow wires to fold inside back shell.

f. Install insulating sleeves on wires.

m. Fill all unused holes with MS25251 grommet sealing plugs. Sizes are listed in table 3-10.

g. Solder wires to contacts as described for BendixScintilla Class A connectors in 3-59.

n. Slide tapered sleeve and cable clamp over grommet and hand tighten.

CLAMP

COUPLING NUT

(DO NOT REMOVE FROM BODY ASSEMBLY)

DO NOT LUBRICATE THIS FACE

Figure 3-57. Installation of Bendix Class E Connectors

346