You are on page 1of 48

163

Chapter 4
Emotion Expressions

The first important gift for which we have film to thank was in a certain sense the  
rediscovery of the human face.  Film has revealed to us the human face with unexampled 
clarity in its tragic as well as grotesque, threatening as well as blessed expression.

The second gift is that of visual empathy: in the purest sense the expressionistic 
representation of thought processes.  No longer will we take part purely externally in the 
workings of the soul of the characters in film.  We will no longer  limit ourselves  to 
seeing the effects of feelings, but will experience them in our own souls, from the instant 
of their inception on, from the first flash of thought through to the logical last conclusion 
of the idea.
­­Fritz Lang1

Character Emotions
164

Many cognitive film theorists have argued that film and emotion are closely connected, 

yet they tend to be interested more in spectator emotions than in character emotions, or to 

be more precise, their analysis of character emotions is focused on their role in generating 

spectator emotions.2  As a device of character construction, emotion expressions 

(principally of the voice and face) are another versatile tool that demand to be considered 

in their own right.  And like typing and mindreading, emotion expressions can be shaped 

toward aesthetic ends.  In this chapter I argue that expressions of basic emotions such as 

anger and fear are universally produced and recognized, and implicit in this discussion is 

the notion that one appeal of cinema is its ability to represent these expressions that 

transcend time and culture.  But I also argue, more importantly, that emotion expressions 

can be understood only in a social or narrative context, and that filmmakers can 

manipulate both the context and the expressions to generate interest in character.  It 

follows, naturally, that one feature of many films with an interest in character, such as 

American independent films, is their interest in exploiting emotion expressions in relation 

to narrative situations.  As I argue in relation to Welcome to the Dollhouse and Hard  

Eight, carrying over the discussion from Chapter 3, one especially significant technique is 

the withholding of conventional expressions of emotion or of reliable contextual cues 
165

necessary for the recognition of clear character emotions.  As with those films’ efforts to 

frustrate mindreading and attribution processes, the careful frustration of our attempts at 

emotion recognition also produces effects of complexity and depth and demands a more 

active engagement with the construction of character.  It also functions within the basic 

viewing strategies outlined in Chapter 1, demanding the exploration of identity, making 

narrative form playfully engaging, and offering a contrast with the comparative simplicity 

of mainstream cinema’s characters.  So as with the other aspects of social cognition I have 

introduced, emotion expressions are natural processes that are exploited by a cultural 

form.

The Face

The human face has always been a key feature of cinema’s appeal to filmmakers and 

spectators alike, one source of its special powers.  This is hardly surprising, given the 

face’s significance as the emblem of our very identities.  If you ask to see a picture of 

someone, you typically aren’t interested in an image of their teeth, knees, or liver.  When 

you look at a picture of your face, you say, “That’s me!”  The face is the only part of a 

person that can be abstracted in this way from the rest of the body; it is the best 

synecdoche we have for ourselves.  
166

Scholars have long recognized the communicative power of faces.  Study in this 

field dates to the enormous interest in physiognomy in ancient Greece and “face­reading” 

even before that in China and the Near East.3  The study of physiognomy, which the 

Oxford English Dictionary defines as “the art of judging character and disposition from 

features of the face,” has long been recognized as pseudoscience, but interest in the face 

as an index of mental states has never abated.  The Darwinian study of facial expressions 

as a product of evolution long ago filled the place once held by physiognomy and face­

reading, though more recently research has shown that social perceivers agree about links 

between facial features and character traits, which may sometimes even have some 

validity.4  

From a Darwinian perspective, interest in faces is not as the outward expressions 

of “character” but as a primary means, along with our bodies and voices, of expressing 

emotions.  Indeed, from such a perspective, emotions and facial expressions have a close 

evolutionary connection.5  Many of the emotion­expressions that are universally 

recognized, such as baring teeth to show anger and opening the mouth to show surprise, 

have a functional purpose that precedes the communication of emotional states.  Baring 

teeth threatens an enemy, while opening the mouth is part of taking in breath.  Each of 

these actions is practical given the situation in which one feels either angry (because one 
167

has been wronged and will have to defend oneself) or surprised (breathing in will 

facilitate alertness to the cause of the surprise and readiness in response to it).  

Darwin theorized that emotions preceded the universally recognizable facial 

expressions that express them.  Emotions themselves have adaptive value: it pays to be 

afraid of things that could harm you, to be angry at those who wrong you, to be disgusted 

by things that could make you sick.   The facial expressions that accompanied these 

emotions, which originally had only practical functions, became habituated over time to 

the point that they took on the significant communicative role they have always since had. 

The ability to communicate our emotional states in turn is greatly beneficial to any 

species that requires the extensive social organizations characteristic of primate societies. 

Being able to communicate your feelings to your conspecifics gives you a definite 

advantage.

One of Darwin’s arguments in his classic work on this topic, The Expression of  

the Emotions in Man and Animals, concerns the universality of emotions.  There has long 

been debate over whether specific emotions themselves, and also whether the facial 

expressions of those emotions, vary from culture to culture, or whether they are universal 

or pan­cultural.  As an evolutionary theory, Darwin’s argues for the universality of 

emotions.   More recent research has basically confirmed this position, identifying several 
168

basic emotions and facial expressions of them that are recognized pan­culturally, even by 

members of pre­literate tribes who have had very little or no exposure to Western culture 

and media.  The seven emotions, as Paul Ekman and his fellow researchers proposed to 

name them, are happiness, surprise, fear, sadness, anger, disgust/contempt, and interest.6

 Ekman and his colleagues went farther than just ascertaining whether and how 

many facial expression are universal.  They set about to code the muscles of the face to 

better understand how each facial expression is produced anatomically.  They found that 

the muscles can be divided into action units (AU’s), of which we have 43, and identified 

about 3,000 meaningful combinations of these 43 action units.  The catalogue of all of 

these facial actions and their combinations is called the Facial Action Coding System, or 

FACS.  The few hundred people who can read the face using FACS report that their 

interpersonal experience is completely transformed.7  And apparently, animators at Pixar 

and Dreamworks use FACS to create facial expressions for characters in feature films.8

What about cultural specificity?  What accounts for differences among cultures in 

the expression of emotion?  The standard account in the facial expression literature holds 

that what varies is not the experience of emotion itself, nor the facial expressions 

corresponding to basic emotions in different cultures.  It’s not as though a smile of joy for 

Westerners means terror in some other culture.  What does vary is customs for who may 
169

display emotions and in what situations.  These are called display rules.9  People often try 

to display an expression for an emotion they are not experiencing, or to mask one emotion 

with another.  For example, if you are trying to tell a lie or to smile for a picture you 

might feel one emotion but display—or attempt to display—another.10

To test this hypothesis, Ekman ran an experiment using Japanese and American 

subjects.11  It is widely believed that in Japanese society, there are cultural expectations 

regarding the facial display of negative emotions (which are also gender­ and age­

specific).   In particular, Japanese are known to mask negative emotions with smiles, and 

as a result the smile means something different in Japanese culture than it does in the 

West, because Japanese expect many smiles to be less than genuine.12  In the Ekman 

experiment, a “stress” film is shown to two groups of students, one a group of American 

students in California and one a group of Japanese students in Tokyo.  This is a film made 

up of things that are difficult to watch and that leave ordinary viewers pretty shocked. 

They showed each film to the students twice: once with the student alone in a room (but 

observed through a hidden camera), and once with the student observed by a technician 

(of their own culture) in a white coat and carrying a clipboard.  Ekman found that when 

alone in the room, the American and Japanese students reacted with the same facial 

expressions.  But when another person was present, the Japanese subjects attempted to 
170

mask their emotions with smiles.  The display rule in Japanese society is to hide or mask 

emotions when in the presence of authority figures, but this is not the rule in America. 

However, the Japanese subjects were betrayed by their faces, as many people find it 

impossible to effectively hide strong emotions of disgust or fear and Ekman, using the 

FACS, could even detect indications of emotions under the masking. 

Indeed, people are typically fairly proficient at distinguishing real emotional 

expressions from sham emotional expressions.  If we were more proficient, we would be 

better detectors of lying and cheating, but in general we are able to distinguish a true (or 

“Duchenne”) smile, produced by genuine amusement, from an affected one, put on when 

asked to pose for a picture.  A Duchenne smile combines a movement of muscles around 

the mouth (called a “simple smile”) with a movement of muscles around the eyes.  A 

simple smile is easily recognized as non­genuine.13

More recent research has identified a more fine­tuned sense of cultural variability 

of emotional expression.  The overwhelming majority of studies of emotional universality 

find that subjects identify emotions displayed by someone of a different culture at a rate 

greater than chance, making the case for some degree of universalism incontrovertible. 

Yet they also find that in­group subjects identify each other’s emotion expressions at a 

higher rate than those of out­group members.  Out­group expressions are more accurate 
171

when the different cultures are closely connected (e.g., by sharing a national border). 

Within a given culture, minority subjects judge majority members’ expressions more 

accurately than the reverse.  Indeed, minorities judge majority expressions more 

accurately than majorities judge each other!  This makes sense intuitively: the success of 

minority members is increased as they are better able to interact with majority members.14 

So this suggests that rather than absolute, the recognition of facial expressions of emotion 

is modestly universal.  Different societies do not possess totally different systems, but 

neither are they identical.

The Voice

The representation of the voice is another cinematic narrative technique with functions 

and possibilities similar to those of the face, yet historically the voice has been given less 

attention by film critics, theorists, and historians.  This lesser emphasis may be explained 

by two factors.  First, cinema existed for three decades before sound recording and sound­

image synchronization became standard, so the representation of the voice did not seem 

“cinematic”  enough to warrant substantial attention as a means of storytelling.  Second, 

the voice is not uniquely cinematic; music, literature, and drama used voices for 
172

thousands of years before cinema was invented.  So paying attention to the storytelling 

possibilities of vocal expression in cinema did not help differentiate cinema from its rival 

arts at a time when this kind of differentiation was a paramount interest of film critics.15 

Like the face, the voice is an emblem and index of an individual’s identity.  Like 

the face, the voice is a means communication that facilitates social organization, and like 

the face, some vocal expressions of emotion are recognized cross­culturally.16   The most 

commonly identified emotions recognized vocally across cultures include anger, fear, 

sadness, and joy.17  There is evidence that the physiological and environmental 

components of emotional experiences have a causal relation to vocal characteristics: 

increases in rates of breathing and blood flow when a subject is taken by surprise affect 

the voice.   Yet cultural specificity also has its part in this story.   The display rules that 

apply in explaining the cultural variability of facial expressions affect vocal expressions in 

more or less the same way in the same circumstances.  A person smiling to mask her fear 

would also try to speak in even, measured tones and not in a breathless fit of anguish.18

The evolution of vocal expressions of emotion runs parallel to the evolution of 

facial expressions of emotion.  Darwin considered facial and vocal expressions to be 

equally significant.  Vocal expressions of emotion, like facial ones, are products of natural 

selection. Many species communicate vocally in ways we might consider simplistic by 
173

comparison with our own species’ vocal abilities, yet, as Darwin argued, our non­verbal 

vocal expressions evolved from these ancestors of our species.  Some of the sounds 

produced by the human vocal apparatus, such as shrieks of pain, are produced the same 

way in many other species.  But only human beings have the control over the acoustic 

properties of their vocalizations necessary to be able to sing and to communicate using 

language.

We often say that when someone is experiencing a given emotion, regardless of 

what they may say or how they may look we can “hear it in their voice.”  Research 

confirms that this is indeed the case: the human voice functions to express emotions 

regardless of which words are spoken.  Listeners can detect basic vocal emotions when 

produced by actors, with some exceptions.19

We express emotions vocally (non­verbally) by varying our voice’s acoustic 

properties; as with facial expressions, we are able to recognize cross­cultural vocal 

expressions of basic emotions such as anger and sadness.  Researchers into non­verbal 

communication of emotion have coded the acoustic properties of some vocal emotion 

expressions much in the same way as FACS correlated facial musculature to emotion 

expressions. The most important acoustic aspects of the voice for emotional expression 

are loudness (intensity, measured in decibels), pitch (fundamental frequency, measured in 
174

hertz), and time, which includes both rate of speech and pauses between words.20  Each of 

these can be further broken down into components, and each may vary to greater or lesser 

extents.  For example, anger is generally characterized by a quick rate and a high 

frequency, and by high variability in both of these qualities.  Sadness is generally 

characterized by a slow rate, low frequency, low intensity, and little variability of these 

qualities.21  For joy, sadness, and anger, recognition of vocal expressions is four or five 

times greater than chance.22  Yet some emotions are more difficult to isolate in discrete 

vocal expressions: disgust is recognized at a rate scarcely better than chance.  However, 

disgust may be a special case, as it is less likely than other emotions to be expressed in 

ordinary conversational speech.  Disgust typically comes out in very brief “affect bursts,” 

which combine vocal and facial expressions.  A typical case would be making a face and 

exclaiming a monosyllabic expression of displeasure.23

Still more modes of expression exist.  Gesture or body language is another means 

of emotional display that psychologists have studied, though to a lesser degree than voices 

and faces.  Of course, the body is a significant tool in the actor’s kit.  Yet more and more, 

the mainstream film conventions of framing and cutting emphasize faces at the expense 

of bodies.24  If John Wayne were acting today, his cowboy gait would be less prominent, 

yet we would see more of his friendly smile and his angry glare.  Bodily expressions of 
175

emotion are a significant form of cinematic narration and characterization but the 

literature on this topic is rather thin, and I leave further discussion of it for future 

research.

Emotion Expressions : A Closer Look

There are three basic claims arising out of this discussion of research on expressions of 

emotion.  The first is that the basic emotions themselves are universal: no matter the 

cultural or historical specificity of a person’s background, she still experiences the same 

happiness, fear, disgust, etc., as any other person.  There are no remote tribes in which 

happiness itself is unknown, or in which they have a different basic emotion, distinct from 

happiness, unknown to Westerners. 

The second claim is that basic expressions of happiness (smiling), fear (furrowing 

the brow), disgust (pursing the lips), etc., are also cross­cultural.  There are also no 

remote tribes in which no one ever smiles, or in which everyone uses some expression we 

have never seen to communicate happiness.  Indeed, the notion of display rules suggests 

that not only are expressions of emotion universal, but that people know how to produce 

many of them independent of experiencing the emotions that they communicate.  If 
176

asked, you could make a happy, fearful, or disgusted face without having to think much 

about how to do it.  Both of these universality claims have significant implications for 

understanding how characterization works in cinema, as we shall see. 25

A third, implicit, claim of this research is more basic yet.  The face may or may 

not be an accurate index of a person’s character or disposition, as physiognomists thought, 

but it is a reliable source of information about a person’s emotions.  This is the kind of 

information people seek when they scan the faces of others.  By looking at someone’s 

face, it’s hard to tell with much certainty whether or not they are virtuous or ill­humored. 

You can generally tell their age, ethnicity, and sex (though not always).  But what you are 

generally looking for in a face, within the parameters of a given context, is information 

not only about personality traits and the intentional states, but also about affect states such 

as emotions and moods.  These are what faces are best at communicating.  This is also a 

universality claim: in all cultures, people treat faces as emotion­indicators and scan faces 

for feelings.  And most significantly, it follows that the ability to read emotions in faces 

must universal, just like the ability to express them.  Both the sending and receiving of 

facial emotion information is a product of natural selection.26

The same claim applies in a slightly modified form to vocal expressions.  The 

voice is used to communicate more than just emotion; the words chosen may convey 
177

many kinds of meaning.  So too the face may communicate several kinds of information 

(a wink might mean “yes,” a wince might say “that hurt” or “this is embarrassing”).  But, 

among other things, the non­verbal aspect of speech functions as an index of emotions. 

In this way it is similar to music; both voices and music communicate emotion even 

without the meaning conveyed by words.  The Beatles’s “Help!” is a cheerful song in 

spite of its desperate lyrics.  There is also evidence that the acoustic properties 

corresponding to particular emotional meanings in music are the same as those applying 

to vocal expressions (i.e., the high pitch and intensity characteristic of fearful speech is 

understood in music to be fearful—think of Bernard Herrmann’s Psycho violins).27

These claims have significant implications for the study of cinematic narrative in 

its specificity as a distinct storytelling medium.28  Unlike literature, moving­image media 

such as cinema use images of faces as a primary narrative technique.  While there are, of 

course, many films that contain no close­up images of faces, rare is the narrative feature 

film that eschews the face.  To make such a film would be to engage in a kind of avant­

garde practice, an experimental effort to break the rules and see what happens.  There is 

also a distinction here to be made between moving­image media such as film, television, 

and video games on one hand, and theater on the other.  Since the introduction of moving 

pictures, the live­ness and immediacy of theater have been its selling points.  But what 
178

cinema lacks in these qualities, it makes up for in its ability to represent faces on a large 

scale.  

Filmmakers rely heavily on images of the face to communicate emotion 

information, and to generate emotional response in spectators.29  The universality claims 

above explain, to a large extent, the power of movies to appeal across cultures and 

historical periods.  Spectators approach the image of the face primed to recognize the 

same emotions, in the same expressions, regardless of their background.  Of course, 

literary narrative creates emotions for characters too, but by other means.  The immediacy 

and directness of the face make for vivid and direct characterizations and allow the 

audience to connect with the characters’ interior states in a powerful way.  However, the 

literary comparison illustrates well that there are other means of representing a 

character’s emotional experience, such as verbal description (much more common in 

literature than film or television) and folk­psychology inference.  Moving­image media 

make use of these techniques too, but the availability of images of the face make them 

secondary.

 Like facial expressions, vocal expressions are a more direct and vivid means of 

characterization than is available in literature.  Yet there is no argument from medium 

specificity to be made regarding the voice.  The silent era produced many masterpieces 
179

that relied on an aesthetic of voiceless performance.  Since then, however, the aesthetic 

has changed to the point that a narrative feature film without voices would be highly 

unusual.30  The contemporary aesthetic, which is the basis of cinematic characterization, 

places the face and voice at the top of all stylistic hierarchies.  Faces (and by extension, 

bodies) are the most important component of mise en scene and are the paramount 

concern of cinematography, especially in terms of framing.  Voices are the most 

important sound component, taking precedence over music and “noise.”  In the vast 

majority of scenes, filmmakers cut to follow both facial and vocal cues above all other 

forms of narrative information.

Problems in Expression Recognition

Underlying the above discussion are several assumptions about expressions of emotion 

that must be qualified to understand how such expressions function both in real life and in 

fictional representations.  One assumption is that each expression, whether facial or vocal, 

conveys or displays one and only one emotion.  Most research in this field follows just 

this logic, asking subjects to identify emotions expressed in a static image of a face or in a 

brief recording (a few seconds long) of a person speaking.  The examples are typically 
180

chosen to be typical expressions of a single emotion which the researcher predicts the 

subjects will recognize clearly.  The subjects are often given a fixed set of choices from a 

list of basic emotions.  Thus the results of the research show that subjects identify single 

emotions for each display.31  Yet in actual settings, it is common for subjects to 

experience more than one emotion, and it would follow that they also may express more 

than one.  When subjects were asked to describe another person’s emotional expressions, 

they generally used more than one term for each emotional episode, e.g., they described 

someone being angry and jealous, or sad and grieving.32  There is typically far more 

nuance and complexity to any instance of emotional experience and expression than the 

division of facial and vocal expressions into seven basic categories would suggest.

Second, implicit in this discussion has been the suggestion that all instances of 

expressions of emotion are equally recognizable.  That is, either you are expressing anger 

in your voice or face, or you are not.  Similarly, it has been implicit that all of the various 

different emotion expressions are equally recognizable.  I made an exception for vocal 

expressions of disgust, but in general the various affect states were not shown to vary in 

strength.   Yet some emotions are more easily and universally recognized than others.33  In 

practice, there is a threshold of recognition for emotional expressions, and varying 
181

degrees of intensity.  It is often difficult to discern another person’s affect states, whether 

because of their efforts to mask them or because of other factors.  We often speculate 

about what someone else is feeling—we even speculate about our own emotions.  It is not 

always easy to put your finger on what a given pattern of behavior really means.  Some of 

the most interesting filmic representations of emotion, such as European art films of the 

1960s,  show a character’s face and voice to be, to some extent, inscrutable.  Sometimes 

it’s obvious that a person is afraid; but often it’s hard to say what a face means. 

Bergman’s Persona and Resnais’s Last Year at Marienbad are good examples of films in 

which faces function as mysteries.

In one study of particular relevance to the question of how emotion expressions 

function in film, psychologists James Carroll and James Russell analyzed facial 

expressions of emotion in four Hollywood films, Dead Poets Society, Terms of  

Endearment, Kramer vs. Kramer, and Ordinary People, all of which had been praised by 

Leonard Maltin for their realism, acting, or general quality.  They identified more than 

100 episodes in which viewers (psychology students) agreed that a character was 

experiencing one of the basic emotions, and agreed on which emotion.  They found that, 

with the exception of happiness, the basic emotions were rarely coupled with the facial 
182

expressions Ekman’s influential theory would predict.  Most of the time, no prototype 

emotion was displayed, yet some action units, such as a brow raise, were consistently seen 

for some emotions (surprise, in this case).  

This point underlies Carroll and Russell’s theory that facial expressions generally 

function at the level of the AUs, and that the seven basic expressions are rarely—if ever—

seen in everyday life.  They suggest that the seven expressions of basic emotions are 

prototypes combining many of the different AUs that one would display for a given 

emotion.  They are mental prototypes used in miming emotions or in acting guides, but 

are really idealizations of expressions and are ecologically rare or nonexistent.34  

This experiment shows that in cinema as well as in real life, emotions may be 

expressed in subtle or partial ways that do not involve the classic facial patterns we think 

of as an “angry face” or a “surprised face.”  Yet with happiness, the Duchenne smile was 

commonly observed. This is clearly the most recognizable, unambiguous, and universal 

of all facial expressions.  It is produced in instances of genuine happiness or amusement 

but not the other contexts in which one might smile, as in polite smiles, miserable smiles, 

smiles of fear or contempt, and supercilious “Chaplin” smiles.35

Third, this discussion has assumed that emotions may be detected from brief, 

discreet expressions of an isolated face or voice.  But in ecological settings a person’s 
183

emotional experience is expressed in multiple modes.  One does not ordinarily use an 

angry voice absent an angry face, angry body language, angry words, and a context 

producing anger.  While facial expressions are often seen to offer the best evidence of 

emotional experience, in practice people are receptive to all of the modes of interpersonal 

communication.  When asked to describe another person’s emotional experience, those 

same subjects discussed context in narrative terms (they told a story about the person’s 

situation), and referred to various vocal and bodily expressions.36  This demonstrates that 

emotion expressions, and the understanding we have of them, are a product of many cues; 

some of them may even be contradictory.  Contradictory cues may coexist just in the 

vocal channel, as one’s words and one’s voice might express different feelings.  While 

there are emotional qualities that people express purely non­verbally, in practice vocal 

expressions occur in combination with language.  It may often be the case that subjects 

must discern someone’s emotions when their words do not make them explicit.  Indeed, 

when asked to describe emotional episodes they observed, subjects would rarely refer to 

explicit descriptions such as ,“I’m so angry!”37  Yet it would be foolish to doubt that the 

verbal component of vocal expression is negligible.  Words are one part of the multi­

channel array that is emotional expression.
184

This leads to a fourth point, which is that people’s understandings of each other’s 

emotional expressions may be influenced to a large extent by context.38  The methods of 

studying expression recognition typically use still pictures of faces abstracted from any 

situation.  Yet contexts can make a big difference in determining what a face means.  For 

example, athletes often express the joy of victory with faces that Ekman would code as 

angry (accompanied by shouting and aggressive gestures such as fist­pumping) or sad 

(crying).  No one who is watching the game—or even highlights of it that make clear that 

these are winners’ faces—would mistake the players’ affect states. Expressions of 

emotion always occur in context and the judgments people make of other people’s 

emotions are based on a combination of information about the person and the situation. 

Indeed one of the defining features of emotion is appraisal: one generally becomes afraid 

only in the presence of something to be feared.  Ecologically, it would be highly unusual 

to encounter emotionally expressive faces absent any context. Even if we grant that clear 

facial expressions of basic emotions exist, which the above example might cast some 

doubt on, they have meaning only within the realm of the social.  

This means that vocal and facial expressions are not the only way that spectators 

have of understanding a character’s emotions.  Inferences based on narrative context (i.e., 

folk psychology) and causal attributions are also possible means of establishing emotion, 
185

as are the direct techniques of narration such as voice­over.  The claim of this section is, 

rather, that faces and voices are primarily emotion­expressers, and that narrative feature 

films make extensive use of them for this purpose.  Yet because of the interaction of 

modes of characterization, the emotional content of a character cannot be split off from 

the other information we have about him.  A person’s environment (i.e., a narrative 

situation) is fundamental to this and every aspect of characterization.

Fifth, this discussion has assumed that the most significant, if not the only, 

function of faces is as emotion expressers.  But although the majority of research into 

facial expressions is concerned with emotion expressions, there are obviously other 

functions of facial expressions.  Faces and voices may be analyzed on a scale of arousal, 

from minimally aroused to neutral to highly aroused.39  Arousal can be associated with 

emotion expressions (surprised faces show high arousal, sad faces low arousal) or they 

may not.  Someone may just look or sound sleepy or hyper.  Given specific contexts, faces 

and voices can be indices of many non­emotion states, such as alertness, hunger, physical 

or mental health, or boredom.   A facial expression may have non­emotional referential 

meaning about intentional rather than affect states.  Rolling the eyes can communicate 

doubt or derision; furrowing the brow can communicate skepticism; licking the lips can 

communicate pleasure; opening the eyes wide can communicate eagerness to learn more; 
186

and smiling and nodding can communicate agreement.  Facial expressions can also have 

clearly coded meanings within a given culture or subculture.  Exaggerated winking can be 

a silly way of saying, “I mean this ironically.”  Ordinary winking can convey a variety of 

meanings.

Finally, although there is strong evidence supporting modest universality claims, 

there are still significant differences of degree of recognition among subjects of different 

backgrounds.  Some of the difficulty in identifying an emotional expression as such may 

be a function of cultural difference.40  Recognition follows a pattern of gradation, and not 

all subjects’ responses fall on the same point of the scale.  So while cinema’s universal, 

cross­cultural appeal might be explained in part by the scientific research I have 

described, the preference of Americans for American cinema might also be explained by 

it, since each culture is better at recognizing its own expressions of emotions than it is at 

recognizing those of other cultures.

To summarize these clarifications, the existence of universal emotions and 

universal expressions of them does not mean that there is no room for ambiguity and 

nuance in our understanding of how expressions function ecologically, and by extension, 

in representations of human experience.  Emotions may be expressed in combination with 

each other and may be easy or difficult to recognize.  Emotion expressions are a multi­
187

channel phenomenon, not simply vocal or facial displays, and they are understood and 

interpreted in a social context.  They are combined with other facial and vocal 

communication which may not contain emotion content, and which may be culturally 

variable.  And emotion expressions themselves are to some extent culturally variable and 

thus not absolutely universal.  Not all subjects are able with 100% accuracy to understand 

all other subjects’ emotion expressions.  There are degrees of fallibility.  All of these 

qualifications offer direction for the application of theories of emotional expression to the 

analysis of cinematic narrative.

Emotion Expressions in Film

The main obstacle to applying these ideas about expressions of emotion to film is that a 

film is a representation of human actions, not the actions themselves.  An actor portrays a 

character who is sad or afraid because of events in her world.  One might think that unless 

she is a hard­core method actor, however, she is simulating the emotion.  So how do 

actors convey emotions so impressively that they hold audiences captivated?  This is not 

the topic of this project, which is concerned primarily with the spectator’s 

comprehension.41  However, in the case of emotions it is impossible to divorce 
188

comprehension from other levels of involvement, since one way that people ordinarily 

respond to the emotional expressions of others is by feeling what they feel.  This 

phenomenon is known as emotional contagion.  When you are around a cheerful person, 

you become cheerful, but a depressed person makes you feel down it the dumps.42  This is 

true of films as well: an angry character, such as Peter Finch’s mad­as­hell newscaster in 

Network, causes the audience to feel his anger.  Obviously, not all film characters’ 

emotions are duplicated in spectators; unsympathetic characters are less likely to generate 

this effect.  Granting that, how do actors express emotions so convincingly that they are 

able to infect the audience with them?

Emotional contagion depends on facial, vocal, and postural mimicry.   Darwin 

recognized that many species mimic facial expressions seemingly automatically, and there 

is substantial evidence showing that infants mimic their parents’ facial and vocal 

expressions and vice versa.  Facial expressions are caused, among other things, by 

autonomic nervous system (ANS) activity, and it would seem that the causation runs both 

ways.  When you smile in mimicry of someone else’s genuine happy smile, your ANS 

activity is that of a smiling, happy person.  In experiments, researchers had subjects form 

facial expressions without telling them to display a particular emotion, by giving them 

instructions about which muscles to move, and measured their ANS activity.  They found 
189

that even without any context in which to feel particular emotions, the subjects showed 

the ANS patterns of someone experiencing them.  Film spectators mimic facial 

expressions of film characters and “catch” their feelings in the process.

A new conception of acting, and in particular of method acting, is suggested by 

the idea of emotional contagion.  One standard simplified description of method acting is 

that an actor uses a memory of an emotional experience to produce a performance of a 

character going through the same emotion.43  This is supposed to produce a more 

authentic rendering than mimicking a character’s outward appearance or pretending to be 

that person.  Emotion memory is an actor’s way of getting into the part and has become a 

standard notion in American film acting, to the point that even if the technique is not 

being used the idea of the actor taking on the character’s interiority is commonplace.  Yet 

mimicry is an effective means of producing an emotional experience, as emotional 

contagion demonstrates.  Facial and vocal expressions are both causes and effects of 

emotional experience.  They are all part of the same process, not the end­point results 

from a stimulus.  It may sound odd, but by pretending to be happy, it is possible to 

become happy.  

Still, aren’t there differences between acted expressions of emotion and genuine 

ones?  Undoubtedly there are, but it would take a specialist in the coding of facial and 
190

vocal expressions to detail them insofar as they constitute variations in how facial action 

units or vocal acoustic parameters are utilized.  On a more general level, though, we 

might assume that representations of expressions function roughly in the same way as 

other aspects of representation. This is essentially a matter of realism.  I contend that 

expressions of emotion derive from and refer to phenomenal reality, especially from 

social intelligence, but in what way do representations of emotion expressions seem real 

and in what ways do they seem not­real?  When they seem not­real, is this an aesthetic 

effect or a failure of realism?

In general, representations are realist or stylized in varying degrees and fashions. 

That is to say that they necessarily bear some relation to reality, but that this relation has 

many permutations and combinations.  It would be a gross simplification to say that any 

representation is more or less realistic than any other.  (Is Rules of the Game more 

realistic than On the Waterfront?  According to what terms?  In what ways?  By whose 

conception of what is real or stylized?  Compared to which other films?)  Specific 

representations function by appealing to realism in certain ways and by applying the 

stylization or abstraction of reality in certain ways.  In cinema, emotion expressions may 

often be exaggerated or understated, and they may be intentionally incongruous or 
191

frustrating.  There also may be variations in quality of acting technique that make some 

performances more or less realistic or stylized, obvious or subtle, clear or obscure.  These 

variations are all historically and culturally specific, as realism at one point in film history 

will later seem laughable, and realism in one national cinema may look contrived against 

examples from another.44  But the basic materials of emotion expression are the same 

facial and vocal features that express emotions in reality.  This is because we know of no 

basic emotion terms or descriptions of facial or vocal activity that are specific to artistic 

representation.  There is no genre of film in which one observes emotion x and 

corresponding facial expression x, which is specific to the genre or more generally to 

cinema and is never observed in the real world.  Like the other aspects of characterization 

I have discussed, it is assumed that the same processes used in understanding people in 

everyday life are those used in understanding cinematic narrative.  This is the simplest 

explanation I can think of; the burden of proof is on those who support a notion of 

cinema­specific processes to show first that they exist and then that they explain our 

engagement with cinema better than the processes I have described.
192

Facial Expressions in the Construction of Character: Welcome to the Dollhouse and 
Hard Eight

Spectators attribute emotions to characters in various ways.  Characterization creates an 

emotion profile on the basis of multi­channel cues.  Each character is the product of this 

ongoing process combining information about narrative situations with visual and aural 

input.  Dawn in Welcome to the Dollhouse is a good example because her emotional 

experience is defined by simple situations and clear, basic emotions.  Welcome to the  

Dollhouse is a film in which understanding the character’s emotions are of central 

concern to the spectator, as we are invited to empathize with her plight as an awkward 

social misfit.   Dawn’s mental states are generally unambiguous and sympathetic.  At 

various points in the narrative, she experiences humiliation (shame), anger, fear, and even 

happiness.  Emotions are generally brief, and each one Dawn experiences is a response to 

a well­defined situation.

­In the first scene, Dawn is humiliated by being unable to find a place to sit in the 

cafeteria.  She is humiliated quite frequently in subsequent scenes, as when she is 

forced to watch her siblings eat her cake, when Steve implies that she is 

“retarded,” and when her family laughs at the video of her being pushed into the 

pool.
193

­At the assembly, Dawn is angered when she is showered with spitballs by the 

bullies.  She is also angered quite frequently, as when she calls her friend Ralpie a 

“faggot,” when she calls her sister “Lesbo,” and when her brother, Mark, orders 

her out of his room.  Her anger also arises whenever she feels she has been treated 

unfairly, e.g., when she is given a detention and when she is forced to dismantle 

her clubhouse.

­The best example of Dawn’s fear comes when Brandon threatens to rape her.  She 

is also made to fear Lolita, Brandon’s friend, who forces Dawn to go to the 

bathroom with the stall door open and speaks to her in menacing tones.

­Dawn’s happiness is generally connected to Steve, her brother’s band­mate whom 

she has a crush on.  She is happy when she watches him sing, when she dreams 

about him, and when she entertains him with Hawaiian Punch and leftover fish­

sticks and plays piano (badly) for him.

­We can also identify blends of emotion, i.e.,  episodes in which more than one 

emotion can be identified.  When she is brought before the principal for returning 

spitball fire and injuring a teacher, Dawn sits next to her parents and is questioned 

about her social life.  Over the principal’s shoulder, we see the bullies through the 

window mocking and taunting Dawn.  She can see them, but the others cannot. 
194

Like so many other scenes in the film, the overriding appraisal that the spectator 

makes is that Dawn is a victim of unfairness.  But her emotions are harder to pin 

down: we might believe that she is shamed by being told she has no friends, 

angered by being the one who got in trouble when the instigators got off, afraid of 

being punished, and remorseful about having caused her teacher harm. 

Note first that all of these emotion episodes are context­dependent.  These emotions are 

clear from these descriptions of them, whatever their representations.  They are 

represented in a multi­channel fashion, as the theories discussed above would predict. 

Her voice rises and quickens when she pleads her case to her teacher and her parents. 

Her facial expressions soften with smiles and wide­opened eyes when she is around 

Steve.  

In general, though, Dawn’s emotions are hardly evident at all her in facial 

expressions.   Heather Matarozzo rarely uses any classic basic emotion faces, as described 

by Ekman.  Her expressions are much more often just blank.  This is not Solondz’s 

general style; indeed most of the other characters are facially very expressive.  Dawn’s 

mother displays many clear, even exaggerated expressions of happiness, disappointment, 

anger, and fear.  Brandon displays menacing, aggressive expressions to Dawn and 

plaintive, supplicating ones to Cookie, the popular girl who snubs him.  Missy is 
195

frequently seen with smiles of happiness and Dawn’s teacher typically sneers with 

contempt.  Yet Dawn’s face is typically inexpressive.  By de­emphasizing Dawn’s face as 

an expressive technique, Solondz underscores Dawn’s difference from the other 

characters and her alienation from her family and schoolmates.  

This technique calls on us to activate assumptions about display rules: her 

stoicism in the opening scenes as well as later ones is likely a product of the suppression 

of affect states such as sadness, anger, fear, and frustration.  This in turn leads back into 

assumptions and inferences about intentionality and dispositions.  We might figure that an 

awkward misfit might suppress the display of negative emotions as a means of easing her 

social experiences, or as an attempt to overcome the negative emotions.  This might 

suggest a resilient or defiant personality, which squares with Dawn’s stubborn actions, or 

a denial of serious problems, which squares with her lack of self­awareness.  The facial 

display is itself a multidimensional cue, and by virtue of its inexpressiveness Dawn’s face 

becomes a site of ambiguity, upping the interest in Dawn’s character and, by contrast, 

making the others seem flatter.

To add to that, the film’s style underemphasizes her facial expressions by 

underlining her emotional experience using other means.  Matarozzo’s voice modulates 

frequently, from quiet and endearing to loud and whiny.  She mimics the bullies’ firm 
196

tones of voice when speaking to Missy or Marc, but she speaks in a hush when threatened 

by Lolita and Brandon.  Her humiliation when reciting her essay on “dignity” is conveyed 

by her unsure posture and her weak, hesitant voice.  This is duplicated in the assembly 

scene when she addresses the school and is, again, humiliated.   

Other stylistic means de­emphasize Dawn’s face.  Solondz cuts to long or extreme 

long shots at moments of heightened feeling to detract from Dawn’s face as an expressive 

device.  For example, when Dawn runs away from Brandon, in the scene in which he has 

said he is going to rape her, she races to a chain link fence, where we are shown her in an 

extreme long shot.  Similarly, her humiliation at being pushed into the pool is a long shot 

seen on a (TV) screen within the screen.  Solondz also uses a musical cue, with distorted, 

rhythmic electric guitar, up­tempo bass, and tom drums in scene transitions.  This cue 

becomes a shorthand for Dawn’s frustration, anger and humiliation, a refrain to sum up 

each episode of her troubled adolescence. 

  Murray Smith has discussed how Takeshi Kitano, Robert Bresson, and Wong Kar­

wai, all encourage a style of acting that is intentionally facially inexpressive or enigmatic, 

each fitting this approach to the face into a larger aesthetic system, achieving specific 

effects.  He contrasts this with the clear basic expressions in films by Hitchcock.45  I 

would suggest that facially inexpressive acting is one baseline technique of modern 
197

independent and art cinema, which may function to involve the spectator in constructing 

the character’s interiority, to increase narrative ambiguity, and to make the characters 

seem complicated and interesting.  Dawn’s emotions are fairly clear from her situation; 

but there is something intriguing about the stoicism with which she faces her 

circumstances.  This sets her apart from characters in more conventional dramas about 

adolescence.  It makes her experience seem highly specific and individuated, but it also 

makes adolescence seem especially hellish.

What makes Welcome to the Dollhouse distinct as an independent film about 

adolescence is its unflinching portrayal of unfairness as a basic condition.  By restraining 

Dawn’s facial expressions, Solondz suggests an acceptance of this unfairness, of her 

routine humiliation, and an almost nihilistic expectation that it will continue unchecked 

for as long as Dawn is a child, and in many other children after her.  He suggests that this 

is a natural state for adolescents and that their best chance at surviving it is by accepting it 

as a fact of life.  In the film’s final scene, Dawn sings the Hummingbird theme song on 

the bus to Disney World, with the saddest happy face one can imagine, which underscores 

both the pathos of her character and the extent to which situations determine our 

attribution of character emotions.  Extracted from the film, this scene would have little 

emotional impact, but in context it is powerfully pathetic. Ultimately, the effect of the 
198

characterization of Dawn in Welcome to the Dollhouse is one of futility, of condemnation 

to suffering which bespeaks the incompatibility of adolescence and individuality.  It is 

typical of both the film’s director and of independent cinema more generally to 

characterize adolescence differently from the Hollywood mainstream.

For much of Hard Eight, the character emotions are much less evident, largely 

because of the enigmatic nature of the exposition.  There are virtually no unambiguous 

basic emotion episodes at all in the first third of the film, which include the scenes of 

Sydney and John’s meeting and the development of their friendship, the episodes 

introducing Jimmy and Clementine (Gwyneth Paltrow), and the development of the 

relationship of Clementine’s relationship with Sydney and John.  In terms of affect 

generated by the film in these scenes we do best to speak of mood rather than emotion. 

Moods are more generalized and longer lasting than emotions.46  Those moments that 

seem like they might build into genuine emotion moments tend not to.  For example, John 

seems to get angry at Syd for suggesting that they return to Las Vegas together, because 

he is wary that Syd might have a sexual interest in him.  But Syd assures him that this is 

not the case and John’s feelings are defused.  Similarly, in the scene in which John 

introduces Syd to Jimmy, it seems that Syd is angry with Jimmy for making sexually 
199

explicit comments about the cocktail waitresses, but their discussion of it never builds 

into a genuinely angry dispute.  In the scene in which Syd observes the cocktail waitress 

Clementine emerging from a customer’s room, clearly indicating that she was having sex 

with him for money, it is suggested that Clementine might feel shame.  Yet her words 

might contradict this inference, as she insists that she doesn’t do anything she doesn’t 

want to.  It could be that she feels mixed emotions: perhaps she is proud to earn money 

but ashamed do it by debasing herself.  Moreover, in all of these moments, no facial or 

vocal expressions clearly display the classic basic emotion expressions.  

What the first scenes of the film do have in significant quantity are smiling faces. 

Especially in the encounters in the cocktail lounge, the characters smile at one another 

frequently but never, it seems, from genuine happiness or amusement.  These social 

smiles actually signify apprehension as much as positive emotion.  Clementine and 

Sydney smile at each other even though Sydney tells her of his disapproval of her 

behavior.  Jimmy and Sydney smile at each other even though they clearly have some 

mutual dislike.  In these cases, facial expressions serve to obscure rather than illuminate 

the characters’ interior states, and spectators’ inferences about other aspects of 

characterization are necessary to establish the character’ emotions or lack of them.

In Hard Eight, the tone shifts dramatically in the scene beginning with Sydney’s 
200

appearance outside a motel room.  Inside, he discovers that John and Clementine have 

kidnapped a man who hired Clementine as a prostitute and then refused to pay.  The man 

is lying unconscious, with his face in a bloody pillow and his hands cuffed to the 

headboard.  In this scene, the characters express their emotions boldly using every 

available channel.  They bare their teeth in anger, cry in sadness, raise their voices in fear. 

They shout at each other and pace back and forth.  Clementine covers her face in shame 

and cowers on the floor.  As the situation is made clear, the narrative context supports 

these responses.  Clementine and John have committed several felonies and are at risk of 

being discovered by the police.  By asking Sydney to come, they have involved him as an 

accessory.  They also say that they have contacted Jimmy, so that he too is involved and 

could potentially affect their effort to escape without getting into trouble with the law. 

We are suspicious of Jimmy not only because of a snap judgment based on his character 

type (slick casino security consultant, which is made to sound somewhat euphemistic) but 

because Sydney tells John that he doesn’t like Jimmy.  We are inclined to trust Sydney, 

who takes on a protective, fatherly concern for John.  The situation prompts our 

interpretation that the characters are angry, afraid, and anguished.  As is so often the case 

in cinematic narrative, a variety of redundant cues support the same meanings.47

In the final third of the film, Clementine and John have fled to Niagara Falls, and 
201

the story turns to a drawn­out confrontation between Jimmy and Sydney.  Jimmy tries to 

shake Sydney down, blackmailing him by threatening to reveal Syd’s secret to John.  This 

is when the narrative’s revelation is made: Sydney acts as he does toward John because 

Sydney killed John’s father.  Sydney seeks, in effect, to take the place of John’s father 

without letting John know who he really is.  What is remarkable about this last part of the 

film is the extent to which Sydney maintains his stoical, generally expressionless 

demeanor.  With the exception of a single short scene, in which Jimmy threatens him with 

a gun, Sydney’s face is a blank screen.  This is in contrast to images of Clementine 

laughing in the wedding video that Sydney views, of Jimmy shouting and showing anger 

and excitement, and John’s soft sobs and sad expression when Sydney tells him, over the 

phone, that he loves John as though he were his own son.  Sydney typically stares straight 

ahead.  At times, Anderson de­emphasizes the face, as Solondz does in Welcome to the  

Dollhouse, by cutting to long shots, by framing unconventionally as in a scene in a car 

with the camera set up behind Jimmy and Sydney’s heads, and by cutting away to 

seemingly irrelevant objects such as Sydney’s waist and a coffee cup on a table.  But 

these techniques are brief and function more as punctuation or pause than as a dominant 

aesthetic.  
202

The effectiveness of the narrative depends on the fascination Anderson finds in 

Philip Baker Hall’s face.  As Sydney, Hall makes the most of his face’s craggy lines, 

deep­set eyes with multiple bags under them, and distinguished, angular features.  The 

audience studies Hall’s face to try to get insight into Sydney’s emotion.  This is not unlike 

Solondz’s use of Matarozzo’s face in Welcome to the Dollhouse, and in each case the face 

seems to suggest an underlying default stance or attitude.  Dawn’s face is an index of her 

suffering, even when she is not shown to suffer, because her character is defined most of 

all by this quality.  Sydney’s face, on the other hand, is constantly purposeful.  Sydney is 

always thinking, it seems, but never lays out his thought processes in words.  He feels no 

less than the others, but his love for John and his hatred for Jimmy are almost always kept 

to himself, as are his anger and his fear.  This is a classic tough­guy image from gangster 

pictures and films noirs.  The stoical thinking man never shows his cards until it is most 

advantageous to him.   Like Welcome to the Dollhouse, the protagonist’s face functions in 

contrast to all of the other faces, which are more conventionally expressive.  But in Hard  

Eight, as in Welcome to the Dollhouse, there are key moments in the narrative in which 

the character’s shell is cracked and Sydney’s passion is displayed.  When Jimmy threatens 

him with a gun, Sydney looks and sounds afraid, just as in the hotel room he looks and 
203

sounds angry.  These bursts humanize him and establish that he does feel as strongly as 

the others.  They underline the significance of these scenes in the narrative, as they are 

rare expressions from Sydney.

Hard Eight is a film of shifting emotional tones, and of shifting narrative 

approaches.  It begins by raising many more questions than it answers, in a rather 

mysterious fashion.  It is not at all clear why the characters are behaving as they do.  This 

is the case of large­scale narrative developments, such as Sydney’s taking John on as his 

protégée.  It is also the case of smaller­scale details, such as Sydney’s habit of passing 

many hours in a casino hotel cocktail lounge playing keno.  It is typical of independent 

film narration to create enigmatic characters based on genre or social types; the work of 

spectatorship becomes the effort to decipher the clues leading to an interpretation of the 

character’s identity.  Thus they are able to combine their most basic appeals: on the level 

of the fascinating individual who stands for a particular social experience (in Syd’s case, 

an old man, a father, a Vegas hustler, a mentor); on the level of formal play (uncovering 

the mysteries of the character as a game we play with the narrative); and on opposing 

Hollywood conventions of more straightforward emotional characterization.

   Midway through the film, the emotion tone shifts from being cool and 

contemplative to being more straightforwardly melodramatic, arousing pathos and fear on 
204

behalf of the central characters who are caught in a bad situation.  We still do not know 

enough about their backstories at this point to feel the full emotional weight of the 

relationships they have with each other.  In the end, what is most fascinating about Hard  

Eight is Sydney, who is capable of acts of selfless love for John at the same time that he is 

capable of vicious cruelty toward Jimmy, who is foolish enough to think he can out­tough 

a tough guy.  The contradiction in Sydney’s emotional makeup is developed in a perfectly 

modulated performance, breaking through the internal norm of restrained stoicism with 

flashes of full emotion, and relying on modulations in narrative situation to further sketch 

out the character’s psychological states.  The clarity of the other characters’ emotional 

expressions makes Sydney’s inexpressiveness all the more interesting. 

Conclusion: Combining Appeals

Spectators understand character psychology in various ways.  They categorize characters, 

which focuses attention on some traits and not others, and guides attention and interest. 

They are given explicit information through dialogue and subjective techniques.  They 

infer intentionality from narrative scenarios and observed actions using folk psychology. 

They attribute the causality of narrative events to character dispositions and thereby 
205

create a sense of the character’s personality.  And they read emotions in characters’ 

expressions or attribute emotions in spite of those expressions on the basis of other cues 

and inferences.  All of these processes are mutually reinforcing.  Information about any 

one aspect of characterization impacts upon the others.  For example, a sense of the 

character’s personality may bear upon any understanding of their emotional states.  A 

deceitful character may be more likely to mask his or her true emotion.  Knowledge about 

the character’s intentions may also affect emotion assessments.  A character who is trying 

to pull off a swindle will be expected to display different emotions from a character who 

is the victim of the crime.  All of the techniques of characterization can tilt our 

understanding of character, which affects spectators’ use of all of the techniques.  The 

importance of narrative context cannot be overstated, yet each technique is part of the 

process that creates a narrative context.  

Connecting all of these dimensions of character­psychology­construction is an 

overarching goal of narrative comprehension: the data of the narrative must be made to 

cohere as best they can.  We prefer that all the parts of the social puzzle fit together, so 

that my inferences about your behavior, your intentional states, your emotions, and your 

traits and types are not mutually contradictory, and that explanations of some of these are 

helpful in explaining other parts.  As we have seen in considering stereotypes, we tend to 
206

see what we are looking for, so narrative contexts direct our expectations and make 

coherence more attainable.  This is why exposition has come up so often in these 

discussions: the design features of narrative demand that beginnings clarify a context—at 

least minimally—so that social cognition processes can function efficiently and 

coherence can be achieved.  

Maximum coherence is the spectator’s goal, but not always the filmmaker’s.  Most 

narratives challenge our abilities to make character psychology inferences and judgments 

cohere in a modest fashion by making traits and actions inconsistent with each other, by 

frustrating typing, by creating ambiguous or contradictory situations and emotion 

expressions, and by withholding information for purposes of suspense or surprise. 

Character­focused narrative traditions such as American independent cinema challenge 

our coherence goal more than modestly, making character comprehension a more 

involved and extensive process, but also potentially a more satisfying one.  Of course, 

narratives can go too far into incoherence or can fail to cohere because they are badly 

made, and there is little satisfaction in that.  But the best independent films pose 

interesting and well­developed challenges of coherence that seek to maximize our interest 

in engaging with the process of figuring out character psychology.

.  
1
 Fritz Lang,, “The Future of the Feature Film in Germany” in Anton Kaes, Martin Jay and Edward 
Dimendberg (eds.), The Weimar Republic Sourcebook (Berkeley: U of California P, 1994), 623.

2
Carroll, Philosophy of Horror and A Philosophy of Mass Art; Tan, Greg M. Smith. 

3
 Alan J. Fridlund, Human Facial Expression: An Evolutionary View (San Diego: Academic P, 1994), 2.

4
 Charles Darwin, The Expression of the Emotions in Man and Animals (New York: Oxford, 1998).  On 
physiognomy, see Leslie A. Zebrowitz, Reading Faces: Window to the Soul? (Boulder: Westview P, 
1997).

5
 Ibid; see also Fridlund; Ross Buck, The Communication of Emotion (New York: Guilford P, 1984); 
Richard S. Lazarus, Emotion and Adaptation (New York: Oxford UP, 1991); Robert Plutchick, 
Emotion: A Psychoevolutionary Synthesis (New York: Harper & Row, 1980); Jonathan H. Turner, On  
the Origins of Human Emotions: A Sociological Inquiry into the Evolution of Human Affect (Stanford: 
Stanford UP, 2000).   Paul Ekman (ed.), Darwin and Facial Expression: A Century of Research in  
Review (New York: Academic P, 1973); and Paul Ekman, Joseph J. Campos, et al. (eds.), Emotions  
Inside Out: 130 Years After Darwin’s The Expression of the Emotions in Man and Animals (New York: 
The New York Academy of Sciences, 2003).

6
 Paul Ekman, Emotion in the Human Face vol. 2 (Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1982). 43.

7
 Ibid; see also Paul Ekman and Erika Rosenberg (eds.), What the Face Reveals: Basic and Applied  
Studies of Spontaneous Expression Using the Facial Action Coding System (FACS) (New York: Oxford 
UP, 1997).

8
 Malcolm Gladwell, “The Naked Face” The New Yorker (5 August 2002), available online at 
http://www.gladwell.com/2002/2002_08_05_a_face.htm.

9
 Paul Ekman, “Expression and the Nature of Emotion” in Klaus R. Scherer and Paul Ekman (eds.), 
Approaches to Emotion (Hillsdale, NJ: Erlbaum, 1984), 319­343.

 On facial expressions and lying, see Paul Ekman, Telling Lies: Clues to Deceit in the Marketplace,  
10

Politics, and Marriage (New York: Norton, 2001).

11
 This experiment is described in Ekman, “Expression and the Nature of Emotion.”

12
 Daniel MacNeill, The Face (Boston: Little, Brown, 1998), 242­243.

13
 Antonio Damasio describes the neurophysiology of this distinction between two kinds of smiles and 
applies it to distinguishing between method acting and its alternatives: Damasio, Descartes’ Error:  
Emotion, Reason, and the Human Brain (New York: Quill, 1994); for a detailed discussion of smiles, 
see Mark G. Frank, Paul Ekman, and Wallace V. Friesen, “Behavioral Markers and Recognizability of 
the Smile of Enjoyment,” in Ekman and Rosenberg, 217­242; and Millicent H. Abel (ed.), An Empirical  
Reflection on the Smile (Lewiston: Edwin Mellen P, 2002).

14
Hillary Anger Elfenbein and Nalini Ambady, “On the Universality and Cultural Specificity of 
Emotion Recognition: A Meta­Analysis” Psychological Bulletin 128 (2002), 203­235.

15
 One influential—and typical—example of this position is Rudolph Arnheim, Film as Art (Berkeley: 
U of California P, 1957).

16
 Klaus R. Scherer, “Vocal Affect Expression: A Review and a Model for Future Research” 
Psychological Bulletin 99 (1986), 143­165.

17
 Tom Johnstone and Klaus R. Scherer, “Vocal Communication of Emotion” in Michael Lewis and 
Jeannette M. Haviland­Jones, Handbook of Emotions 2nd ed. (New York: Guilford P, 2000), 220­235.

18
 Ekman, Telling Lies, 92­98.

19
 Johnstone and Scherer.

20
 Ibid.

21
 Patrik N. Juslin and Petri Laukka, “Communication of Emotions in Vocal Expression and Music 
Performance: Different Channels, Same Code?” Psychological Bulletin 129 (2003), 770­814.

22
 Johnstone and Scherer.

23
 Klaus R. Scherer, “Affect Bursts” in Stephanie H.M. Van Goozen, Nanne E. Van de Poll, and Joseph 
A. Sergeant (eds.), Emotions: Essays in Emotion Theory (Hillsdale, NJ: Erlbaum, 1994), 161­193.

 David Bordwell, “Intensified Continuity: Visual Style in Contemporary American Film” Film  
24

Quarterly 55.3 (2002), 16­28.

25
 The existence of basic emotions and universally recognized expressions of them is a matter of debate 
among experts in the field.  See James A. Russell, “Is There Universal Recognition of Emotion from 
Facial Expressions? A Review of Cross­Cultural Studies” Psychological Bulletin 115 (1994),102­41; 
Paul Ekman, “Strong Evidence for Universals in Facial Expressions: A Reply to Russell's Mistaken 
Critique” Psychological Bulletin 115 (1994), 268­87; Carroll E. Izard, “Innate and Universal Facial 
Expressions: Evidence From Developmental and Cross­Cultural Research” Psychological Bulletin 115 
(1994), 288­99; and James A. Russell, “Facial Expressions of Emotion: What Lies Beyond Minimal 
Universality?” Psychological Bulletin 118 (1995), 379­99.  However, no one denies that some emotions 
are recognized cross­culturally at a rate of better than chance; the questions motivating these debates 
refer to the extent of recognition.

26
 Buck. 

27
 Juslin and Laukka.

28
 One application of facial expression research to film narrative theory is Murray Smith, “Darwin and 
the Directors: Film, Emotion and the Face in the Age of Evolution,”  Times Literary Supplement 7 
February 2003, 13­14.

29
 Smith, Engaging Characters; Carl Plantinga, “The Scene of Empathy and the Human Face on Film,” 
in Carl Plantinga and Greg M. Smith (eds.), Passionate Views: Film, Cognition, and Emotion 
(Baltimore: Johns Hopkins UP, 1999), 239­255.

30
Unusual but not unheard of: in the “Hush” episode of Buffy the Vamire Slayer originally aired 14 
January 1999, a demon’s spell leaves everyone in Sunnydale literally speechless. 

31
 James A. Russell and José Miguel Fernández­Dols, “What Does a Facial Expression Mean?” in 
James A. Russell and José Miguel Fernández­Dols (eds.), The Psychology of Facial Expression  
(Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1997), 3­30; James A. Russell, Jo­Anne Bachorowski, and José Miguel 
Fernández­Dols, “Facial and Vocal Expressions of Emotion” Annual Review of Psychology 54 
(February 2003), 329­349.

32
 Sally Planalp, “Communicating Emotion in Everyday Life: Cues, Channels, and Processes” in Peter 
A. Andersen and Laura K. Guerrero (eds.), Handbook of Communication and Emotion: Research,  
Theory, Applications, and Contexts (San Diego: Academic P, 1998), 29­48.

33
 Elfenbein and Ambady.

34
 James A. Carroll and James A. Russell, “Facial Expressions in Hollywood’s Portrayal of Emotion,” 
Journal of Personality and Social Psychology 72.1 (1997), 164­176.

35
 Ekman, Telling Lies, 150­160.

36
 Planalp; Ursula Hess, Arvid Kappas, and Klaus R. Scherer, “Multichannel Communication of 
Emotion: Synthetic Signal Production” in Klaus R. Scherer (ed.), Facets of Emotion: Recent Research 
(Hillsdale, NJ: Erlbaum, 1988), 161­182. 

37
 Planalp.

38
 José Miguel Fernández­Dols and James M. Carroll, “Is the Meaning Perceived in Facial Expressions 
Independent of its Context?” in Russell and Fernández­Dols (eds.), 275­294.

39
 James A. Russell, “Reading Emotions From and Into Faces: Ressurecting a Dimensional­Contextual 
Perspective” in Russell and Fernández­Dols (eds.), 295­320.

40
 Elfenbein and Ambady.

41
 The emotional response of spectators is a topic addressed in many cognitivist film theories, e.g., 
Carroll; Smith, Engaging Characters; Plantinga and Smith; Greg M. Smith; Tan; and Torben Grodal, 
Moving Pictures: A New Theory of Film, Genres, Feeling, and Cognition (Oxford: Clarendon, 1997). 

42
 Elaine Hatfield, John T. Cacioppo, and Richard L. Rapson, Emotional Contagion (Cambridge: 
Cambridge UP, 1994).

43
 The idea of “emotion memory” comes from Constanin Stanislavski, An Actor Prepares, trans. 
Elizabeth Reynodls Hapgood (New York: Theater Arts, 1936).

44
 Kristin Thompson, Breaking the Glass Armor: Neoformalist Film Analysis (Princeton: Princeton UP, 
1988).

45
 Smith, “Darwin and the Directors.” 

46
 Greg M Smith.

47
 Bordwell, Staiger and Thompson 31.