Sie sind auf Seite 1von 164

PARTICIPANT WORKBOOK

COURSE

ON

COMPUTER AIDED DESIGN & MANUFACTURING

on 05-07th AUGUST 2010

AT
AND IN ASSOCIATION WITH

ANCHOR INSTITUTE CELL , S.V. NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF


TECHNOLOGY
ICCHANATH , SURAT

ASME Course Director : Dr. D.M.Kulkarni

Training & Development Cell , The American Society of Mechanical Engineers , Three , Park Avenue , NY 10016-5990
WORK BOOK INDEX & SCHEDULE
MODULE (M) | LECTURE (L) | TUTORIAL (T) | PRACTICE (P)
LX* THEORY LECTURE IN PPT MODE

05-VIII-2010 |THURSDAY | DAY-1


M1 Fundamentals of Computer Aided Design
L1* Overview of CAD
L2* Product Modeling
L3* Non-Parametric Versus Parametric Modeling
L4 Introduction to PRO/ E
L5 Sketch Mode
T1 Invoking sketch, Sketcher Environment, Sketch Tool bar
T2 Dimensioning, Constraints, Deleting, Trimming, Mirroring
T3 2D car profile 9.30 AM to 1.00 PM
T4 Nut profile
P1 Solid Bearing Sketch
L6* Modeling Analytic Curves (Line, Circle, Arc, Ellipse,
Parabola, Hyperbola)
L7* Continuity
L8* Modeling Synthetic Curves and Surfaces (Cubic Splines,
Bezier, B-Spline)
LUNCH BREAK
M2 Geometric Modeling
L1* Fundamentals of Solid Modeling
L2* Representation Schemes
L3 Part Mode
T1 Features I: Extrude, Revolve, Hole, Round, Chamfer, Rib,
Pattern.
T2 Features II : Datum, Sweep, Blend, helical sweep,
cosmetic 2.00 PM to 5.30 PM
T3 Basic 3D car modeling
T4 Creating a 3D Nut & Bolt
T5 Creating a Solid Bearing
T6 Modeling a Drawing board clip
T7 Modeling a vase
P1 Modeling parts of a Knuckle Joint

Training & Development Cell , The American Society of Mechanical Engineers , Three , Park Avenue , NY 10016-5990
2
06-VIII-2010 | FRIDAY | DAY-2
M3 Structural FE Analysis
L1* Overview of FE Analysis
T1 Truss Analysis
T2 2-D-Cantilever Beam
T3 Plate with a Circular Hole
T4 Internally Pressurized Cylinder
P1 3-D-Cantilever Beam
P2 Cantilever beam with two welded materials
9.30 AM to 1.00 PM
P3 Uniformly loaded two welded materials
P4 Effect of Self Weight on a Cantilever Beam
L2* Non-Linear Analysis
T5 Define Bi-Linear kinematic hardening
T6 Define Multi-Linear isotropic hardening
P5 Cantilever beam loaded beyond yield limit
P6 Column (Multi-Linear Plasticity)
LUNCH BREAK
M4 Thermal & Vibration FE Analysis
L1* Steady and Transient Thermal Analysis
T1 Conduction across block
T2 Conduction, convection and Insulation cross block
T3 Transient heat conduction across block
P1 Heat loss from a composite pipe
P2 1-D heat conduction across a composite wall
L2* Modal & Harmonic Analysis 2.00 PM to 5.30 PM
T4 Cantilever beam
T5 Simply supported beam
P3 AeroPlane wing
T6 Harmonic Analysis of Cantilever Beam
T7 Harmonic Analysis of Simply supported Beam
T8 Classical Euler buckling analysis

Training & Development Cell , The American Society of Mechanical Engineers , Three , Park Avenue , NY 10016-5990
3
07-VIII-2010 | SATURDAY |DAY-3
M5 Assembly Modeling & Design Simulation
L1* Geometric Transformations 9.30 AM to 1.00 PM
L3 Assembly Mode
T1 Import, Constraints in Assembly & Exploded View
T2 Nut & Bolt Assembly
T3 Assembly of C Clamp
T4 Assembly of knuckle Joint
P1 Modeling and assembly of screw jack
LUNCH BREAK
M6 Design & Manufacturing Simulation
L1* Product Data Exchange
L2 Design Simulation
T1 Motion Analysis, Velocity Vs time plot,
T2 Simulating a Four Bar Mechanism
T3 Simulating a Disc and plunger Mechanism
P1 Design simulation of Single cylinder engine
P2 Design simulation of Four Cylinder engine 2.00 PM to 5.30 PM
L3 Surface Modeling
T4* Features: Extrude, Revolve, Sweep, Blend, Helical sweep
T5* Surface editing, merging, Trimming
P3 Surface Modeling of a Chair
L4 Manufacturing
T6 NC CAD Profile Milling

Training & Development Cell , The American Society of Mechanical Engineers , Three , Park Avenue , NY 10016-5990
4
M1 | Fundamentals of Computer Aided Design

Training & Development Cell , The American Society of Mechanical Engineers , Three , Park Avenue , NY 10016-5990
5
INTRODUCTION M1-L4
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Pro/ENGINEER is a powerful program used to create complex designs with a great
precision. The design intent of any 3D model or an assembly is defined by its specification and
its use.
To start Pro/E on a Windows machine, there may be an icon on your desktop or you
may have to look in the Start menu at the bottom left of the screen on the Windows taskbar.
The program takes a while to load, so be patient. The start-up is complete when your screen
looks like the following figure, which is a default Pro/E screen.

Training & Development Cell , The American Society of Mechanical Engineers , Three , Park Avenue , NY 10016-5990
6
Generally a design process consists of the following steps:
• Sketching using the basic sketch entities.
• Converting the sketch into features and parts.
• Assembling different parts and analyzing them.
• Documentation of the parts and assembly in the terms of drawing views.
• Manufacturing the final part and assembly.
All these steps are divided into different modes of Pro/ENGINEER Wildfire 2.0, namely, the
Sketch mode, Part mode, Assembly mode, Drawing mode and Manufacturing mode.

IMPORTANT TERMS AND DEFINITIONS


Some important terms that will be used while working with Pro/ENGINEER Wildfire 4.0 are
discussed here.

Entity
An element of section geometry is called an entity. The entity can be an arc, line, circle, point,
conic coordinate system, and so on. When one entity is divided at a point then the total
number of entities is said to be two.

Dimension
It is the measurement of one or more entities.

Constraint
Constraints are logical operations that are performed on the selected geometry to make it
more accurate in defining its position and size with respect to the other geometry.

Parameter
It is defined as a numeric value or any definition that defines a feature. For example, all
dimensions in a sketch are parameters. The parameters can be modified at any time.

Relation
A relation is an equation that relates two entities.
Training & Development Cell , The American Society of Mechanical Engineers , Three , Park Avenue , NY 10016-5990
7
Weak Dimensions and Weak Constraints
Weak dimensions and weak constraints are temporary dimensions or constraints that appear
in gray color. These are automatically applied to the sketch. They are removed from the
sketch without any confirmation from the user. These should be changed to strong
dimensions or constraints if they seem to be useful for the sketch.

WORKING DIRECTORY
A working directory is a directory on the system where we can save the work done in the
current session. We can set any directory on our system as the working directory.
In ProE, the file menu options play a more crucial role while starting the modeling. This is
important when creating an assembly model, as it is important to see that all the parts should
be in the same directory. It would be easy to create a separate directory for all different
assemblies that are being modeled.
Working directory can be setup at the start of the ProE from the start up page in the File
menu as shown below in the figure.

Training & Development Cell , The American Society of Mechanical Engineers , Three , Park Avenue , NY 10016-5990
8
THE SKETCH MODE M1-L5
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
In Pro/ENGINEER, a sketch can be drawn in the Sketch mode or in the sketcher environment.
A designer can draw a 2D sketch of the product and assign the required dimensions and
constraints to it. By assigning the dimensions, the designer can make sure that the 2D sketch
of the product or model is satisfying the necessary conditions. He can then continue to create
the 3D model of the product in the Part mode.

M1-T1
2.0 INVOKING THE SKETCH MODE
To invoke the Sketch mode, choose New from the File menu or create a new button from the
File toolbar. Select Sketch radio button. A default name of the sketch file appears in the
Name edit box. We can change the sketch name as required and then choose OK button to
enter the sketch.

Training & Development Cell , The American Society of Mechanical Engineers , Three , Park Avenue , NY 10016-5990
9
2.1 SKETCHING ENTITIES
Pro/Engineer’s sketcher environment provides a variety of options for sketching two-
dimensional entities.
SKETCH
TOOL
BAR

Lines
Lines
are created
with the
Sketch
>> Line
option.
Two entities
are

available: Geometry and Centerline.


Geometry is the default selection and is used to create feature entities.
Centerline entities are used for construction techniques only.

Training & Development Cell , The American Society of Mechanical Engineers , Three , Park Avenue , NY 10016-5990
10
• 2 Point: The two point’s option of line construction is used to create a line from picked

endpoints.
* Note: In Drawing Mode, dimensions will be automatically displayed in grey color.
• 2 Tangent: The 2 tangent option of line construction is used to create a line tangent of
two arcs, circles, or splines.

The symbol ‘T‘in the above picture shows that the line is tangent to the circle.

Arcs
Arcs are created with the Sketch >> Arc option.
• Tangent end: The tangent end option creates an arc that is tangent to the endpoint of
a selected entity. Select the end points in a counterclockwise direction.

• Concentric: The Concentric option creates an arc concentric to an existing arc or circle.

Training & Development Cell , The American Society of Mechanical Engineers , Three , Park Avenue , NY 10016-5990
11
• 3 Tangent: The 3 tangent options are used to create an arc tangent to three selected
entities.

• Fillet: The fillet option is used to create a fillet between two selected entities. The first
selection point defines the initial radius of the fillet.

*Note: Elliptical fillet command also available in which fillet will be in elliptical shape.
Corners need not be trimmed after using the Fillet Command.

Circles
Circles are created with the Sketch >> Circle option. Two entity types are available: Geometry
and Construction. The methods of creating a circle are:
• Center/point: The Center/point option is used to create a circle by first selecting the
circle’s center point, then selecting a second point on the perimeter of the circle.
• Concentric: The Concentric option is used to construct a circle with a center point
common to a second circle.

Training & Development Cell , The American Society of Mechanical Engineers , Three , Park Avenue , NY 10016-5990
12
• 3 Tangent: The 3 tangent options are used to create a circle tangent to three selected
entities.

Rectangle
A rectangle can be created from the Sketcher toolbar. Pick the lower left and upper right
corner of the rectangle.

Splines
A spline is a variable radius curve that passes through multiple control points.
A Spline can be created from the Sketcher toolbar.

Text
Text can be used in extruded protrusion, cut, and cosmetic feature sections.
Sketched text can be created the Sketcher toolbar.

Training & Development Cell , The American Society of Mechanical Engineers , Three , Park Avenue , NY 10016-5990
13
M1-T2
2.2 WORKING WITH CONSTRAINTS

The entities in a sketch have to be fully specified in terms of size, shape, orientation, and
location. This is achieved by setting constraints. Using constraints in the sketch reduces the
number of dimensions in that sketch.

Constraints are the logical operations that are performed on the selected geometry to make it
more accurate in defining its position with respect to the other geometry. For example, if a
line is nearly parallel to another line, Pro/ENGINEER snaps the parallel line and displays the
parallel constraint symbol. We can also apply constraints manually.

There are two types of constraints in Pro/ENGINEER, Geometry constraints and Assembly
constraints. Here Geometry constraints are discussed.

To apply constraints manually, choose the Constrain:


Impose sketcher constraints on the section button from the
Sketcher Tools toolbar to display the Constraints dialog box.
This dialogue box is shown in Figure 1.c.1.

This dialog box is used to apply constraints manually. Although the


constraints are applied automatically as we draw the sketch, we can
use this dialog box if we want to manually apply additional Figure 1.c.1
Constraints. The constraints that are applied automatically are weak constraints and they
appear in grey color. Weak constraints can be made strong. The constraints in the Constraints
dialog box are discussed next.

Training & Development Cell , The American Society of Mechanical Engineers , Three , Park Avenue , NY 10016-5990
14
Make a line or two vertices vertical
This constraint forces the selected line segment to become a vertical line. This
constraint also forces the two vertices to be placed along a vertical line.

Make a line or two vertices horizontal


This constraint forces the selected line segment or two vertices that are appear by
some distance to become horizontal or to lie in a horizontal line.

Make two entities perpendicular


This constraint forces the selected entity to become normal to another selected
entity.

Make two entities tangent


This constraint forces the two selected entity to become tangent to each other.

Place point on the middle of the line


This constraint forces a selected point or vertex to lie on the middle of a line.

Create same points, points on the entity or collinear constraint


This constraint performs three functions. This constraint can be used to force the two
selected points to become coincident to constraints a point on the selected entity,
and to make two selected entities collinear, so that they lie on the same line. This constraint
aligns two vertices or entities.

Make two points or vertices symmetric about a centerline


This constraint makes a section symmetrical about the centerline. When we select
this, it prompts to select a centerline and two vertices to make them symmetrical.

Training & Development Cell , The American Society of Mechanical Engineers , Three , Park Avenue , NY 10016-5990
15
Create Equal Lengths, Equal Radii, or Same Curvature Constraint
This constraint forces any two selected entities to become equal in dimension. When
we select this constraint, it prompts to select two lines to make their lengths equal, or
it prompts to select two arcs, circles, or ellipses to make their radii equal.

Make two lines parallel


This constraint is used to force two lines to become parallel. When selected, this
constraint prompts to select two entities that we want to make parallel.

Disabling the Constraints


The need to disable a constraint arises when we are drawing an entity. For example, if we
draw a circle at some distance apart from a circle. While drawing it, the system tends to apply
the equal radius constraint when the sizes of the two circles become equal. If at this moment
we do not want to apply the equal radius constraint, right click to disable the equal radius
constraint. When we right click to disable the equal radius constraint, an orange line appears
across the symbol. To enable the constraint, right click once again.

Converting a Weak Constraint into a Strong Constraint


Some weak dimensions are automatically applied to the sketch while drawing. As we proceed
to complete the sketch, these dimensions are automatically deleted from the sketch without
any configuration.

Select a weak dimension or a weak constraint from the graphics window. The selected
dimension or constraint is highlighted in red. Press and hold right mouse button to invoke the
shortcut menu. Choose Strong option from the shortcut menu.

Training & Development Cell , The American Society of Mechanical Engineers , Three , Park Avenue , NY 10016-5990
16
EXAMPLE:
Sketch: 1
Draw the sketch for the model shown in figure 1.1.1. The sketch is shown in Figure 1.1.2.

Figure 1.1.1 model Figure 1.1.2 Sketch of the model

Sol: -
Drawing the lines of the sketch
Draw the lines A, B, C, D, and E. After drawing the lines the sketch will appear as shown in
figure 1.1.3 with weak dimensions.

Figure 1.1.3 Partial sketch with weak dimensions

Training & Development Cell , The American Society of Mechanical Engineers , Three , Park Avenue , NY 10016-5990
17
Drawing the Arc
1. Choose the Create an arc 3 points or tangent to an entity at its end point button from
the Sketcher Tools toolbar.
2. Draw the arc by selecting start and end point of the arc. The figure 1.1.4 shows the
sketch with arc. In the figure, the letter T indicates the tangent constraint. It may show
tangent constraint at the start and end points. If it shows the tangent constraint only
at one point we need to impose the tangent constraint later.

Figure 1.1.4 Sketch with arc

Drawing the Circle


1. Choose Create circle by picking the center and a point on the circle button to display
the flyout. From this flyout, choose the Create concentric circle button; it prompts to
select an arc.
2. Select the arc by clicking on it. Move the mouse and a circle appears.
3. To draw the circle, click to select a point inside the sketch.
4. Press the middle mouse button to end circle creation.

Training & Development Cell , The American Society of Mechanical Engineers , Three , Park Avenue , NY 10016-5990
18
Dimensioning the Sketch
1. Choose the Create defining dimension button from the Sketcher Tools toolbar.
2. Place all the dimensions as shown if figure 1.1.5. The sketch is complete and appears
similar to that shown below.

Figure 1.1.5 Sketch with all entities, weak dimensions, and weak constraints

Modifying the Dimensions


The sketch is dimensioned with default values. We need to modify these values to the given
values.
1. Choose the One-by-One: Select items button.
2. Select all dimensions by specifying a window around them.
3. When all dimensions turn in red color, choose the Modify the values of dimensions,
geometry of splines, or text entities button. The Modify Dimension dialog box is
displayed.
All the dimensions in the sketch are displayed in this dialog box and each dimension has a
separate thumbwheel and an edit box. We can use the thumbwheel or the edit box to modify
the dimensions.
4. Clear the Regenerate check box and then modify the values of the dimensions.
5. Modify all dimensions, as shown in figure 1.1.6. After modifying the dimensions,
choose Regenerate the section and close the dialog button from the Modify
Dimensions dialog box.
The sketch is complete and shown in figure 1.1.6

Training & Development Cell , The American Society of Mechanical Engineers , Three , Park Avenue , NY 10016-5990
19
Figure 1.1.6 The complete sketch with dimensions and constraints

To Sketch 2D car Profile M1-T3

Sketching Nut Profile. M1-T4

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Training & Development Cell , The American Society of Mechanical Engineers , Three , Park Avenue , NY 10016-5990
20
Solid Bearing M1-P1

Training & Development Cell , The American Society of Mechanical Engineers , Three , Park Avenue , NY 10016-5990
21
M2 | Geometric Modeling

Training & Development Cell , The American Society of Mechanical Engineers , Three , Park Avenue , NY 10016-5990
22
PART MODE M2-L3
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
ENTERING THE PART MODE
To enter the Part mode, select New from the File menu or choose the Create a new object
button from the File toolbar. The New dialog box is displayed with the different modes
available.
The Part radio button in the Type area and the Solid radio button in the Sub-type area is
Selected by default in the New dialog box. The default name of the part file also appears in
the Name edit box. You can change the part name as desired and then choose the OK button
to enter the Part mode. When you choose the OK button, the new part file is opened and you
enter the Part mode.

Figure
shows
you
the
initial

screen appearance on entering the Part mode with the Model Tree, the three default datum
planes, and the default options available in the Menu Manager.
M2-T1

Training & Development Cell , The American Society of Mechanical Engineers , Three , Park Avenue , NY 10016-5990
23
Basic Features can be invoked from Base
features tool bar or from INSERT in MENU
BAR.

Extrude: Extrusion is the process of defining a volume by


protruding/removing the sketched cross section, along an axis normal to the section plane.
To create Extrude: Click the Extrude Tool icon from the Base Features toolbar or choose Insert
> Extrude.

Revolve: The Revolve Command, revolves/rotates the sketched cross section through the
specified angle about a centerline. By revolving a sketch, you can add or remove material. If
the Revolve feature is a base feature, then the section drawn should be a closed section, to
revolve the section as a solid. The section sketch of a revoked feature will not be completed
until you have drawn a centerline. The section drawn should be on one side of the centerline.
If there is more than one centerline, the section considers the first drawn centerline as its axis
for rotation.
To create Revolve: Click the Revolve tool icon or choose from Insert > Revolve.

Sweep: The Sweep option extrudes a section along a defined path. For creating a sweep, you
have to define or create a section and path. The path can be an open or a closed one. The

Training & Development Cell , The American Society of Mechanical Engineers , Three , Park Avenue , NY 10016-5990
24
Sweep option can be used for adding/removing material. The types of sweep possible are
Constant Section Sweep, Helical Sweep, and Variable Section Sweep.

Constant Section Sweep: Constant Section Sweep is the basic type of sweep where the cross-
section of the swept feature remains constant throughout the sweep.

Helical Sweep: The Helical Sweep command extrudes a section along a helical trajectory. For
this command you have to define a trajectory that will specify the shape and height of the
helix, a pitch value and the cross section of the helical feature. This command is mainly used
to create to create helical springs and threads.

Blend: The Blend command creates a feature, by joining two or more planar sections at their
edges, to form a continuous feature. The number of entities in each section should be the
same. The three types of Blends are Parallel Blend, Rotational Blend and General Blend.
Training & Development Cell , The American Society of Mechanical Engineers , Three , Park Avenue , NY 10016-5990
25
Training & Development Cell , The American Society of Mechanical Engineers , Three , Park Avenue , NY 10016-5990
26
M2-T2
Datum: Datums are imaginary features. They act as reference for sketching a feature,
assembling components, and other tasks. Most of the designs contain more than one feature.
As all the features cannot be created on a single plane, we need to create or select additional
planes to draw the remaining features.

Draft: Rotating the selected surface at a certain angle creates Drafts. You can specify an angle
value between -30˚ and 30˚ for drafts. Drafts are mainly used in constructing moulds and
castings. You can draft only those planes, which are formed by tabulated cylinders, and
planes.

Hole: The types of holes possible in ProE are counter bore, countersunk, tapered or drill type.

Rib: A Rib feature is a thin fin or web protrusion that attaches solid surfaces in your design.
Typically, ribs are designed to strengthen parts in your design, and are often used to prevent
unwanted bending.

Training & Development Cell , The American Society of Mechanical Engineers , Three , Park Avenue , NY 10016-5990
27
Shell: The Shell feature creates a hollow surface inside the solid leaving the solid like a shell
with specified wall thickness. Additionally, it allows you to specify the thickness of the
surfaces that you want to remove from the shell.

Rounds: A Round is used to create fillet between surfaces. It is a type of edge treatment
feature, in which, a radius is added to an edge or edges and an edge chain between surfaces.
To create Rounds, you have to define one or more round sets. A set is an organizational unit,
containing one or more round pieces. Transitions are fillet geometry that connects round
pieces. Transitions are located where round pieces intersect or terminate. ProE uses default
transitions during the initial round creation and provides many transition types, allowing you
to create and modify transitions.

Chamfer: Chamfers are used to level the selected edges and corners, with the help of some
selected parameters.

Pattern: Patterns are one or two dimensional, incremental array of features, created from a
single feature called the parent or the leader. When you pattern a feature, you need to
specify the total number of features to be created, including the one being patterned. The
increment in dimensions, if required, also needs to be specified. Creating a Pattern is an
easier way to reproduce a feature. The entire instance in the pattern is related parametrically.

Training & Development Cell , The American Society of Mechanical Engineers , Three , Park Avenue , NY 10016-5990
28
Therefore, any change in the original feature, automatically updates the pattern definition. It
may be easier or more effective to perform operations once on the multiple features
contained in a pattern rather than on the individual features.

Cosmetic Features: Cosmetic Features are reference geometry used to represent the physical
geometry of the part. Cosmetic Features are mainly used to minimize the model size and to
reduce the regeneration time. Cosmetic Features cannot change the model volume. Threads,
Grooves and company logos are examples of cosmetic features.

Training & Development Cell , The American Society of Mechanical Engineers , Three , Park Avenue , NY 10016-5990
29
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
3D Nut and Bolt M2-T4
a. Sketch a hexagon with 22 units as side length and extrude it to 15 units.

b. Draw a circle Ф 22 units at the centre of the hexagon taking references and
extrude it to 130 units.
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Solid Bearing M2-T5

Training & Development Cell , The American Society of Mechanical Engineers , Three , Park Avenue , NY 10016-5990
30
The Solid Bearing is made by extruding the given section. Another Extrude Command is
used to create the 2 holes. Revolve Command can be used to create the Oil Hole.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
M2-T6
Drawing Board clip

Training & Development Cell , The American Society of Mechanical Engineers , Three , Park Avenue , NY 10016-5990
31
a. Start Pro/E Wildfire.
b. Select File > New and name the new part Example_sweep.
c. Select Insert > Sweep > Protrusion from the menu bar.
d. Select Sketch Traj from the Menu Manager. This will allow you to sketch the
trajectory of the sweep.
e. Select the plane labeled FRONT, and select Okay from the DIRECTION menu in the
Menu Manager.
f. Select Default from SKET VIEW. Pro/E will switch to Sketcher Mode.
g. Select Sketch > Intent Manager from the menu bar.
h. Draw the path shown in Figure 3.1 as follows:
 Select Line from the GEOMETRY menu.
 Click points A and B with the left mouse button, and click the middle mouse
button.
 Click points C and D with the left mouse button, and click the middle mouse
button.
 Select Arc from the GEOMETRY menu.
 Select Center/Ends from the ARC TYPE menu.
 Click points E, B, and D with the left mouse button.

[Figure 3.1]

Training & Development Cell , The American Society of Mechanical Engineers , Three , Park Avenue , NY 10016-5990
32
i. Dimension the path as shown in Figure 3.2. Modify the dimensions if necessary.

[Figure 3.2]

j. Select Done from the SKETCHER menu.


k. Now you will sketch the cross-section of the part. Select Sketch > Intent Manager
from the menu bar.
l. Draw the section shown in Figure 3.3 as follows:
 Select Line from the GEOMETRY menu.
 Click points A and B with the left mouse button, and then click the middle
mouse button.
 Select Arc from the GEOMETRY menu.
 Select Center/Ends from the ARC TYPE menu.
 Click points C, A, and B with the left mouse button.

Training & Development Cell , The American Society of Mechanical Engineers , Three , Park Avenue , NY 10016-5990
33
[Figure
3.3]

m. Add the dimensions shown in Figure 3.4 as follows:


 Click Edge1 and the plane labeled RIGHT with the left mouse button, and then
click point A with the middle mouse button.
 Click Arc with the left mouse button, and then click point B with the middle
mouse button.
 Select Regenerate and modify dimensions if necessary.

[Figure 3.4]

n. Done from the SKETCHER menu.


o. Select OK button from the PROTRUSION: Sweep pop-up menu.

Training & Development Cell , The American Society of Mechanical Engineers , Three , Park Avenue , NY 10016-5990
34
p. Rotate the part to view it from all angles. You should see the image shown in Figure
3.5.

[Figure 3.5]

1. Vase M2-T7

a. Select File > New and name the new part Example_blend.
b. Select Insert > Blend > Protrusion from the menu bar.
c. Select Done from the Menu Manager pop-up.

Training & Development Cell , The American Society of Mechanical Engineers , Three , Park Avenue , NY 10016-5990
35
d. Select Smooth and then Done from the Attributes menu.
e. Select the plane labeled FRONT, and select Okay from the DIRECTION menu in the
Menu Manager.
f. Select Default from SKET VIEW. Pro/E will switch to Sketcher Mode.
g. Select Sketch > Intent Manager from the menu bar.
h. Select Circle from the GEOMETRY menu.
i. Draw a circle and dimension it as shown in Figure 3.6. This will define the cross-
section of the beginning of the blend.

[Figure 3.6]

j. Select Sec Tools from the SKETCHER menu.


k. Select Toggle from the SEC TOOLS menu.
l. Select Sketch from the SKETCHER menu and Circle from the GEOMETRY menu.
m. Define the second cross-section by drawing a circle concentric to the first as shown
in Figure 3.7. Dimension it as shown.

Training & Development Cell , The American Society of Mechanical Engineers , Three , Park Avenue , NY 10016-5990
36
[Figure 3.7]

n. Repeat steps 10 - 13 twice to add two more circular cross-sections. Dimension the
first one to have a diameter of 30 and the second to have a diameter of 50. You
should see the image shown in Figure 3.8.

[Figure 3.8]

Training & Development Cell , The American Society of Mechanical Engineers , Three , Park Avenue , NY 10016-5990
37
o. Select Done from the SKETCHER menu.
p. Enter 75 as the depth for section 2 in the textbox at the bottom of the screen, and
click the check button.
q. Enter 75 as the depth for section 3, and click the check button.
r. Enter 25 as the depth for section 4, and click the check button.
s. Select the OK button from the PROTRUSION: Blend menu.
t. Rotate vase to view it from all angles. You should see the image shown in Figure 3.9.

[Figure 3.9]

u. Select the Shell Tool icon from the tool bar at the right of the screen.
v. Enter 5 into the Thickness textbox at the shell tool bar on the dashboard.
w. Select References from the shell tool menu bar on the dashboard.
x. Select the top surface of the vase, as shown in Figure 3.10.

Training & Development Cell , The American Society of Mechanical Engineers , Three , Park Avenue , NY 10016-5990
38
[Figure 3.10]

y. Click the check button. You should see the shelled vase shown below.

Training & Development Cell , The American Society of Mechanical Engineers , Three , Park Avenue , NY 10016-5990
39
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
1. KNUCKLE JOINT M2-P1

a. End Eye: The eye is made by using several Extrude Commands. A Round and
Pattern is also used.

Training & Development Cell , The American Society of Mechanical Engineers , Three , Park Avenue , NY 10016-5990
40
b. Knuckle: The Knuckle is made by using Extrude and Round Commands.

c. Pin: The Pin is made by using 2 Extrude Commands.


d. Collar: The collar is made by using 1 Extrude Command.
e. Taper Pin: Split Pin is made by using a Revolve.

Training & Development Cell , The American Society of Mechanical Engineers , Three , Park Avenue , NY 10016-5990
41
M3 | STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS

Training & Development Cell , The American Society of Mechanical Engineers , Three , Park Avenue , NY 10016-5990
42
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
M3-T1
! TRUSS ANALYSIS
/PREP7 ! PREPROCESSOR PHASE
!DEFINE PARAMETERS (MM)
HEIGHT = 3118
WIDTH = 3600
!DEFINE KEYPOINTS
K,1, 0, 0 ! KEYPOINT, #, X, Y
K,2, WIDTH/2,HEIGHT
K,3, WIDTH, 0
K,4, 3*WIDTH/2, HEIGHT
K,5, 2*WIDTH, 0
K,6, 5*WIDTH/2, HEIGHT
K,7, 3*WIDTH, 0
!DEFINE LINES
L,1,2 ! LINE CONNECTING KPOINT 1 AND 2
L,1,3
L,2,3
L,2,4
L,3,4
L,3,5
L,4,5
L,4,6
L,5,6
L,5,7
L,6,7
!ELEMENT DEFINITION
ET,1,LINK1 ! ELEMENT TYPE #1; SPRING ELEMENT
R,1,3250 ! REAL CONSTANT #1; XSECT AREA: 3200 MM^2
MP,EX,1,200E3 ! MATERIAL PROPERTY #1; YOUNG'S MODULUS: 200 GPA
LESIZE,ALL, , ,1,1,1 ! SPECIFY DIVISIONS ON UNMESHED LINES
![LESIZE,NL1,SIZE,ANGSIZ,NDIV,SPACE,KFORC,LAYER1,LAYER2,KYNDIV]
LMESH,ALL ! MESH ALL LINES
FINISH ! FINISH PRE-PROCESSOR
/SOLU ! ENTER SOLUTION PHASE
!APPLY SOME CONSTRAINTS
DK,1,ALL,0 ! DEFINE A DOF CONSTRAINT AT A KEYPOINT
DK,7,UY,0
!APPLY LOADS
FK,1,FY,-280E3 ! DEFINE A FORCE LOAD TO A KEYPOINT
FK,3,FY,-210E3
FK,5,FY,-280E3
FK,7,FY,-360E3
SOLVE

Training & Development Cell , The American Society of Mechanical Engineers , Three , Park Avenue , NY 10016-5990
43
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
M3-T2
! 2-D-CANTILEVER BEAM
!80X20 MM CANTI LEVER BEAM SUBJECTED TO 100 N LOAD
!THEROTICAL SOLUTION: MAX TENSILE STRESS(X) = 120 N/MM>2
!THEROTICAL SOLUTION: MAX DEFLECTION IN Y DIRECTION (DELTA(Y)) = 0.128 MM
/JOBNAM,BEAM
/TITLE,2-D STRESS ANALYSIS
/PREP7
!STEP1! DEFINE ELEMENT!
ET,1,82,,,3 !ACTIVATE THICKNESS OPTION BY GIVING KOPT(3)=3
R,1,1 !DEFINE THICKNESS AS 1 (YOU CAN CHANGE AND CHECK RESULTS)
!DEFINE MATERIAL PROPS!
MP,EX,1,2E5
MP,NUXY,0.33
!DEFINE SOLID MODELLING
RECTG,,80,,20
APLOT
DEFINE MESH SIZE
KESIZE,1,2
KESIZE,2,5
KESIZE,3,5
KESIZE,4,2
!MESH THE AREA
AMESH,1
EPLOT
FINI
SAVE
!ENTER SOLUTION PHASE
/SOLU
!DEFINE SUPPORT
NSEL,S,LOC,X,0
D,ALL,ALL,0
NSEL,ALL
!DEFINE LOAD
FK,3,FY,-100
SOLVE

Training & Development Cell , The American Society of Mechanical Engineers , Three , Park Avenue , NY 10016-5990
44
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
M3-T3
! PLATE WITH A CIRCULAR HOLE
/PREP7
!STEP1! DEFINE ELEMENT!
ET,1,82,,,3
R,1,10
!DEFINE MATERIAL PROPS!
MP,EX,1,2E5
MP,NUXY,0.33
!DEFINE SOLID MODELLING
RECTG,,4,,2
APLOT
PCIRC,,0.5
APLOT
ASBA,1,2
APLOT
!DEFINE MESH SIZE
KESIZE,2,0.3
KESIZE,3,0.3
KESIZE,4,0.3
KESIZE,5,0.05
KESIZE,6,0.05
!MESH THE AREA
AMESH,3
EPLOT
FINI
SAVE
!ENTER SOLUTION PHASE
/SOLU
!DEFINE SUPPORT
NSEL,S,LOC,X,0
D,ALL,UX,0
NSEL,ALL
NSEL,S,LOC,Y,0
D,ALL,UY,0
NSEL,ALL
!DEFINE LOAD
NSEL,S,LOC,X,4
F,ALL,FX,50
NSEL,ALL
SOLVE

Training & Development Cell , The American Society of Mechanical Engineers , Three , Park Avenue , NY 10016-5990
45
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
M3-T4
! INTERNALLY PRESSURIZED CYLINDERS
/PREP7
PCIRC,5,7,0,90 !CREATING A ANNULAR QUARTER CIRCLE
ET,1,PLANE82
ESIZE,0.1
AMESH, ALL
MP,EX,1,200E5 ! YOUNG'S MODULUS
MP,PRXY,1,0.3 ! POISSON'S RATIO
FINISH
/SOLU
ANTYPE,0 ! STATIC ANALYSIS
DL,2,,UX,0
DL,4,,UY,0
SFL,3,PRES,10
SOLVE

Training & Development Cell , The American Society of Mechanical Engineers , Three , Park Avenue , NY 10016-5990
46
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
M3-P1
! 3-D-CANTILEVER BEAM
! 10X3X2 CANTI LEVER BEAM SUBJECTED TO 6500 N LOAD
!THEROTICAL SOLUTION: MAX TENSILE STRESS(X) = 120 N/MM>2
!THEROTICAL SOLUTION: MAX DEFLECTION IN Y DIRECTION (DELTA(Y)) = 6.77
/PREP7
!STEP1! DEFINE ELEMENT!
ET,1,95
!DEFINE MATERIAL PROPS!
MP,EX,1,2E5
MP,NUXY,0.33
!DEFINE SOLID MODELLING
BLOCK,,10,,2,,3
VPLOT
!DEFINE MESH SIZE
KESIZE,1,0.5
KESIZE,2,0.5
KESIZE,5,0.5
KESIZE,8,0.5
KESIZE,3,2
KESIZE,4,2
KESIZE,6,2
KESIZE,7,2
!MESH THE AREA
VMESH,1
!EPLOT
FINI
SAVE
!ENTER SOLUTION PHASE
/SOLU
!DEFINE SUPPORT
NSEL,S,LOC,X,0
D,ALL,ALL,0
NSEL,ALL
!DEFINE LOAD
NSEL,S,LOC,X,10
NSEL,R,LOC,Y,2
F,ALL,FY,-500
NSEL,ALL
SOLVE

Training & Development Cell , The American Society of Mechanical Engineers , Three , Park Avenue , NY 10016-5990
47
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
M3-P2
! CANTILEVER BEAM WITH TWO WELDED MATERIALS
/PREP7
ET,1,82
RECTG,,2,,2
APLOT
LOCAL,11,0,2,0
WPCSYS,1
RECTG,,2,,2
CSYS,0
APLOT
AGLUE,ALL
!MATERIAL DATA
MP,EX,1,30E3
MP,EX,2,380E3
!ASSIGNING THE MATERIAL TO THE AREA
ASEL,S,,,1
AATT,1
ASEL,S,,,3
AATT,2
ASEL,ALL
KESIZE,ALL,0.3
AMESH,1
EPLOT
AMESH,3
EPLOT
/SOLU
NSEL,S,LOC,X,0
D,ALL,ALL,0
NSEL,ALL
!NSEL,S,LOC,X,4
FK,7,FY,-10000
!NSEL,ALL
ALLS
SOLVE

Training & Development Cell , The American Society of Mechanical Engineers , Three , Park Avenue , NY 10016-5990
48
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
M3-P3
! UNIFORMLY LOADED TWO WELD MATERIALS
/PREP7
ET,1,82
RECTG,,2,,2
APLOT
LOCAL,11,0,2,0
WPCSYS,1
RECTG,,2,,2
CSYS,0
APLOT
AGLUE,ALL
APLOT
!MATERIAL DATA
MP,EX,1,30E3
MP,EX,2,30E3
!ASSIGNING THE MATERIAL TO THE AREA
ASEL,S,,,1
AATT,1
ASEL,S,,,3
AATT,2
ASEL,ALL
KESIZE,ALL,0.3
AMESH,1
EPLOT
AMESH,3
EPLOT
/SOLU
NSEL,S,LOC,Y,2
D,ALL,ALL,0
NSEL,ALL
NSEL,S,LOC,Y,0
F,ALL,FY,-100
NSEL,ALL
ALLS
SOLVE

Training & Development Cell , The American Society of Mechanical Engineers , Three , Park Avenue , NY 10016-5990
49
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
M3-P4
! EFFECT OF SELF WEIGHT ON A CANTILEVER BEAM
/TITLE, EFFECTS OF SELF WEIGHT
/PREP7
LENGTH = 1000
WIDTH = 50
HEIGHT = 10
K,1,0,0 ! CREATE KEYPOINTS
K,2,LENGTH,0
L,1,2
ET,1,BEAM3 ! SET ELEMENT TYPE
R,1,WIDTH*HEIGHT,WIDTH*(HEIGHT**3)/12,HEIGHT !** = EXPONENT
MP,EX,1,200000 ! YOUNG'S MODULUS
MP,PRXY,1,0.3 ! POISSON'S RATIO
MP,DENS,1,7.86E-6 ! DENSITY
LESIZE,ALL,LENGTH/10, ! SIZE OF LINE ELEMENTS
LMESH,1 ! MESH LINE 1
FINISH
/SOLU ! ENTER SOLUTION MODE
ANTYPE,0 ! STATIC ANALYSIS
DK,1,ALL,0, ! CONSTRAIN KEYPOINT 1
ACEL,,9.8 ! SET GRAVITY CONSTANT
SOLVE
FINISH
/POST1
PLDISP,2 ! DISPLAY DEFORMED SHAPE

Training & Development Cell , The American Society of Mechanical Engineers , Three , Park Avenue , NY 10016-5990
50
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
NON-LINEAR ANALYSIS
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
M3-T5
! MATERIAL OPTION: BILNEAR KINEMATIC HARDENING (MATERIAL NON-LINEARITY)
/PREP7
MP,EX,1,12E6 !YOUNG'S MODULUS
TB,BKIN,1,1 !ACTIVATES A DATA TABLE FOR NONLINEAR (BKIN) MATERIAL
PROPERTIES
TBDATA,1,44E3,1.2E6 !DEFINES DATA FOR THE DATA TABLE (MAT-1, YIELD ST, TGT MODULUS
TBLIST,BKIN,1 !LIST THE DATA TABLE
/XRANGE,0,0.01 !X-AXIS INTERVAL
TBPLOT,BKIN,1 !PLOT THE DATA TABLE

Training & Development Cell , The American Society of Mechanical Engineers , Three , Park Avenue , NY 10016-5990
51
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
M3-T6

! MULTI-LINEAR ISOTROPIC HARDENING


/PREP7
!MATERIAL PROPERTY
MP,EX,1,210E3
MP,NUXY,1,0.3
MPTEMP,1,25.0 !DEFINES A TEMPERATURE TABLE FOR MATERIAL PROPERTIES.
TB,MISO,1,1,24 !!ACTIVATES A DATA TABLE FOR NONLINEAR (MISO) MATERIAL
PROPERTIES
TBTEMP,25.0 !DATA AT 25 DEG C
!YIELDING STARTS AT 341.384 MPA (TRUE STRESS)
TBPT,DEFI,1.625638095E-3,341.384
TBPT,DEFI,0.0121136,341.5
TBPT,DEFI,0.0174469 , 342
TBPT,DEFI,0.0237165 , 343.132
TBPT,DEFI,0.0295588 , 355.803
TBPT,DEFI,0.0353671 , 364.04
TBPT,DEFI,0.0525925 , 371.619
TBPT,DEFI,0.0582689 , 377.53
TBPT,DEFI,0.0639133 , 384.741
TBPT,DEFI,0.0725067 , 390.62
TBPT,DEFI,0.0832376 , 401.312
TBPT,DEFI,0.0916672 , 411.241
TBPT,DEFI,0.107957 , 420.112
TBPT,DEFI,0.118672 , 425.977
TBPT,DEFI,0.134531 , 438.781
TBPT,DEFI,0.144966 , 447.522
TBPT,DEFI,0.170586 , 447.522
TBPT,DEFI,0.180653 , 447.522
TBPT,DEFI,0.185649 , 447.522
TBPT,DEFI,0.19062 , 447.522
TBPT,DEFI,0.195567 , 447.522
TBPT,DEFI,0.200489 , 447.522
TBPT,DEFI,0.205387 , 447.522
TBPT,DEFI,0.219938 , 447.522
!SET THE AXES LABLES FOR THE STRESS-STRAIN CURVE PLOT.
/AXLAB,X,TRUE STRAIN (MM/MM)
/AXLAB,Y,TRUE STRESS (N/MM^2)
TBPL,MISO,1 ! PLOT AND VERIFY THE MATEIAL STRESS-STRAIN CURVE.

Training & Development Cell , The American Society of Mechanical Engineers , Three , Park Avenue , NY 10016-5990
52
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
M3-P5
! NON-LINEAR ANALYSIS OF A CANTILEVER BEAM
!/FILNAM,BEAM
/PREP7
!ELEMENT SELECTION
ET,1,82 !PLANE82
!MATERIAL OPTION: BILNEAR KINEMATIC HARDENING (MATERIAL NON-LINEARITY)
MP,EX,1,12E6,
TB,BKIN,1
TBDATA,1,44E3,1.2E6
TBLIST,BKIN,1
/XRANGE,0,0.01
TBPLOT,BKIN,1
!MATERIAL PROPERTIES (NON LINEAR ANALYSIS)
!GEOMETRIC MODELLING
RECTG,,6,,2
APLOT
!MESH SIZE
KESIZE,2,0.5
KESIZE,3,0.5
KESIZE,1,0.5
KESIZE,4,0.5
!AREA MESH
AMESH,1
!ELEMENT PLOT
EPLOT
SAVE
FINISH
!SOLUTION
/SOLU
!CONSTRAINTS
!SELECT NODES ON EXTREME LEFT SIDE
NSEL,S,LOC,X,0.0
!RESTRICT THE THE MOVEMENT OF THESE NODES IN X AND Y DIRECTION
D,ALL,ALL,0.0
!SELECT ALL NODES FOR FURTHER ANALYSIS
ALLS
!LOADING
F,26,FY,-10000
!LOAD STEP OPTIONS FOR A NON-LINEAR ANALYSIS
NSUBST,20,20,20
!RAMPED LOADING AND NOT STEPPED
KBC,0
!CONVERGENCE TOLERENCE
CNVTOL,F,-10000,0.001
!AUTOMATIC TIME STEP

Training & Development Cell , The American Society of Mechanical Engineers , Three , Park Avenue , NY 10016-5990
53
AUTOTS,ON
!NEWTON RAPHSON OPTION
NROPT,FULL,,ON
!EQUILIBRIUM ITERATIONS
NEQIT,20
!DO NOT TERMINATE THE ANALYSIS IF THE SOLN FAILS TO CONVERGE
!NCNV,0
!SOLVE THE CURRENT SOLN
SOLVE
!FINISH TO REVIEW THE RESULTS
FINISH
!POSTPROCESSING (REVIEW OF RESULTS)
/POST1
!PLOT THE DEFORMED SHAPE ONLY
PLDISP,1

Training & Development Cell , The American Society of Mechanical Engineers , Three , Park Avenue , NY 10016-5990
54
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
M3-P6
! Non-Linear Analysis of a Column
/prep7 ! Enter Preprocessor
k,1,0,0 ! Keypoints
k,2,0,100
l,1,2 ! Line connecting keypoints
ET,1,LINK1 ! Element type
R,1,25 ! Area of 25
MP,EX,1,75000 ! Young's modulus
MP,PRXY,1,0.3 ! Poisson's ratio
TB,MELA,1,1,12, ! Create a table of 12 data points
! to map the stress-strain curve
TBPT,,.001,75 ! Data points
TBPT,,.002,150
TBPT,,.003,225
TBPT,,.004,240
TBPT,,.005,250
TBPT,,.025,300
TBPT,,.06,355
TBPT,,.1,390
TBPT,,.15,420
TBPT,,.2,435
TBPT,,.25,449
TBPT,,.275,450
ESIZE,5 ! Element size 5
LMESH,all ! Line mesh all lines
FINISH
/SOLU ! Enter solution phase
NLGEOM,ON ! Nonlinear geometry on
NSUBST,20,1000,1 ! 20 load steps
OUTRES,ALL,ALL ! Output data for all load steps
AUTOTS,ON ! Auto time-search on
LNSRCH,ON ! Line search on
NEQIT,1000 ! 1000 iteration maximum
ANTYPE,0 ! Static analysis
DK,1,all ! Constrain keypoint 1
FK,2,FY,10000 ! Load on keypoint 2
SOLVE
FINISH
/POST1 ! Enter post processor
/ESHAPE,1 ! Show element shape
PLNSOL,U,Y,0,1 ! Plot deflection contour
FINISH
/POST26 ! Enter time history
RFORCE,2,1,F,Y ! Reads force data in variable 2
NSOL,3,2,U,Y ! Reads y-deflection data into var 3

Training & Development Cell , The American Society of Mechanical Engineers , Three , Park Avenue , NY 10016-5990
55
XVAR,2 ! Make variable 2 the x-axis
PLVAR,3
/AXLAB,Y,DEFLECTION! Changes y label
/AXLAB,X,LOAD ! Changes X label
/REPLOT

Training & Development Cell , The American Society of Mechanical Engineers , Three , Park Avenue , NY 10016-5990
56
M4 | THERMAL & VIBRATIONAL ANALYSIS

Training & Development Cell , The American Society of Mechanical Engineers , Three , Park Avenue , NY 10016-5990
57
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
M4-T1
! CONDUCTION ACROSS BLOCK
/TITLE, SIMPLE CONDUCTION EXAMPLE
/PREP7 ! PREPROCESSOR PHASE
!DEFINE GEOMETRY
LENGTH=1.0
HEIGHT=1.0
BLC4,0,0,LENGTH, HEIGHT ! AREA - ONE CORNER, THEN WIDTH AND HEIGHT
!MESH 2D AREAS
ET,1,PLANE55 ! THERMAL ELEMENT ONLY
MP,KXX,1,10 ! 10 W/MC
MAT,1
TYPE,1
ESIZE, LENGTH/20 ! NUMBER OF ELEMENT SUB-DIVISIONS/SIDE
AMESH,ALL
FINISH
/SOLU
ANTYPE,0 ! STEADY-STATE THERMAL ANALYSIS
!FIXED TEMP BC'S
NSEL,S,LOC,Y,HEIGHT ! SELECT NODES ON TOP WITH Y=HEIGHT
D,ALL,TEMP,500 ! APPLY FIXED TEMP OF 500C
NSEL,ALL
NSEL,S,LOC,X,0 ! SELECT NODES ON THREE SIDES
NSEL,A,LOC,X,LENGTH
! A—ADDITIONALLY SELECT A SET AND EXTEND THE CURRENT SET
NSEL,A,LOC,Y,0
D,ALL,TEMP,100 ! APPLY FIXED TEMP OF 100C
NSEL,ALL
SOLVE
FINISH
/POST1
PLNSOL,TEMP,,0, ! CONTOUR PLOT OF TEMPERATURES

Training & Development Cell , The American Society of Mechanical Engineers , Three , Park Avenue , NY 10016-5990
58
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
M4-T2
! CONDUCTION-CONVECTION-INSULATION ACROSS BLOCK
/TITLE, CONDUCTION-CONVECTION-INSULATION ACROSS BLOCK
/PREP7 ! PREPROCESSOR PHASE
!DEFINE GEOMETRY
LENGTH=1.0
HEIGHT=1.0
BLC4,0,0,LENGTH, HEIGHT ! AREA - ONE CORNER, THEN WIDTH AND HEIGHT
!MESH 2D AREAS
ET,1, PLANE55 ! THERMAL ELEMENT ONLY
MP,KXX,1,10 ! 10 W/MC
MAT, 1
TYPE, 1
ESIZE, LENGTH/20 ! NUMBER OF ELEMENT SUB-DIVISIONS/SIDE
AMESH,ALL
SAVE
FINISH
/SOLU
ANTYPE,0 ! STEADY-STATE THERMAL ANALYSIS
!FIXED TEMP BC'S
NSEL,S,LOC,Y,HEIGHT ! SELECT NODES ON TOP WITH Y=HEIGHT
D,ALL,TEMP,500 ! APPLY FIXED TEMP OF 500C
NSEL,ALL
!CONDUCTION BCS
NSEL,S,LOC,X,0 ! SELECT NODES ON THREE SIDES
D,ALL,TEMP,100
NSEL,ALL
!CONVECTION BC'S
NSEL,S,LOC,X,LENGTH !RIGHT EDGE
SF,ALL,CONV,10,100 ! APPLY FIXED TEMP OF 100C
NSEL,ALL
!INSULATED BC'S
NSEL,S,LOC,Y,0 ! BOTTOM EDGE
SF,ALL,CONV,0,25 ! INSULATE EDGE
NSEL,ALL
SOLVE
FINISH
/POST1
PLNSOL,TEMP,,0, ! CONTOUR PLOT OF TEMPERATURES

Training & Development Cell , The American Society of Mechanical Engineers , Three , Park Avenue , NY 10016-5990
59
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
M4-T3
! TRANSIENT CONDUCTION EXAMPLE
TITLE, TRANSIENT CONDUCTION
/PREP7 ! PREPROCESSOR PHASE
!DEFINE GEOMETRY
LENGTH=1.0
HEIGHT=1.0
BLC4,0,0,LENGTH, HEIGHT ! AREA - ONE CORNER, THEN WIDTH AND HEIGHT
! MESH 2D AREAS
ET,1,PLANE55 ! THERMAL ELEMENT ONLY
MAT,1
TYPE,1
MP,DENS,1,920 !DENSITY
MP,C,1,2.040 !SPECIFIC HEAT CAPACITY
MP,KXX,1,5 !THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY
ESIZE, 0.05 ! ELEMENT SIZE
AMESH,ALL !MESH AREA
SAVE
FINISH
/SOLU
ANTYPE,4 ! TRANSIENT THERMAL ANALYSIS
TIME, 300 ! TIME AT END=300
NROPT,FULL ! NEWTON RAPHSON = FULL
LUMPM,0 ! LUMPED MASS APPROX OFF
NSUBST,20 ! 20 SUBSTEPS
NEQIT,100 ! MAX NO. OF ITERATIONS = 100
AUTOTS,OFF ! AUTO TIME SEARCH ON
LNSRCH,ON ! LINE SEARCH ON
OUTRES,ALL,ALL ! OUTPUT DATA FOR ALL SUBSTEPS
KBC,1
!FIXED TEMP BC'S
NSEL,S,LOC,Y,HEIGHT ! SELECT NODES ON TOP WITH Y=HEIGHT
D,ALL,TEMP,500 ! APPLY FIXED TEMP OF 500C
NSEL,ALL
NSEL,S,LOC,Y,0 ! SELECT NODES ON THREE SIDES
D,ALL,TEMP,100 ! APPLY FIXED TEMP OF 100C
NSEL,ALL
IC,ALL,TEMP,100 ! INITIAL CONDITIONS: 100K
SOLVE
FINISH
/POST1 ! ENTER POSTPROCESSOR
/CONT,1,8,100,,500 ! DEFINE A CONTOUR RANGE
PLNSOL,TEMP,,0, ! CONTOUR PLOT OF TEMPERATURES
ANTIME,20,0.5,,0,2,0,500 ! ANIMATE TEMP OVER TIME

Training & Development Cell , The American Society of Mechanical Engineers , Three , Park Avenue , NY 10016-5990
60
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
M4-P1
! HEAT LOSS FROM A COMPOSITE PIPE
/PREP7
!STEP1 DEFINE ELEMENT
ET,1,35
!DEFINE MATERIAL PROPS!
MP,KXX,1,2
MP,KXX,2,0.25
!DEFINE SOLID MODELLING
PCIRC,0.05,0.1
APLOT
!DEFINE LINES TO SEPARATE INTO TWO DIFFERENT AREAS
L,3,7
L,6,1
!DEFINE THE NEW SEMICIRCULAR AREAS
A,1,2,3,7,8,6
A,7,3,4,1,6,5
AGLUE,2,3
!DELETE THE FORMAL FULL-CIRCLE AREA
ADELE,1
APLOT
!DEFINE MESH SIZE
AESIZE, ALL, 0.01
!ASSIGNING MATERIAL
ASEL,S,,,2
AATT,1
ASEL,ALL
ASEL,S,,,3
AATT,2
ASEL,ALL
!MESH THE AREA
AMESH,ALL
EPLOT
FINI
SAVE
!ENTER SOLUTION PHASE
/SOLU
!DEFINE CONSTRAINTS
DL,7,2,TEMP,500
DL,8,2,TEMP,500
DL,5,3,TEMP,500
DL,6,3,TEMP,500
!DEFINE LOAD
SFL,1,CONV,25,,300
SFL,2,CONV,25,,300
SFL,3,CONV,25,,300

Training & Development Cell , The American Society of Mechanical Engineers , Three , Park Avenue , NY 10016-5990
61
SFL,4,CONV,25,,300
SOLVE
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
M4-P2
! 1-D UNIFORM HEAT GENERATION IN COMPOSITE WALL
/PREP7
!ELEMENT TYPE
ET,1,PLANE55
ET,2,PLANE55
ET,3,PLANE55
!MATERIAL PROP
MP,KXX,1,25
MP,KXX,2,15.3
MP,KXX,3,50
!MODELLING
RECTNG,,0.03,,0.10
RECTNG,0.03,0.09,,0.10
RECTNG,0.09,0.11,,0.10
AGLUE,1,2 !A2 BECOMES A4
AGLUE,4,3
!DEFINE MESH SIZE
AESIZE,ALL,0.005
!ASSIGNING MATERIAL
ASEL,S,,,1
AATT,1
ASEL,ALL
ASEL,S,,,2
AATT,2
ASEL,ALL
ASEL,S,,,3
AATT,3
ASEL,ALL
!MESH THE AREA
AMESH,ALL
EPLOT
FINI
SAVE
/SOLU
!APPLYING LOAD
SFL,4,CONV,1000,,298
SFL,10,CONV,1000,,298
BFA,2,HGEN,4E6
!SOLUTION
SOLVE

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Training & Development Cell , The American Society of Mechanical Engineers , Three , Park Avenue , NY 10016-5990
62
VIBRATION FE ANALYSIS
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
M4-T4
! MODAL ANALYSIS OF A CANTILEVER BEAM
/TITLE, MODAL ANALYSIS
/PREP7
K,1,0,0 ! ENTER KEYPOINTS
K,2,1,0
L,1,2 ! CREATE LINE
ET,1,BEAM3 ! ELEMENT TYPE
R,1,0.0001,8.33E-10,0.01 ! REAL CONST: AREA,I,HEIGHT
MP,EX,1,2.068E11 ! YOUNG'S MODULUS
MP,PRXY,1,0.33 ! POISSON'S RATIO
MP,DENS,1,7830 ! DENSITY
LESIZE,ALL,,,10 ! ELEMENT SIZE
LMESH,1 ! MESH LINE
FINISH
/SOLU
ANTYPE,2 ! MODAL ANALYSIS
MODOPT,SUBSP,5 ! SUBSPACE, 5 MODES
MXPAND,5 ! EXPAND 5 MODES
DK,1,ALL ! CONSTRAIN KEYPOINT ONE
SOLVE
FINISH
/POST1 ! LIST SOLUTIONS
SET,LIST
SET,FIRST
PLDISP ! DISPLAY FIRST MODE SHAPE
ANMODE,10,0.5, ,0 ! ANIMATE MODE SHAPE

Training & Development Cell , The American Society of Mechanical Engineers , Three , Park Avenue , NY 10016-5990
63
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
M4-T5
! MODAL ANALYSIS OF A SIMPLY SUPPORTED BEAM
/TITLE, DYNAMIC ANALYSIS
/PREP7
K,1,0,0 ! ENTER KEYPOINTS
K,2,1,0
L,1,2 ! CREATE LINE
ET,1,BEAM3 ! ELEMENT TYPE
R,1,0.0001,8.33E-10,0.01 ! REAL CONST: AREA,I,HEIGHT
MP,EX,1,2.068E11 ! YOUNG'S MODULUS
MP,PRXY,1,0.33 ! POISSON'S RATIO
MP,DENS,1,7830 ! DENSITY
LESIZE,ALL,,,10 ! ELEMENT SIZE
LMESH,1 ! MESH LINE
FINISH
/SOLU
ANTYPE,2 ! MODAL ANALYSIS
MODOPT,SUBSP,5 ! SUBSPACE, 5 MODES
EQSLV,FRONT ! FRONTAL SOLVER
MXPAND,5 ! EXPAND 5 MODES
DK,1,ALL ! CONSTRAIN KEYPOINT ONE
DK,2,UY !CONSTRAINT KEYPOINT 2 (UY CAN BE CHANGED TO ALL)
SOLVE
FINISH

Training & Development Cell , The American Society of Mechanical Engineers , Three , Park Avenue , NY 10016-5990
64
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
M4-P3
! MODAL ANALYSIS OF AN AEROPLANE WING
/PREP7
wpstyle,0.1,0.1,0,1.5,0.001,0,1,,5
WPSTYLE,,,,,,,,1
/AUTO,1
/REP,FAST
/DIST, 1 ,0.729000,1
/REP,FAST
/DIST, 1 ,1.371742,1
/REP,FAST
/DIST, 1 ,0.729000,1
/REP,FAST
/DIST, 1 ,1.371742,1
/REP,FAST
/AUTO, 1
/REP
/DIST, 1 ,1.371742,1
/REP,FAST
FLST,3,4,8
FITEM,3,0.2,0.5,0
FITEM,3,0,0.8,0
FITEM,3,0.3,1,0
FITEM,3,1.5,0.5,0
K, ,P51X
FLST,3,3,3
FITEM,3,2
FITEM,3,1
FITEM,3,4
BSPLIN, ,P51X
FLST,3,3,3
FITEM,3,2
FITEM,3,3
FITEM,3,4
BSPLIN, ,P51X
WPSTYLE,,,,,,,,0
FLST,2,2,4
FITEM,2,1
FITEM,2,2
AL,P51X
MPDATA,EX,1,,38000
MPDATA,PRXY,1,,0.3
MPDATA,DENS,1,,8.3e-5
!*
ET,1,PLANE42
ET,2,SOLID45

Training & Development Cell , The American Society of Mechanical Engineers , Three , Park Avenue , NY 10016-5990
65
!*
FLST,5,2,4,ORDE,2
FITEM,5,1
FITEM,5,-2
CM,_Y,LINE
LSEL, , , ,P51X
CM,_Y1,LINE
CMSEL,,_Y
!*
LESIZE,_Y1,0.25, , , , , , ,1
!*
MSHAPE,0,2D
MSHKEY,0
!*
CM,_Y,AREA
ASEL, , , , 1
CM,_Y1,AREA
CHKMSH,'AREA'
CMSEL,S,_Y
!*
AMESH,_Y1
!*
CMDELE,_Y
CMDELE,_Y1
CMDELE,_Y2
!*
/UI,MESH,OFF
TYPE, 2
EXTOPT,ESIZE,10,0,
EXTOPT,ACLEAR,0
!*
EXTOPT,ATTR,0,0,0
MAT,1
REAL,_Z4
ESYS,0
!*
FLST,2,1,5,ORDE,1
FITEM,2,1
VEXT,P51X, , ,0,0,10,,,,
/VIEW,1,1,2,3
/ANG,1
/REP,FAST
/VIEW,1,1,1,1
/ANG,1
/REP,FAST
/VIEW,1,,,1
/ANG,1

Training & Development Cell , The American Society of Mechanical Engineers , Three , Park Avenue , NY 10016-5990
66
/REP,FAST
/VIEW,1,1,2,3
/ANG,1
/REP,FAST
/AUTO,1
/REP,FAST
ESEL,U,TYPE,,1
NSEL,S,LOC,Z,0
NSEL,S,LOC,Z,0
FLST,2,24,1,ORDE,2
FITEM,2,1
FITEM,2,-24
!*
/GO
D,P51X, , , , , ,ALL, , , , ,
NSEL,ALL
FINISH
/SOLU
!*
ANTYPE,2
!*
MSAVE,0
!*
MODOPT,LANB,5
EQSLV,SPAR
MXPAND,5, , ,0
LUMPM,0
PSTRES,0
!*
MODOPT,LANB,5,0,1000, ,OFF
/STATUS,SOLU
SOLVE
FINISH
/POST1
SET,FIRST
!*
PLDI,2,
ANMODE,30,0.25, ,0
FINISH
! /EXIT,MODEL

Training & Development Cell , The American Society of Mechanical Engineers , Three , Park Avenue , NY 10016-5990
67
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
M4-T6
! HARMONIC ANALYSIS OF A CANTILEVER BEAM
/TITLE, DYNAMIC ANALYSIS
/PREP7
K,1,0,0 ! ENTER KEYPOINTS
K,2,1,0
L,1,2 ! CREATE LINE
ET,1,BEAM3 ! ELEMENT TYPE
R,1,0.0001,8.33E-10,0.01 ! REAL CONST: AREA,I,HEIGHT
MP,EX,1,2.068E11 ! YOUNG'S MODULUS
MP,PRXY,1,0.33 ! POISSON'S RATIO
MP,DENS,1,7830 ! DENSITY
LESIZE,ALL,,,10 ! ELEMENT SIZE
LMESH,1 ! MESH LINE
FINISH
/SOLU
ANTYPE,3 ! HARMONIC ANALYSIS
DK,1,ALL ! CONSTRAINT AT KEYPOINT 1
DK,2,UY ! CONSTRAINT AT KEYPOINT 2
F,7,FY,100 ! APPLY EXCITING FORCE
HARFRQ,0,100, ! FREQUENCY RANGE
NSUBST,100, ! NUMBER OF FREQUENCY STEPS
KBC,1 ! STEPPED LOADS (1 CAN BE 0 FOR RAMPED LOAD: 1N 1 HZ, 2 N
2 HZ)
SOLVE
FINISH
/POST26
NSOL,2,7,U,Y, UY_7 ! GET Y-DEFLECTION DATA
STORE,MERGE
PRVAR,2 ! PRINT DATA
PLVAR,2 ! PLOT DATA

Training & Development Cell , The American Society of Mechanical Engineers , Three , Park Avenue , NY 10016-5990
68
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
M4-T7
! HARMONIC ANALYSIS OF A SIMPLY SUPPORTED BEAM
/TITLE, DYNAMIC ANALYSIS
/PREP7
K,1,0,0 ! ENTER KEYPOINTS
K,2,1,0
L,1,2 ! CREATE LINE
ET,1,BEAM3 ! ELEMENT TYPE
R,1,0.0001,8.33E-10,0.01 ! REAL CONST: AREA,I,HEIGHT
MP,EX,1,2.068E11 ! YOUNG'S MODULUS
MP,PRXY,1,0.33 ! POISSON'S RATIO
MP,DENS,1,7830 ! DENSITY
LESIZE,ALL,,,10 ! ELEMENT SIZE
LMESH,1 ! MESH LINE
FINISH
/SOLU
ANTYPE,3 ! HARMONIC ANALYSIS
DK,1,ALL ! CONSTRAINT AT KEYPOINT 1
DK,2,UY ! CONSTRAINT AT KEYPOINT 2
F,7,FY,100 ! APPLY EXCITING FORCE
HARFRQ,0,100, ! FREQUENCY RANGE
NSUBST,100, ! NUMBER OF FREQUENCY STEPS
KBC,1 ! STEPPED LOADS (1 CAN BE 0 FOR RAMPED LOAD: 1N 1 HZ, 2 N
2 HZ)
SOLVE
FINISH
/POST26
NSOL,2,7,U,Y, UY_7 ! GET Y-DEFLECTION DATA
STORE,MERGE
PRVAR,2 ! PRINT DATA
PLVAR,2 ! PLOT DATA

Training & Development Cell , The American Society of Mechanical Engineers , Three , Park Avenue , NY 10016-5990
69
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
M4-T8
! BUCKLING ANALYSIS
/TITLE,EIGENVALUE BUCKLING ANALYSIS
/PREP7 ! ENTER THE PREPROCESSOR
ET,1,BEAM3 ! DEFINE THE ELEMENT OF THE BEAM TO BE BUCKLED
R,1,100,833.333,10 ! REAL CONSTS: TYPE 1, AREA (MM^2), I (MM^4), HEIGHT (MM)
MP,EX,1,200000 ! YOUNG'S MODULUS (IN MPA)
MP,PRXY,1,0.3 ! POISSON'S RATIO
K,1,0,0 ! DEFINE THE GEOMETRY OF BEAM (100 MM HIGH)
K,2,0,100
L,1,2 ! DRAW THE LINE
ESIZE,10 ! SET ELEMENT SIZE TO 1 MM
LMESH,ALL,ALL ! MESH THE LINE
FINISH
/SOLU ! ENTER THE SOLUTION MODE
ANTYPE,STATIC ! BEFORE YOU CAN DO A BUCKLING ANALYSIS, ANSYS
! NEEDS THE INFO FROM A STATIC ANALYSIS
PSTRES,ON ! PRESTRESS CAN BE ACCOUNTED FOR - REQUIRED
! DURING BUCKLING ANALYSIS
DK,1,ALL ! CONSTRAIN THE BOTTOM OF BEAM
FK,2,FY,-1 ! LOAD THE TOP VERTICALLY WITH A UNIT LOAD.
! THIS IS DONE SO THE EIGENVALUE CALCULATED
! WILL BE THE ACTUAL BUCKLING LOAD, SINCE
! ALL LOADS ARE SCALED DURING THE ANALYSIS.
SOLVE
FINISH
/SOLU ! ENTER THE SOLUTION MODE AGAIN TO SOLVE BUCKLING
ANTYPE,BUCKLE ! BUCKLING ANALYSIS
BUCOPT,LANB,1 ! BUCKLING OPTIONS - BLOCK LANCZOS, ONE MODE
SOLVE
FINISH
/SOLU ! RE-ENTER SOLUTION MODE TO EXPAND INFO - NECESSARY
EXPASS,ON ! AN EXPANTION PASS WILL BE PERFORMED
MXPAND,1 ! SPECIFIES THE NUMBER OF MODES TO EXPAND
SOLVE
FINISH
/POST1 ! ENTER POST-PROCESSOR
SET,LIST ! LIST EIGENVALUE SOLUTION - TIME/FREQ LISTING IS THE
! FORCE REQUIRED FOR BUCKLING (IN N FOR THIS CASE).
SET,LAST ! READ IN DATA FOR THE DESIRED MODE
PLDISP ! PLOTS THE DEFLECTED SHAPE

Training & Development Cell , The American Society of Mechanical Engineers , Three , Park Avenue , NY 10016-5990
70
M5 | Assembly Modeling & Design Simulation

Training & Development Cell , The American Society of Mechanical Engineers , Three , Park Avenue , NY 10016-5990
71
ASSEMBLY M5-T1
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Introduction
Creating an assembly is a fun task. Your main challenge will be display management, as the
screen gets messy with many features shown. However, you will not appreciate that until we
get into our project.

To actually assemble components, we specify assembly constraints. As we know that the


geometric relationship between any two parts has six degrees of freedom (DOF). To assembly
two components is equivalent to constrain all 6 DOF’s between the two. There are six types of
common constraints that you should know. The rest should be easy to figure out on your
own. Remember that the constraints must be used in combination in order to fully constrain
the 6 DOF’s.

Six Common Assembly Constraints

MATE (or MATE COINCIDENT)


Two planar surfaces or datums become coplanar and face in opposite directions.

Figure 4.1 The MATE constraint.

MATE OFFSET
Two planar surfaces or datums are made parallel, with a specified offset distance, and face in
opposite directions. The offset dimension can be negative.

Figure 4.2 The MATE OFFSET constraint.


ALIGN (or ALIGN COINCIDENT)

Training & Development Cell , The American Society of Mechanical Engineers , Three , Park Avenue , NY 10016-5990
72
This can be applied to planar surfaces, datums, revolved surfaces and axes. Planar surfaces
become coplanar and face in the same direction.

Figure 4.3 the ALIGN constraint with planar surfaces.

ALIGN OFFSET
This can be done only with planar surfaces: they become parallel with a specified offset and
face the same direction.

Figure 4.4 The ALIGN OFFSET constraint.

ALIGN OREINT
Two planar surfaces or datums are made parallel and face the same direction (similar to Align
offset except without the specified offset distance).

Figure 4.5 the ALIGN ORIENT constraint.

Training & Development Cell , The American Society of Mechanical Engineers , Three , Park Avenue , NY 10016-5990
73
INSERT
This constraint can only be used with two surfaces of revolution in order to make them
coaxial.

Figure 4.6 the INSERT constraint.

As you might already notice, for certain geometries and constraints, you could have more
than one choice from the 6 basic types. For example, ALIGN can be used to make two axes
coaxial, equivalent to INSERT, and so on.

Add Color and Create an Exploded View


To change color and appearance, click VIEW > Color and Appearance. The rest should be
straightforward.
An exploded view is useful when you create an assembly drawing. To create an exploded
view, click VIEW > Explode > Explode View. The default exploded view will show, which often
does not make sense. Then you should use VIEW > Explode > Edit Position to adjust the
relative positions of the components. In the dialog window, you are asked to pick the motion
reference, which is like a guide for your moving. Play with it until you get the position you like.

Training & Development Cell , The American Society of Mechanical Engineers , Three , Park Avenue , NY 10016-5990
74
Modeling Rigid Coupling Parts and Creating Assembly

Fig 4.7Rigid coupling for shafts of the same diameter

MAKING COMPLETE PATRS


Making PART 1
The model tree for the part is shown below in fig 4.8.

Figure 4.8-Model tree for the part1 (PRT0001.PRT)

Enter the Sketch mode by clicking the button ; and selecting the plane (any plane works)
for sketching. After entering the sketch mode follow the steps given below.

Training & Development Cell , The American Society of Mechanical Engineers , Three , Park Avenue , NY 10016-5990
75
a. Sketching the cross section, which can be revolved to get basic block of the part.
 Draw the cross section according to the dimensions using line command.

 Place the centerline as shown in figure below.

 Exit sketch mode by clicking

Figure 4.9 sketching the basic cross section

b. Revolving the cross section to get solid part.

 Select the button

 Select the button


The solid model generated after Step 2 is shown below in figure 4.10.

Training & Development Cell , The American Society of Mechanical Engineers , Three , Park Avenue , NY 10016-5990
76
Figure 4.10 Revolved feature.

c.
 Enter the sketch mode by selecting the surface mentioned in figure 4.10.
*Note: This can be done by creating a new datum plane in which the surface, mentioned
in figure 4.10, lies.
 Draw the sketch as shown in figure 4.11.

 Now exit the sketcher and extrude by selecting the button . And then OK button.
The solid model after step 3 is as shown in fig 4.12.

Training & Development Cell , The American Society of Mechanical Engineers , Three , Park Avenue , NY 10016-5990
77
Figure 4.11

Figure 4.12

Training & Development Cell , The American Society of Mechanical Engineers , Three , Park Avenue , NY 10016-5990
78
d. Making holes
 Make six holes in sketch mode as shown in figure 4.13.

 Exit the sketcher and select extrude button and select button from the extrude

dash board. And then select the button to create through holes.

Figure 4.13

Training & Development Cell , The American Society of Mechanical Engineers , Three , Park Avenue , NY 10016-5990
79
Figure 4.14 solid model after making holes

e. Making races to accommodate soft material pad


 Select the hub extreme cross section as reference plane, as shown in figure 4.15, for
sketching.
 Then draw the circle as shown in figure 4.16.
 Then extrude to remove material and adjust the depth 15 units.
After step 5 the part looks like the figure shown in figure 4.17.

Training & Development Cell , The American Society of Mechanical Engineers , Three , Park Avenue , NY 10016-5990
80
Figure 4.15

Figure 4.16

Training & Development Cell , The American Society of Mechanical Engineers , Three , Park Avenue , NY 10016-5990
81
Figure 4.17

f. Creating rounds

Select the button , then it prompts to select the edges to make round. Select the edges
and then click OK button.
The complete part after Step 5 looks like the picture shown in figure 4.18.

Figure 4.18 the complete part

Training & Development Cell , The American Society of Mechanical Engineers , Three , Park Avenue , NY 10016-5990
82
Making PART 2
Part 2 is same part 1 except one edge, which is the mating edge with part 1.
a. Sketch for part 2
Sketch the initial sketch. The basic cross sectional sketch of part 2 is shown in figure 4.19.

Figure 4.19
And all other steps are same as those of pat1.
The part after revolving is shown in figure 4.20 and figure 4.21 viewed in two different angles.

Figure 4.20

Training & Development Cell , The American Society of Mechanical Engineers , Three , Park Avenue , NY 10016-5990
83
Figure 4.21

Now after a. follow the steps from b. of part 1.


The complete part 2 is shown in figure 4.22 and figure 4.23.

Figure 4.22 the complete part 2

Training & Development Cell , The American Society of Mechanical Engineers , Three , Park Avenue , NY 10016-5990
84
Figure 4.23

MAKING PART 3 – SOFT MATERIAL DISK


Draw the circle in the Sketch mode, which can be extruded up to a depth of 30 units.
Part 3 is shown in figure 4.25.

Figure 4.24 sketch for Part 3

Training & Development Cell , The American Society of Mechanical Engineers , Three , Park Avenue , NY 10016-5990
85
Figure 4.25 PART 3

MAKING PART 4 – NUT


a.
 Draw a circle with 30 units diameter.
 Extrude to get a cylinder of length 150 units.
The extruded cylinder is shown in figure 4.26.

b.
 Enter the sketch mode by selecting the surface as drawing plane.
 Draw a 6-edged polygon, which can be inscribed in a circle of diameter 60 units.
 Now, exit sketcher and extrude in third direction up to a depth of 25 units.
The final part after step 2 is shown in figure 4.27.

Figure 4.26 part after a

Training & Development Cell , The American Society of Mechanical Engineers , Three , Park Avenue , NY 10016-5990
86
Figure 4.27 part after b

c. Rounding the edges

Select the icon , and then it prompts to select edge(s). Select all the sharp edges and then
say OK.
The complete part is shown in figure 4.28.

Figure 4.28 complete part – nut

MAKING PART 5 – BOLT


a.
 Draw two concentric circles with diameters 30 and 60 units respectively.
 Draw a 6-edged polygon, which inscribed in outer circle.
 Trim out the outer circle.
 Now, exit the sketcher and extrude to a depth of 25 units.
 And make the sharp edges round as the procedure discussed earlier.
The complete part – bolt is shown in the figure 4.29.

Training & Development Cell , The American Society of Mechanical Engineers , Three , Park Avenue , NY 10016-5990
87
Figure 4.29 the complete part – bolt

ASSEMBLING THE COMPLONENTS


Starting with a new assembly file, insert the components one by one by clicking the button

. The order of the inserting the components should be convenient to assemble the parts
in to one. Here the preferred order is PART 1, PART 3, PART 2, PART 4, and PART 5.
After inserting the part in to the assembly file COMPONENT PLACEMENT dialog box will
appear as shown below in figure 4.30. Choose appropriate constraints and offset values to
place a component.

Training & Development Cell , The American Society of Mechanical Engineers , Three , Park Avenue , NY 10016-5990
88
Figure 4.30 The main dialog window for assembly.

Placing PART 1:
Click Add components to assembly button and open PART 1. No need to apply any
constraints to this place this part as there are no other parts.
Do not modify any values/constraints in the dialog box as shown in figure 4.31. Now click OK.

Training & Development Cell , The American Society of Mechanical Engineers , Three , Park Avenue , NY 10016-5990
89
Figure 4.31 component placement box – PART 1

Placing PART 3:
Add PART 3 to assembly. It needs minimum two constraints to place the part 3.
We can place PART 3 by using two constraints – MATE and ALLIGN.

Applying MATE constraint


Select MATE from the drop down list. It prompts to select the two surfaces. Select the
surfaces highlighted in figure 4.32. Now, set the offset value to zero/coincident.

Training & Development Cell , The American Society of Mechanical Engineers , Three , Park Avenue , NY 10016-5990
90
Figure 4.32 Mating surfaces of PART 1 and PART 3.

Applying ALIGN constraint


After applying MATE constraint automatically it prompts for another constraint if not click
ADD button to add additional constraints.
Set ALLIGN in the constraints box and select the axis of PART 3 and center axis (at the center
of hub) of the PART1, which are highlighted in figure 4.33.
Now click OK.
The assembled parts are as shown in figure 4.34.

Training & Development Cell , The American Society of Mechanical Engineers , Three , Park Avenue , NY 10016-5990
91
Figure 4.33

Figure 4.34 Assembly of PARTS 1&3

PLACING PART 2
Add PART 2 to the assembly file. To place it, it needs two constraints similar to that as PART 2.
These are gain MATE and ALLIGN constraints.

Training & Development Cell , The American Society of Mechanical Engineers , Three , Park Avenue , NY 10016-5990
92
Figure 4.35 Mating surfaces of PART 1and PART 2

Figure 4.36 aligning axes of PART 1 and PART 2

Figure 4.37 assembly of PART 1, PART 2, and PART 3

Training & Development Cell , The American Society of Mechanical Engineers , Three , Park Avenue , NY 10016-5990
93
PLACING PARTS 4&5:

For assembling PART 4(nut) and PART 5 (bolt) the same constraints are applicable. It is also
possible with other types of constraints like INSERT etc.
The mating surfaces and aligning axes are highlighted in the following figures.

Fig 4.38 Mating surfaces: (PART 1+ PART 2+PART 3) & PART 4

Figure 4.39 alignment of axes

Training & Development Cell , The American Society of Mechanical Engineers , Three , Park Avenue , NY 10016-5990
94
Fig 4.40 assembly – PARTS 1, 2, 3 &4

Figure 4.41 mating surfaces of partial assembly and PART 5

Training & Development Cell , The American Society of Mechanical Engineers , Three , Park Avenue , NY 10016-5990
95
Figure 4.42 alignment of axes of partial assembly and PART 5

Figure 4.43 assembly of PARTS 1, 2, 3, and 4

Of course we need multiple components of PART 4 and PART 5 for the complete assembly.
Add and place multiple parts that are requires for complete assembly. A component can be
placed multiple times in the assembly.

The complete assembly is shown in the figure 4.44 and its exploded view is shown in the
figure 4.45. To explode/ unexplode select View >> Explode >> Explode View / Unexplode
View.

Training & Development Cell , The American Society of Mechanical Engineers , Three , Park Avenue , NY 10016-5990
96
Figure 4.44 Complete assembly of rigid coupling – Unexplode view

Figure 4.45 Complete assembly of rigid coupling – Explode view

Training & Development Cell , The American Society of Mechanical Engineers , Three , Park Avenue , NY 10016-5990
97
Modeling Flexible Coupling Parts and Creating Assembly
MAKING COMPLETE PATRS
Flexible couplings are designed to transmit torque while permitting some radial and axial and
angular misalignment. Flexible couplings can accommodate angular misalignment up to a few
degrees and some parallel misalignment.
The assembly that’s discussed in further is designed according to the specifications given in
Example 9.15 of the book Design of Machine Elements, written by V.B.Bhandari.

Making PART 1
The flange can be made as explained earlier in modeling rigid coupling.
The dimensions of the flange can be identified from the following figure 4.48

Fig 4.48 Showing dimensions of flange

Training & Development Cell , The American Society of Mechanical Engineers , Three , Park Avenue , NY 10016-5990
98
The following figure shows the completed view of Part 1.

Fig 4.49 showing completed view of part 1.

In the above figure, the diameter of centre hole is 100 mm and that of others is 68.21 mm.

Making PART 2
Making of part 2 of flexible coupling is similar to that of making part 2 of rigid coupling except
for a little change in shape

Unlike the case of rigid coupling, in flexible coupling, the two flanges seems similar except for
change in shaft diameters.

Training & Development Cell , The American Society of Mechanical Engineers , Three , Park Avenue , NY 10016-5990
99
The following figure, fig. 4.50 shows the dimensions of the 2nd part

Fig 4.50 showing dimensions of part 2.

The following figure shows the complete view of 2nd part with all the features

Fig 4.51 showing complete view of part 2

Training & Development Cell , The American Society of Mechanical Engineers , Three , Park Avenue , NY 10016-5990
100
MAKING PART 3 – NUT Sub Assembly
The nut used in flexible coupling is surrounded with brass lining and a rubber bush.

The following figure shows the nut dimensions

Fig 4.52 showing dimensions of nut

The following figure shows complete view of the nut

Fig 4.53 showing the completed view of the nut

Training & Development Cell , The American Society of Mechanical Engineers , Three , Park Avenue , NY 10016-5990
101
The following figure shows completed view of brass lining.

Fig 4.54 Showing brass lining for the nut used.

The dimension of inner diameter is 25.33 mm and that of outer diameter is 31.33 mm.
The following figure shows the rubber bush.

Fig 4.55 showing the rubber bush

Training & Development Cell , The American Society of Mechanical Engineers , Three , Park Avenue , NY 10016-5990
102
The dimension of the inner diameter of the rubber bush is 31.33 mm and that of outer
diameter is 68.21 mm.

MAKING PART 4 – BOLT


Bolt can also be created as mentioned in modeling of rigid coupling.
The following figure shows the bolt used in the assembly.

Fig 4.56 showing the bolt.


The diameter of the circular hole is 15.33 mm and the distance between two parallel edges of
hexagon are 35 mm.

Training & Development Cell , The American Society of Mechanical Engineers , Three , Park Avenue , NY 10016-5990
103
MAKING PART 5 - WASHER
The following figure shows the washer used in the assembly.

Fig 4.57 showing washer


The inner diameter of the washer is 15.33 mm and the outer diameter is 40 mm.

4.4.2 ASSEMBLING THE COMPLONENTS


Assembling the five parts namely nut, brass lining, rubber bush, the two flanges and finally
bolts and washers is done similar to that of rigid coupling. The only difference is
• There would not be any soft material in between the two flanges and
• The nut itself is a sub assembly of nut, brass lining and rubber bush.

The assembly of the nut is done by inserting the nut into the brass lining and then inserting
this sub-assembly into the rubber bush. This assembly is depicted in the following figures.

Training & Development Cell , The American Society of Mechanical Engineers , Three , Park Avenue , NY 10016-5990
104
The figure below gives the explode view of the nut assembly.

Fig 4.58 showing the exploded nut sub assembly.

The complete nut assembly can be seen from the following figure.

Fig 4.59 showing the unexploded view of nut sub-assembly.

Training & Development Cell , The American Society of Mechanical Engineers , Three , Park Avenue , NY 10016-5990
105
The complete assembly of the flexible coupling is depicted in following figures as both
exploded and unexploded views.

The following figures give the exploded views of the assembly seen from different directions

Fig 4.60 showing the exploded view of the assembly

Training & Development Cell , The American Society of Mechanical Engineers , Three , Park Avenue , NY 10016-5990
106
Fig 4.61 showing the exploded view of the assembly
The following figures give the unexploded view of the assembly.

Fig 4.62 showing the unexploded view of the assembly

Training & Development Cell , The American Society of Mechanical Engineers , Three , Park Avenue , NY 10016-5990
107
From the above figure,
• Bolts, washers and the second flange are clearly visible.
• We can also observe the difference in diameters of the shafts that can be used.
• Also both the shafts are keyed.

Fig 4.63 showing the unexploded view of the assembly


From the above figure,
• Nut head and the first flange are visible

Fig 4.64 showing the unexploded view of the assembly

Training & Development Cell , The American Society of Mechanical Engineers , Three , Park Avenue , NY 10016-5990
108
From the above figure,
• The gap between the two flanges
• Also the rubber bushes come out of the first flange and touch the second flange’s
surface, making the surfaces of rubber bushes as the surface of contact between the
two flanges. Where as in the case of rigid coupling, the two flange surfaces meet
directly.

In the above section 4.4, the complete assembly making of a flexible coupling is discussed in
brief.

M5-T2
Parts of nut and bold assembly can be taken from M2-T4 for assembly.

Training & Development Cell , The American Society of Mechanical Engineers , Three , Park Avenue , NY 10016-5990
109
C CLAMP M5-T3

Guidelines to make a C Clamp

1) Fixed Jaw: The Fixed Clamp is made by Extrude Commands for the main parts. Logo is
also made by Extrude Command. Round Command is used several times.

Training & Development Cell , The American Society of Mechanical Engineers , Three , Park Avenue , NY 10016-5990
110
2) Moveable Jaw: Moveable Jaw is made by revolving a section. Cosmetic Threads are
created over the relevant area. And a hole is created.

3) Pin: The pin is made using a single Revolve Command.

Training & Development Cell , The American Society of Mechanical Engineers , Three , Park Avenue , NY 10016-5990
111
KNUCLE JOINT M5-T4

Training & Development Cell , The American Society of Mechanical Engineers , Three , Park Avenue , NY 10016-5990
112
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

SCREW JACK ASSEMBLY M5-P1

Solution:

Training & Development Cell , The American Society of Mechanical Engineers , Three , Park Avenue , NY 10016-5990
113
Guidelines to Create a Screw Jack

a. Base: The base of the Screw Jack can be made using 2 Revolve commands. Hole
Command is used at the lowermost part. 2 Round commands are used at the changing
section.

b. Cup: The Cup of the Screw Jack is made by initially revolving the first section. Hole is
made at the bottom of the Cup. The Cut section at the top is made by extruding the
given section and removing material. It is then patterned using a Circular Pattern with
4 instances at 90º each.

Training & Development Cell , The American Society of Mechanical Engineers , Three , Park Avenue , NY 10016-5990
114
c. Nut: The Nut is made by first revolving the given section. A hole is made throughout
the part. Threads are made using Cosmetic Feature.

d. Screw: The Screw is made by first Extruding the top most part of the screw. Next, use
a Blend to create the head. Another Extrude is used on the body of the threaded
portion. A Helical Sweep is used to create the screw threads. Two Hole commands are
used; one at the top of the screw and another to fit the Split Pin.

Training & Development Cell , The American Society of Mechanical Engineers , Three , Park Avenue , NY 10016-5990
115
e. Set Screw: To make the Set Screw, first revolve the given section. Next Extrude
the top slot as shown and remove material. Finally Mirror the extrude
command.

f. Tommy Bar: The Tommy Bar is made by using extrude command twice. The
chamfer command is used where the 2 extrude commands meet.

Training & Development Cell , The American Society of Mechanical Engineers , Three , Park Avenue , NY 10016-5990
116
g. Washer: The Washer is made by using a Blend command followed by a Hole
Command.

Training & Development Cell , The American Society of Mechanical Engineers , Three , Park Avenue , NY 10016-5990
117
M6 | Design & Manufacturing Simulation

Training & Development Cell , The American Society of Mechanical Engineers , Three , Park Avenue , NY 10016-5990
118
DESIGN SIMULATION M6-L2

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Assembling the Components

1. Start Pro/E Wildfire.


2. Select File > New, change the Type radio button to
Assembly, and type the name Inverted_Slider in the
textbox.
3. Click OK Button.

4. Select the Add Component icon from the tool bar at


the right of the screen.
5. Select the pivot and click the Open button. The pivot
should now appear on the screen. You may want to hide
the datum planes to better see the features that you will
need to select later in the assembly process.
6. Select Coord Sys from the Type pull-down menu in the
Component Placement window, as shown in Figure 5.1.
7. Click on the pivot's coordinate system, and then click on
the assembly's coordinate system, as shown in Figure 5.2.
This will fully constrain the pivot within the assembly.

[Fig 5.1]

[Figure 5.2]

8. Select Okay from the Component Placement window.

Training & Development Cell , The American Society of Mechanical Engineers , Three , Park Avenue , NY 10016-5990
119
9. Select the Add Component icon again, and open the driver. You may want to
hide the coordinate systems of the parts since you will not use them again.
10. In the Component Placement window, set the Type to Mate.
11. Click on the front surface of the driver, and then click on the back surface of the pivot.
12. A pull-down menu for a second constraint should appear in the Component Placement
window. Set its type to Insert.
13. Click on the inside surface of the hole in the pivot, and then click on the outside
surface of the protrusion on the driver, as shown in
Figure 5.3.

[Figure 5.3]

14. Click on the Add Constraint icon in the Component


Placement window.
15. A pull-down menu for a third constraint should appear
in the Component Placement window. Set its type to Align. [Figure 5.4]
16. Click on the Offset menu and change it to Oriented, as shown in Figure 5.4.

17. Click on the bottom surface of the pivot and then the bottom surface of the driver, as
shown in Figure 5.5.

Training & Development Cell , The American Society of Mechanical Engineers , Three , Park Avenue , NY 10016-5990
120
[Figure 5.5]

18. The driver should be pointing to the left of the pivot, as shown in Figure 5.5. If so,

click on the Change Orientation icon in the Component Placement window so


that it is facing to the right of the pivot.
19. Select the OK button from the Component Placement window.

20. Select the Add Component icon and select the slider.

21. Set the first constraint type to Mate, and select the front surface of the slider and the
back surface of the driver, as shown in Figure 5.6.

Training & Development Cell , The American Society of Mechanical Engineers , Three , Park Avenue , NY 10016-5990
121
[Figure 5.6]

22. Set the second constraint type to Insert. Select the hole in the driver and protrusion
on the slider.

23. Use the Add Constraint icon to add a third constraint. Set the type to Align and
the offset to Oriented.

Training & Development Cell , The American Society of Mechanical Engineers , Three , Park Avenue , NY 10016-5990
122
24. Select the bottom surface of the driver and the bottom surface of the slider, as shown
in Figure 5.7.

[Figure 5.7]

25. Click the OK button on the Component Placement window. The parts should be
aligned as shown in Figure 5.7.

26. Select the Add Component icon and open the guide.
27. Set the first constraint type to Mate. Select the inside front surface of the slider and
the front surface of the guide, so that the guide will be able to fit inside the slider with
the pin on the guide pointing to the front.
28. Set the second constraint to Align. Select the point labeled Pnt1 on the slider and the
point Pnt2 on the guide, as shown in Figure 5.8.

Training & Development Cell , The American Society of Mechanical Engineers , Three , Park Avenue , NY 10016-5990
123
[Figure 5.8]

29. Use the Add Constraint icon to add a third constraint. Set the type to Align and
the offset to Oriented.
30. Select the bottom surface of the guide and the bottom surface of the slider.
31. Select the OK button from the Component Placement window. You should see the
parts oriented as shown in Figure 5.9.

[Figure 5.9]

Training & Development Cell , The American Society of Mechanical Engineers , Three , Park Avenue , NY 10016-5990
124
32. Select the Add Component icon and open the pivot again.
33. Set the first constraint type to Mate. Select the back surface of the pivot and the front
surface of the guide, as shown in Figure 5.10, and set the offset to 0. This is so we can
align PNT1 on the guide and PNT0 on the pivot, as is necessary for the motion analysis.

[Figure 5.10]

34. Set the second constraint to Insert. Select the protrusion on the guide and the hole in
the pivot.

35. Use the Add Constraint icon to add a third constraint. Set the type to Align and
the offset to Oriented.
36. Select the bottom surface of the guide and the bottom surface of the pivot.
37. Select the Okay button from the Component Placement window. You should see the
parts oriented as shown in Figure 5.11.

Training & Development Cell , The American Society of Mechanical Engineers , Three , Park Avenue , NY 10016-5990
125
[Figure 5.11]

Training & Development Cell , The American Society of Mechanical Engineers , Three , Park Avenue , NY 10016-5990
126
M6-T1
Building the Motion Model

1. Start Pro/E Wildfire.


2. Open the Inverted Slider assembly.
3. Select File > Erase > Not Displayed from the menu bar. If a window pops up
containing a list of parts, click the Okay button. This operation will not delete any files
- it will just remove from the session any parts you do not need for the Pro/Mechanica
motion analysis.
4. Select Applications > Mechanica from the menu bar. A window will be displayed
containing the unit information for the assembly. Click the Continue button on this
window.
5. You will begin by setting the material properties of the assembly. Select Motion >
Model > Property > Material from the Menu Manager.

6. Select AL6061 and click the Copy Material icon .


7. Click on the Assign button, and select Part.

[Figure 5.1.1]

8. Use the model tree to select all of the parts in the assembly, and click the Okay button
from the Select window.

Training & Development Cell , The American Society of Mechanical Engineers , Three , Park Avenue , NY 10016-5990
127
9. Close the Materials window, and select Done/Return from the PROPERTIES menu.
10. You will now define the grounded bodies in the assembly. Select Bodies from the
MOTN MODEL menu.
11. Select Ground in the Bodies window, and click on the Review button.
12. Click on the Select/Review Part button on the Body Definition window.
13. Select the first pivot, hold down the Control key, and select the second pivot.
14. Click the Okay button on the Select window and the Accept button on the Body
Definition window. The two pivots are now grounded. You should see the Bodies
window as shown in Figure 5.1.2.

[Figure 5.1.2]

15. Select the Done button from the Bodies window.


16. You will now define the joints in the assembly. Select Connections > Joints > Create
from the Menu Manager.

Training & Development Cell , The American Society of Mechanical Engineers , Three , Park Avenue , NY 10016-5990
128
17. Select PNT0 from the first pivot and PNT1 from the driver. These points should be
coincident, as should any points defining a joint.
18. A Joint Create window should open. Set the joint type to Pin and click the Accept
button. You should see the joint symbol pointing normal to the parts as shown in
Figure 5.1.3.

[Figure 5.1.3]

19. Select PNT0 from the driver and PNT0 from the slider to create a second joint.
20. Set the type to Pin and click the Accept button.
21. Select PNT0 from the second pivot and PNT1 from the guide.
22. Set the type to Pin and click the Accept button.
23. Select PNT2 from the guide and PNT1 from the slider.
24. Set the type to Slider and click the Accept button.
25. Select Done/Return from the POINTS menu and the MEC ACTION menu. You should
see the joints as shown in Figure 5.1.4.

Training & Development Cell , The American Society of Mechanical Engineers , Three , Park Avenue , NY 10016-5990
129
[Figure 5.1.4]

26. Select Drivers > Create from the Menu Manager.


27. Select the first joint between the pivot and the driver.
28. From the Create Joint Driver window, select the buttons for Position and Ramp.
29. Type 0 into the Constant textbox and 0.6283 into the Slope textbox. This will cause
the driver to rotate at a constant speed of one revolution in 10 seconds (2p/10 =
0.6283).
30. Click on the Accept button, and select Done/Return from the MEC ACTION and MOTN
MODEL menus.

Training & Development Cell , The American Society of Mechanical Engineers , Three , Park Avenue , NY 10016-5990
130
1. Analyzing the Motion
2. Select Analysis from the Menu Manager.
3. Click on Motion in the Motion Analysis Definition window and select the Edit button.
You should see the window shown in Figure 5.1.5. This window allows you to specify
the duration, time increment, etc. of the motion analysis. The default motion analysis
is to create a new frame every 0.1 seconds for 10 seconds, thus creating 100 frames.

[Figure 5.1.5]

4. Click the OK button to accept the default parameters, and close the Analysis window.
5. Select Run from the Menu Manager.
6. Select Motion (Standard/Motion) in the Run window, and click the Start button. If
you did everything correctly, you should see an animation of the assembly with the
driver completing one revolution in 10 seconds. If you get a message saying that there
was an error while compiling the equations of motion, you may need to define path
and environment variables to run a C++ compiler.

Training & Development Cell , The American Society of Mechanical Engineers , Three , Park Avenue , NY 10016-5990
131
7. Select Results > Animate > Start from the Menu Manager. This will bring up an
Animate window with normal play, stop, etc. buttons. Experiment with these buttons
to view an animation of your assembly. Click the link below to view the correct
animation.
8. Close the animation window and select Done/Return from the ANIMATE menu.
9. Now you will plot the velocity of the end of the guide. To do this, you will first need to
create a datum point. Select File > Open from the menu bar and open the guide. A
new window should open.

10. Select the Datum Point icon from the tool bar at the right of the screen.
11. Select the front surface of the guide, hold down the Control key, and select the axis of
the hole through the guide, as shown in Figure 5.1.6.

[Figure 5.1.6]

12. Click the OK button from the Datum Point window.


13. Select File > Save from the menu bar and click the green check button to save the
part.

Training & Development Cell , The American Society of Mechanical Engineers , Three , Park Avenue , NY 10016-5990
132
14. Select File > Close from the menu bar.
15. In the window with the assembly, the guide should be automatically updated. You will
need to run the Motion analysis again to obtain the velocity profile of the end of the
guide. Select Motion > Run from the Menu Manager.
16. Select Motion (Standard/Motion) in the Run window, and click the Start button. You
should see the same animation you saw in step 6.
17. Select Results > Graph > Pt Velocity from the Menu Manager.
18. Select on the point you just created on the guide.
19. Select Mag from the Select the Component window, and click the Accept button.
20. Select the OK button on the Select window. You should see the velocity profile shown
in Figure 5.1.7. You can use the menu bar on this window to format, save, and print
the graph.

Figure 5.1.7

21. Close the graph window.


22. Select File > Save from the menu bar on the main window, and click the green check
button to save the assembly.

Training & Development Cell , The American Society of Mechanical Engineers , Three , Park Avenue , NY 10016-5990
133
1. Four Bar Mechanism M6-T2

2. Disc and Plunger M6-T3

Training & Development Cell , The American Society of Mechanical Engineers , Three , Park Avenue , NY 10016-5990
134
Practice:
1. Single cylinder Engine M6-P1

2. Four Cylinder Engine M6-P2

Training & Development Cell , The American Society of Mechanical Engineers , Three , Park Avenue , NY 10016-5990
135
192 4 0123456789
6 
012340564175890