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Stargirl
Kristin Lillywhite
Justin Glauser
Ben Simmons
Mitchell Watson
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Cover Sheet 1
Table of Contents 2
Unit Goals/Rationale 3
Day 1 4
Day 2 5
Day 3 7
Day 4 9
Day 5 13
Day 6 15
Day 7 19
Day 8 22
Day 9 25
Day 10 28
Day 11 29
Day 12 31
Day 13 37
Day 14 39
Day 15 (Summative Assessment) 42
Day 16 47
Day 17 50
Day 18 51
Day 19 53
Day 20 57
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Stargirl Unit Goals and Rationale

Unit Goals:

We designed our Stargirl Unit with the needs of ninth grade students in mind. At this age,
students are still constructing their own identities and self-concepts. They feel torn between their
need for independence and the need to be accepted by others. Jerry Spinelli’s novel, Stargirl,
addresses these personal and social tensions. Our essential question, “What does it mean to be
normal?” is taken from the novel. Over the course of the unit we hope to encourage students to
reflect on the reading experience and how it relates to their personal struggle for identity. The
journal prompts at the beginning of each lesson are designed to facilitate these two goals.

Other goals for our unit included increasing the students’ understanding and interest in the book.
Our lesson plans were designed to foster classroom discussion and provide background
information when necessary. The objectives in each lesson plan are correlated directly to the
Utah Core Curriculum standards. We hope that students will be able to appreciate the literature
by explaining how it relates their own lives. We also anticipate that students will be able to learn
and practice essential skills from the state core.

Unit Rationale:

Specific learning activities were designed to accomplish our unit goals. Originally we
envisioned these learning activities as separate alternative assessments. In the end, we decided
that a personal essay would be the most appropriate way to evaluate the knowledge gained from
the book and our essential question. Each student will write a 2-3 page essay describing the
ways in which they are like the main characters and discussing the topic of “what is normal”.
The journals and brainstorming activities will prepare the students to succeed on the essay.
Creative, interactive learning activities were also designed to prepare students for our final
summative assessment. For the first three weeks the content and schedule of the lesson plans
were guided by the specific chapters from our novel. During the last week, the lesson plans are
designed around specific themes found throughout the entire novel. There is also time given
during the last week for students to complete learning activities and work on the summative
assessment. The final essay will be assessed for a clear thesis statement, a well-supported
argument, cohesion, and relatively few grammatical errors (see summative assessment rubric for
more details). These principles will be taught throughout the course of the unit.
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Day 1 Lesson Plan: Stargirl Ch 1-3.

Objective: Students will be able to relate similar personal experiences from their lives to those
of Stargirl and Leo in the novel through the use of journal writing in class.

Core- Curriculum Standard:

Standard #2 (Writing): Students will write informational and literary text to reflect on and
recreate experiences, report observations, and persuade others.

NCTE-Standard:

3. Students apply a wide range of stratergies to comprehend, interpret, evaluate, and appreciate
texts. They draw on their prior experiences, their interactions with other readers and writers, and
other texts.

4. Students adjust their use of spoken, written, and visual language, to communicate effectively
with a variety of audiences and for different purposes.

5. Students employ a wide range of strategies as they write and use different writing process
elements appropriately to communicate with different audiences for a variety of purposes.

Learning Activities for Lesson:

Journal (5-10 minutes): I will greet students and the door with a prompt. This prompt will say:
What ways do you keep track of your memories and dreams?

Class Discussion (10-15 minutes): As a class we will discuss different ways that we keep track
of our memories and dreams. I will call on random students and ask them what they thought
about the prompt and what they do to keep track of their memories/dreams. After the short
classroom discussion, I will transition the topic to journals. Questions I can ask: What reasons
might a person keep a journal? Who of you keeps a journal? I will talk about the importance of
keeping a journal and what benefits can come from having one.

Group Activity- Journal Making (15-20 minutes): I will then tell the students that we are going
to keep a journal for the next unit for Stargirl. I will instruct students to use the materials I have
brought to class to create their own journal. Each student will get a folder and decorate any way
they please, and I will laminate them and insert lined paper in each so they can keep a journal.

Remaining Time (5 minutes): I will hand out a copy of Stargirl and instruct them to read
chapters 1-2 for the next day.
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Day 2 Lesson Plan: Stargirl Ch 3-5.

Objective: By the end of this lesson, students will begin to seriously question the differences
among popularity, normality, and individuality.

Core-Curriculum Standard:

Standard 1 (Reading): Students will use vocabulary development and an understanding of text elements
and structures to comprehend literary and informational grade level text.
Objective 3 (Comprehension of Literary Text): Comprehend literature by analyzing literary
elements with a work.
a. Describe how conflict, character and plot work together.
b. Explain how character is developed through implication and inference.
c. Relate themes in literary works to real-life events.
d. Analyze how setting contributes to characterization, plot, or theme.
e. Interpret figurative language in literature (i.e., simile, metaphor, personification,
hyperbole, and symbolism).
f. Identify the speaker in a poetic text.

Standard 3 (Inquiry): Students will understand the process of seeking and giving information in
conversations, group discussions, written reports, and oral presentations.

NCTE Standards:

4. Students adjust their use of spoken, written, and visual language (e.g., conventions, style,
vocabulary) to communicate effectively with a variety of audiences and for different
purposes.

5. Students employ a wide range of strategies as they write and use different writing process
elements appropriately to communicate with different audiences for a variety of purposes.

6. Students apply knowledge of language structure, language conventions (e.g., spelling and
punctuation), media techniques, figurative language, and genre to create, critique, and
discuss print and non-print texts.

11. Students participate as knowledgeable, reflective, creative, and critical members of a variety
of literacy communities.

12. Students use spoken, written, and visual language to accomplish their own purposes (e.g.,
for learning, enjoyment, persuasion, and the exchange of information).

Learning Activities for Lesson:


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Journal (5-10 minutes): In chapter 4 of Stargirl, Spinelli shows what it means to be popular in
Mica Area High School by introducing Wayne Parr as being the core of the school. Write your
response, in your own words, to the following questions: What makes him popular and how do
you know? Is he normal? Would you rather be normal, popular, or neither?

Class Discussion (10-15 minutes): Discuss as a class the above questions. The goal is to bring
the students to the realization that being popular is different from being normal, and one
person’s normal is not another’s. Questions you can ask: Is Parr normal? Is he someone you
would want to hang around with? Why or why not? Would you want to trade places with him
for a day? Why or why not? Would Parr be popular at this high school? Why or why not?
(that’s one of my favorite questions)

Group Activity - Script (15-20 minutes): [to be projected on overhead; adapted from Milner
Text Ch 4, p 104] Imagine that our high school has a program like Hot Seat. Using the above
cues, students are to split into groups of three and write a short 2-3 minute script. One student
will pose as Stargirl, another will be Parr, and the third will be the interviewer for our school’s
version of the program (you can make up a name if you wish). This will require you to get out
of your head and be someone who you may not be. Remember what’s popular and not popular
in our school. Would Stargirl buy into that? What would Parr be like here? What you need to
ask is why Stargirl chooses not to be popular (a theme that will show up later in the lesson). Be
creative, have fun, and work fast.

Presentations of Scripts (5-15 minutes): Allow groups to present their skits to the class. There
is to be no swearing or profanity.

Homework: Read Chapters 6-8 for class the next day.


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Day 3 Lesson Plan: The High School Experience

Objective: Students will be able to research newspaper and magazine articles using the internet,
then present the material found in a brief oral presentation.

Core-Curriculum Standard:

Standard 2 (Writing): Students will write informational and literary text to reflect on and recreate
experiences, report observations, and persuade others.

Objective 1(Writing to Learn): Compare multiple ideas and perspectives to extend thinking
through writing.

Standard 3 (Inquiry/Research/Oral Presentation): Students will understand the process of seeking


and giving information in conversations, group discussions, written reports, and oral
presentations.

Objective 1 (Processes of Inquiry): Use the process of inquiry to examine multiple points of
view.

NCTE Standard:

Standard 8. Students use a variety of technological and information resources (e.g., libraries,
databases, computer networks, video) to gather and synthesize information and to create and
communicate knowledge. Standard 9 - Students develop an understanding of and respect for
diversity in language use, patterns, and dialects across cultures, ethnic groups, geographic
regions, and social roles.

Learning Activities for Lesson:

Journal Prompt - How is Mica High similar to and/or different from Logan High School?
10 minutes

Research - Students will be divided into groups of no more than three and given pre-arranged
time in the school library to use the internet. They will receive specific search parameters along
with suggested sites to search for scholarly articles. I will have back-up sites for them to go to
should they be “unable” to find a proper research site. Their instructions will be to find an article
that demonstrates similarities and differences between Logan High School and these others
schools. These similarities and differences may be found in academics, athletics, curriculum
structure, or general experiences.
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20 minutes

Presentation - In their groups students will prepare a 2 minute oral presentation of the
information they found in the library.
20 minutes

Rubric - Students will be assessed based on the relevance of their articles, their use of library
time, and on their presentations; all using the following rubric.

Article Choice: Possible 10 points


1-3 : Article talks about another school but doesn’t demonstrate similarities or differences.
4-7: Article discusses either a similarity or a difference but not both; and/or the experiences are
not relevant to high school life.
8-10: Article discusses at least one similarity and difference in the high school experience.

Presentation: Possible 10 points


1-3: Only one student participates and/or doesn’t present a difference or similarity. Doesn’t know
the name of the site visited, nor of the articles referenced.
4-7: Each student participates but only present one side of similarities and differences. Knows
the name of the site and article.
8-10: Each student presents a similarity and/or difference and ties his/her part of the presentation
in with the rest of the group.

Use of Library Time: Possible 10 points


1-3: Students were off-task most of the time. Had to be given a back-up site and/or article.
4-7: Students were on-task but disruptive for others. Found their own site and article.
8-10: Students were on-task and productive. Found their own site and article and did not cause
any disruption.

Homework: Read chapters 9 – 13 in Stargirl.

Back up articles:

http://axxiom.wordpress.com/2007/11/06/the-high-school-experience/

http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m2248/is_152_38/ai_n6005505/

http://pdfs.voya.com/VO/YA2/VOYA200406WeLove.pdf

http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m0JSD/is_5_56/ai_77196130/

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/09/27/magazine/27Boarding-t.html
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Day 4 Lesson Plan: Introduction to Character and Individuality (Stargirl Chapters 9-11)

Objective: Students will be able to define the literary terms: character, characterization, conflict,
foreshadowing, and plot. Students will analyze elements of character, conflict, foreshadowing
and plot in the literature.

Core-Curriculum Standard: Objective 3 Comprehend literature by evaluating the contribution


to the meaning of several literary elements within a work of literature.

a. Describe how conflict, character, and plot work together.

b. Explain how character is developed through implication and inference.

c. Relate themes in literary works to real-life events.

NCTE Standard: 3- Students apply a wide range of strategies to comprehend, interpret,


evaluate, and appreciate texts. They draw from their prior experience and their interactions with
other readers and writers.

Activity 1:
Journal (5-10 minutes). Students will respond to the following journal prompt in their unit
journals: “What does individuality mean to you? How do you express your individuality?”
Before class, write the journal prompt and class agenda on the board.

Activity 2:
Small Group Work (30 minutes). Write the critical literary terms (character, characterization,
conflict, foreshadowing, and plot) on the board. Divide into pairs (2 partners). Assign roles: one
student will be the reader and the other will be the writer. Both partners are expected to discuss
each question. Students should read through the definitions and questions listed on the task sheet
(see attached). Each partnership should complete one task sheet and answer the questions about
the literature. Monitor group work and assist students as needed.

Activity 3:
Group Discussion (5-10 minutes). Summarize the critical terms by review the answers to the
task sheet. Ask students to hand in work and transition into summarizing the discussion of the
literature.

Homework:
Reading assignment
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Character and Individuality Tasksheet


Name_______________________ Role: Reader/Writer
Name_______________________

Character:
Character is a person or animal who takes part in the action of a literary work. The main
character is the most important character in a story. This character often changes in some
important way as a result of the story’s events.

Who are the main characters in Stargirl?

Protagonist is another word for the main character. The antagonist is a major character who
opposes the protagonist.

Who could be considered an antagonist in chapters 9-11? Why are they antagonists?

Characters are sometimes classified as round or flat, dynamic or static. A round character
shows many different traits, faults as well as virtues. A flat character does not change.

Is Stargirl a dynamic or static character? Explain your answer.

Name on static character found in chapters 9-11.

What other round characters do you know of from other literature?

Characterization:
Characterization is the act of crating and developing a character.
A. In direct characterization, the author states a character’s traits.
B. In indirect characterization, an author tells what a character looks like, does, and says
and how other characters react to him or her. It is up to the reader to draw conclusions
about the character based on this indirect information. The most effective indirect
characterizations usually result from showing characters acting or speaking.

What character traits are directly stated in chapters 9-11?

How does the author indirectly describe the expression of individuality at Mica High?
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How do Stargirl’s actions affect the other Mica High students?

Conflict:
Conflict is a struggle between opposing forces. Characters in conflict form the basis of stories,
novels, and plays.

There are two kinds of conflict: external and internal.


a. In an external conflict, the main character struggles against an outside force. This
force may be another character. The outside force may be the standards and
expectations of a group. The outside force may be nature itself, a person-against-
nature conflict.

What group standards or expectations does Stargirl violate in chapters 9-11?

How can the Pledge of Allegiance, the Grisdale funeral, and the Danny Pike incident be
considered conflicts?

b. An internal conflict involves a character in conflict with himself or herself. A story


may have more than one conflict.

Does Leo seem to be conflicted in chapters 9-11? Why or why not?

Foreshadowing:
Foreshadowing includes clues that suggest events that have yet to occur. Use of this technique
helps to create suspense, keeping readers wondering and speculating about what will happen
next.

Write three different sentences from chapters 9-11 that demonstrate elements of foreshadowing.

1.
2.
3.

Plot:
Plot is the sequence of events in a literary work. In most novels, dramas, short stories, and
narrative poems, the plot involves both characters and a central conflict.
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Summarize the inciting incidents, rising and action and climax from chapters 9-11. Focus on
characters and conflicts from these three chapters; do not summarize the whole novel.

Inciting Incidents: Rising Action: Climax:


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Day 5 Lesson Plan: Stargirl Ch 12-13.

Objective: Students will examine the significance of the different names in the novel Stargirl,
and similarly relate different names to their own personalities.

Core-Curriculum Standard:

Standard 1 (Reading): Students will use vocabulary development and an understanding of text
elements and structures to comprehend literary and informational grade level text.

Standard 2 (Writing): Students will write informational and literary text to reflect on and
recreate experiences, report observations, and persuade others.

NCTE-Standard:

4. Students adjust their use of spoken, written, and visual language, to communicate effectively
with a variety of audiences and for different purposes.

12. Students use spoken, written, and visual language to accomplish their own purposes.

Learning Activities for Lesson:

Journal (5-10 minutes): In these chapters for this lesson, Spinelli introduces us to how Stargirl
gets her name. So I am going to introduce this lesson to my students by having them journal
about their names and how their parents came up with their names. Students will enter the
classroom with a prompt on the board that says, “Where did your parents get your name from?
Did they ever want to name you something besides your real name?”

Class Discussion (10-15 minutes): We will discuss, as a class, the journal entry. Questions to
ask: Why do people have names? What would the world be like if we didn’t have names? What
if everyone were named the same thing? (My class has just previously read Romeo and Juliet
and I will read to them a few lines from the play: "What's in a name? That which we call a rose /
By any other name would smell as sweet" from II.ii.1-2.) I will call on a student to be the scribe
for the class. I will ask the students what names Stargirl has been known by and the scribe will
write them on the board. The class will be expected to write down all of her names, and if they
can’t, they can use their books to find them.

Group Activity- Names (15-20 minutes): I will pass out a blank piece of paper and write on the
board a prompt. This prompt will say, “Stargirl has been known by many different names. She,
herself, came up with her names through her interests and through other experiences she has had.
Come up with your own new names using your interests, life experiences, and other aspects that
can help you create your name.

Presentations of Names (5 minutes): For the remainder of the class, each student will stand
before the class and present their name and give a brief reasoning as to why they came up with
that.
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Model

Mitchell’s name has changed to: PianoMan, Chachell, and Llechtim (lect-him)
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Day 6 Lesson Plan: Analyzing Media and Relationships (Stargirl Chapters 14-16)

Objective: Students will be able to compare and analyze written, visual, and oral texts.

Core Curriculum Standard: Objective 2 (Comprehension of Informational Text) Comprehend


and evaluate informational text (i.e., web pages, newspapers, magazines, encyclopedias, maps,
schedules).

a. Analyze the purpose of external text features and structures in a variety of


informational texts (e.g., textbooks, advertisements, posters, graphs, charts, maps,
schedules, product instructions).

b. Infer meaning from implicit information in the text.

NCTE Standard: 4- Students adjust their use of spoken, written, and visual language (e.g.,
conventions, style, vocabulary) to communicate effectively with a variety of audiences and for
different purposes.

Activity 1:
Journal (5-10 minutes). Students will respond to the following prompt in their unit journals:
“Think about the relationship between Stargirl and Leo. Is it a typical high school romance?
Why or why not? Do you think it is ‘normal’ to feel the way Stargirl and Leo feel?” Before
class, write the journal prompt and class agenda on the board.

Activity 2:
Learning Stations (10 minutes at each station): Divide the students into six or seven small
groups. Each group should have 4-5 group members. Students will rotate among four different
learning stations. At each station there will be a text for students to analyze.

Station 1: Students will be re-reading selected passages from Stargirl. Students will answer the
corresponding questions on their tasksheets.

Station 2: Students will be discussing the media’s influence on culture. Students will be asked to
discuss and share their opinions with their group members. They will also be asked to rate their
concerns about media and power on their tasksheets.

Station 3: Students will look at photographs showing couples and families (e.g., photos that
typically come with new picture frames). Have a one-minute sand timer on the table or desk
next to the photograph. Students will pass the photo around so that every group member can
study the picture. Students will participate in the following timed exercise. One student in the
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group will be chosen to monitor the timer. For the first minute, students will write down verbs,
action words that describe what is happening in the photo. For the second minute, students will
write down adjectives and description. For the third minute, students will fill in the emotional
story behind the picture (adapted from Learning Activity 10-2 in the Milner text pg. 333).
Once students have completed the writing exercise they will discuss and answer the
corresponding questions on their tasksheets.

Station 4: Students will watch a clip featuring a popular music video. Preview the music video
before showing the clip in the learning activity. Make sure the chosen music video is free
from profanity, has distinct characters, and would be recognized by students. After viewing the
video, students will respond to the corresponding questions on their tasksheets (adapted from
analyzing video and music sources from Chapter 10 in the Milner text pg. 330).

Homework:
Reading assignment
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Analyzing Media and Relationships Tasksheet


Name ________________________________________

Station 1: Text Media-Stargirl. Look through today’s reading selection (chapters 14-16).
Answer the following questions.

1- How does Leo react with Stargirl gets hit with a tomato? What does this reaction reveal
about his character?

2- Why does Stargirl sign her name in code on the Valentine? What do her actions reveal
about her character?

3- List three things from Chapter 15 that indicate that Leo is infatuated with Stargirl.

4- Why do the girls in Chapter 16 laugh at Leo and call him Starboy?

5- In your groups, discuss the relationship between Leo and Stargirl by predicting what you
think will happen by the end of the book. What might strength or challenge their
friendship?

Station 2 Media and Culture. One way to explore media is with an interest in exposing their
power over the culture. The following list state five consequences of that power. Rate the
strength of your concern for each item from 5 (most concerned) to 1 (least concerned). Compare
your ratings with those of your group members. Discuss the power of media to influence culture.

___ Mass media corrupt the morality of the culture with tolerance for violence, sexism and
stereotyping minorities.

___ Mass media falsify life and set up unrealistic expectations for it.

___ Mass media reinforce a passive reception of life rather than active engagement in it.

___ Mass media undermine the capacity for critical thought as well as analytic and synthetic
reasoning.

___ Mass media promote consumerism, not self-reflection and self-discovery.

Station 3: Photo Stories. Look at photographs showing couples and families. Pass the photo
around so that every group member can study the picture. Choose one person in the group to
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monitor the timer. Participate in the following timed exercise. For the first minute, write down
verbs, action words that describe what is happening in the photo. For the second minute, write
down adjectives and description—what in this picture leaps out at you? For the third minute, fill
in the emotional story behind the picture. Once you have completed the writing exercise, talk
about the discussion questions with your group members.

1- Verbs (1 minute):

2- Adjectives and Description (1 minute):

3- Emotional Story (1 minute):

Discussion questions:
a. Do these photographs represent all romantic relationships? Why or why not?

b. Why do you think these pictures are used to sell picture frames?

Station 4: After viewing the music video clip, answer the following questions.

1- Describe the main character(s) or plot in the music video.

2- Are the love relationships exaggerated or stereotyped in this music video? In what ways?

3- Are there characters that are portrayed positively?

4- Are there characters that are portrayed negatively?

5- Would you want to be like any of the characters portrayed on the music video? Why or
why not?

6- Do the lyrics match the plot of the music video? Why or why not?
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Day 7 Lesson Plan: Stargirl Mid-book Review

Objective: Students must be caught up on the reading to this point (chapter 16) and be able to
answer questions about the characters and plot. Students will further understand the story of
Stargirl by developing questions to be asked in a Hot Seat style show.

Core-Curriculum Standard:

Standard 1(Reading): Students will use vocabulary development and an understanding of text
elements and structures to comprehend literary and informational grade level text.

Objective 3 (Comprehension of Literary Text): Comprehend literature by evaluating the


contribution to meaning of several literary elements within a work of literature.

NCTE Standard:

1. Students read a wide range of print and non-print texts to build an understanding of texts, of
themselves, and of the cultures of the United States and the world; to acquire new information; to
respond to the needs and demands of society and the workplace; and for personal fulfillment.
Among these texts are fiction and nonfiction, classic and contemporary works.

Learning Activities for Lesson:

Journal Prompt – What are your impressions of the first half of Stargirl? Has the story captured
your attention? Why or why not?
10 minutes

Mid-book Review - Students will answer the questions on the following page which are from
chapters 1 – 16 of Stargirl. Each question requires a short answer (1-3 sentences).
20 minutes

Hot Seat Questions - Once students have finished answering the review questions they may turn
it in and will begin working on their next assignment. They will receive the attached form and
begin formulating six questions that they would want to ask someone if they were in the jury
during the Hot Seat show. Each question must fit into one of the six topics outlined on the
attached form. Students will leave this form on their desks when they leave class.
Students’ questions will be reviewed and a future opportunity to revise them will be given. The
final questions will be part of another exercise, given on day 10.
20 minutes
Homework: Read chapters 17 and 18 of Stargirl.
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STARGIRL MID-BOOK REVIEW


Respond to each of the following questions with short answers. This means 1 – 3 sentences each.
Make sure the information you give is relevant to the question. If you do not know the answer to
a question, skip it and come back to it after you’ve answered the others. Use the back of this
sheet if you need more room to write.

1. What is the Hot Seat?

2. According to Hillari Kimble, why is Stargirl attending Mica Area High School?

3. What does Stargirl do at the football game that attracts so much attention?

4. What does Hillari do to Cinammon?

5. In chapter 9, Leo compares the students at Mica Area High School to what animal? What is
the significance of this comparison?

6. What kind of cheerleader is Stargirl? (hint-describe what she does at sports events)

7. How do the other students react to how Stargirl cheers?

8. How does Stargirl respond to the students’ reaction?

9. What happens with the jury and Stargirl during the Hot Seat show?

10. By the end of chapter 16, it is clear that Leo and Stargirl like each other. How do you think
their relationship will turn out in the end?
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3rd PERIOD HOT SEAT

Create one question for each of the topics on this form. Each question should be something you
would want to ask a classmate if they were on the Hot Seat. Each question should also be
something you would be comfortable answering.

1. Personal grooming habits

2. Family

3. School/education

4. Future career

5. Love/romantic interest

6. Entertainment/hobbies
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Day 8 Lesson Plan: Stargirl Ch 17-18.

Objective: Stargirl is written as a fictional memoir with the character sharing an incident that
happened over his lifetime. Students in this class will be introduced to the idea of the memoir
and write their own brief memoir. Then, the class will examine their own memoirs for
character/setting/plot/point-of-view/significance. They will learn, through their own stories, that
they have something to say and how they can express that through writing.

Core Curriculum Standards:

Standard 1 (Reading): Students will use vocabulary development and an understanding of text
elements and structures to comprehend literary and informational grade level text.
Standard 2 (Writing): Students will write informational and literary text to reflect on and recreate
experiences, to report observations, and to persuade others.
Standard 3 (Inquiry): Students will understand the process of seeking and giving information in
conversations, group discussions, written reports, and oral presentations.

NCTE Standards:

1. Students read a wide range of print and nonprint texts to build an understanding of texts, of
themselves, and of the cultures of the United States and the world; to acquire new
information; to respond to the needs and demands of society and the workplace; and for
personal fulfillment. Among these texts are fiction and nonfiction, classic and
contemporary works.

2. Students read a wide range of literature from many periods in many genres to build an
understanding of the many dimensions (e.g., philosophical, ethical, aesthetic) of human
experience.

3. Students apply a wide range of strategies to comprehend, interpret, evaluate, and appreciate
texts. They draw on their prior experience, their interactions with other readers and writers,
their knowledge of word meaning and of other texts, their word identification strategies,
and their understanding of textual features (e.g., sound-letter correspondence, sentence
structure, context, graphics).

4. Students adjust their use of spoken, written, and visual language (e.g., conventions, style,
vocabulary) to communicate effectively with a variety of audiences and for different
purposes.

5. Students employ a wide range of strategies as they write and use different writing process
elements appropriately to communicate with different audiences for a variety of purposes.
Page 23

6. Students apply knowledge of language structure, language conventions (e.g., spelling and
punctuation), media techniques, figurative language, and genre to create, critique, and
discuss print and nonprint texts.

9. Students develop an understanding of and respect for diversity in language use, patterns,
and dialects across cultures, ethnic groups, geographic regions, and social roles.

10. Students whose first language is not English make use of their first language to develop
competency in the English language arts and to develop understanding of content across the
curriculum.

11. Students participate as knowledgeable, reflective, creative, and critical members of a


variety of literacy communities.

12. Students use spoken, written, and visual language to accomplish their own purposes (e.g.,
for learning, enjoyment, persuasion, and the exchange of information).

Learning Activities for Lesson:

Intro Lecture What is a memoir (5-10 minutes): Put the discussion topics and writing prompt on
the overhead/whiteboard/blackboard. Explain what a memoir is: an autobiographical account of
one sliver of a person life. Explain how Stargirl is a fictional work written as a memoir. This
will double as the journal prompt as this piece of writing will take up most of the class period.

Students Memoir (25-30 minutes): The students are to think of their first love/crush and write
a brief memoir describing the event (taken from Milner text Ch. 9). Embellishing to make it
a work of fiction is totally acceptable though as some students may not want to delve into the
story as much. They will write on their memoirs individually in class; one page is just fine.

Oral Presentations of Memoirs (15-20 minutes): Students will volunteer to read aloud to the
class one of their written memoirs. Then, the story is to be examined in accordance with the
questions on the overhead/blackboard/whiteboard. Students finish their memoirs and turn in
next class period.

Homework: Finish personal memoirs if not finished in class to be turned in tomorrow. Read
Chapters 19-20.
Page 24

Overhead

Memoir = an autobiographical account that only attempts to share a brief portion of the author’s
life instead of the author’s life as a whole. A memoir usually focuses on a specific theme (pearl
of wisdom) that greatly affected the life of the author.

Memoir writing prompt: Think of your first crush; if you haven’t had a first crush yet, making
up the perfect encounter with and an imaginary first crush is totally acceptable. Write down a
one-half to one page account (single spaced) of what happened either when you first saw the
person and knew they were the one for you and/or when you first did something about it (talked
to them, sent them an anonymous note, etc.). I will ask for a couple of volunteers to read their
memoirs, so be ready to share.

Discussion prompts to examine the student’s memoirs. The point is to illustrate that even the
experiences of an individual student, even their fantasies, have literary merit and can be
examined as such.
• Character: Did you like the subject? Could you identify with the subject? The minor
characters? Why? Would you liked to have known more? Did the characters change as
you read?
• Setting: Was the setting important to the action? Were there enough details to put you in
the places that things happened?
• Plot: Did the story hold your attention? How did the writer create interest and suspense
for you? Was the story predictable? Were you surprised?
• Point of View: How would the story have been different if told by someone watching the
action? Did the narrator have a voice? Did it ring true?
• Significance: Did the story seem worth telling? What ideas came to you as you listened
to it? Does it help you understand the author more? Did you like it?
Page 25

Day 9 Lesson Plan: Stargirl Ch 19-20.

Objective: Students will be able use descriptive language in their writing.

Core-Curriculum Standard:

Standard 3 (Inquiry/Research/Oral Presentation): Students will understand the process of seeking


and giving information in conversations, group discussions, written reports, and oral
presentations.

NCTE Standards:

4. Students adjust their use of spoken, written, and visual language (e.g., conventions, style,
vocabulary) to communicate effectively with a variety of audiences and for different puroposes.

11. Students participate as knowledgeable, reflective, creative, and critical members of a variety
of literacy communities.

12. Students use spoken, written, and visual language to accomplish their own purposes (e.g.,
for learning, enjoyment, persuasion, and the exchange of information).

Learning Activities for Lesson:

Journal (5-10 minutes): I will greet my students at the door (desks in groups of 3-4) and instruct
them to write in their journals on the prompt that is one the board. The prompt will say, “What
are your first thoughts in the morning? What is your morning routine? What do you do first?”

Group Activity (10 minutes): I will pass out pictures that I have cut out of a magazine and give
each group 5 pictures. I will instruct each group to pull out 1 piece of paper and that they are to
come up with at least 20 words that describe the pictures. What does the picture look like?
What is in the picture?

Class Activity (15 minutes): I will have the students turn to page 102. I will ask a student to
read a quote, “she’s not easy to put into words, is she?” When the student is done reading the
quote, I will ask my class what words would they use to describe Stargirl. I will ask each group
to come up with 10 words that they would use to describe Stargirl.

Presentation of words (10 minutes): Each group will present to the class their list of 10 words
and why they chose them.
Page 26

Day 10 Lesson Plan: Newspaper Features

Objective: Students will be able to place themselves into the story of Stargirl by emulating
actions of the characters. Students will be able to write a newspaper feature article and
understand the difference between active and passive voice.

Core-Curriculum Standard:

Standard 1 (Reading): Students will use vocabulary development and an understanding of text
elements and structures to comprehend literary and informational grade level text.

Objective 2 (Comprehension of Informational Text): Comprehend and evaluate informational


text (i.e., web pages, newspapers, magazines, encyclopedias, maps, schedules).

NCTE Standard:

3. Students apply a wide range of strategies to comprehend, interpret, evaluate, and appreciate
texts. They draw on their prior experience, their interactions with other readers and writers, their
knowledge of word meaning and of other texts, their word identification strategies, and their
understanding of textual features (e.g., sound-letter correspondence, sentence structure, context,
graphics).

Learning Activities for Lesson:

Journal Prompt – Take a minute to think about your house, your family, and your bedroom.
What do these things (or what’s in them) say about you? Is there anything you would or
wouldn’t want a classmate to see?
10 minutes

Writing Instruction - Students will receive instructions on how to write a newspaper feature
article. Using my own examples, I will demonstrate the use of active voice, avoiding opinion
statements, and creating headlines. Students will be taught to include as much information about
a person as is pertinent to the article. The students will have opportunities to practice this before
the next activity.
15 minutes

Feature Writing - Students will look through collected newspapers for articles containing a
person’s name, approximate age, and why they’re being mentioned in the paper. They will
collect this information on three individuals. Any extra information about the individuals is also
useful but not required.
Page 27

25 minutes

Homework: Using the information found about the individuals in the paper, write a feature
article about one of three people you discovered. Your feature should answer the question: What
does this person need right now in his/her life? Use as much information about the person as was
found in your article. You may make up any missing information about the person. This feature
article should celebrate the person for a specific reason. Be sure to include the person’s name,
approximate age, and this reason in the article.
Read chapters 24 – 26 in Stargirl.

Example Sentences

Passive Voice:
Mr. Jones had given Andy the book and told him to have it read in a week’s time.

Active Voice:
Mr. Jones gave Andy the book, telling him to read it in a week’s time.

Pertinent Information: Identify any information that is not pertinent to the story-
Mr. Jones, a teacher at North High School, provides students with opportunities to demonstrate
their personalities through situational role-play and class discussion. A fifteen year member of
the North High faculty, Mr. Jones is originally from Wisconsin; a state known for cheese and
cold weather. The activities that Mr. Jones provides his classes are beneficial in two ways….
Page 28

Day 10 Lesson Plan: Hot Seat (alternate plan)

Objective: Students will be able to place themselves into the story of Stargirl through emulation
of the events and actions in the book.

Core-Curriculum Standard:
Standard 1 (Reading): Students will use vocabulary development and an understanding of text
elements and structures to comprehend literary and informational grade level text.

NCTE Standard:
3. Students apply a wide range of strategies to comprehend, interpret, evaluate, and appreciate
texts. They draw on their prior experience, their interactions with other readers and writers, their
knowledge of word meaning and of other texts, their word identification strategies, and their
understanding of textual features (e.g., sound-letter correspondence, sentence structure, context,
graphics).

Learning Activities for Lesson:

Journal Prompt – Take a minute to think about your house, your family, and your bedroom.
What do these things (or what’s in them) say about you? Is there anything you would or
wouldn’t want a classmate to see?
10 minutes

Hot Seat, Part 1 - I will return to each student his/her revised and graded list of questions from
day 7. I will then ask for six students to volunteer to sit in the Hot Seat. I will use the promise of
a reward as incentive to volunteer. The volunteers will each take a seat at the front of the class.
In turn they will each get to pick a fellow classmate (not another volunteer) to ask them their six
questions. The volunteer students must respond to each question honestly. If they feel that any
particular question is too personal they may “plead the 5th”.
30 minutes

Hot Seat, Part 2 - Having examined the students’ questions from Day 7, I will have selected the
best two from each topic and have these written on separate slips of paper. Each of the six
volunteers will then become the jury and will get to ask me two of the questions I have chosen as
the best. Each one will receive one of the above mentioned a slip of paper from me. Having
selected the questions myself I will be prepared to answer without compromising myself as a
professional.
10 minutes

Homework: Read chapters 24 – 26 in Stargirl.


Page 29

Day 11 Lesson Plan: Stargirl. Ch 24-26.

Objective: Students will learn to identify themes in the reading through associating alternate
forms of media (music in this case) that coincide with textual themes.

Core-Curriculum Standards:

Standard 1 (Reading): Students will use vocabulary development and an understanding of text
elements and structures to comprehend literary and informational grade level text.
Objective 3 (Comprehension of Literary Text): Comprehend literature by analyzing literary
elements with a work.
a. Describe how conflict, character and plot work together.
b. Explain how character is developed through implication and inference.
c. Relate themes in literary works to real-life events.
Analyze how setting contributes to characterization, plot, or theme.
Standard 3 (Inquiry): Students will understand the process of seeking and giving information in
conversations, group discussions, written reports, and oral presentations.
Objective 1 (Process of Inquiry): Use the process of inquiry to examine multiple points of
view.
a. Formulate questions to evoke valid responses from different points of view.
b. Gather information from multiple sources that reflect varied points of view.
c. Analyze multiple points of view for credibility.

NCTE Standards:

3. Students apply a wide range of strategies to comprehend, interpret, evaluate, and


appreciate texts. They draw on their prior experience, their interactions with other
readers and writers, their knowledge of word meaning and of other texts, their word
identification strategies, and their understanding of textual features (e.g., sound-letter
correspondence, sentence structure, context, graphics). 3

4. Students adjust their use of spoken, written, and visual language (e.g., conventions, style,
vocabulary) to communicate effectively with a variety of audiences and for different
purposes.

5. Students employ a wide range of strategies as they write and use different writing process
elements appropriately to communicate with different audiences for a variety of purposes.
6. Students apply knowledge of language structure, language conventions (e.g., spelling and
punctuation), media techniques, figurative language, and genre to create, critique, and
discuss print and nonprint texts.

9. Students develop an understanding of and respect for diversity in language use, patterns,
and dialects across cultures, ethnic groups, geographic regions, and social roles. 9
Page 30

12. Students use spoken, written, and visual language to accomplish their own purposes (e.g.,
for learning, enjoyment, persuasion, and the exchange of information). 12

Learning Activities for Lesson:

Materials: It would help for the teacher to have a radio handy with an auxiliary audio in
(headphone in jack) and a male-to-male headphone extension cord. If you do, it would also be a
good idea to encourage your students to bring their mp3 players/ipods to class to class for this
day.

Journal Entry (10 Minutes): In chapter 25, Leo explains to Stargirl what it means to fit in. Think
about what Stargirl does to attempt to be one of “them” in Chapter 26. Do you think she went
overboard in her attempt to fit in? What do you do to fit in/not fit in at school? Do you think
you go overboard sometimes?

The Song Wall (20-25 minutes): (This “song wall” is a conglomeration of ideas from both
the “Music and Theme” section in Ch 9, p330 and Ch 7’s Word Wall on pp 219-20). After
the journal, students are to break up into groups of no more than four people. An overhead
(PowerPoint/blackboard/etc.) will be projected for the prompt. The students, in their groups, are
to choose songs that describe the image mused over in the journal entry. The songs are to be
tallied and a mini-playlist will be constructed that describes the themes occurring in this section.
They are to put together a list of what they would consider excellent choices for a soundtrack to
the scenes (e.g. Leo discussing what it is to be popular and Stargirl showing up having
surrendered her individuality). Think of the themes involved in this section: Individuality vs.
Conformity, popularity vs. personal happiness, why be popular/individual, what is normal, what
is real, love over societal pressures, and brainstorm your own. Draw and label a graph on the
board with 4 rows as themes and 12 columns as songs while the students come up with their
choices.

The Song Wall, Presentation (15-20 minutes): Start the interactive part of the activity by asking
which group got the most songs. That group is to contribute one of their themes and the songs
they picked for that theme. Then the other groups add to the four themes. The teacher is to
encourage modification of the themes as the class contributes their resultant ideas. If there is a
song in question that is acceptable for the class to hear (not too mature), the song is to be played
(although don’t let anything be played over roughly 3 minutes). The class has to come to a
majority consensus on the themes. More songs can be added as the class modifies the board.

Homework: Read Chapters 27-28.


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Day 12 Lesson Plan: Stargirl’s Speech (Chapters 27-28)

Objective: Students will be able to define the literary terms: volume, pitch, tone, and rhythm.
Students will analyze Dr. Martin Luther King’s “I have a Dream Speech.” Students will be able
to practice oral speaking skills in a collaborative group setting.

Core-Curriculum Standard: Objective 3 (Comprehension of Literary Text) Comprehend


literature by evaluating the contribution to meaning of several literary elements within a work of
literature.

NCTE Standard: 6- Students apply knowledge of language structure, language conventions,


figurative language, and genre to create, critique, and discuss print and non-print texts.

Activity 1:
Journal (5-10 minutes). Students will respond to the following journal prompt in their unit
journals: “Do you think that Stargirl’s success at the speech competition will increase her
popularity at school? What is the connection between public speaking and popularity in
society?” Before class, write the journal prompt and class agenda on the board. Discuss
Stargirl’s speech, transitioning into a discussion of the critical terms and speech genre
conventions.

Activity 2:
Large Group Activity (10 minutes). Write the critical terms on the board: volume, pitch, tone,
and rhythm. Define all of the terms in a brief mini-lecture/discussion. Assign a critical term to
each row of students. Ask students to look for examples of their assigned critical term as they
watch a video clip of Martin Luther King’s “I Have a Dream” speech. Each student will write
down one or two sentences explaining how their critical term is demonstrated in the clip. Inform
students that they will be called on after the clip. Discuss the speech. Collect the students’
notes.

Activity 3:
Small Group Activity (10 minutes). Divide the class into small groups (no more than our
students in each group). Type selected passages from Martin Luther King’s speech on separate
pieces of paper. Number each passage in the correct order. There should be about 8-9 groups;
each group will receive one passage. Each group will practice reading their selection. Students
should practice implementing the critical terms. Monitor and assist each small group.

Activity 4:
Large Group Activity (20 minutes). Bring the small groups back together to present their portion
of the speech. Groups will present their selections in the correct order. A few students will be
Page 32

chosen to softly hum the tune of “My Country Tis’ of Thee” while the other small groups read
their passages one at time (adapted from the Choral Reading Activity from Chapter 4 in the
Milner text pg. 98). Any remaining sections can be read by the instructor. Make sure the
directions are clear before beginning. The instructor may want to point to groups to direct the
reading.

Homework
Reading Assignment
Page 33

“I Have a Dream” Speech


Dr. Martin Luther King

Section 1:

I am happy to join with you today in what will go down in history as the greatest demonstration
for freedom in the history of our nation.

Five score years ago, a great American, in whose symbolic shadow we stand today, signed the
Emancipation Proclamation. This momentous decree came as a great beacon light of hope to
millions of Negro slaves who had been seared in the flames of withering injustice. It came as a
joyous daybreak to end the long night of their captivity.

But one hundred years later, the Negro still is not free. One hundred years later, the life of the
Negro is still sadly crippled by the manacles of segregation and the chains of discrimination. One
hundred years later, the Negro lives on a lonely island of poverty in the midst of a vast ocean of
material prosperity. One hundred years later, the Negro is still languished in the corners of
American society and finds himself an exile in his own land. And so we've come here today to
dramatize a shameful condition.

Section 2:

In a sense we've come to our nation's capital to cash a check. When the architects of our republic
wrote the magnificent words of the Constitution and the Declaration of Independence, they were
signing a promissory note to which every American was to fall heir. This note was a promise that
all men, yes, black men as well as white men, would be guaranteed the "unalienable Rights" of
"Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness." It is obvious today that America has defaulted on
this promissory note, insofar as her citizens of color are concerned. Instead of honoring this
sacred obligation, America has given the Negro people a bad check, a check which has come
back marked "insufficient funds."

But we refuse to believe that the bank of justice is bankrupt. We refuse to believe that there are
insufficient funds in the great vaults of opportunity of this nation. And so, we've come to cash
this check, a check that will give us upon demand the riches of freedom and the security of
justice.

Section 3:

We have also come to this hallowed spot to remind America of the fierce urgency of Now. This
is no time to engage in the luxury of cooling off or to take the tranquilizing drug of gradualism.
Now is the time to make real the promises of democracy. Now is the time to rise from the dark
and desolate valley of segregation to the sunlit path of racial justice. Now is the time to lift our
nation from the quicksands of racial injustice to the solid rock of brotherhood. Now is the time to
make justice a reality for all of God's children.
Page 34

It would be fatal for the nation to overlook the urgency of the moment. This sweltering summer
of the Negro's legitimate discontent will not pass until there is an invigorating autumn of
freedom and equality. Nineteen sixty-three is not an end, but a beginning. And those who hope
that the Negro needed to blow off steam and will now be content will have a rude awakening if
the nation returns to business as usual. And there will be neither rest nor tranquility in America
until the Negro is granted his citizenship rights. The whirlwinds of revolt will continue to shake
the foundations of our nation until the bright day of justice emerges.

Section 4:

But there is something that I must say to my people, who stand on the warm threshold which
leads into the palace of justice: In the process of gaining our rightful place, we must not be guilty
of wrongful deeds. Let us not seek to satisfy our thirst for freedom by drinking from the cup of
bitterness and hatred. We must forever conduct our struggle on the high plane of dignity and
discipline. We must not allow our creative protest to degenerate into physical violence. Again
and again, we must rise to the majestic heights of meeting physical force with soul force.

The marvelous new militancy which has engulfed the Negro community must not lead us to a
distrust of all white people, for many of our white brothers, as evidenced by their presence here
today, have come to realize that their destiny is tied up with our destiny. And they have come to
realize that their freedom is inextricably bound to our freedom.

Section 5:

We cannot walk alone.

And as we walk, we must make the pledge that we shall always march ahead.

We cannot turn back.

There are those who are asking the devotees of civil rights, "When will you be satisfied?" We
can never be satisfied as long as the Negro is the victim of the unspeakable horrors of police
brutality. We can never be satisfied as long as our bodies, heavy with the fatigue of travel, cannot
gain lodging in the motels of the highways and the hotels of the cities. We cannot be satisfied as
long as the negro's basic mobility is from a smaller ghetto to a larger one. We can never be
satisfied as long as our children are stripped of their self-hood and robbed of their dignity by
signs stating: "For Whites Only." We cannot be satisfied as long as a Negro in Mississippi
cannot vote and a Negro in New York believes he has nothing for which to vote. No, no, we are
not satisfied, and we will not be satisfied until "justice rolls down like waters, and righteousness
like a mighty stream."¹

Section 6:

I am not unmindful that some of you have come here out of great trials and tribulations. Some of
you have come fresh from narrow jail cells. And some of you have come from areas where your
quest -- quest for freedom left you battered by the storms of persecution and staggered by the
Page 35

winds of police brutality. You have been the veterans of creative suffering. Continue to work
with the faith that unearned suffering is redemptive. Go back to Mississippi, go back to Alabama,
go back to South Carolina, go back to Georgia, go back to Louisiana, go back to the slums and
ghettos of our northern cities, knowing that somehow this situation can and will be changed.

Let us not wallow in the valley of despair, I say to you today, my friends.

And so even though we face the difficulties of today and tomorrow, I still have a dream. It is a
dream deeply rooted in the American dream.

Section 7:

I have a dream that one day this nation will rise up and live out the true meaning of its creed:
"We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal."

I have a dream that one day on the red hills of Georgia, the sons of former slaves and the sons of
former slave owners will be able to sit down together at the table of brotherhood.

I have a dream that one day even the state of Mississippi, a state sweltering with the heat of
injustice, sweltering with the heat of oppression, will be transformed into an oasis of freedom
and justice.

I have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be
judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character.

I have a dream today!

Section 8:

I have a dream that one day, down in Alabama, with its vicious racists, with its governor having
his lips dripping with the words of "interposition" and "nullification" -- one day right there in
Alabama little black boys and black girls will be able to join hands with little white boys and
white girls as sisters and brothers.

I have a dream today!

I have a dream that one day every valley shall be exalted, and every hill and mountain shall be
made low, the rough places will be made plain, and the crooked places will be made straight;
"and the glory of the Lord shall be revealed and all flesh shall see it together."2

This is our hope, and this is the faith that I go back to the South with.

With this faith, we will be able to hew out of the mountain of despair a stone of hope. With this
faith, we will be able to transform the jangling discords of our nation into a beautiful symphony
of brotherhood. With this faith, we will be able to work together, to pray together, to struggle
Page 36

together, to go to jail together, to stand up for freedom together, knowing that we will be free one
day.

Section 9

And this will be the day -- this will be the day when all of God's children will be able to sing
with new meaning:

My country 'tis of thee, sweet land of liberty, of thee I sing.


Land where my fathers died, land of the Pilgrim's pride,
From every mountainside, let freedom ring!
And if America is to be a great nation, this must become true.
And so let freedom ring from the prodigious hilltops of New Hampshire.
Let freedom ring from the mighty mountains of New York.
Let freedom ring from the heightening Alleghenies of Pennsylvania.
Let freedom ring from the snow-capped Rockies of Colorado.
Let freedom ring from the curvaceous slopes of California.
But not only that:
Let freedom ring from Stone Mountain of Georgia.
Let freedom ring from Lookout Mountain of Tennessee.
Let freedom ring from every hill and molehill of Mississippi.
From every mountainside, let freedom ring.

Section 10:

And when this happens, when we allow freedom ring, when we let it ring from every village and
every hamlet, from every state and every city, we will be able to speed up that day when all of
God's children, black men and white men, Jews and Gentiles, Protestants and Catholics, will be
able to join hands and sing in the words of the old Negro spiritual:

Free at last! Free at last!


Thank God Almighty, we are free at last!3

Retrieved from http://americanrhetoric.com/speeches/mlkihaveadream.htm


Page 37

Day 13 Lesson Plan Stargirl Ch 29-30

Objective: Students will be able to connect other resources of popularity to the themes within
Stargirl.

Core-Curriculum Standard:

Standard #2 (Writing) Students will write informational and literary text to reflect on and
recreate experiences, report observations, and persuade others.

NCTE-Standards:

5. Students employ a wide range of strategies as they write and use different writing process
elements appropriately to communicate with different audiences for a variety of purposes.

12. Students use spoken, written, and visual language to accomplish their own purposes.

Learning Activities for Lesson:

Journal (5 minutes): Students will walk in the door with a prompt on the board, this prompt will
say, “in what ways does a person become popular?”

Class Discussion (5 minutes): I will call on a few students to ask them to share their journal with
the class. I will then ask the students, “If you met someone and they weren’t popular, would you
make them popular? How?”

Class Activity (30 minutes): Divide the class into 4 groups. Each group will be given popular
examples of popularity: Regina George from Mean Girls, Elphaba, Rudolph the Red Nose
Reindeer, and Sandy from Grease. Each group will be instructed to look at how each of their
characters became popular. If a group gets done they can look at another character.

Remaining 5 minutes: I will explain to them that they are going to come back to class the next
day and they will look at the characters that they didn’t study in class that day.
Page 38

Model of Characters

Elphaba: Elphaba is an illegitimate daughter. Elphaba has green skin, black hair, and takes care
of her sister, Nessa. Elphaba studies hard in school and isn’t popular, at all. When she meets
Galinda, Galinda takes in upon herself to teach her how to popular. Listen to this song and write
down what ways Galinda thinks Elphaba needs to catch on to in order to be popular.

Regina George: The “queen bee” who everyone wants to be friends with. She takes upon
herself the task of making a girl, who moved to America from Africa, popular. She teaches her
what to wear, who to hang out with, etc. However, in the long run, it ruins everything. Have
you ever experienced a time when someone tried to change you?

Sandy: Is not the popular girl at school, but the local heart-throb has a crush on her. She wears
dresses and sweaters; however, near the end of the movie we see Sandy in a black leotard and
ratted hair. Why does Sandy change her appearance?

Rudolph the Red Nosed Reindeer: a reindeer who is born with a glowing red nose. His father,
Santa's lead reindeer Donner, feels ashamed and uses a special cover to hide Rudolph's nose so
Donner and his wife can send Rudolph to take-off practice a year later without Rudolph being
taunted by the other yearlings. The other reindeer start to notice Rudolph’s red nose and start
making fun of him; however, in the end of the book, his nose makes him popular. How does his
nose make him popular?
Page 39

Day 14 Lesson Plan: We Wear the Mask

Objective: Students will make the connection between Stargirl and “We Wear the Mask” by
Paul Laurence Dunbar. Students will also use Milner’s “Juxtaworlds” exercise (Milner, 321) to
further understand Dunbar’s poem and the relation it has to both Stargirl and their own
personality.

Core-Curriculum Standard:

Standard 2 (Writing): Students will write informational and literary text to reflect on and recreate
experiences, report observations, and persuade others.

Objective 1 (Writing to Learn): Compare multiple ideas and perspectives to extend thinking
through writing.
C. Compare/contrast connections between texts, between texts and self, and between texts and
different world connections.

NCTE Standard:

3. Students apply a wide range of strategies to comprehend, interpret, evaluate, and appreciate
texts. They draw on their prior experience, their interactions with other readers and writers, their
knowledge of word meaning and of other texts, their word identification strategies, and their
understanding of textual features (e.g., sound-letter correspondence, sentence structure, context,
graphics).

Learning Activities for Lesson:

Journal Prompt – Do you feel like you’ve been shunned by your peers in school? Have you,
perhaps, ever shunned another student? Why do you think this happened?
5 minutes

Poetry Study - Students will enter the classroom to find their assigned desks in groups of four.
After their journal prompt, groups will read Paul Laurence Dunbar’s “We Wear the Mask” and
discuss together the poem. After discussion time, each group will come to the front of the class
and explain what they thought of the poem, its overall meaning, and how it connects with
Stargirl.
15 minutes

Juxtaworlds - Students will then go to the computer lab/ library to do a Google Image search.
They will find several appropriate images to juxtapose with the text of the poem. Using the
Page 40

attached Microsoft Word document as a template they will import their images into the text of
the poem. They must be sure to print off their finished, juxtaposed poem and hand it in by the
end of class.
30 minutes

Homework: Finish reading Stargirl, chapters 33 and More than Stars.

NOTE: If internet access is restricted or no computer lab/library time is available, the third
activity is still an option. Just print out the template and have student find and cut out pictures
from magazines, newspapers, and the like.
We Wear the Mask
by Paul Laurence Dunbar Page 41

We wear the mask that grins and lies,


It hides our cheeks and shades our eyes,-
This debt we pay to human guile;
With torn and bleeding hearts we smile,
And mouth with myriad subtleties.

Why should the world be overwise,


In counting all our tears and sighs?
Nay, let them only see us, while
We wear the mask.

We smile, but, O great Christ, our cries


To thee from tortured souls arise.
We sing, but oh the clay is vile
Beneath our feet, and long the mile;
But let the world dream otherwise,
We wear the mask!
Page 42

Day 15 Lesson Plan: Stargirl Essay (Chapters 33, More Than Stars)

Objective: Students will be able to organize ideas and details from the literature. Students will
be able to engage in the writing process.
Core Curriculum Standard: Objective 2 (Extended Writing): Write to persuade others.
(Emphasize persuasive compositions. Students should use the entire writing process to produce
at least one extended piece per term, not necessarily limited to the type of writing emphasized at
individual grade levels.)

a. State a thesis that clearly takes a position.

b. Organize writing effectively using leads, details, transitions, conclusions, personal


experience, facts, anecdotes, examples, and paraphrased ideas.

c. Refute counter-arguments by using personal experience, facts, anecdotes, examples and


paraphrased ideas.

NCTE Standard: 5- Students employ a wide range of strategies as they write and use different
writing process elements appropriately to communicate with different audiences for a variety of
purposes.
Activity 1:
Journal (5-10 minutes). Students will respond to the following journal prompt in their unit
journals: “What do you think is the main message in Stargirl? What does it mean to be normal?”
Before class, write the journal prompt and class agenda on the board.

Activity 2:
Large Group Discussion (5-10 minutes). Summarize the main ideas from class discussions and
the book. Talk about what it means to be normal. Leading questions could include: What is
conformity? Do you think individuality should be encouraged or discouraged? Is there a
difference between being normal and being popular? What does this book say about school
sprit? Is school spirit a good or a bad thing? What do you think were Stargirl’s motivations
behind her actions?

Individual Task (20-30 min). Give students the chance to begin brainstorming for the final essay
in class. Pass out copies of the essay prompt and brainstorming sheets (see attached). Read the
prompt and ask students to follow along as you explain the final summative assessment. Answer
questions as they may come up. Direct the students’ attention to the brainstorming sheet.
Explain each section of the Venn diagram. Start at the section titled “Examples from the Book”.
Students will need to think of at least two examples from the book. The examples they choose
should answer one of the questions from the prompt. Students should also list the page number
where their example comes from. For instance, the example listed on the brainstorming task
sheet states, “I like to give people secret presents like Stargirl gives Leo a porcupine tie (pg.
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111.)” This example answers the question, “How are you like Stargirl?” After completing the
“Examples from the Book” section, students should record their examples under the correct
heading. Model answers for each section and give students time to fill in their own answers
before moving on to the next section. If students finish the brainstorming activity before the end
of the class, help students create an outline for their essay using the brainstorming sheet.
Students will need to write an introductory paragraph over the weekend and turn it on Monday.
The paragraph won’t be graded. Students will receive 5 pts if they have written three complete
sentences. Students will also receive written feedback on their paragraphs. The brainstorming
sheet and outlines will be saved to be turned in with the final assessment.

Homework:
Finish brainstorming activity and outline. Write an introductory paragraph for the final essay.
Page 44

Summative Assessment- Essay response


Essay Prompt: For the last few weeks, we having been discussing Jerry Spinelli’s novel,
Stargirl. Our class activities were focused around answering the essential question, “What does it
mean to be normal? For a final project, you will write a 2-3 page essay to answer the following
questions: In what ways are you like Stargirl and in what ways are you like Leo? Do you
consider yourself “normal”? Why or why not?

Please remember to include your answer to the questions in a thesis statement. Use at least two
specific examples from the book to illustrate the main points of your argument. As always, be
conscious of how grammar and organization affect the readability of your paper.
Page 45

Essay Rubric

0 1 23 45 67 8 9 10 Points Earned
Thesis There is no clear There is a thesis The thesis /10
thesis statement. statement, but it statement is
is either too concise and
broad or not addresses all
well defined. prompt
questions.
Supporting the The paper itself There is only The thesis is /10
Argument doesn’t support one supporting well supported
the thesis. There example from with at least two
are no examples the literature. examples from
from the There is minimal the literature.
literature. digression from There is no
main arguments. digression from
main arguments.

Grammar The paper is The reader can The grammar is


unreadable. understand the clean, and /10
There are five or gist of what the allows the main
more errors. person is trying ideas of the
to say, but the paper to come
paper definitely across clearly to
needs polish. the reader.
There are no There are no
more than four more than two
errors. errors.
Cohesion No transition Some transition The paper /10
sentences. The sentences moves smoothly
paper jumps present. from one idea to
from one idea to the next through
another. transition
sentences that tie
the paper
together.
Total /40
Page 46

Three Ways I’m Normal:


1.

Three Ways I’m Not 2.


Normal or Different Than
Stargirl and Leo:
3.
1-

2-

3-

Three Ways I’m Like Leo:


Three Ways I’m like Stargirl:
1.
1.
2.
2.
3.
3.

Examples from the Book:


- I like to give people secret presents like Stargirl gives Leo a
porcupine tie (pg. 111).
1.

2.
Page 47

Day 16 Lesson Plan: Conformity.

Objective: Students will take away a visual idea of the perceived differences of normal,
popular, and individual.

Core-Curriculum Standards:

Standard 3 (Inquiry): Students will understand the process of seeking and giving information in
conversations, group discussions, written reports, and oral presentations.
Objective 1 (Process of Inquiry): Use the process of inquiry to examine multiple points of
view.
a. Formulate questions to evoke valid responses from different points of view.
b. Gather information from multiple sources that reflect varied points of view.
c. Analyze multiple points of view for credibility.
d. Use primary and secondary sources.

Objective 2 (Written Communication of Inquiry): Write to analyze multiple points of view.


a. Select a format to analyze multiple points of view.
b. Compile and analyze information from multiple points of view.
c. Report analysis of multiple points of view using paraphrase, summary, or quotations.
d. Use informal and formal citations to support inquiry.

Objective 3 (Oral Communication of Inquiry): Conduct interviews to support inquiry.


a. Determine the purpose for interviews (e.g., to examine perspectives, to acquire
information, to clarify understanding, to respond to writing).
b. Ask probing questions to elicit elaboration and clarification of ideas.
c. Use appropriate interview procedures (e.g., supportive statements, body language, and
eye contact).
d. Present interview results.

NCTE Standards:

4. Students adjust their use of spoken, written, and visual language (e.g., conventions, style,
vocabulary).

5. Students employ a wide range of strategies as they write and use different writing process
elements appropriately to communicate with different audiences for a variety of purposes.

8 Students employ a wide range of strategies as they write and use different writing process
elements appropriately to communicate with different audiences for a variety of purposes.

11. Students participate as knowledgeable, reflective, creative, and critical members of a


variety of literacy communities.
Page 48

12. Students use spoken, written, and visual language to accomplish their own purposes (e.g.,
for learning, enjoyment, persuasion, and the exchange of information).

Learning Activities for Lesson:

Journal Entry (5-10 minutes): This journal entry harkens back to Day 2’s journal entry but asks
the students to dig deeper into the ideas of what is popular vs. normal and what it means to be an
individual. Writing prompt: “What does it mean to when someone describes another as popular,
normal, and individual?”

Class Discussion (5-10 minutes): Class discussion about the journal entry. The students will
chip in their ideas that they wrote in their journals on each of the three subjects. Use questions to
cause the students to dig deeper such as: Does being popular mean something different than
being normal? Is being normal a bad thing? Is being popular a bad thing? Can you be an
individual and still be normal/popular? Is being popular being an individual at the same time?

Poster Collage (20-30 minutes): Three students have been asked to take 25 photos (number may
vary a little depending on size of the class, cost, availability of time and photo processing
options, etc.) from around the school (see volunteers instructions). The students will break into
three groups. Each group is handed a 20x30 sheet of poster-board (or something similar) to tape
pictures onto. Each group is assigned one of three topics: popular, normal, and individual. They
are to go through the stacks of photos the volunteers shot and choose which photos work in each
group’s categories. The groups can pull photos out of any of the three stacks of photos taken,
they’re not limited. This shows the students that an individual’s ideas of
normal/popular/individual may vary from person to person. The students will work together in
their groups until their project is done.

Collage Presentations (5-10 minutes): At the end of class, each group will have the opportunity
to quickly present their posters and why they chose the pictures they chose. Be sure to point out
the variety in students choices as they discuss what they think is popular. Be sure to pose the
question “Are these labels widely accepted by society or are they applied according to what each
individual perceives popularity/normality/individuality to be?”

Homework: None.
Page 49

Instructions to student volunteers for gathering pictures. (Note to


teacher: the assignment can be presented in a ‘Top Secret’ orders like dossier for extra effect.)

Your Category ___________________

Thank you for volunteering. This project will garner you x amount of extra credit points.
Your mission, if you choose to accept it, will be to take a series of 25 photographs around the
school campus during or after school (you cannot use this as an excuse to disrupt anyone’s
classes or daily activities though, think fly on the wall/spy). These photos can be of anything
that you envision pertaining to your category. One of the main themes you will want to capture
is the people that fit into your category. Think about who is popular in the school. See if they’ll
let you take a picture of them. If someone is too shy, try just capturing them wearing something
without showing their faces (think of shooting the game of cards as opposed to who’s playing it,
this would count as an activity) that typify your category. Group pictures in the cafeteria,
pictures of plays, games, concerts, etc. are all accepted. If you don’t have access to a camera
(and we can’t provide one) or just are too shy to take the pictures, contact the newspaper and see
if they have some photos you could borrow for the class. You must have the following however,
in order to get full credit for your efforts:

You must have 10 pictures of people that exemplify your category. Ask the newspaper/yearbook
if you have a hard time getting these pictures yourself (for example, if you are going to get
mauled by the football players if you try to take a picture of them, that would be a good
reason to go to the newspaper). Think popular jocks, debate champions, the writing club,
group pictures of students at lunch, teacher whom everybody talks about, etc.

You must have 10 pictures of activities and/or places that fit your category. Again, if you want
to get to a place that could be dangerous for you to go (caution about those football players
again), ask the newspaper/yearbook if they have appropriate pictures for you to use. Think
parking lots, cafeteria, game fields (football, baseball, gym), concerts (band and choir), plays,
pep-rallies, etc. Whatever you think fits your category. You can have people in these
pictures, but the main theme of the photo must be the specific action they are performing.

The other 5 you pick what you want. The sky is the limit. Be sure to have fun and play with the
assignment. The more variety you provide for the class, the better the activity will be for the
day. Be prepared for the class, and perhaps the school, seeing the fruits of your labors (these
photos may be posted where the student body may see them).
Page 50

Day 17 Lesson Plan: Stargirl

Objective: Students will be able to take information from the book and create a coat of arms.

Core Curriculum Standards: Standard 3 (Inquiry/Research/Oral Presentation): Students will


understand the process of seeking and giving information in conversations, group discussions,
written reports, and oral presentations.

NCTE Standards:

5. Students employ a wide range of strategies as they write and use different writing process
elements appropriately to communicate with different audiences for a variety of purposes.

9. Students develop and understanding of and respect for diversity in language use, patterns, and
dialects across cultures, ethnic groups, geographical regions, and social roles.

Learning Activities for Lesson:

Journal (5-10 minutes): Students will journal about a prompt on the board. The prompt will say,
“Who is your favorite character in Stargirl? Why?”

Class Discussion (5 minutes): I will have family coat of arms to show the class. I will give a
little background on what it functions as and why people use them. I will tell students that we
are making a coat of arms for the novel Stargirl. In their coat of arms they are to have a quote,
an object that has significance, a drawing of an interpretation of the book, and something else of
their choice. After I have instructed them on how to make their coat of arms, I will explain to
them that they are to come up with a short explanation about their coat of arms. Why they chose
the quote they used? Why did you decide on…?

Class Activity (20 minutes): Students will be handed their art supplies for the activity and they
will work on them and when they are done we will share with the class their coat of arms.

Presentation of Arms (15 minutes): Presentation of coat of arms.


Page 51

Day 18 Lesson Plan: The Romance of Leo and Stargirl

Objective: Students will be able to compare the love story of Stargirl with other works of
literature, create their own conclusions, and tie it in with the original story. They will work on
their reading, writing, and editing skills in the process.

Core-Curriculum Standard:

Standard 2 (Writing): Students will write informational and literary text to reflect on and
recreate experiences, report observations, and persuade others.

Objective 1 (Writing to Learn): Compare multiple ideas and perspectives to extend thinking
through writing.

NCTE Standard:

1. Students read a wide range of print and non-print texts to build an understanding of texts, of
themselves, and of the cultures of the United States and the world; to acquire new information; to
respond to the needs and demands of society and the workplace; and for personal fulfillment.
Among these texts are fiction and nonfiction, classic and contemporary works.

2. Students read a wide range of literature from many periods in many genres to build an
understanding of the many dimensions (e.g., philosophical, ethical, aesthetic) of human
experience.

3. Students apply a wide range of strategies to comprehend, interpret, evaluate, and appreciate
texts. They draw on their prior experience, their interactions with other readers and writers, their
knowledge of word meaning and of other texts, their word identification strategies, and their
understanding of textual features (e.g., sound-letter correspondence, sentence structure, context,
graphics).

Learning Activities for Lesson:

Journal Prompt – Do you believe in “true love”? If no, then why not? If yes, explain what makes
“true love” different from any other kind.
10 minutes

After journals, students will have the rest of the class period to work on one of the following
activities.
Page 52

Ending Rewrite – Students who did not like the ending or who perhaps would like to see a
different ending to Stargirl may use the remaining time to write a new ending to the story. These
new endings should be comparable in length with the last chapter of the book. Should they finish
early, I will proof read and edit their draft.
40 minutes

Reunion Script – Students may form groups of no more than four and work together to produce a
script for a five minute sketch depicting Leo and Stargirl as if they met again after the ending of
the book. Should they finish early they will be allowed to practice performing this sketch.
40 minutes

Comparisons of Love – Students will be able to read short stories or pieces of short stories and
plays depicting love. These will include but are not limited to The Wooing of Ariadne by Mark
Petrakis, from Act 2, Scene 1 of Shakespeare’s The Taming of the Shrew, and Lanval. After the
students have read one of these works, they will write a one page comparison of it and Stargirl.
Should they finish early they may read another of the stories, but are not required to write a
comparison.
40 minutes

Homework: Students who do not finish their work in class will need to finish it at home and
bring it to class the next day.
Page 53

Day 19 Lesson Plan: School Spirit and Letters to the Editor

Objective: Students will be able to analyze the genre conventions of letters to the editor and
explain effective and ineffective techniques for writing their own letters to the editor.

Core-Curriculum Standard: Objective 2 (Extended Writing) Write to persuade others.


(Emphasize persuasive compositions. Students should use the entire writing process to produce
at least one extended piece per term, not necessarily limited to the type of writing emphasized in
individual grade levels.)
a. State a thesis that clearly takes a position.

b. Organize writing effectively using leads, details, transitions, conclusions, facts,


anecdotes, examples, and paraphrased ideas.

NCTE Standards: 12- Students use spoken and written language to accomplish their own
purposes (e.g., for learning, enjoyment, persuasion, and the exchange of information).

Activity 1:
Journal (5-10 minutes). Students will respond to the following journal prompt in their unit
journals: “Do you feel it’s important to have school spirit? Describe any positive or negative
examples of school spirit from Stargirl.” Before class, write the journal prompt and class agenda
on the board.

Activity 2:
Group Discussion (10 minutes). Discuss student responses to the journal prompts. Ask students
to volunteer their ideas or read from their journals. Facilitate a group discussion by looking
closely at examples of school spirit from the text. Some examples include pg. 7, pg. 53, and pg.
184. Guiding questions could include: Do you believe Hillari Kimble’s (a character from the
book) school spirit theory? Why would adults want to encourage school spirit or encourage
students to be involved with clubs and activities? When is it okay to boo sports teams? Do you
agree or disagree with Stargirl’s actions (walking out of the basketball game, cheering for the
other team, helping an injured opponent, etc.)? Look at the description of the Mica High reunion
on pgs. 184-185; in ten years from now, what will you remember about your high school
experience? What will you be remembered for?

Activity 3:
Mini-Lesson (15-20 minutes). Give students the prompt and rubric for the writing assignment.
Give students the model letters to the editor. Demonstrate on an overhead the textual features of
ineffective and effective model letters to the editor. Ineffective examples will have a lot of
name-calling, vague or incorrect information, or an incoherent organization and style. Effective
examples, preferably letter to the school newspaper written by students, will be brief, have
Page 54

specific, accurate information, and will be related to a ‘hot topic’ or important issue. Effective
examples will also be free from spelling and grammar errors.

Activity 4:
Individual Task (10 minutes). Give students the remaining time in class to write to the editor
responding to the following scenario: “Imagine that Logan High administrators are thinking
about getting rid of popular student activities and traditions in order to save money. Please write
a letter to the editor of The Grizzly, Logan High’s school paper, to explain which school tradition
or activity you would like to keep and why. Be sure to include at least three reasons why your
chosen activity has a positive effect on the Logan High community. Possible activities include
dances, sports, homecoming week, etc. Remember to include all of the elements of effective
persuasive writing.” Collect the letters at the beginning of the next class period (adapted from
Chapter 9 in the Milner text pgs. 310-311, 314).

Homework:
Finish letters to the editor
Page 55

Ineffective Letter to the Editor Model


“Student government has done a lousy job of managing stuff. I can’t believe that people
actually voted for the idiots in office. What were they thinking! I can’t tell you how many times
those people have made me so mad, I wanted to hit something. No one is qualified to lead so
they shouldn’t even try. Elections are a joke!
The administration is so bad. It’s like, I’ve been eating the same rotten food everyday
since kindergarten. What is there problem? I just wanted to send this letter because nobody
listens to good common sense anymore, and I think I have a lot of that.” (Intentional
misspellings)

Effective Letter to the Editor Model


“This year has definitely been a trying one for ASUSU because dealing with budget cuts
is always a messy situation. Though they have needed to make adjustments, like all other
aspects of USU, the officers have come out alive and given students another memorable year.
It’s about time the entire student body started learning about who this year’s candidates
are, in order to ensure a solid group of leaders through the next school year. The people voted
into student government have a say in student dollars, so whoever is uninterested in voting is
flagrantly disregarding their own financial situation. Especially in these difficult economic
times, it is crucial that we, as college students drowning in higher education expenses, put our
futures in the hands of students who actually know what they are doing.
Elections are a serious matter and time should be invested by every student to figure out
which candidates know what they are going to be responsible for if they will. Go ahead, ask the
candidates questions when they come to your door. Put them on the spot. Make them sweat.
It’s good for their character. In the end, we will all benefit. USU students, far and wide, get
ready, because it’s time to vote.”
Page 56

Letter to the Editor Prompt and Rubric

Prompt:
“Imagine that Logan High administrators are thinking about getting rid of popular student
activities and traditions in order to save money. Please write a letter to the editor of The Grizzly,
Logan High’s school paper, to explain which school tradition or activity you would like to keep
and why. Be sure to include at least three reasons why your chosen activity has a positive effect
on the Logan High community. Possible activities include dances, sports, homecoming week,
etc. Remember to include all of the elements of effective persuasive writing.”

Specific activity or tradition 0 1


Three reasons why the activity has positive effects 0 1 2 3
Complete sentences, at least on paragraph long 0 1 2

Total: /6

One point will be take away for having more than 3 grammar/spelling errors.

Example:

“Dear Editor,
I would like to comment on recent events that have taken place at our school. Many have
noticed that administrators are trying to cut student activities such as this year’s Junior Prom.
Losing this activity would have a devastating effect on school spirit. The Junior Prom give
junior class members the opportunity to volunteer and get involved in planning and organizing
events. Students are able to develop leadership skills as they prepare for this occasion. The
Junior Prom also helps to build friendships. Activities and assembles are designed to make
everyone feel included. Funds generated from the ticket sales can help pay for Prom expenses.
Students are willing to buy tickets to the Junior Prom because in the past this has been a fun, safe
activity. Many of us fee that some of our most memorable high school experiences happen at
school dances. As students, we need to work together to make sure that our voice is heard and
that administrators know we do not want this valuable Logan High tradition to die.”
Page 57

Day 20 Lesson Plan: Wrap-Up Workday.

Objective: Students are to be allowed time to finish their papers in the computer lab.

Core-Curriculum Standards:

Standard 3 (Inquiry): Students will understand the process of seeking and giving information in
conversations, group discussions, written reports, and oral presentations.
Objective 2 (Written Communication of Inquiry): Write to analyze multiple points of view.
a. Select a format to analyze multiple points of view.
b. Compile and analyze information from multiple points of view.
c. Report analysis of multiple points of view using paraphrase, summary, or quotations.
d. Use informal and formal citations to support inquiry.

NCTE Standards: 12, 4, 6, 7-8

4. Students adjust their use of spoken, written, and visual language (e.g., conventions, style,
vocabulary) to communicate effectively with a variety of audiences and for different
purposes.

6. Students apply knowledge of language structure, language conventions (e.g., spelling and
punctuation), media techniques, figurative language, and genre to create, critique, and
discuss print and non-print texts.

7. Students conduct research on issues and interests by generating ideas and questions, and
by posing problems. They gather, evaluate, and synthesize data from a variety of sources
(e.g., print and non-print texts, artifacts, people) to communicate their discoveries in
ways that suit their purpose and audience.

8. Students use a variety of technological and informational resources (e.g., libraries,


databases, computer networks, video) to gather and synthesize information and to create
and communicate knowledge.

12. Students use spoken, written, and visual language to accomplish their own purposes (e.g.,
for learning, enjoyment, persuasion, and the exchange of information).

Learning Activities for Lesson:

Computer Lab Work Day (50 minutes): Students should already have a rough draft of their
papers completed to work on in the lab that the teacher has already corrected (or the students
have peer-critiqued if that is the style the instructor prefers). This is a time where the teacher
will be available for students having difficulties with their papers to get feedback before their
final drafts are due. Quick one to two minute conferences with each of the students to check on
their progress will be conducted during the class.
Page 58

Homework: Finish papers to turn in next class period.