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Pick and Place Handler Model 900 Series User Manual

Version 3.7 February 28, 2011

Exatron, Inc.
2842 Aiello Drive San Jose, California 95111 (408) 629-7600 Tel (800) exa-tron Tel (408) 629-2832 Fax www.exatron.com

Copyright Notice
Copyright 2011 Exatron This document contains proprietary information which is protected by copyright. All rights are reserved. EXATRON MAKES NO WARRANTY OF ANY KIND WITH REGARD TO THIS MATERIAL, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. The information contained in this document is subject to change without notice.

Table of Contents
List of Figures Chapter 1: Safety, Support and Options
Chapter Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-1 Exatron Safety Warnings. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-1 Lock-Out Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-3 Facilities Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-4 Air Conditioning and Environmental Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-4 Electrical Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-4 Vacuum/Pneumatic Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-5 Internet Access . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-5 Uncrating the Handler. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-6 Mounting the Handler . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-6 Standard Warranty . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-6 Customer In-House Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-7 Offshore Warranty Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-7 Exatron Support Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-8 Warranty and Support Contracts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-8 Service Contract . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-9 Preventive Maintenance Contract. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-12 Customer Service Support Guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-15 End-of-Life Handler Disposal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-21 Significance of This Manuals Version Number. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-21 Typographical Conventions Used in This Manual . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-22 Terms Used in This Manual . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-22 Photo Gallery of Optional Configurations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-25 Optional Accessories and Peripherals Available with Handler . . . . . . . . 1-41

Chapter 2: System Description


Chapter Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-1 Where to Find Information on Extra Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-1 How the System Works . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2 Mechanical Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-3 Motors. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-3 Pickup Heads . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-3 Pickup Head Rotation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-3 Multiple Pickup Heads . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-4 Lead Screws . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-5 Tray Carriages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-7 Gantry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-7 Smart Buckets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-9 Anti-Vibration Feet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-9
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Model 900 Manual

Chapter 2: System Description continued


Electrical Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-10 Main Disconnect Switch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-10 Emergency Stop Button . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-11 HALT and RUN Buttons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-11 Power Supplies. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-11 Fuses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-13 PC Boards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-14 PCM-8152 Motherboard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-14 PET-C06 I/O PC Board . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-15 5000-M42 Board . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-15 8000-D14 I/O PC Board (Optional) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-16 Serial Adapter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-16 Sensors. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-17 Light Pole . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-18 Pneumatic Systems. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-18 Pickup Head Shaft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-18 Main Air Regulator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-19 Auxiliary Air Regulator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-20 Vacuum Generator with Sensor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-21 Test Site Air Valve Manifold . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-23 Test Site Override Buttons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-23 Test Sites . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-25 Docking Ring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-25 Sockets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-25 Docking Plates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-25 Thermal Test Assembly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-25 Tray Configurations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-30 Key Positions and Distances. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-31 How X and Y Distances Are Measured . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-32 Measuring X Distances . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-33 Measuring Y Distances . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-34 How Z Distances Are Measured . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-35 Tape-and-Reel Assembly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-38 Emergency Stop Button . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-40 Override Buttons. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-41 CE Marking Standard Practice and Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-41

Chapter 3: Hardware and Software Setup


Chapter Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-1 Setting Up Your New Handler . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-1 Benchtop Models . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-1 Cabinet ModelsLeveling Feet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-1
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Chapter 3: Hardware and Software Setup continued


Changing Device Sizes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-3 Replacing the Pickup Head . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-4 Powering Up the System. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-6 Switching Between System Computers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-8 Shutting Down the System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-8 Securing Trays or Tubes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-9 Calibrating Procedures for Tube Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-11 Setting Dead Nest Length. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-12 Setting Dead Nest Height . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-13 Calibrating and Loading a Detaper . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-14 Loading the Detaper . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-14 Aligning the Detaper with the Path of the Pickup Head . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-19 Using the Control Panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-21 Setting Up a Taper . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-23 Changing Taper Changeover Kit for Different Device Sizes. . . . . . . . . . 3-24 Mounting a Takeup Reel. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-26 Mounting a Supply Reel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-27 Replacing the Tape Track. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-28 Loading the Carrier Tape . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-30 Loading the Sealing Tape. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-33 Adjusting the Position of the Taper. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-37 Adjusting Seal Head . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-38 Understanding Blade Sizes and Orientation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-38 Changing Seal Head Blade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-40 Adjusting Seal Heads Lateral Position . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-41 Adjusting Seal Heads Downward Pressure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-43 Adjusting Speed of Seal Head . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-44 Setting Temperature for Heat Seal Head . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-45 Getting Acquainted with the Main Window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-46 Managing Job Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-47 Verifying the Factory-Installed Job File. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-47 Copying the Job File for Modifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-48 Opening a Job File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-49 Saving a Job File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-51 Checking the Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-51 Setting the Number of Rows and Columns in Trays or Waffle Packs. . . 3-52 Fine Tuning Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-54 Changing the Password . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-54

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Model 900 Manual

Chapter 4: Auto Run


Chapter Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-1 Halt, Run, and EMO Buttons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-1 Starting an Auto Run . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-2 Auto Run Window Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-3 Process Instructions and Description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-6 Auto Run Using Tape and Reel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-9 Auto Run Using Multiple Test Sites . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-11

Chapter 5: Diagnostics
Chapter Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-1 Keeping Your Original Job File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-2 Diagnostics Windows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-2 Using Override Buttons. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-4 Input / Output Check Window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-7 Input Group Box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-8 Output Group Box. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-8 Buttons on All I/O Port Pages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-8 Ports on Circuit Boards. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-9 Selecting a Port to Check . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-10 Motor Home Position Sensors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-13 Thermal Head Sensors. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-15 Tube Inputs and Outputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-17 Taper Inputs and Outputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-18 Taper Outputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-18 Loading an Inspection File to the Camera . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-19 Taper Override Buttons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-21 Taper Inputs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-22 Check Tube Latches Window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-25 Setup Parameters Window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-26 Test Site Delay Group Box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-29 Rotation / Taper Group Box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-32 Results of Rotation Combinations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-33 Test Interface Group Box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-33 Work Mode Group Box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-34 Tray Delay Group Box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-35 Tape Delay Group Box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-36 Tape and Reel Group Box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-36 Precisor Delay Group Box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-37 Enable Trays Group Box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-38 Tray Information Group Box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-39 Enable Test Sites Group Box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-39
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Chapter 5: Diagnostics continued


Setup Parameters Window continued Enable Tubes Group Box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-40 Bucket Full Count Group Box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-40 Simulated Fixed Test Results Group Box. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-41 Rub Routine Group Box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-41 Thermal Soak Time Delay Group Box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-42 Sort Interface Window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-43 Test Sort Result Group Box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-44 Tester Setting Group Box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-44 Handler Port (TTL Signals) Group Box. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-45 Taper and Bucket Latch Group Box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-45 Motors Setup Window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-47 Setup Motor Parameters Group Box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-48 Motor Test Cycle Group Box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-49 Fine Tune Window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-51 Selections Group Box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-53 X Distance Calibration Group Box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-54 Y Distance Calibration Group Box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-55 Z-Get Distance Calibration Group Box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-56 Z-Put Distance Calibration Group Box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-56 Pitch and Teach Group Box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-57 Z Vacuums Group Box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-62 Test Site Clamp Group Box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-62 Rotation Group Box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-64 Z Compress Group Box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-64 Socket Offsets Group Box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-65 Air Pressure Group Box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-67 Other Buttons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-67 Setting Distances to Various Positions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-68 Positions to Be Calibrated . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-70 Setting Test Site Distances. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-73 Setting the Y Distance to a Test Site . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-74 Comparing the Z Distances . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-75 Setting the Z-Put Distance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-77 Setting the Z-Get Distance. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-78 Understanding Tray and Waffle Pack Numbering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-79 Setting Tray Distances . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-80 Calibration Order for Tray Pockets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-81 Setting the Y Distances to a Tray . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-82 Setting the X Distances for a Tray . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-83 Setting the Z Distances for a Tray . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-84
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Model 900 Manual

Chapter 5: Diagnostics continued


Example of Calibrating Distances for Four JEDEC Trays . . . . . . . . . . . 5-85 Defining Y Distances for JEDEC Trays . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-85 Defining X Distances for JEDEC Trays . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-88 Example of Calibrating Distances for Waffle Packs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-90 Defining Y Distances for Waffle Packs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-90 Defining X Distances for Waffle Packs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-94 Example of Distances for Preheating Tray and Dual Test Sites. . . . . . . 5-97 Defining Y Distances for Preheating Tray and Dual Test Sites . . . . 5-98 Defining X Distances for Three Trays and Moving Preheating Tray 5-99 Thermal Setup Window (Optional) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-100 Hot Thermal Omega Group Box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-100 Cold Thermal Julabo/Huber Group Box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-101 Socket Pressure Group Box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-102 Taper Window (Optional) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-103 Taper Fine Tune Group Box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-104 Seal Head Group Box. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-106 Tape and Reel Group Box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-107 Vacuum Group Box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-111 Motor Group Box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-111 Other Buttons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-112

Chapter 6: Servicing and Troubleshooting


Chapter Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-1 Backing Up the Computer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-3 Cleaning the Handler. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-3 Cleaning or Replacing the Suction Cup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-3 Lubricating the Bearing Shafts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-3 Checking Lead Screw/Coupling Tightness . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-5 Motor Replacement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-5 Master and Slave Cool Muscle Motors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-6 Setting Up a Cool Muscle Motor Controller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-8 Replacing a Cool Muscle Servo Motor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-13 Programming a Cool Muscle Motor. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-16 Checking Motor Serial Cables. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-18 Air Regulator Maintenance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-19 Checking Incoming Air from the House Supply . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-19 Checking the Moisture/Dirt Trap in the Air Regulator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-19 Checking the Air Regulator Shutoff Valve . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-22 Automatic Air Shut-Off Valve . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-23 Adjusting Air Pressure on the Regulator. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-24 Adjusting Auxiliary Air Regulator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-24
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Chapter 6: Servicing and Troubleshooting continued


Adjusting Air Valves . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-25 Adjusting Air Pressure on a Digital Pressure Switch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-26 Unlocking or Locking a Digital Air Pressure Switch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-27 Unlocking or Locking SMC Model ITV . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-27 Unlocking or Locking SMC Models ISE40 and ZSE40 . . . . . . . . . . 6-29 Changing Settings on a Digital Air Pressure Switch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-31 Changing Settings on SMC Model ITV . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-31 Changing Settings on SMC Models ISE40 and ZSE40 . . . . . . . . . . 6-35 Setting Minimum Air Pressure on SMC Models ISE40 and ZSE40 . 6-37 Vacuum Generator Maintenance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-39 Troubleshooting Vacuum Assemblies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-42 Air Regulator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-42 Vacuum Generators. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-42 Vacuum Switches Used with Vacuum Pump . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-42 Checking and Replacing a Vacuum Air Filter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-42 Adjusting Pickup Nozzle Blow-Off . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-43 Adjusting Blow-Off for Handler Using In-House Air Supply . . . . . . . 6-44 Adjusting Blow-Off for Handler Using Vacuum Pump Air Supply . . 6-44 Cleaning Vacuum Assemblies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-46 Checking and Setting the Vacuum Generator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-50 Solenoid Maintenance. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-58 Opening the Computer for Part Replacement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-58 Cabinet Models. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-58 Benchtop Models . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-61 Fiberoptic Photoelectric Sensor Guidelines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-64 Taper Maintenance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-65 Checking Omega Temperature Controller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-66 Thermal Heads Air Pressure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-71 Laser Servicing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-71 Networking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-71 Internet Access . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-71 Setting LAN Connections and Required IP Addresses. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-72 Testing Network Communication with Peripherals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-77 Remote Handler Control with WebEx . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-80 Replacing Exatron Program File with an Upgrade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-82 Troubleshooting. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-85 Motors Move Very Slowly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-85 Tray Carriage Alignment Is Faulty . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-85 System Does Not Pick Up Devices Reliably. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-85 System Noise When Y Gantry Moves . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-87

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Model 900 Manual

Chapter 7: Parts List


Chapter Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-1 Obtaining Replacement Parts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-1 Suction Cups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-1 Vacuum Generator Air Filter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-2 Z Chain . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-2 Hose Sizes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-2 Relays. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-2 Motor Controllers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-2 Guide to the Parts List. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-4 Exatron (Part Number) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-4 Part Quantity Columns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-4 Manual . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-5 Description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-5 Assembly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-5 Size. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-5 Finish . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-5 List of Parts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-6

Chapter 8: Prints Appendix A: Test Interfaces


Chapter Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-1 Components of Test Interfaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-1 DUT InterfaceHardware . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-1 Control InterfaceMethod of Communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-2 TCP/IP Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-3 TTL Handler Port Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-4 Start Test Output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-5 Sort Test Result . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-5 End of Test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-6 Sort to Bin Selection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-6 Handler Port Diagnostics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-7 Handler Port Simulator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-7 Serial Port Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-9 Exatron RS-232 Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-10 Beginning the Connection. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-10 Starting the Test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-10 After the Test Is Completed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-11 Cycle Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-11 Exatron Plus RS-232 Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-12 Command Set Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-17
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Appendix A: Test Interfaces continued


Serial Commands for Multiple Test Sites with One Serial Port . . . . . . . . . . A-18 Command Set Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-18 Multiple Sockets in Multiple Sites. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-19 Request for Tester Results . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-20 GPIB Test Interface. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-21 If the Tester Controls the Testing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-21 If the Handler Controls the Testing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-22 Decimal-Hexadecimal-Binary-ASCII Conversion Table . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-24 Setting Up HyperTerminal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-26 Configuring a Connection Session . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-26 Testing Communication Between Handler and Tester . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-31

Appendix B: System Backup and Recovery


Chapter Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-1 Setting a Computer to Boot from CD-ROM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-1 Creating a Secure Zone on the Hard Disk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-6 Backing Up a Hard Disk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-15 Copying Archive Files to CDs or DVDs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-28 Restoring a Disk or Partition Backup from CD-ROM. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-28 Restoring a Backup Under Windows. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-40

Index

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Model 900 Manual

Contents-10

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02/2011

List of Figures
Figure 1-1: EMO (Emergency Stop) Button . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-2 Figure 1-2: Air RegulatorIn ON Position (Left), in OFF Position (Center), in OFF Position with Lock (Right). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-3 Figure 1-3: Lockable Disconnect SwitchIn ON Position (Left), in OFF Position with Lock (Right) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-4 Figure 1-4: Context Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-23 Figure 1-5: Drop-Down Arrow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-23 Figure 1-6: Group Box. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 1-7: Input Boxes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 1-8: Cabinet Model with Detaper, Six Test Sites, Model 201 Taper, and Two Trays. . . Figure 1-9: Cabinet Model with Dual Preheating Trays, Dual Thermal Test Sites, and Two Trays . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 1-10: Cabinet Model with Detaper, Test Site, Model 201 Taper, and One Tray. . . . . . . Figure 1-11: Cabinet Model with Chiller, Hot and Cold Test Sites, Enclosed Trays, and Laser Figure 1-12: Cabinet Model with Preheating Tray, MEMS Light Source Tester, Enclosed Trays, and Laser. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 1-13: Cabinet Model with Lead Straighteners and Inspection. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 1-14: Cabinet Model Assembler with Bowl Feeder and Tube Inputs, Inspection, and Taper Output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 1-15: Cabinet Model with Bowl Feeder Input, Preheating Tray, MEMS Magnetic Ambient and Thermal Testing, and Taper Output with In-Tape Inspection . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 1-16: Cabinet Model with Four Trays and MEMS Audio Test Box (Left); 16 Test Sockets in Audio Test Box (Right) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 1-17: Cabinet Model with Bowl Feeder Input, Machine Vision Inspection, MEMS Vibration Testing, and Taper Output (Top); Isolation Plate with 12 Sockets for MEMS Vibration Testing (Bottom) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 1-18: Benchtop Model with Detaper and Two Trays/Waffle Packs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 1-19: Cabinet Model with Laser and Enclosed Trays . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 1-20: Hot and Cold Test with Chiller and Air Dryer, Four Trays . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 1-21: Benchtop Model with Rotary Tester and Trays/Waffle Packs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 1-22: Custom Model with Tube Input and Output, One Test Site . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 1-23: Cabinet Model with Burn-In Board, Dual Test Sites, and Two Trays . . . . . . . . . . Figure 1-24: Custom Model with Two Input Sources, Two Inspection Cameras, Welder . . . . . Figure 1-25: Port Feeder Track and Tray as Input for Welder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 1-26: Fixed and Moving Preheating Trays. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 1-27: Refrigerated/Heating Circulators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 1-28: Air Dryer (Left); Air Filter (Right). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 1-29: Temperature Controllers for Hot and Cold Testers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-24 1-24 1-25 1-26 1-26 1-27 1-28 1-29 1-30 1-31

1-32

1-33 1-34 1-35 1-36 1-37 1-38 1-39 1-40 1-41 1-41 1-42 1-42 1-43

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Model 900 Manual

Figure 1-30: Hot and Cold Test Heads . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-43 Figure 2-1: Tray Carriage Motor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 2-2: One Type of Rotational Pickup HeadRotation On (Left); Rotation Off (Right) . . Figure 2-3: Another Type of Rotational Pickup HeadRotation On (Left); Rotation Off (Right) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 2-4: Multiple Nozzles on One Pickup Head. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 2-5: Lead Screws . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-3 2-4 2-5 2-5 2-6

Figure 2-6: Two Styles of Tray Clamps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-7 Figure 2-7: Cable Chain to Pickup Head (Left); Z-Chain and Lead Screw Driving Pickup Head (Right) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-8 Figure 2-8: Lead Nutsfor Pickup Head (Left), for Thermal Heads (Right). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-8 Figure 2-9: Smart BucketsTop View (Left); Front View (Right) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-9 Figure 2-10: Anti-Vibration FootTop (Left), Bottom (Right) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-10 Figure 2-11: Main Disconnect SwitchIn OFF Position with Lock (Left), In OFF Position (Center), in ON Position (Right) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 2-12: Emergency Stop Button . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 2-13: 24-Volt DC Power Supply . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 2-14: CPU Power Supply Installed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 2-15: ATX Power Supply Switched to 115 Volts (Left) and 230 Volts (Right) Input . . Figure 2-16: Fuses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 2-17: Location of Jumpers and Connectors for PCM-8152 Motherboard . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 2-18: PET-C06 I/O Board . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 2-19: 5000-M42 Circuit Board. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 2-20: 8000-D14 I/O Board . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 2-21: Serial Adapter (Left); Ethernet Switch (Right). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 2-22: Y Motor Sensor. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 2-23: Light Pole . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 2-24: Main Air Regulator Turned On . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 2-25: Automatic Air Shut-Off Valve . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 2-26: Air Pressure Switch with Digital Display. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 2-27: Auxiliary Air Regulator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 2-28: Vacuum Generators for Dual Pickup Heads. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 2-29: Vacuum and Blow-Off Buttons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 2-30: Dirty Filter (Left) Versus Clean Filter (Right) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 2-31: Air Valves on Manifold Block . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 2-32: Pusher and Slider Override Buttons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 2-33: Slide Cylinder Retracted, Push Cylinder Down (Left); Slide Cylinder Extended, Push Cylinder Up (Right) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 2-34: Clamp Socket . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 2-35: Preheating Assembly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

2-10 2-11 2-12 2-12 2-13 2-13 2-14 2-15 2-16 2-16 2-17 2-17 2-18 2-19 2-20 2-20 2-21 2-21 2-22 2-23 2-23 2-24 2-24 2-25 2-26

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List of Figures

Figure 2-36: Hot and Cold Thermal Ranges . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 2-37: Undersides of Thermal Heads with Purge Enclosures (Hot Head on Left, Cold Head on Right) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 2-38: Hot Head Descending to Test Site (Left); Hot Head at Test Site (Right) . . . . . . . Figure 2-39: Cold Head Descending to Test Site (Left); Cold Head at Test Site (Right). . . . . . Figure 2-40: Dual Thermal Head Assembly with Test Site . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 2-41: Thermal Head Air Pressure Control Panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 2-42: Four Trays with 7 x 17 Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 2-43: Multiple Types of Waffle Packs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 2-44: Three Waffle Packs on Each Tray . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 2-45: X Motor Diagram for 4-Tray Handler with 12 Waffle Packs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 2-46: Y Motor Diagram for 4-Tray Handler with 12 Waffle Packs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 2-47: Z Motor Diagram . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 2-48: Suction Cup at Z-Get (Pick Height) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 2-49: Suction Cup at Z-Put (Put Height) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 2-50: Reels on Taper . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 2-51: Tape Track with Sensors and Pickup Head . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 2-52: Pressure Roller Block, Seal Head, and Image Sensor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 2-53: Pressure Roller Block (Left); Pinch Roller on Pressure Roller Block (Right) . . . . Figure 2-54: Taper Override Buttons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 2-55: Main Disconnect SwitchIn OFF Position with Lock (Left), In OFF Position (Center), in ON Position (Right) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

2-26 2-27 2-27 2-28 2-28 2-29 2-30 2-31 2-33 2-34 2-35 2-36 2-36 2-37 2-38 2-39 2-39 2-40 2-41 2-42

Figure 2-56: Gold Alodine Finish on Interior Surfaces. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-42 Figure 2-57: Ferrite EMI Noise Filter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-43 Figure 3-1: Wheel Unlocked (Left), Locked (Right) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-2 Figure 3-2: Anti-Vibration Foot . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-2 Figure 3-3: Screws To Be Loosened When Changing Pickup Head. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-4 Figure 3-4: Pickup Heads for Two Sizes of Device . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 3-5: Pickup Head Firm Against Tray Side . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 3-6: Main Disconnect SwitchIn OFF Position with Lock (Left), In OFF Position (Center), in ON Position (Right) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 3-7: Powering Up a Benchtop System (Left); Powering Up a Cabinet System (Right) . . Figure 3-8: Shutting Down Windows from the Start Button. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-5 3-5 3-6 3-7 3-8

Figure 3-9: Selecting the Turn Off Option . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-9 Figure 3-10: Two Styles of Tray Clamps (Left, Center); Spring Clip (Right) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-10 Figure 3-11: Dowel on Holder Fits Dowel Hole on Tube . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-10 Figure 3-12: Tube Held Out Away from Dowel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-11 Figure 3-13: Tube Snapped Into Place on Holder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-11 Figure 3-14: Tube Dead Nest Area . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-12 Figure 3-15: Tube Dead Nest Area Resized from 16 to 28-Pin Device . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-12

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Model 900 Manual

Figure 3-16: Dead Nest Adjustment Leg in Partially Raised Position . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-13 Figure 3-17: Dead Nest Adjustment Leg in Lowered Position . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-13 Figure 3-18: Tape Threading Diagram on Side of Detaper. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-14 Figure 3-19: Detaper Supply Reel Tensioner Arm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 3-20: Carrier Tape from Supply Reel Threaded Under Both Rollers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 3-21: Tape Window LatchClosed (Left), Opened (Right) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 3-22: Tape Window Raised . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 3-23: Winding Cover Tape Onto Reel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 3-24: Cover Tape Wound Onto Reel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 3-25: Tape Sprockets Fitting Over Gear Teeth . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 3-26: Tape Sprockets Fitting Over Gear Teeth . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 3-27: Detaper Locking Screws on Side Plate. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 3-28: Detaper Adjustment Screw . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 3-29: Detaper Control Panel. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 3-30: Counting Number of Sprocket Holes Between Pocket CentersBetween Single Pockets (Left), Between Four Pockets (Right) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 3-31: Model 202 Taper. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 3-32: Lifting Pressure Roller Arm and Pushing In Keeper Pin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 3-33: Gap Sensor (Left); Gap Sensor LED Lit (Right) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 3-34: Locking Hub on Takeup Reel with Alignment Pins. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 3-35: Center Prongs of Supply Reel. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 3-36: Screws on Side of Tape Track to Be Removed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 3-37: Tape Track with Part Number and Sample Tape . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 3-38: Cover Tape Guide Block Assembly Pushed Left . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 3-39: Guide Block Partly Removed from Rod. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 3-40: Carrier Tape Under Guide At Bottom Rear of Track . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 3-41: Carrier Tape Under Guide At Top Front of TrackSide View (Left); Top View (Right) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 3-42: Lifting Pressure Roller Arm and Pushing In Keeper Pin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 3-43: Tape Under Takeup Arm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 3-44: Sealing Tape PlatesOutside (Left), Inside (Right) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 3-45: Adjustment Collar on Sealing Tape Supply Reel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 3-46: Sealing Tape Threaded to Sealing Tape Guide Assembly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 3-47: Model 202 Sealing Tape Threaded to Sealing Tape Guide Assembly (Left); Sealing Tape Threaded Under Guide Block (Right) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 3-48: Two Widths of Guide BlocksTop View (Left); Bottom View (Right). . . . . . . . 3-15 3-15 3-16 3-16 3-17 3-17 3-18 3-18 3-19 3-20 3-21 3-21 3-23 3-25 3-26 3-27 3-27 3-28 3-29 3-29 3-30 3-31 3-31 3-32 3-32 3-33 3-33 3-34 3-34 3-35

Figure 3-49: Placement in Grooves of Guide Blockof Sealing Tape (Left) and Carrier Tape (Right) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-35 Figure 3-50: Guide Block Partly Removed from Rod. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-36 Figure 3-51: Guide Block Assembly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-36

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Figure 3-52: Taper Alignment Knob Above Base Bolts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-38 Figure 3-53: Two Sizes of Heat Seal Blades: 16mm, Top, and 12mm, Bottom . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-39 Figure 3-54: Top Side of Blades As They Slide into Seal Head (Left); Bottom Side of Blades That Contact Tape (Right) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 3-55: Replacing Heat Seal Head Blade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 3-56: Seal Head with Empty Rails for Blade Insertion (Back View) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 3-57: Pressure Seal Blade Inserted Partway into RailTop View (Left), Side View (Right) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 3-58: Six Lateral Adjustment Screws for Seal Head; Thumbscrew for Small Adjustments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 3-59: Example of Good Tape Seal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 3-60: Auxiliary Air Regulator for Seal Head Pressure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 3-61: Outward-Facing Knob Adjusts Upward Speed; Right Knob Adjusts Downward Speed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 3-62: Heater Controller Displaysin Celsius (Left), in Fahrenheit (Right) . . . . . . . . . . Figure 3-63: Main Window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 3-64: Entering Password . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 3-65: Opening a Job File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 3-66: Tray Information. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 3-67: Example of Row and Column Layout for Tray . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 3-68: Example of Row and Column Layout for Waffle Pack . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

3-39 3-40 3-40 3-41 3-42 3-43 3-43 3-44 3-45 3-46 3-50 3-50 3-52 3-53 3-53

Figure 3-69: Changing Password. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-55 Figure 4-1: EMO (Emergency Stop) Button . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-1 Figure 4-2: Auto Run Window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-2 Figure 4-3: Opening a Job File for Auto Run . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-5 Figure 4-4: Starting Input and Output Pockets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-6 Figure 4-5: Drop-Off to Inspection Gap . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-7 Figure 4-6: Auto Run Window During Run . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-8 Figure 4-7: Initializing Taper Before Auto Run . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-9 Figure 4-8: Auto Run WindowHandler Using Multiple Test Sites . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-11 Figure 5-1: Main Window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-1 Figure 5-2: Entering Password . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 5-3: Opening a Job File for Diagnostics. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 5-4: Buttons on Each Diagnostic Window. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 5-5: Examples of Override Buttons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 5-6: Push Cylinder Up (Left); Push Cylinder Down (Right) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 5-7: Slide Cylinder Retracted (Left); Slide Cylinder Extended (Right). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 5-8: Input / Output Window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 5-9: Buttons Turning All Motors On or Off. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 5-10: Corresponding Ports on Circuit Boards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-3 5-3 5-4 5-5 5-6 5-6 5-7 5-8 5-9

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Figure 5-11: Port Selection Drop-Down ListBoards 1, 2, and 3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-10 Figure 5-12: Input / Output Check WindowPort for Pickup Nozzle Vacuums. . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 5-13: Input / Output Check WindowPort for Safety Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 5-14: Input / Output Check WindowPort for Motors Homing and Thermal Heads . . Figure 5-15: Input / Output Check WindowPorts for Signal Lights, Run and Halt Buttons. . Figure 5-16: Input / Output Check WindowPort for Handler with Four Pusher/Sliders. . . . . Figure 5-17: Y Motor Home SensorSignal Low . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 5-18: Y Motor Home SensorSignal High. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 5-19: X Motor Home Sensors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 5-20: Z Motor Home Sensor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 5-21: Thermal Head Car Home Sensor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 5-22: Thermal Cylinder Sensors on Sensor Check Window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 5-23: Thermal Head Up Sensor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 5-24: Input / Output Check WindowPort for Handler with Tubes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 5-25: Input / Output Check WindowPort for Handler with Taper . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 5-26: Example of Inspection Files with Their Slot Numbers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 5-27: Bit Settings for Inspection Files with Binary Numbers 000, 001, and 010 . . . . . . Figure 5-28: Bit Settings for Inspection Files with Binary Numbers 011 and 100 . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 5-29: Taper Control Panel with Sensor Lights and Override Buttons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 5-30: Tape Track with Empty/Out-of-Pocket Sensor and Pickup Head . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 5-31: Taper Model 202 with Slack Switch and Heat Sensors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 5-32: Slack Switch Sensor Blocked . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 5-33: Seal Head . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 5-34: Check Tube Latches Window. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 5-35: Setup Parameters WindowOne Version . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 5-36: Setup Parameters WindowAnother Version . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 5-37: Test Site Delay Group Box. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 5-38: Using Normal Top Push Cylinder (Left); Using Z Plunger/Pickup Head (Right) . Figure 5-39: Rotation / Taper Group Box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 5-40: Test Interface Group Box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 5-41: Examples of Various Work Modes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 5-42: Tray Delay Group Box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 5-43: Tape Delay Group Box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 5-44: Tape and Reel Group Box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 5-45: Precisor Delay Group Box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 5-46: Enable Trays Group Box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-11 5-11 5-12 5-12 5-13 5-13 5-14 5-14 5-15 5-15 5-16 5-16 5-17 5-18 5-19 5-20 5-20 5-21 5-22 5-23 5-24 5-24 5-25 5-27 5-28 5-29 5-31 5-32 5-34 5-35 5-35 5-36 5-36 5-37 5-38

Figure 5-47: Tray Information Group Box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-39 Figure 5-48: Enable Test Sites Group Box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-40

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Figure 5-49: Enable Tubes Group Box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-40 Figure 5-50: Simulated Fixed Test Results Group Box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-41 Figure 5-51: Rub Routine Group Box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-41 Figure 5-52: Thermal Soak Time Delay Group Box of Setup Parameters Window . . . . . . . . . . Figure 5-53: Sort Interface Window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 5-54: Sorts for Output Tubes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 5-55: Handler Port Group Box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 5-56: Motors Setup Window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-42 5-43 5-44 5-45 5-48

Figure 5-57: Fine Tune Window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-51 Figure 5-58: Examples of Drop-Down List of Selectionswith Four Trays (Left); with Waffle Packs (Right) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-53 Figure 5-59: Examples of Drop-Down List of Selectionswith Tube Outputs (Left); with Bowl Feeder, Inspection, and Taper (Right) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-53 Figure 5-60: X Distance Calibration Group Box. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-54 Figure 5-61: Y Distance Calibration Group Box. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-55 Figure 5-62: Z-Get Distance Calibration Group Box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 5-63: Z-Put Distance Calibration Group Box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 5-64: Pitch and Teach Group BoxUsing Tubes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 5-65: Tray Dimension Drawing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 5-66: Pitch and Teach Group BoxUsing Waffle Packs on Both Trays . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 5-67: Tray Drawing for Two-Inch Waffle Packs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 5-68: Tray Drawing for Four-Inch Waffle Packs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 5-69: Test Sockets Open . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 5-70: Test Sockets Closed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 5-71: Rotation Group Box; 360-Degree Rotation Head. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 5-72: Z Compress Group Box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 5-73: ExamplePositive Socket Offset . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 5-74: ExampleNegative Socket Offset. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 5-75: Fine Tune Buttons. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 5-76: Selections for 4 Trays and 2 Test Sites. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 5-77: Selections for 4 Trays with Waffle Packs and 2 Test Sites . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 5-78: Selections for Preheating Tray and Multiple Test Sites with Thermal Heads . . . . Figure 5-79: Where to Start Setting Distances . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 5-80: Test Site Selected . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 5-81: Y Distance Group Box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 5-82: Example Z Distances to Test Site . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 5-83: Example Z Distances to X Tray . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 5-84: Suction Cup at Z-Get (Pick Height) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 5-85: Suction Cup at Z-Put (Put Height) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-56 5-56 5-57 5-59 5-59 5-60 5-61 5-63 5-63 5-64 5-65 5-65 5-66 5-67 5-70 5-70 5-71 5-73 5-73 5-74 5-75 5-75 5-76 5-76

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Figure 5-86: Z-Put Distance Group Box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-77 Figure 5-87: Z-Get Distance Group Box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 5-88: Tray Numbering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 5-89: Waffle Pack Numbering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 5-90: Tray X1, First Pocket Selected (Left); Tray X4, Last Pocket Selected (Right) . . . Figure 5-91: Order of Calibrating Distances for Multiple Trays. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 5-92: Order of Calibrating Distances for Multiple Trays with Multiple Waffle Packs . . Figure 5-93: Y Distance Group Box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 5-94: X Distance Group Box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 5-95: Four Trays with 7 x 17 Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 5-96: Y Motor Diagram for 4-Tray Handler . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 5-97: Y Distances to Tray X1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 5-98: X Motor Diagram for 4-Tray Handler . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 5-99: X Distances for Tray X1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 5-100: Waffle Packs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 5-101: Y Motor Diagram for 4-Tray Handler with 12 Waffle Packs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-78 5-79 5-79 5-80 5-81 5-82 5-82 5-83 5-85 5-86 5-87 5-88 5-89 5-90 5-91

Figure 5-102: Y Distances to Tray X4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-93 Figure 5-103: X Motor Diagram for 4-Tray Handler with 12 Waffle Packs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-94 Figure 5-104: X Distances for Tray X4. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-96 Figure 5-105: Moving Preheating Tray (Left); Thermal Test Site (Right) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-97 Figure 5-106: Y Motor Diagram for 3-Tray Handler with Preheating Tray and Dual Test Sites 5-98 Figure 5-107: X Motor Diagram for 3-Tray Handler with Moving Preheating Tray . . . . . . . . . 5-99 Figure 5-108: Thermal Setup Window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-100 Figure 5-109: Socket Pressure Group Box (Left); Head Air Pressure (Right) . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-102 Figure 5-110: Taper Window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-103 Figure 5-111: Taper Fine Tune Group Box. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-104 Figure 5-112: Seal Head Group Box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 5-113: Tape Reel Group Box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 5-114: Gap Sensor Offset from Pickup Head. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 5-115: Leader Pockets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 5-116: Output Tape Slack (Left); Output Tape Taut, Raising Takeup Arm (Right) . . . 5-106 5-107 5-108 5-109 5-110

Figure 5-117: Counting Number of Sprocket Holes Between Pocket Centers . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-110 Figure 5-118: Motor Group Box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-111 Figure 6-1: Terminal Block and Input Connector on Network Card . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-6 Figure 6-2: Slave Boards Powered Through Terminals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-7 Figure 6-3: Slave Boards Powered Through RS-232 Cables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-7 Figure 6-4: Cool Muscle Motor ControllersSlave on Left; Master on Right with Piggybacked Network Card . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-8

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Figure 6-5: Cool Muscle Motor ControllersSlave on Left, Master on Right; Jumpers in Opposite Configurations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-9 Figure 6-6: Master Network Card with Interface Card on Top . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-11 Figure 6-7: Slave Network Card Powered Through Terminal Block . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-11 Figure 6-8: Slave Network Card Powered Through RS-232 Cable . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-12 Figure 6-9: New Motor Assembly to Be Installed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 6-10: Screwing Motor Drive Board in Cover. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 6-11: Adding Grommet and Long Screws . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 6-12: Sliding Network Card into Cover; Adding Long Spacers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 6-13: Sliding Both Covers Together; Adding Rainbow Cable . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 6-14: Initialize Motors Menu Item . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 6-15: Initialize Motors Dialog Box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 6-16: Serial Cables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 6-17: Serial Hub . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 6-18: SMC Air Regulator. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 6-19: Small Black Screw Removed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 6-20: Metal Casing Unscrewed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 6-21: Clear Glass Casing Snapped Off . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 6-22: Large Black Inner Screw Removed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 6-23: SMC Air Regulator Turned Off (Left), On (Right) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 6-24: Automatic Air Shut-Off Valve . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 6-25: Auxiliary Air Regulator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 6-26: Air Valves with Control Adjustment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 6-27: OUT Lights Off and Fractional ReadingNo Air Pressure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 6-28: OUT1 Light GreenNormal Air Pressure. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 6-29: Control Buttons on Top of Digital Air Pressure Switch. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 6-30: Display Locked (Left); Unlocked (Right) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 6-31: Display Locked (Left); Unlocked (Right) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 6-32: F_1 Alternating with Set Value . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 6-33: F_2 Alternating with Set Value . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 6-34: P_1 Alternating with Set Value of 0. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 6-35: P_2 Alternating with Set Value of 1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 6-36: G.L. Showing Fastest Gain of 9 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 6-37: S.L. Showing Best Sensitivity of 0 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 6-38: Displays of Air Pressure in PSI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 6-39: Unit Set to PSI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 6-40: Output Mode 1 Normally Open (Left); Output Mode 2 Normally Open (Right). . Figure 6-41: Response Time 2.5 MS (Left); Manual Mode (Right) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 6-42: K15 Vacuum Generator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-13 6-14 6-14 6-15 6-15 6-16 6-17 6-18 6-18 6-20 6-20 6-21 6-21 6-22 6-23 6-24 6-25 6-25 6-26 6-27 6-28 6-29 6-30 6-31 6-32 6-33 6-33 6-34 6-34 6-35 6-36 6-36 6-37 6-39

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Figure 6-43: Vacuum AssembliesK15 (Top); K35 Switch for Vacuum Pump (Bottom) . . . . 6-40 Figure 6-44: Extra Holes in K15 Interface Plate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-40 Figure 6-45: K35 Vacuum SwitchUsed with Vacuum Pump . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-41 Figure 6-46: Blow-Off Adjustment Screw Locationon Vacuum Generator (Left); on Vacuum Switch (Right) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-41 Figure 6-47: Dirty Filter (Left) Versus Clean Filter (Right) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-43 Figure 6-48: Blow-Off Adjustment Screw at PS Port When Using In-House Air . . . . . . . . . . . 6-44 Figure 6-49: Blow-Off Adjustment Screw at PD Port When Using Vacuum Pump. . . . . . . . . . Figure 6-50: Various Styles of Vacuum Pumps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 6-51: Vacuum Chamber . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 6-52: Vacuum Assembly with Four Screws Highlighted. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 6-53: Vacuum Assembly with One Solenoid Valve Removed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 6-54: Vacuum Assembly with Both Solenoid Valves Removed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 6-55: Removing Gasket from Vacuum Assembly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 6-56: Vacuum Assembly with Gasket Still Attached. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 6-57: Vacuum Assembly with Both Solenoid Valves and Gasket Removed . . . . . . . . . Figure 6-58: Vacuum Generator Controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 6-59: Vacuum Generator Optimal Pressurefor Nozzle with Larger Hole . . . . . . . . . . Figure 6-60: Vacuum Generator Optimal Pressurefor Nozzle with Smaller Hole . . . . . . . . . Figure 6-61: Vacuum and Blow-Off Override Buttons on Vacuum Generator . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 6-62: P1 Baseline Value Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 6-63: P1 Set at Least 8-10 Points Higher Than Baseline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 6-64: P2 Set to 101 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 6-65: Error Code Set to Zero . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 6-66: Green Indicator Light with High Number Showing Device Attached . . . . . . . . . . Figure 6-67: Computer Sliding Out of Cabinet on Rails. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 6-68: Four Computer Base Bolts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 6-69: Sliding Computer Out of Cabinet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 6-70: Front Bolts Securing Lid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 6-71: Top Bolts Securing Lid. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 6-72: Benchtop Handler Elevated on Blocks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 6-73: Marking Jacks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 6-74: Removing Face Plate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 6-75: Omron Sensor Controller Set to L-ON . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 6-76: Green and Red Indicator Lights . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 6-77: Conditions of Indicator Lights . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 6-78: Omega Temperature Controller Display Panel. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-45 6-45 6-46 6-46 6-47 6-47 6-48 6-48 6-49 6-50 6-51 6-52 6-53 6-54 6-54 6-55 6-56 6-57 6-59 6-59 6-60 6-60 6-61 6-62 6-62 6-63 6-64 6-64 6-65 6-66

Figure 6-79: Back of Box with Pre-Heat Plug-in . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-66

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Figure 6-80: Current Temperature Displayed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 6-81: Setpoint 1 Menu Item Displayed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 6-82: Setpoint 1 Value Displayed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 6-83: Setpoint 1 Value Increased . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 6-84: Setpoint 1 Value Saved. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 6-85: Setpoint 2 Menu Item Displayed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 6-86: Configuration Menu Item Displayed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 6-87: Dynamic Socket Pressure Controls. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 6-88: LAN Setup Icon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 6-89: Local Area Connection Status Dialog BoxGeneral Tab. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 6-90: Local Area Connection Properties Dialog BoxGeneral Tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 6-91: Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) Properties Dialog BoxGeneral Tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 6-92: Local Area Connection Properties Dialog BoxAdvanced Tab. . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 6-93: Windows Firewall Dialog BoxExceptions Tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 6-94: Selecting Run Option . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 6-95: Opening a DOS Window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 6-96: PING Command with Replies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 6-97: IPCONFIG Command with Reply . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 6-98: E-mail Invitation to WebEx Meeting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 6-99: WebEx Meeting Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 6-100: Exatron Directory with Job Files, 3 Essential System Files, and Existing Program File. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 6-101: Backup Directory with Job Files, Old Program File, and New Zipped File. . . . . Figure 6-102: Exatron Directory with Job Files and New Program File. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 6-103: Error Message . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

6-67 6-68 6-68 6-69 6-69 6-70 6-70 6-71 6-73 6-73 6-74 6-75 6-76 6-77 6-78 6-78 6-79 6-79 6-80 6-81 6-82 6-83 6-83 6-84 7-2 7-3 7-3 7-5 8-2

Figure 7-1: Relays12-Volt (Left); 24-Volt (Right) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 7-2: Cool Muscle Motor ControllersSlave on Left; Master on Right with Piggybacked Board . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 7-3: Cool Muscle Motor ControllersSlave on Left, Master on Right; Jumpers in Opposite Configurations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 7-4: Dimensions Listed From Smallest to Largest. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 8-1: PET-V84-B . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Figure A-1: Ports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-3 Figure A-2: 24-Pin D Connector on Handler . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-4 Figure A-3: TTL 24-Pin Connector with Pin Designations. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-5 Figure A-4: Sort Interface Window. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-6 Figure A-5: Eight-Bit LED Checker #3000-521 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-7 Figure A-6: TTL 24-Pin Connector with Pin Designations. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-8 Figure A-7: Typical RS-232 Interface Cable. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-9 Figure A-8: Getting to HyperTerminal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-26

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Figure A-9: Opening the HyperTerminal Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-27 Figure A-10: Naming a New Connection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-27 Figure A-11: Selecting the Connection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure A-12: Selecting the Port Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure A-13: Getting to Connection Properties. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure A-14: Getting to ASCII Setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure A-15: Displaying Typed Commands Onscreen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-28 A-29 A-29 A-30 A-31

Figure A-16: Using Call to Connect . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-31 Figure A-17: Disconnecting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-32 Figure B-1: CMOS Setup Opened to Main Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-2 Figure B-2: CMOS Setup Changed to Advanced Menu; Advanced BIOS Features Selected . . B-3 Figure B-3: Advanced BIOS Features Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-4 Figure B-4: Selecting CD-ROM Drive as Boot Device . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure B-5: CD-ROM Drive Selected as Boot Device . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure B-6: Saving Changes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure B-7: Acronis Program Icon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure B-8: Acronis Main Window. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-5 B-5 B-6 B-6 B-7

Figure B-9: Manage Acronis Secure Zone Button . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-8 Figure B-10: Manage Acronis Secure Zone WizardWelcome . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-8 Figure B-11: Creating Secure Zone in Unallocated and Free Space . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-9 Figure B-12: Specifying Size of Secure Zone . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-10 Figure B-13: Activating Acronis Startup Recovery Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-11 Figure B-14: Alternate SelectionDo Not Activate Acronis Startup Recovery Manager. . . . Figure B-15: Confirming Settings Before Creating Secure Zone . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure B-16: Secure Zone Successfully Created . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure B-17: Reviewing Properties of the Created Secure Zone . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure B-18: Backup Disk Shipped with Handler. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure B-19: Selecting the Backup Option . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure B-20: Create Backup WizardWelcome . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure B-21: Selecting Entire Disk or Partition Backup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure B-22: Alternate SelectionIndividual Files and Folders Backup. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure B-23: Selecting Partitions to Back Up . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure B-24: Explanation of Differences Between Full and Incremental Backups . . . . . . . . . Figure B-25: Restoration Based On Incremental Backups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure B-26: Restoration Based On Differential Backups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure B-27: Selecting Backup Storage Destination . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure B-28: Selecting a Full Backup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-11 B-12 B-13 B-14 B-15 B-16 B-16 B-17 B-17 B-18 B-19 B-19 B-19 B-20 B-21

Figure B-29: Selecting an Incremental Backup. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-21

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List of Figures

Figure B-30: Selecting a Differential Backup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure B-31: Selecting Backup Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure B-32: Archive SplittingAutomatic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure B-33: Archive SplittingFixed Size . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure B-34: Drop-Down List of Fixed Sizes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure B-35: Adding Optional Archive Comments. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure B-36: Confirming Settings Before Creating Backup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure B-37: Progress Bar Displayed While Backup Is Created. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure B-38: Successful Completion. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure B-39: Archive Files Created. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure B-40: Acronis Boot Disk Inserted in Drive (Left); Acronis Splash Screen (Right) . . . Figure B-41: Acronis Main Screen with Restore Option . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure B-42: Error Messages Due to Inserting Wrong Backup Disk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure B-43: Restore Image WizardWelcome . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure B-44: Selecting Archive File for Restoration. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure B-45: Option to Verify Archive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure B-46: Selecting Partition or Disk to Restore . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure B-47: Option to Resize Partitions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure B-48: Resizing Partitions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure B-49: Deleting Partitions on Destination HD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure B-50: Option to Restore Additional Partition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure B-51: Confirming Settings Before Restoring Partition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure B-52: Prompts to Insert Series of Recovery Disks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure B-53: Successful Completion. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure B-54: Selecting the Recovery Option. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure B-55: Restore Data WizardWelcome. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure B-56: Selecting Location of Archive File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure B-57: Selecting Original or New Location for Restoration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure B-58: Selecting Restoration Destination . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure B-59: Selecting Archive Files to Be Restored . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure B-60: Selecting Restoration Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure B-61: Selecting Restoration Options Manually . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure B-62: Selecting Whether to Overwrite Existing Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure B-63: Confirming Settings Before Restoring Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

B-22 B-22 B-23 B-24 B-24 B-25 B-26 B-27 B-27 B-27 B-28 B-29 B-30 B-30 B-31 B-32 B-33 B-34 B-35 B-36 B-37 B-38 B-39 B-39 B-40 B-41 B-42 B-43 B-44 B-45 B-46 B-47 B-48 B-49

Figure B-64: Progress Bar Displayed While Data Is Restored . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-50 Figure B-65: Successful Completion. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-50 Figure B-66: Restored Files. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-50

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Chapter 1: Safety, Support and Options


Chapter Overview
This chapter discusses the following main topics: Topic Exatron Safety Warnings Lock-Out Procedures Facilities Requirements Standard Warranty Exatron Support Services Warranty and Support Contracts End-of-Life Handler Disposal Significance of This Manuals Version Number Typographical Conventions Used in This Manual Terms Used in This Manual Photo Gallery of Optional Configurations Page 1-1 1-3 1-4 1-6 1-8 1-8 1-21 1-21 1-22 1-22 1-25

Please read and understand this entire User Manual before installing or using your Exatron handler. A short glossary of terms used in this manual and other keys to understanding is found at the end of this chapter.

Exatron Safety Warnings


Typically, the handler is simply one part of a complete test system. It is the responsibility of the company purchasing the handler to properly train all handler operators in all of the safety practices required for every component of the test system. The following safety procedures must be followed at all times.

WARNING! Keep fingers, hair, and clothing away from any moving parts on the handler. Its motors are very powerful and can cause severe injury.

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WARNING! Always reset all motors before running the machine. Do not run it without homing the motors. WARNING! Never try to stop an action of the handler with your hands or any other device. To stop the handler, press the EMO (emergency stop) button or click Pause on the screen.

Figure 1-1: EMO (Emergency Stop) Button

WARNING! If your Exatron handler is equipped with safety covers, never operate the handler without them. Never remove the safety covers. Never defeat any electrical interlock switch supplied with the handler. To avoid operator contact with moving parts, the Model 900 is equipped with fixed and moving covers. The fixed covers are screwed in place and should never be removed except for maintenance and then only by qualified maintenance technicians. The movable covers are supplied with interlocks. Exatron specifically disclaims responsibility and/or liability for any injury which occurs as a result of any interlock being defeated and/or bypassed, or for any injury which occurs as a result of any fixed cover being removed during operation. The only hazardous waste associated with any Model 900 handlers is the circulatory fluid used in chillers, for handlers using cold testing. For MSDS, see the suppliers recommendations. WARNING! If your Exatron handler is equipped with a thermal circulator or chiller, dispose of the circulatory fluid in accordance with local or federal regulations. Using compressed air can be hazardous. It is the responsibility of the company purchasing the handler to properly train all handler operators in every aspect of the safety practices associated with the use of compressed air. WARNING! Never operate any Exatron system which requires compressed air without an approved air regulator and shutoff valve, such as that originally supplied with your system.

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Lock-Out Procedures

WARNING! Never unplug a pressurized air hose while the air regulator is turned on. If your handler is equipped with a laser, follow all the federal and state safety regulations for safely operating the laser. Follow the safety warnings in the laser manufacturers manual. WARNING! Only a qualified in-house laser safety officer (LSO) should service the laser, if the handler is equipped with a laser.

Lock-Out Procedures
Lock-out/tag-out procedures should be followed when servicing or repairing the handler. This prevents an operator from turning on the handler when it may be partially disassembled and thus prevents damage or injury. Before servicing or repairing your handler, turn off the air regulator and lock it in the OFF position as shown in Figure 1-2. Then, if you have to leave the handler in an inoperable or unsafe condition, no one can turn it on by mistake. NOTE: Locking devices such as padlocks are provided by you, the customer. WARNING! Turn off the air regulator and lock it in the OFF position before servicing.

Figure 1-2: Air RegulatorIn ON Position (Left), in OFF Position (Center), in OFF Position with Lock (Right)

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The handler has a lockable disconnect switch (Figure 1-3) that shuts off all AC power to the handler and computer(s). When using lockout procedures, turn off and lock this switch also.

Figure 1-3: Lockable Disconnect SwitchIn ON Position (Left), in OFF Position with Lock (Right)

Facilities Requirements
Air Conditioning and Environmental Requirements
The Model 900 handler should be installed in a temperature-controlled, dust-free environment to preclude dust and dirt particles from contaminating its moving parts, especially those parts which come into contact with the devices being tested. The life of your handler is greatly enhanced by keeping it as clean as possible. See Chapter 6 for instructions. Handlers equipped with laser markers must have a smoke extraction/filter system. If no laser is present, there are no special ventilation requirements.

Electrical Requirements
The power supplies for handlers shipped either within the United States or offshore have builtin switching electrical supply capability for 100-volt AC to 240-volt AC, 50 Hz to 60 Hz, at usually 5-10 amps. For more information see "Power Supplies" on page 2-11. However, the handler is wired for either 100-120-volt AC, 50/60 Hz, at 3 amps; or 220-240-volt AC, 50/60 Hz, at 2 amps. You must specify your choice when you order the handler. Tapers, if included, can be wired for either 100-120-volt AC, 60 Hz; or 220-240-volt AC, 50 Hz. You must specify your choice when you order the handler.

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Facilities Requirements

Vacuum/Pneumatic Requirements

If the handler is to be used in an electrically noisy environment or near large electromechanical equipment, Exatron recommends the use of a reliable power conditioner to filter line noise, surges, and spikes which can cause the handler to operate improperly or become damaged. CAUTION: Connect the power cord to earth-grounded power outlets only. Service calls made to the customer facility to correct problems caused by improper electrical supply are not covered by the Exatron warranty.

Vacuum/Pneumatic Requirements
The Model 900 system requires a supply of pressurized air at a minimum of 80 PSI at 2 to 5 CFM (depending on the number of vacuum generators), filtered for proper operation. The air supply must be clean (containing no particulate matter greater than 5 microns in size), oil-free, and dry (having a dew point of 36 degrees F to 38 degrees F) to operate correctly. Dirty, oily or wet air will cause the vacuum generator to malfunction and will make your system unreliable. If the handler is equipped with a taper, add 0.5 CFM of shop air to the CFM required for the handler itself. The external air source should be attached to the air regulator mounted on the handler base. Before turning on the air regulator and using the handler, make certain the compressed air line is attached to the air regulator fitting. Check to make sure the air regulator gauge on the external regulator measures the air pressure at 80 PSI, and adjust if necessary. To maintain these levels of pressurized air quality, replace the air filter (Exatron part #GPA-97075) in the air regulator of your handler after every 6000 hours or 12 months of operation, whichever comes first; or if your air regulator registers a pressure drop of 15 PSI. Moisture of any kind will travel through external and internal air lines. This moisture will coat these air lines and the insides of the handler's cylinders, causing them to stick or to stop functioning altogether. The best defense against this kind of contaminate is to prevent it from occurring in the first place by maintaining the clean air supply described above. If the air lines are allowed to become discolored or the moisture traps become overfilled, damage to the system will occur. The only corrective action to take at that point is to replace all of the air lines and to completely clean all of the solenoids supplied by those air lines. Handler damage due to improper air supply is not covered by the Exatron warranty.

Internet Access
It is strongly recommended that your handler be equipped with Internet access. This is to facilitate remote troubleshooting by Exatron engineers as necessary, and to save you larger onsite costs, the details of which are itemized in the "Customer Service Support Guide" on page 1-15. See Chapter 6 and especially "Remote Handler Control with WebEx" on page 6-80 for how we can help you troubleshoot remotely.

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Exatron strives to maintain low capital acquisition costs and low service costs for our customers. A key part of this strategy is the use of the Internet to provide software updates and perform remote service on our systems. Software support in the field can be extremely expensive to the end user, so high-speed connections are an excellent money-saving tool. We encourage our customers to put our systems on their networks and provide remote access to the system through the Internet. Exatron reserves the right to bill the customer for any on-site warranty work that otherwise could have been accomplished remotely.

Uncrating the Handler


The Model 900 series handler will usually come in a wooden crate that will require some disassembly to remove the handler. Please inspect the system when it is removed from the crate for any obvious damage which may be the result of shipping. Contact Exatron and the shipping company immediately if you see any damage.

Mounting the Handler


CAUTION: All benchtop (also known as "tabletop" or "plate-mounted") handlers must be mounted securely to ensure reliability and functionality. The Model 900 series handler can be ordered either with its own secure cabinet or frame, or as a benchtop system. If yours is a benchtop system, it must be mounted on and secured to a very sturdy table. The system includes several motors which move at fairly high speeds, creating a great amount of kinetic energy. This energy is translated through the system itself to the tabletop; a flimsy table will vibrate and shake due to this energy. Exatron cannot be responsible for the operation of the system both in reliability and in functionality when the system is not secured on a steady and solid table. If yours is a cabinet-based system: For seismic safety, once the handler is installed in its designated location, do not leave it on unlocked wheels. Lock its wheels, then extend the leveling feet. See "Cabinet ModelsLeveling Feet" on page 3-1 for instructions. Additionally, if local regulations require it, an optional tie-down kit is available from Exatron. This will permanently attach the handler to the floor so it cannot be moved. See Figure 8-1 on page 8-2. Call for a quote.

Standard Warranty
All Exatron products are under warranty for one year from the date of purchase. Exatron agrees to repair any mechanical or electrical assembly, subassembly, or entire unit that fails during normal use within its first year. The customer agrees to follow the recommended maintenance procedure as defined in this User Manual. Exatron does not warrant test contactors. Handler test contactors are fragile and may be easily ruined by operator abuse. Exatron uses the finest materials available in our contactor designs. Exatron does not warrant the following:

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Standard Warranty

Customer In-House Service

Damage caused by improper packaging of equipment returned to Exatron for repair Damage caused by the shipping company Damage caused by natural catastrophes: flood, fire, earthquake, etc. Damage caused by equipment connected to improper power line voltages Damage caused by equipment connected to improper air supply: contaminated with oil, water, dirt, etc. Damage caused by operator abuse or improper practices cautioned against in this manual Damage caused by interface hardware not manufactured by Exatron Damage or malfunction caused by customer modifications Test contactors

Customer In-House Service


Except in the case of laser marking systems, Exatron encourages customer in-house equipment service and tries to make in-house service as easy as possible to perform. There are no "Void Warranty" warning stickers on Exatron handlers. By using the built-in diagnostic software and diagnostic tools, it is usually possible for the operator to isolate a problem quickly and effect a repair. The customer is responsible for all cost of in-bound shipping expenses. Standard out-bound shipping expenses will be paid by Exatron. In such cases where the customer requests specific out-bound shipping methods to be used, the customer is responsible for all shipping costs and any additional related charges.

Offshore Warranty Service


An Exatron handler purchased in the United States and then shipped offshore will be warranted through Exatron in California. Replacement parts are furnished for a period of one year from date of purchase with the exception of replacement contactors. In most cases, it will not be necessary to return the worn part from the offshore user location. To receive offshore service support, the handler must be purchased through your local Exatron representative, or an extended warranty agreement must be purchased directly from your local Exatron representative. Please supply the following information when requesting offshore service or replacement parts: The part number(s) required. If the part number is not known, photocopy or take a photo of the part and fax it to Exatron.

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The model number of the handler The type of device being run by the handler, such as: DIP, SOIC, SOJ, PLCC, LCC, SIP, PGA, PCB, ZIP, etc. The handlers serial number The full shipping address Any special shipping or customs instructions Method of shipment, such as: Federal Express, UPS, DHL, U.S. Mail, or the name of your chosen shipping company In most cases, faxed requests and shipment of replacement parts orders are processed within twenty-four hours of receipt by Exatron.

Exatron Support Services


For factory technical support, you can contact us in several ways. Call 1-800-EXA-TRON or 1-408-629-7600, between 8:00 A.M. and 5:00 P.M. Pacific time, Monday through Friday. E-mail us anytime at service@exatron.com. Fax us at 1-408-629-2832. When contacting us, please have your Exatron equipment close at hand, along with the following information: The model number of your handler with all its options (taper, tubes, etc.) The exact wording of any messages that appeared on your handler display. A description of what happened and what you were doing when the problem occurred. A description of how you tried to solve the problem.

Warranty and Support Contracts


The following three sample contracts show details of what is covered. They may be changed without notice.

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Warranty and Support Contracts

Service Contract

Service Contract

2842 Aiello Drive, San Jose, CA 95111

www.exatron.com 408-629-7600

SERVICE CONTRACT Rev H


for Customer TBD Street Address City, State, Zip
Please see our Customer Service Support document for detailed warranty details This contract shall commence on Starting Date for a period of twelve (12) months and shall be renewed only upon receipt of new purchase order for a new 12 month period. Exatron shall provide service by way of prompt, reliable technical consultation and service coordination with respect to Customers Exatron built products located at their TBD facility, full address. Please see section Product Movements, below, for more information regarding the location of the Exatron products covered by this contract.. This Service Contract" includes: Perform Preventive Maintenance procedures as defined in the Exatron Manual. Clean, align and inspect handler for worn and/or damaged parts. Examine handler for signs of wear and notify the Customer. A list of required replacement parts will be supplied to the customer during each visit. Purchased parts may be installed during the next visit. 1 year factory labor Installation of any update and diagnostic software as might be available Best effort response time, 1 to 3 business days typical Typical same day shipment of spare parts Toll free 800-EXA-TRON support service phone line What is NOT covered by this Service Contract: All actual travel costs, see below The cost of all spare parts The cost of consumables and test contacts Any OEM equipment warranty/service costs (non-Exatron products) Operator and/or service training of customer personnel Shipping damage of any kind Acts of God

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Acts of war Power line problems and damage Air supply problems and damage Ongoing camera & laser application support Any other Exatron products not specifically listed on this contract

Service performed on Exatron-built products only: Service is strictly limited to the Exatron portions of a given system Service work on any OEM subsystem is to be purchased directly from the OEM This includes, and not limited to, bowl feeders, chillers, camera/vision systems, customer supplied equipment, label printers, laser markers, smoke extractors, and any large OEM subsystem used in the overall Exatron system Please note: All laser markers require professional service. Improper service will void the OEM warranty and could result in personal injury and/or serious damage to the laser.

This contract does NOT extend the Exatron product warranty. This contract does NOT provide for any additional service work beyond the limits of this contract.
Service Contract Schedule Exatron will make every effort to have a service engineer at the customers facility with in 1 to 3 business days of the call for service. There are no service response time guaranties. We do offer a 1 business day turn around service on a per occurrence basis. Please contact Exatron for details and quotation. PM Product Movements Preventive maintenance contracts are priced to specific locations. With the exception of movements between buildings on the same campus, any movement of the Exatron product covered by this contract during the period of this contract may result in a change in the price of the preventive maintenance contract, and the contract must be requoted. The value of any unused portion of this contract will be applied towards the new contract price. Exatron reserves the right to refuse service for machines which are moved to parts of the world considered unstable or dangerous. Service Operating Hours Preventive Maintenance service work shall be performed 8:00 AM to 5:00 PM, local time, Monday through Friday, excluding weekends and local public holidays. Availability of Products Any spare parts at site shall be made freely available by Customer to Exatron's engineer to enable remedial work to be carried out. In the event spare parts must be obtained from the factory in San Jose, California, the engineer may return to the customer facility to complete the work. Return to the customer facility will be determined by mutual agreement between Exatron and the customer. Price Call for a quotation. There is a substantial cost increase for customers who do not have and/or allow our service engineer to connect the Exatron Product to the internet allowing for remote diagnostics. Spare Parts 25% discount on all Exatron spare parts, except consumables, during the life of the contract. Spare parts for OEM subsystems should be purchased directly from the OEM vendor. If purchased through Exatron, there is an additional markup and no discounts are available. Terms Call for a quotation.

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Warranty and Support Contracts

Service Contract

All actual travel expenses are NOT included and will be billed at the time: These include as a minimum the following expenses: Air fare as required Rental car and/or cab fees Lodging Per-diem food allowance Equipment and/or spare parts express shipping costs Travel expenses to the customer are waived if within 50 miles of Exatron, San Jose, California. Site Medical Facilities Site medical facilities will be made freely available to Exatron's engineer(s) as needed for emergency medical treatment. Limitation of Liability During the initial warranty period of a system covered by this contract, Exatrons entire liability and customer's exclusive remedy will be repair or replacement of an assembly not meeting Exatron's standard warranty. Following the warranty period, Customer is responsible for any and all costs associated with repairs, replacement parts, etc. In no event will Exatron be liable to the customer for any damages including lost profits, cost saving, or other incidental or consequential damages arising out of the use or inability to use Exatron products referred to herein even if Exatron has been advised of the possibility of such damages, or of any claim by any other party. Customer will indemnify Exatron against any damage to Customers property and against any claims for loss or injury to any person or to the property of any person by reason of the Customers negligence or of any act or omission on the part of the Customers employees, subcontractors, assignees or agents arising out of this contract. Excuse of Performance Neither party shall be liable to the other party for any delay due to causes beyond its reasonable control, including but not limited to faulty instructions, lack of instructions, travel or shipping delays due to weather or other factors outside their control, shipper's error, acts of God, or strikes or other labor disputes. Law The validity, interpretation, and performance of this agreement, and any dispute connected therewith will be governed and construed in accordance with the laws of the State of California. IN WITNESS WHEREOF, the parties have executed this Agreement by their duly authorized representatives as of the date and year stated at the top of this document. Customer TBD EXATRON

_____________________________________________________________________ By ___________________________By _David Ledezma______________ Title __________________________Title _Customer Service Manager____ Customer contact person(s) Phone number(s) Email(s) EXATRON PRODUCTS COVERED UNDER THIS P.M. CONTRACT Serial # Serial #

Handler Model Exatron PC

Original Customer PO# :__________________ Original Ship date#:______________________

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Preventive Maintenance Contract

2842 Aiello Drive, San Jose, CA 95111

www.exatron.com 408-629-7600

PREVENTIVE MAINTENANCE CONTRACT Rev J


for Customer TBD Street Address City, State, Zip
Please see our Customer Service Support document for detailed warranty details This contract shall commence on Starting Date for a period of twelve (12) months and shall be renewed only upon receipt of new purchase order for a new 12 month period. Exatron shall provide service by way of prompt, reliable technical consultation and service coordination with respect to Customers Exatron built products located at their TBD facility, full address. Please see section Product Movements, below, for more information regarding the location of the Exatron products covered by this contract. This "Preventive Maintenance Contract" includes: Perform Preventive Maintenance procedures as defined in the Exatron Manual. Clean, align and inspect handler for worn and/or damaged parts. Examine handler for signs of wear and notify the Customer. A list of required replacement parts will be supplied to the customer during each visit. Purchased parts may be installed during the next visit. Installation of any update and diagnostic software as might be available Scheduled PM visits only, as listed below. Typical same day shipment of spare parts Toll free 800-EXA-TRON support service phone line What is NOT covered by this "Preventive Maintenance Contract": All actual travel costs, see below The cost of all spare parts The cost of consumables and test contacts Un-scheduled service calls Any OEM equipment warranty/service costs (non-Exatron products) Operator and/or service training of customer personnel Shipping damage of any kind Acts of God Acts of war Power line problems and damage Air supply problems and damage Ongoing camera & laser application support Any other Exatron products not specifically listed on this contract Service performed on Exatron-built products only: Service is strictly limited to the Exatron portions of a given system Service work on any OEM subsystem is to be purchased directly from the OEM This includes, and not limited to, bowl feeders, chillers, camera/vision systems, customer supplied equipment, label printers, laser markers, smoke extractors, and any large OEM subsystem used in the overall Exatron system

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Preventive Maintenance Contract

Please note: All laser markers require professional service. Improper service will void the OEM warranty and could result in personal injury and/or serious damage to the laser.

This contract does NOT extend the Exatron product warranty. This contract does NOT provide for any additional service work beyond the limits of this contract.
Preventive Maintenance Visit Schedule There will be two (2) preventive maintenance visits each year. The timing of each visit shall be mutually agreed upon by Exatron and the customer to prevent unnecessary disruption of Customer's plant operation. The dates of the mutually agreed semi-annual visits must be determined at least 30 days prior to its occurrence. One engineer will be dispatched to carry out the preventive maintenance work. PM Product Movements Preventive maintenance contracts are priced to specific locations. With the exception of movements between buildings on the same campus, any movement of the Exatron product covered by this contract during the period of this contract may result in a change in the price of the preventive maintenance contract, and the contract must be requoted. The value of any unused portion of this contract will be applied towards the new contract price. Exatron reserves the right to refuse service for machines that are moved to parts of the world considered unstable or dangerous. Service Operating Hours Preventive Maintenance service work shall be performed 8:00 AM to 5:00 PM, local time, Monday through Friday, excluding weekends and local public holidays. Availability of Products Any spare parts at site shall be made freely available by Customer to Exatron's engineer to enable remedial work to be carried out. In the event spare parts must be obtained from the factory in San Jose, California, the engineer may return to the customer facility to complete the work. Return to the customer facility will be determined by mutual agreement between Exatron and the customer. Price The PM contract is priced by the day. We recommend a minimum of 2 PM visits per year. We recommend a maximum of 4 PM visits per year. Prices DO NOT include any travel costs and/or spare parts if applicable. 2 PM visits per year at $1200 per visit ($2400 Contract Cost) 3 PM visits per year at $1100 per visit ($3300 Contract Cost) 4 PM visits per year at $1000 per visit ($4000 Contract Cost) Spare Parts Spare parts for OEM subsystems could be purchased directly from the OEM vendor and/or Exatron. Exatron manufactured spare parts to be purchased through Exatron only. Terms Call for a quotation. All actual travel expenses are NOT included and will be billed at the time: These include as a minimum the following expenses: Air fare as required Rental car and/or cab fees Lodging Per-diem food allowance Equipment and/or spare parts express shipping costs Travel expenses to the customer waived if within 50 miles of Exatron, San Jose, California. Site Medical Facilities Site medical facilities will be made freely available to Exatron's engineer(s) as needed for emergency medical treatment.

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Limitation of Liability During the initial warranty period of a system covered by this contract, Exatrons entire liability and customer's exclusive remedy will be repair or replacement of an assembly not meeting Exatron's standard warranty. Following the warranty period, Customer is responsible for any and all costs associated with repairs, replacement parts, etc. In no event will Exatron be liable to the customer for any damages including lost profits, cost saving, or other incidental or consequential damages arising out of the use or inability to use Exatron products referred to herein even if Exatron has been advised of the possibility of such damages, or of any claim by any other party. Customer will indemnify Exatron against any damage to Customers property and against any claims for loss or injury to any person or to the property of any person by reason of the Customers negligence or of any act or omission on the part of the Customers employees, subcontractors, assignees or agents arising out of this contract. Excuse of Performance Neither party shall be liable to the other party for any delay due to causes beyond its reasonable control, including but not limited to faulty instructions, lack of instructions, travel or shipping delays due to weather or other factors outside their control, shipper's error, acts of God, or strikes or other labor disputes. Law The validity, interpretation, and performance of this agreement, and any dispute connected therewith will be governed and construed in accordance with the laws of the State of California.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, the parties have executed this Agreement by their duly authorized representatives as of the date and year stated at the top of this document. Customer TBD EXATRON

_____________________________________________________________________ By ___________________________By _Quang Truong______________ Title __________________________Title _Customer Service Manager____ Customer contact person(s) Phone number(s) Email(s) EXATRON PRODUCTS COVERED UNDER THIS P.M. CONTRACT Serial # Serial #

Handler Model Exatron PC

Original Customer PO# :__________________ Original Ship date#:______________________ PM Contract PO# :__________________ Exatron Invoice# :__________________ NOTE: LASER & LASER PC SERVICE/MAINTENANCE ARE NOT INCLUDED DATES FOR PREVENTIVE MAINTENANCE The Preventive Maintenance procedures will be performed two (2) times semi-annually as scheduled below: (Please fill out and return with signed copy of the contract.) 1: TBD 2007 PM Contract Quote#:______________________

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Customer Service Support Guide

Customer Service Support Guide

2842 Aiello D rive, San Jo se, C A 95111

w w w .exatron.com 408-629-7600

C ustom er S ervice & S upport Rev K


Manager Factory service hours Phone numbers Fax number E-mail Quang Truong (or Eric Hagquist) 8:00AM-5:00PM M-F Pacific Time 408-629-7600 or 1-800-EXATRON 408-629-2832 info@exatron.com or qtruong@exatron.com

Standard Exatron Warranty: 1 year all Exatron parts other than test contacts and consumables 1 year factory labor. Warranty does not cover travel expenses for on-site service. See note, below, regarding Ethernet access for support All parts listed by OEM and in-house part numbers Typical same day shipment of spare parts PC Anywhere remote update and diagnostic software standard Self-service encouraged with on-line documentation and extensive built-in diagnostics Service contracts available See below Toll free 800-EXA-TRON support service phone line Major OEM subassemblies such as bowl feeders, lasers, vision systems, etc., have pass-through OEM warranties ONLY. No additional Exatron warranty Assume OEM warranties do not include on-site labor usually factory only Any unexpected OEM warranty/service costs passed on to customer at Exatron cost What is NOT covered by the Standard Exatron Warranty: On-site operator or in-house service training after install Consumables and test contacts Shipping damage of any kind Improper or lack of preventative maintenance Operator abuse of any kind Acts of God Acts of war Power line problems and damage Air supply problems and damage Any problems with OEM equipment not covered by OEMs warranty Ongoing camera & laser application support (see below) Ongoing Exatron updates added after shipmen Problems with non-Exatron supplied system components Please note: All of our products are quoted with factory installation. If this option is not ordered, then problems that arise from "self installation" are not considered covered by our standard warranty Exatron comprehensive manuals: Over the years our documentation has improved greatly. We now offer full color comprehensive manuals. These manuals are installed on the handlers hard disk and can be downloaded from our website, anytime. All manuals have fullcolor photos to help get the point across. To keep our costs down, our manuals have grown to cover all possible options and are now considered comprehensive. We then add customized chapters to the comprehensive manual with productspecific electrical schematics, master assembly drawings, and a detailed parts list.

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Self diagnostic support: All Exatron products have substantial built-in self diagnostic software. These diagnostics are well documented in our manuals. Typically every sensor, switch, solenoid, valve, lamp, motor, vacuum can be individually turned on/off and tested quickly. This is a great help with troubleshooting problems. Combine this with remote Internet access and just about all problems can be found quickly and at low cost to everyone. Void warranty stickers: There are no "void warranty" stickers on Exatron products, but there are some on some of our OEM add-ons. We do require that a properly trained service technician perform any service work on Exatron products. Laser self service: Exatron does NOT recommend customer self service for any of our laser products. There are substantial safety issues with lasers and they must be serviced by the OEM laser vendor. In some cases, Exatron can provide basic service work. Laser service work must be quoted on a specific as-needed basis. Any damage, of any kind, to the laser caused by improper service or operator abuse voids any remaining warranty. Factory customer operator and service training: Exatron will train the customers operators and/or service personnel if: The training takes place at Exatron The customer pays all of their own travel / lodging costs Exatron is given at least 30 day notice Exatron will then train on the next best thing we have in-house at that time (best effort) Exatron uses only standard Exatron manuals for training aids Any spare manuals must be purchased by the customer In most cases, we are willing to provide up to two days of training for up to 3 people at no cost during the buy-off of the equipment. Additional factory customer operator service training can be purchased for $600 per day for one person, $200 per additional person all trained at the same time. Typically we would limit our class sizes to 4 people maximum. The number of days required to train depends on the Exatron product(s) and the skill level of the people being trained. On-site training classes: On occasion, Exatron provides our customers with on-site training classes. This can be as simple as a few hours reviewing our standard documentation. Or a more formal class may be required. Exatron will quote on-site training classes based on the customers needs. Spare parts: Most spare parts orders are shipped the same day, if the order is placed before 1pm PST. We do all we can to maintain a good stock of commonly used spare parts. But there will be times were Exatron cannot supply a spare part overnight. The customer must maintain their own stock of spare parts based on their needs. All shipping costs will be charged to the customers account. Please specify shipping method at time of order. Exatron will hold all spare part orders if the customer has any overdue open invoices. Spare test contactors: It is expected that the customer will maintain at least a 60 day inventory of spare test contactors. In many cases, test contactors are custom designed. In many cases, we ship the test contactors as a lot. We do not maintain a stock of spares in these cases. Typical lead time is 3 to 4 weeks; longer is possible for unforeseen reasons. Spare part kits: Exatron offers a well stocked spare parts kit. Call for a quotation. Spare part long-term support: Exatron makes every effort to supply spare parts for the life of the equipment. We manufacture our own machine parts and our ability to find old drawings, for old parts, is excellent. As the handler ages, many of the non-Exatron made parts will no longer be available. In some cases, we may substitute used parts that still have some life in them. If all else fails, we can design in new parts or upgrade around the problem part; this can add substantial extra cost, but will also extend the working life of the handler.

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Customer Service Support Guide

RoHS Lead Free Compliance: Exatron has been building equipment since 1974. We no longer use lead solder in any of our newly designed products. Some of our "newly built" older designs might in fact use older in-stock parts that are not RoHS compliant. We do have older stocks of spare parts that were originally made with lead solder. Some of these older parts will be used in newly built Exatron products that were originally designed years ago. This applies mostly to older PCBs, both bare boards and assemblies. This may also apply to older test contacts & cable assemblies. In the event the customer needs to have all spare parts, including older in-stock parts, the customer's original order must clearly indicate that RoHS compliance is required. Exatron reserves the right to re-quote as needed. There will be substantial price increases. With many of our older spare parts, we will need to generate new documentation, artworks, and buy a minimum number of parts to remanufacture just one spare part that is now RoHS complaint. All of these costs and a much longer lead time, will be passed on to the customer within the required re-quote. Product upgrades: As the product ages, there will be a time when Exatron will no longer be able to upgrade the product with new options that are constantly being added to our product line. We will do all we can to support the product to work as well as it did when it originally shipped. Spare computer parts: It is simply a fact that as computers get cheaper, they also become less reliable. Exatron does all we can to buy the highest quality and generic computer parts as possible. This is why we build our own PCs. Please note that computer parts typically DO NOT have long term support. In most cases, but not all, we can swap out one PC vendor with another. It is highly recommended that the customer buy a spare PC at time of order (included in some spare parts kits). We maintain a small stock of older computers, subject to prior sale. Recover disks: All Exatron PC based handlers are shipped with software recovery disks. We will store a copy as well at Exatron. This disk(s) will allow the customer to fully recover from a catastrophic computer failure. The disk will recover all of the installed software that was on the handlers hard disk at time of shipment. This disk will not always fully recover if the computer itself has to be changed out to a different type or upgraded version of MS Windows. It is up to the customer to maintain backup files for all job files and Exatron updates after the equipment is shipped from Exatron. Please do not make your only backup files on the Exatron computer. Software updates: Some customers ask for improvements that we add to all future versions. Sometimes we even find "bugs" and fix them. We are always making improvements. Exatron provides these generic software updates on request only. We strongly believe in the idea that "if it isnt broken, dont fix it" when it comes to software adding a change to fix one problem can often lead to more and worse other problems, so we specifically do not make software fixes unless really necessary. Should the customer request be considered by Exatron to be an enhancement, we reserve the right to quote as needed. Spare hard drive: Exatron highly recommends adding a spare hard drive to our computers. This can be ordered at time of order. Adding a disk drive after shipment will require an on-site service call and is not covered by our standard warranty. 8-to 5-phone support: Exatron offers toll free (800-EXA-TRON) phone support, 8am to 5pm Pacific Time, Monday Friday, at no extra cost for the life of the equipment. Most questions are answered on the spot. More complicated issues will take longer. At some point Exatron may require the customer to purchase an on-site service call or return the equipment to Exatron for repair. Internet support: Exatron strives to maintain low capital acquisition costs and low service costs for our customers. A key part of this strategy is the use of the Internet to provide software updates and perform remote service on our systems. Software support in the field can be extremely expensive to the end user, so high-speed connections are an excellent money-saving tool. We strongly encourage our customers to put our systems on their networks and give us access to the system over their networks.

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Internet access software is included with every Exatron PC-based handler. In most cases, handlers can be connected to Exatron over any Internet port as long as the customer initiates the connection. There will be substantially higher service and engineering costs to our customers who cannot provide Internet access to our products. OEM equipment: Many Exatron products are systems built with additional third party OEM products. These products include laser markers, chillers, smoke extraction, vision/camera systems, bowl feeders, label printers, and other big ticket non-Exatron products. In every case, Exatron will require the OEM to pass its standard warranty through to the end user. In every case, Exatron will do all we can to correct any system problems. The specific service policy for the non-Exatron product will be determined at time of order. Most of our OEM products do not include on-site support or return shipping costs without a specific additional order at time of the original system order. In the event an OEM product is supplied by the customer, Exatron will only guarantee the initial integration. This integration must be bought off at Exatron prior to shipment. Exatron will not offer any additional warranty from that point in time. Exatron service work on OEM equipment: Service work is typically limited to repair of Exatron products only. We will make every effort to service our OEM partners equipment to the best of our ability. Should the OEM product require service beyond our limited ability, any and all costs required to bring the OEM equipment back to working order will be passed on to the customer. ONGOING CAMERA AND LASER APPLICATION SUPPORT: Exatron systems that require machine vision (cameras) and/or laser markers include the initial application development only. Depending on how the system is used, ongoing application support may be required. We encourage customers to develop sufficient in-house familiarity with the vision and laser systems to accomplish this themselves. However, in the event that additional application support is needed, Exatron considers this not to be covered by warranty. Applications support is available from Exatron at a price to be determined on a case-by-case basis. Exatron customers are also encouraged to seek applications support directly from the camera and/or laser vendor(s). Third-party service: Exatron has working relationships with qualified third-party service providers in Asia and Europe. Please see our web site for contact information. The customer is free to directly contact any of these service providers. Each has their own pricing structures. Returned to the factory repair turn-around times: Exatrons in-house repairs are billed at $75 per hour, 1 hour minimum. All products sent in to Exatron for repair must have an RMA number. If there is no RMA number, turn-around times can be significantly longer. Work performed 8am-5pm Pacific Time normal business days only Standard service turn-around time (with RMA#) ...typically the next day, best effort Rebuilds & engineering turn-around times...to be determined as needed 1 business day response subject to availability at the time (see below) Field upgrades and service call turn-around times: On-site turn-around time: We will make our best effort to provide on-site service as quickly as possible. Our standard warranty does not cover travel expenses. We will waive our technicians time and spare part costs during the warranty period. This does NOT apply to adding newly purchased upgrades. There will be a substantial increase in travel costs for immediate/overnight travel. All of these costs are all passed on to the customer.

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Customer Service Support Guide

Field upgrades lead times must be quoted and confirmed at time of order. All field upgrades are quoted, open ended. We will do all we can to make a field upgrade go as quickly as possible. All costs for any unforeseen delays, for any reason, that requires the Exatron technician to stay extra days or make a return visit will be passed on to the customer as required. One-business-day guaranteed response time: Subject to availability at the time (see below) In-warranty service costs: On-site service within the USA (no Internet access) In the event Exatron is required to provide an on-site service call, where the problem could have been corrected with Internet access prior to the service call, Exatron will bill all costs for the service call at Out of Warranty service rates. Labor performed at no charge within our Standard Exatron Warranty (see above) Labor and travel time will be billed for any work for what is NOT covered by the Standard Exatron Warranty (see above) All actual travel expenses billed to the customer On-site service within the USA (with Internet access) Labor performed at no charge within our Standard Exatron Warranty (see above) Labor and travel time will be billed for any work for what is NOT covered by the Standard Exatron Warranty (see above) All actual travel expenses billed to the customer On-site service outside the USA (no Internet access) All actual travel expenses billed to the customer and $1875.00 per day, full payment received prior to the service call On-site service outside the USA (with Internet access) All actual travel expenses billed to the customer and $1200.00 per day, full payment received prior to the service call Field upgrades and out-of-warranty service costs: On-site field upgrade or service within the USA (no Internet access) Labor performed at $200.00 per hour, day minimum All actual travel expenses billed to the customer On-site field upgrade or service within the USA (with Internet access) Labor performed at $150.00 per hour, day minimum All actual travel expenses billed to the customer On-site field upgrade or service outside the USA (no Internet access) Labor performed at $2,000 per day All actual travel expenses billed to the customer On-site field upgrade or service outside the USA (with Internet access) Labor performed at $1500.00 per day All actual travel expenses billed to the customer Remote software engineering costs (8am to 5pm Pacific time, Monday-Friday; excludes local holidays: On-site remote software engineering within the USA Labor performed at $150.00 per hour, one hour minimum After hours service, labor performed at $250.00 per hour, one hour minimum On-site remote software engineering outside the USA Labor performed at $200.00 per hour, one hour minimum After hours service, labor performed at $300.00 per hour, one hour minimum

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Blanket service purchase order for service/spares: Customers who would like the fastest service at the lowest cost should consider opening a blanket service purchase order. With a standing open P.O. Exatron can respond immediately to customers employees requests for service and/or spare parts. This saves the down time required for Exatron to quote and the customer to generate a PO. Exatron will bill as needed at the time. We recommend a minimum of $5,000.00 per year Contact Exatron for terms. PM contracts: Sold by the day, $1,000 per day, plus travel and living expenses. Please contact Exatron for a copy of our PM Contract. One-business-day turn-around on-site service trips: Available on normal USA business days only Subject to availability at the time, this is not a guarantee Quoted on a "per trip" basis We will bill at the premium rate if Exatron is required to have a service technician on-site within 1 business day. Any unforeseen, no fault of Exatron, travel delays will be still billed at the premium rate. Exatron best effort on making necessary repairs only Flat daily rate, no discount for repairs made in less than 8 hours Service price schedule: One-business-day on-site service trip within the USA (no Internet access) Labor performed at $2,000 per day All actual travel expenses billed to the customer $1,000 premium for guaranteed 1 business day service response time* One-business-day on-site service trip within the USA (with Internet access) Labor performed at $1,500 per day All actual travel expenses billed to the customer $1,000 premium for guaranteed 1 business day service response time* One-business-day on-site service trip outside the USA (no Internet access) Labor performed at $3,000 per day All actual travel expenses billed to the customer Travel time added to 1 Business day guarantee $1,500 premium for guaranteed 1 business day service response time* One-business-day on-site service trip outside the USA (with Internet access) Labor performed at $2,000 per day All actual travel expenses billed to the customer Travel time added to 1 Business day guarantee $1,500 premium for guaranteed 1 business day service response time* * Subject to availability at the time. One-business-day response time starts at time of departure from Exatron; travel time not included. There will be a substantial increase in travel costs for overnight travel. All of these costs are all passed on to the customer. Terms: Terms to be determined at time of service call. Field upgrade terms will be added to our quote. Actual travel expenses include: Air fare as required (All tickets to be purchased thru Exatron's travel agent) Rental car and/or cab fees Lodging Living expenses Field upgrade and all on-site service call shipping costs: In the event a spare part(s) needs to be shipped overnight to a customer's site during a service call or field upgrade. We will ship the package via the customer's account with the shipper. Should Exatron be required to ship via our account, we will then bill the customer for all shipping costs at actual cost plus 50%

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End-of-Life Handler Disposal

Customer Service Support Guide

End-of-Life Handler Disposal


Exatron has no time limit on Exatron product support. We will make every effort to repair any of our products, no matter how old it is. Our never-ending support greatly extends the life of many of our products. Exatron offers trade-in value on any of our products as part of a new Exatron equipment purchase. Exact terms are subject to quote at that time. This applies to any used Exatron product as a trade-in on any new Exatron product. We will service our products even when the product is not purchased directly from Exatron. This makes the resale value of Exatron products high as compared to many of our competitors. The customer can sell the product to a third party, used equipment vendor, or online as, for example, on eBay. Exatron will always offer spare parts, service contacts, and rebuilds of any of our products. Most of the materials used in the construction of our products can be recycled. When it comes time to finally retire an Exatron product, the customer can ship the product back to Exatron, at the customers expense, and we will quote the cost to dismantle and recycle the handler. In many cases, there is no charge for this service other than any third-party disposal fees as required. Whenever possible, reusable components will be offered as a donation to local schools. Please note that in many cases, Exatron builds systems using major third-party pieces of equipment. These include lasers, printers, camera inspection, chillers, fume extractors, and other large OEM (original equipment manufacturer) subsystems. Exatron will attempt to provide the same support as best we can for these subsystems. Exact details cannot be determined until the day comes that end-of-life service is required. The customer is free to contact the OEM directly for its end-of life service policy and then deal directly with that OEM.

Significance of This Manuals Version Number


The version number on the cover page of this manual indicates two levels of revision. The first number is incremented for brand new manuals or complete overhauls, including addition or deletion of chapters. The second number is incremented for small section changes and additions. For example, version 2.0 would refer to a completely redone manual or one that has had chapters moved, added, or deleted. The jump from 2.0 to 2.1 might include new or updated procedures, new screens or photos, or updated sections.

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Typographical Conventions Used in This Manual


Names of input boxes and buttons are displayed in bold type, such as: Click the Start Test button. Messages displayed on the hardware or software are shown in bold monospaced type, such as: If the tester responds correctly with an "R," you see the message: Pass checking tester. Emphasized words and phrases are displayed in bold and italicized type, such as: Start by defining the test site closest to Tray X1.

Terms Used in This Manual


Bin Refers to a physical output location, such as a tray, bucket, or tube. Contrast with sort. A positive air pressure in the vacuum lines, used to break any residual vacuum between the pickup head and a device it was suctioning. Blow-off

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Terms Used in This Manual

Customer Service Support Guide

Context menu

A pop-up menu that is displayed when you right-click over an area or item. It offers actions appropriate to the item.

Figure 1-4: Context Menu

Device

A generic term that refers to the chip, package, or other part processed by the Exatron handler. A down-pointing arrow at the right end of an input box. Click the arrow to view and select from the possible options. Some drop-down boxes have a slider bar that you can slide up and down to view even more selections.

Drop-down arrow

Figure 1-5: Drop-Down Arrow

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Group box

A collection of input boxes, buttons, etc., on a window that are grouped together by function and purpose. They are usually surrounded by a thin border and a box title.

Figure 1-6: Group Box

Home position

The location that each motor returns to each time the handler is reset. A box where you can type in text or numbers.

Input box, or box

Figure 1-7: Input Boxes

Slop

Amount of play, or looseness, between a device and its holder. Refers to a logical output location; a type of test result. Contrast with bin. The component of a vacuum generator that sucks air in one hole as air pressure is forced along the pathways, thus causing a vacuum. Left/right axis. For the Model 900 handler, this is viewed as the operator stands at one side of the handler. The device trays move on the X axis. Deep axis. For the Model 900 handler, this is viewed as the operator stands at one side of the handler. The pickup assembly moves along the gantry on the Y axis. Vertical, up-and-down axis. The pickup nozzle lowers and rises on the Z axis.

Sort

Venturi

X axis

Y axis

Z axis

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Photo Gallery of Optional Configurations

Customer Service Support Guide

Photo Gallery of Optional Configurations

Figure 1-8: Cabinet Model with Detaper, Six Test Sites, Model 201 Taper, and Two Trays

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Figure 1-9: Cabinet Model with Dual Preheating Trays, Dual Thermal Test Sites, and Two Trays

Figure 1-10: Cabinet Model with Detaper, Test Site, Model 201 Taper, and One Tray

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Customer Service Support Guide

Figure 1-11: Cabinet Model with Chiller, Hot and Cold Test Sites, Enclosed Trays, and Laser

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Figure 1-12: Cabinet Model with Preheating Tray, MEMS Light Source Tester, Enclosed Trays, and Laser

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Photo Gallery of Optional Configurations

Customer Service Support Guide

Figure 1-13: Cabinet Model with Lead Straighteners and Inspection

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Figure 1-14: Cabinet Model Assembler with Bowl Feeder and Tube Inputs, Inspection, and Taper Output

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Photo Gallery of Optional Configurations

Customer Service Support Guide

Figure 1-15: Cabinet Model with Bowl Feeder Input, Preheating Tray, MEMS Magnetic Ambient and Thermal Testing, and Taper Output with In-Tape Inspection

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Figure 1-16: Cabinet Model with Four Trays and MEMS Audio Test Box (Left); 16 Test Sockets in Audio Test Box (Right)

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Photo Gallery of Optional Configurations

Customer Service Support Guide

Figure 1-17: Cabinet Model with Bowl Feeder Input, Machine Vision Inspection, MEMS Vibration Testing, and Taper Output (Top); Isolation Plate with 12 Sockets for MEMS Vibration Testing (Bottom)

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Figure 1-18: Benchtop Model with Detaper and Two Trays/Waffle Packs

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Photo Gallery of Optional Configurations

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Figure 1-19: Cabinet Model with Laser and Enclosed Trays

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Figure 1-20: Hot and Cold Test with Chiller and Air Dryer, Four Trays

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Photo Gallery of Optional Configurations

Customer Service Support Guide

Figure 1-21: Benchtop Model with Rotary Tester and Trays/Waffle Packs

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Figure 1-22: Custom Model with Tube Input and Output, One Test Site

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Photo Gallery of Optional Configurations

Customer Service Support Guide

Figure 1-23: Cabinet Model with Burn-In Board, Dual Test Sites, and Two Trays

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Figure 1-24: Custom Model with Two Input Sources, Two Inspection Cameras, Welder

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Photo Gallery of Optional Configurations

Optional Accessories and Peripherals Available with Han-

Figure 1-25: Port Feeder Track and Tray as Input for Welder

Optional Accessories and Peripherals Available with Handler

Figure 1-26: Fixed and Moving Preheating Trays

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Figure 1-27: Refrigerated/Heating Circulators

Figure 1-28: Air Dryer (Left); Air Filter (Right)

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Photo Gallery of Optional Configurations

Optional Accessories and Peripherals Available with Han-

Figure 1-29: Temperature Controllers for Hot and Cold Testers

Figure 1-30: Hot and Cold Test Heads

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Chapter 2: System Description


Chapter Overview
This chapter discusses concepts of how your handler works. Following chapters show you how to put these concepts into practice and carry out procedures. This chapter deals with the following main topics: Topic Where to Find Information on Extra Options How the System Works Mechanical Systems Electrical Systems Pneumatic Systems Test Sites Tray Configurations Key Positions and Distances How X and Y Distances Are Measured How Z Distances Are Measured Tape-and-Reel Assembly CE Marking Standard Practice and Options Page 2-1 2-2 2-3 2-10 2-18 2-25 2-30 2-31 2-32 2-35 2-38 2-41

This chapter will familiarize you with the various parts of the system hardware, what they do, and how they work. Exatron recommends that you read this part of the manual in the presence of the system to facilitate reference to the actual system. The parts of the system are identified as shown in this chapter. The Exatron software is discussed primarily in Chapters 4 through 6.

Where to Find Information on Extra Options


Each Model 900 handler is custom-built for the customers specific needs. Certain features are common enough to be grouped into optional categories and discussed in this manual. Other features are unique, and are addressed in supplements provided directly to the customers using them.

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Chapter 2: System Description

Use the references in the following table of common options to read about the options on your machine.

Common Options
If You Have This Option... Pickup head rotation Auxiliary pusher and slider See These Sections "Pickup Head Rotation" on page 2-3 "Results of Rotation Combinations" on page 5-33 "Test Site Override Buttons" on page 2-23 "Using Override Buttons" on page 5-4 "Test Site Delay Group Box" on page 5-29 "Test Site Clamp Group Box" on page 5-62 "Multiple Pickup Heads" on page 2-4 "Setting Test Site Distances" on page 5-73 "Thermal Soak Time Delay Group Box" on page 5-42 "Thermal Setup Window (Optional)" on page 5-100 "Tray Configurations" on page 2-30 "How X and Y Distances Are Measured" on page 2-32 "Understanding Tray and Waffle Pack Numbering" on page 5-79 "Pitch and Teach Group Box" on page 5-57 "Example of Calibrating Distances for Waffle Packs" on page 5-90 "Tape-and-Reel Assembly" on page 2-38 "Setting Up a Taper" on page 3-23 "Auto Run Using Tape and Reel" on page 4-9 "Taper Window (Optional)" on page 5-103 "Adjusting Seal Head" on page 3-38 "Setting Temperature for Heat Seal Head" on page 3-45 "Adjusting Seal Head" on page 3-38 "Securing Trays or Tubes" on page 3-9 "Calibrating Procedures for Tube Devices" on page 3-11

Multiple pickup heads Multiple test sites Thermal test sites Waffle packs

Tape and reel

Heat seal on tape Pressure seal on tape Input or output tubes

How the System Works


Variations of the Model 900 have two or more trays (and/or tubes, bowl feeder) containing devices. Tray X1 is on the left and is usually the input tray. Devices are lifted from this tray and carried by the pickup head to one or more test sites, where they are tested. Depending on the results of the test, each device is then sorted and carried to a destination: Pass or sort tray or fail bucket Pass or sort tube Tape which is then sealed and wound onto a takeup reel

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Mechanical Systems

Motors

The Y motor moves the pickup head from right to left and back, carrying the devices from tray to test site to tray. Some handlers rotate the device at one or more points in this journey.

Mechanical Systems
Motors
The motors used on the Exatron Model 900 handler are servo motors. The motors transfer power to the lead screws by a standard flexible motor coupling. These motors are "smart" motors, in that after carrying out a command from the software to move to a certain position, they send back a response to the software that the movement was correctly completed. In this way, the handler is prevented from taking the next action until it is confirmed that the previous action was carried out.

Figure 2-1: Tray Carriage Motor

Pickup Heads
Pickup heads can be custom-built for your companys needs.

Pickup Head Rotation


One option that may be built for the pickup head is rotation. This allows the devices to be turned 90 degrees in either direction before being placed at the test site.

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Figure 2-2: One Type of Rotational Pickup HeadRotation On (Left); Rotation Off (Right)

Multiple Pickup Heads


Pickup heads can be built as two separate entities, moving to complement each other. Handlers using dual pickup heads may operate in the following manner: 1. The left pickup head picks a device from the input tray or tube. 2. The Y gantry moves to the test site. 3. The right pickup head picks the previous device from the test site. 4. The left pickup head puts the device into the test site and moves to the right. 5. The test socket closes and tests the device, while 6. The right pickup head drops the previous tested device into the output tray or tube. 7. The cycle repeats.

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Mechanical Systems

Lead Screws

Figure 2-3: Another Type of Rotational Pickup HeadRotation On (Left); Rotation Off (Right)

In Figure 2-3, dual pickup heads are in operation. The left nozzle is rotated; the right nozzle is not. Pickup heads can be built as multiple nozzles on one Z pickup head, moving in tandem to and from test sites.

Figure 2-4: Multiple Nozzles on One Pickup Head

Lead Screws
The lead screws employed on the Model 900 are PTFE-baked and employ a Delrin nut for long-term reliability. As each lead screw is used, the teflon gradually wears off the lead screw and embeds itself in the nut to smooth out any irregularities in the nut, thus enhancing long wear.

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Different pitches may be employed on the Model 900. For example, one-half-inch pitch screws signify that the carriages move one-half inch for every complete rotation of the lead screw; one-inch pitch screws signify that the carriages move one inch for every complete rotation of the lead screw. The 1" pitch screw moves faster: it requires one-half as many steps on the motor to move the same distance as the 1/2" screw. Therefore, the 1" pitch screw is used where a faster movement is preferred; a 1/2" pitch lead screw is used where a slower motion is preferred, as where entire trays of devices are being moved (and not held by suction as on the Y axis) and thus must not be rudely jostled.

Pickup assembly Y lead screw

Thermal head Y lead screw

Pickup nozzle Z lead screw

Trays X lead screws

Figure 2-5: Lead Screws

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Mechanical Systems

Tray Carriages

Tray Carriages
Each tray carriage is mounted on its own lead screw (see above) and is guided and kept square to the system by two linear bearings. The tray is held on the carriage by a colored tray clamp: anodized red for failed parts and green for good parts, other colors for other sort categories. There is also a spring clip in the right rear of the carriage for added tray stability.

Figure 2-6: Two Styles of Tray Clamps

Gantry
The Y-axis gantry employs a servo-motor-driven lead screw to move a pickup head assembly along its length. The pickup head is guided by two linear bearings along which the pickup head rides. An infrared through-beam home sensor is mounted to the wall on the motor end of the gantry. The pickup head assembly includes a servo motor driving a chain which turns a short lead screw which in turn drives the pickup head shaft down to the trays and test sites. Wires and air lines are brought to the pickup head by way of a flexible cable chain mounted under the Z-motor, behind the wall bisecting the long axis of the Y gantry. The wires in the cable chain are high-flexibility flat cable.

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Z-chain

Servo motor Cable chain

Y lead screw Z lead screw

Figure 2-7: Cable Chain to Pickup Head (Left); Z-Chain and Lead Screw Driving Pickup Head (Right)

Some handlers have thermal heads as well as one or more pickup heads. Where multiple gantry lead screws exist, the lead screw that a certain head runs on can be identified by the lead nut.

Figure 2-8: Lead Nutsfor Pickup Head (Left), for Thermal Heads (Right)

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Mechanical Systems

Smart Buckets

Smart Buckets
Some Model 900s may include new "smart buckets," so called because of the sensors they are equipped with. Features of the smart buckets include: Easy to remove Plexiglass front cover Holes for optional padlocking in place Option in software to clear devices-in-bucket counts or not when the bucket is removed

Figure 2-9: Smart BucketsTop View (Left); Front View (Right)

The solenoid (must be 24-volt, not 12-volt!) in back locks the bucket in place. Two sensors are associated with each smart bucket. The sensor in back sees the bucket (Bucket Present sensor). The fiberoptic sensor inside performs two functions: Counts devices as they fall in. Warns when the bucket is full.

Anti-Vibration Feet
The anti-vibration feet are equipped with shock-absorbing rubber pads to isolate the handler from external vibrations. Each foot can be individually leveled.

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Figure 2-10: Anti-Vibration FootTop (Left), Bottom (Right)

Electrical Systems
Main Disconnect Switch
Your handler is equipped with a main disconnect switch (Figure 2-11). Turning off this switch shuts off AC power to the handler and its computer. Therefore, all computers connected to the handler should be shut down properly before turning off this switch. When the main disconnect switch is turned off, it can be locked so that repairs can be made to any component without danger of accidental startup. Thus, it can be used as a lockout procedure.

Figure 2-11: Main Disconnect SwitchIn OFF Position with Lock (Left), In OFF Position (Center), in ON Position (Right)

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Electrical Systems

Emergency Stop Button

Emergency Stop Button


The EMO (emergency stop) button can be pushed in anytime there is a need to disable the motors and shut off the 24-volt DC. However, it leaves the computer running, so that when Auto Run is continued, the operator is given the choice of restarting where the handler left off with the device count. It is released by being turned clockwise until it pops out again.

Figure 2-12: Emergency Stop Button

HALT and RUN Buttons


On handlers equipped with HALT and RUN buttons, these act to pause and restart Auto Run. After pushing in the HALT button, you must push it a second time to release it before you can effectively push the RUN button to restart.

Power Supplies
The Model 900 uses two power supplies, both "switching" type. The first supplies 24-volt DC for the servo motors and the solenoids. Input is 100 to 240-volt AC and 50-60 Hz. Output is always DC. It auto-selects the correct input voltage. The second power supply is an ATX-style supply for the PC-104 motherboard. The CPU ATXstyle power supply for the PC-104 allows for manual switching. It supplies multiple voltage whatever is required by standard ATX specifications. Input is 115 or 230-volt AC and 50 or 60 Hz, switchable.

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Figure 2-13: 24-Volt DC Power Supply

Figure 2-14: CPU Power Supply Installed

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Electrical Systems

Fuses

Figure 2-15: ATX Power Supply Switched to 115 Volts (Left) and 230 Volts (Right) Input

The PC-104 motherboard uses all voltages of the ATX power supply. The PET-C06 I/O PCB uses 5 volts from the ATX power supply. If your handler stands on its own frame, the power supplies are in the CPU box. If your handler is a benchtop model, the power supplies are on the bottom of the machine.

Fuses
The fuses for the handler are standard fuses.

Figure 2-16: Fuses

When the handler is plugged into a power source, the bottom AC fuse lights up. When the black power switch is turned on, the middle +5-volt DC fuse lights too. When the yellow CPU reset button is turned on, the top +24-volt DC fuse lights in addition to the other two.

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Chapter 2: System Description

PC Boards
PCM-8152 Motherboard
This is the main computer board for the Model 900 handler. It uses a PC-104 bus, which allows connection to the PET-C06 board.

Figure 2-17: Location of Jumpers and Connectors for PCM-8152 Motherboard

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Electrical Systems

PC Boards

PET-C06 I/O PC Board


This PC-104-based board sits over the motherboard and connects to the motherboard via the PC-104 bus. This board routes all the I/O signals for the motors, air solenoids, and sensors. A 40-pin flat cable routes the I/O signals to ports P1 and P2. In turn, port P1 goes to the 5000-M42 circuit board, and port P2 may go to the taper, if so equipped, or to other optional features.

Figure 2-18: PET-C06 I/O Board

5000-M42 Board
All I/Os come from the PET-C06 board. A 40-pin ribbon cable leads to the 5000-M42 board from the PET-C06 board. The 5000-M42 board (Figure 2-19) splits out inputs (sensors, etc.) and outputs (vacuums, blow-offs, etc.). Wires to all assemblies go through at least one Molex connector in order to facilitate repair and change.

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Figure 2-19: 5000-M42 Circuit Board

8000-D14 I/O PC Board (Optional)


If the handler is equipped with a taper, an 8000-D14 board is added. The 8000-D14 board provides 24V and 5V to the taper solenoids and sensors. The 8000-D14 board is an intermediate I/O board that acts as a buffer, reducing risk of damage to the PET-C06 board. It can also amplify circuits.

Figure 2-20: 8000-D14 I/O Board

Serial Adapter
If your handler has a large number of motors, it may have a serial adapter or network hub to add serial COM ports.

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Electrical Systems

Sensors

Figure 2-21: Serial Adapter (Left); Ethernet Switch (Right)

Sensors
Sensors confirm to the Exatron software that various moving parts are at the positions they should be. For example, home sensors tell the software when the pickup assembly, pickup nozzle, and tray carriages are at their home positions.

Pickup assembly home sensor

Figure 2-22: Y Motor Sensor

For more information, see "Input Group Box" on page 5-8.

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Chapter 2: System Description

Light Pole
The light pole on each machine enables an operator to tell at a glance which machines in a room are running and which machines need attention. Color Red Yellow Green Meaning Problem alert Needs operator assistance, such as reloading Machine is operating and busy

Figure 2-23: Light Pole

The background colors of the Exatron software confirmation and error messages likewise have similar meanings.

Pneumatic Systems
Pickup Head Shaft
The pickup head shaft is bored through and the vacuum/blow-off pressure passes through the shaft to the suction cup pick-up. Suction cups are available in various sizes, including 2, 4, 6, 8, and 10 millimeters. The typical size is 6 mm. In general, the preferred size is that which covers the largest possible surface of the device without running off the edge of the part or interfering with any other features of the device. However, there may be situations where a smaller suction cup is preferred, specifically in the case of bare silicon devices (FBGA, BGA, etc.).

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Pneumatic Systems

Main Air Regulator

Main Air Regulator


The main air regulator "steps down" the air pressure from the incoming supply for the entire handler. This air regulator is mounted on the rear right corner of the base. The regulator assembly includes two oil/water particulate traps which should be visually inspected on occasion (see "Checking the Moisture/Dirt Trap in the Air Regulator" on page 6-19). This regulator should be set at factory air pressure of 80 PSI. The system requires a minimum of 80 PSI to operate properlyspecifically, to generate sufficient vacuum through the venturi to pick up devices from the trays. The incoming air line exits the regulator and splits to supply the needs of the entire system. Adjustment knob On/off switch in ON position

Figure 2-24: Main Air Regulator Turned On

On some models, an optional automatic air shut-off valve is part of the air regulator (Figure 225). This shut-off valve automatically cuts off air to the handler and to the vacuum generators when the power is shut off or any EMO button is pushed.

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Figure 2-25: Automatic Air Shut-Off Valve

On some models, the main air regulator is attached to a sensor, with a pressure switch with digital display on the outside of the handler (Figure 2-26). This switch allows you to set a minimum air pressure, so that if the incoming air ever drops below that limit, the handler will stop.

Figure 2-26: Air Pressure Switch with Digital Display

Auxiliary Air Regulator


The auxiliary or internal air regulator (or auxiliary pusher regulator) "steps down" the air pressure for use by the test site air cylinders on those systems using them.

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Pneumatic Systems

Vacuum Generator with Sensor

Adjustment valve

Figure 2-27: Auxiliary Air Regulator

Vacuum Generator with Sensor


The Model 900 is supplied with a vacuum generator unit for each pickup head, mounted to the base wall, below the Y-axis motor and behind the back sheet metal cover. You will need to remove this cover to gain access to the vacuum generator. When the vacuum is engaged, a hissing noise is heard from its exhaust. It is controlled by an electric valve which is controlled by the handler electronics. In addition to creating a vacuum, the vacuum generator also acts as a regular air valve. It can produce a small positive air pressure, or blow-off, in the vacuum lines. This positive air pressure is used to break any residual vacuum between the pickup head and a device it was suctioning. The vacuum sensor notes when a device is released from the pickup head. It sends a signal to the Exatron software to increment the count of devices placed in various sort categories.

Figure 2-28: Vacuum Generators for Dual Pickup Heads

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The vacuum and blow-off features of the vacuum generator can be manually actuated by way of override buttons mounted on the side wall of the handler base near the vacuum assembly.

Figure 2-29: Vacuum and Blow-Off Buttons

A small adjustment screw can be found on the vacuum generator unit which will increase or decrease the blow-off pressure. CAUTION: Be careful when adjusting this screw, as loosening it will have the effect of increasing the blow-off pressure, but if the screw is turned too much it will come out and render the blow-off inoperable. Refer to the vacuum generator manufacturers manual for a drawing of the location of the adjustment screw. The vacuum generator is fitted with an electronic sensor that measures the strength of the vacuum drawn through the air lines. The sensor measures in centimeters of mercury (cmHg) and displays the result on the small LCD screen of the sensor. When the vacuum is engaged, the display should give a reading for the level of vacuum in the system. The sensor puts out a signal when a given level of vacuum is reached, indicating the vacuum has a secure hold on the device being lifted. For instructions on calibrating the vacuum generator, see "Checking and Setting the Vacuum Generator" on page 6-50. Finally, note the small white filter on the vacuum generator. If this filter becomes visibly dirty or contaminated, it must be replaced. See "Vacuum Generator Air Filter" on page 7-2 for the part number. CAUTION: A dirty filter causes poor handler operation. Replace your filter!

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Pneumatic Systems

Test Site Air Valve Manifold

Figure 2-30: Dirty Filter (Left) Versus Clean Filter (Right)

Test Site Air Valve Manifold


Pressurized air for the air cylinders at the test sites (and thermal heads, if so equipped) is controlled by a series of 24-volt DC air valves mounted on a manifold block. Each air valve is wired through an override button which will turn the valve on while it is pressed. However, the override button will not turn a valve off which has been actuated by the handler itself.

Figure 2-31: Air Valves on Manifold Block

Test Site Override Buttons


If your handler has auxiliary pusher/slider(s) at the test site(s), you can find the override buttons on the left side of the box. These test the hardware actions. These buttons accomplish the same thing the software can do, but in a more direct way. Either may be used, according to the operators convenience.

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Figure 2-32: Pusher and Slider Override Buttons

Button Top Second Third Bottom

Affects Pusher, test site 1 Pusher, test site 2 Slider, test site 1 Slider, test site 2

Action When pressed, pusher at test site 1 is lowered When pressed, pusher at test site 2 is lowered When pressed, slider at test site 1 is extended over test site When pressed, slider at test site 2 is extended over test site

Figure 2-33: Slide Cylinder Retracted, Push Cylinder Down (Left); Slide Cylinder Extended, Push Cylinder Up (Right)

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Test Sites

Docking Ring

Test Sites
Docking Ring
The Exatron test site docking ring is designed to accept the docking hardware designed for a specific part after it is fitted with a docking plate. The docking plate has tabs along two sides, which mate with tabs in the docking ring.

Sockets
Every type of test socket takes a specific Exatron docking plate. There are two major categories of test site sockets. RF/PI SocketRequires Z axis to clamp part in socket Clamp SocketClamping mechanism attached to Y gantry

Figure 2-34: Clamp Socket

Docking Plates
Every new socket board will need a new docking plate designed for it. New docking plates are available on an ongoing basis; if you do not see a plate for your type of socket board, please contact Exatron for an updated list. If we do not have a plate for your socket board, we can design one for it.

Thermal Test Assembly


Thermal testing may be done by means of ambient, cold, and/or hot heads over test sites. In some cases one or two preheating trays may be included, to get the devices to the desired temperature before being placed in the test sites (Figure 2-35).

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Figure 2-35: Preheating Assembly

Handlers customized for thermal testing may have thermal heads on a separate assembly. If a handler is equipped with two testers, it will likely have two thermal head assemblies as well. Thermal heads commonly range from a cold of -55 degrees Celsius (using an appropriate chiller) to a hot of 125 degrees Celsius.

Figure 2-36: Hot and Cold Thermal Ranges

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Test Sites

Thermal Test Assembly

Figure 2-37: Undersides of Thermal Heads with Purge Enclosures (Hot Head on Left, Cold Head on Right)

A clear retractable tube around the thermal head provides a defrost/purge enclosure for the test site. An air dryer is to be used with cold heads below around 50 degrees Fahrenheit or 10 degrees Celsius to prevent frost on the cold head from damaging the devices or test sockets. This dry or purge air provided by the air dryer slightly pressurizes the test area inside the clear tube and prevents moisture from seeping in to cause frost on any components. The usual order of testing, and the recommended best practice, is to test with ambient or room temperature first, then cold, and hot last; so that the device is placed in the output at a slightly warm temperature that collects no frost.

Figure 2-38: Hot Head Descending to Test Site (Left); Hot Head at Test Site (Right)

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Figure 2-39: Cold Head Descending to Test Site (Left); Cold Head at Test Site (Right)

Figure 2-40: Dual Thermal Head Assembly with Test Site

The thermal heads are driven, not by motors, but by air cylinders. They are pushed all the way to the bottom of their path of travel by positive air pressure. The amount of air pressure to the thermal heads can be adjusted in the Exatron software. (See "Air Pressure Group Box" on page 5-67.) Additionally, the thermal head control panel acts like override buttons, enabling you to manually raise and lower the thermal heads and turn on or off the air pressure (Figure 2-41). By fine-tuning the contact pressure at the test socket, the coplanarity of the device and contact surfaces is improved and the life of the contacts or interposers is extended.

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Test Sites

Thermal Test Assembly

Figure 2-41: Thermal Head Air Pressure Control Panel

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Tray Configurations
The outline dimensions of Exatrons tray carriages are the JEDEC standard. If a company uses waffle packs, the company-specific waffle packs may be any dimensions that fit the tray carriages.

Figure 2-42: Four Trays with 7 x 17 Configuration

In the example in Figure 2-42, each tray has 7 columns and 17 rows. A company may also decide to use two different configurations at the same time. One tray carriage may have waffle packs and another may use a single tray. Or each tray may use a different configuration of waffle packs (Figure 2-43).

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Key Positions and Distances

Thermal Test Assembly

Figure 2-43: Multiple Types of Waffle Packs

A colored tray clamp is used to secure each tray in place. Pull the tray clamp toward the front of the handler and carefully slide in the tray. When the tray is all the way to the back, push the tray clamp back to secure the tray. CAUTION: Be careful when carrying or moving filled trays. Jerking the trays can dislodge devices from their pockets, costing clean-up time.

Key Positions and Distances


X and Y axes are viewed as if the operator were positioned facing the side of the handler. > Thus, the X axis moves from the front to the rear of the handler, but from the operators right to his left. Correspondingly, the Y axis moves the width of the handler, but toward and away from the operator, if he stands at the side of the handler. The Z axis moves the pickup head up and down, lifting and dropping the device. Rows and columns are numbered as the operator stands at the front of the handler. > Row 1 is at the back of the tray. > Column 1 is at the left of the tray. X home is at the front.

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Y1 home is at the right end of the Y gantry. If there is a second pickup car or a thermal car, the Y2 home is usually at the left end of the gantry. Z home is at the top of the pickup head. Test site 1 is at the left end of the handler. Tray X1 is at the left. Other trays are counted from left to right: X2, X3, etc. Pin 1 of each tray is always at the upper left, identified by a 45-degree bevel. Pin 1 of each device placed in a tape pocket is usually placed toward the tape sprocket holes.

How X and Y Distances Are Measured


This section and the next provide an overview only. Specific instructions and examples are found in the sections beginning with "Fine Tune Window" on page 5-51. The following example shows how X and Y distances are measured. The handler in this example has 4 tray carriages, each using 3 waffle packs. The 12 waffle packs each need to have two locations calibrated: The corner pocket in the first row and column The corner pocket in the last row and column For each location, X, Y, and Z distances need to be measured, or calibrated. Therefore, this example setup needs the following measurements: 24 X distances 24 Y distances 24 Z-get distances 24 Z-put distances

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How X and Y Distances Are Measured

Figure 2-44: Three Waffle Packs on Each Tray

Measuring X Distances
The conceptual diagram in Figure 2-45 shows the X distances for a hypothetical tray setup. It follows the example shown in Figure 2-44, each tray having three waffle packs. The packs are labeled with the tray number and the waffle suffix. Thus, the packs in tray X1 are labeled X1_1, X1_2, and X1_3. The packs in tray X2 are labeled X2_1, X2_2, and X2_3. Again in Figure 2-45, the only movement we are dealing with is that of the X motors and trays. The pickup head stays in the back. Each tray must slide a certain distance toward the back, to get the proper device pocket under the pickup head. So the distances to be calibrated are the distances the X tray must move to get the centers of specific device pockets under the pickup head. When using waffle packs, the position of the centers of the first and last pockets of each waffle pack must be measured.

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Figure 2-45: X Motor Diagram for 4-Tray Handler with 12 Waffle Packs

These distances have been filled in for each waffle pack, for the first column and last column. NOTE: These measurements are examples only. Your measurements may differ.

Measuring Y Distances
In Figure 2-46, the only movement we are dealing with is that of the Y motor, which moves the pickup head. So the distances to be calibrated are the distances the Y motor carrying the pickup head must move to be positioned over the centers of specific device pockets.

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How Z Distances Are Measured

Figure 2-46: Y Motor Diagram for 4-Tray Handler with 12 Waffle Packs

These distances have been filled in for each waffle pack, for the first row and the last row. NOTE: These measurements are examples only. Your measurements may differ.

How Z Distances Are Measured


The Z motor is attached to the Y gantry, and drives the vertical movement of the pickup head. Z distances are measured down from Z home, which is at the top of the Z travel. The two important Z distances are Z-get (also referred to as the pick height) and Z-put (also referred to as the put height). These distances may vary slightly from tray to tray, and from trays to test site.

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Figure 2-47: Z Motor Diagram

The important thing to remember is that Z-put (the put height) for each location is higher than Z-get (the pick height) for that same location. Thus, the Z-put distance from Z home (at the top of Zs vertical travel) is a smaller number than the Z-get distance. This is because closer contact is required for the pickup head to pick up a device than to drop it into the pocket. The key to defining a pick height or Z-get distance is to have the suction cup just touching the device, but not flattened on it. The suction cup should be high enough that when you turn on the vacuum, you can see the device lift slightly against the suction cup.

Figure 2-48: Suction Cup at Z-Get (Pick Height)

Notice that the suction cup at Z-get (pick height) is just touching the device, but not flattened on it.

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How Z Distances Are Measured

Figure 2-49: Suction Cup at Z-Put (Put Height)

Notice that the suction cup at Z-put (put height) is not quite touching the device.

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Tape-and-Reel Assembly
Some handlers are equipped with a tape-and-reel assembly, or taper. The Model 202 taper uses fixed-width changeover kits that can accommodate devices of certain fixed widths. Alternatively, Model 202 may come with an adjustable-width changeover kit for different sizes or types of devices. A handler equipped with either taper places passed devices into a carrier tape which is then sealed with a sealing tape by either pressure or heat. The supply reel containing the carrier tape is the lower one, sometimes made of cardboard. The takeup reel is directly above it, usually made of plastic. The supply reel containing the sealing tape is toward the front. Supply reel with sealing tape Tape trackcounterclockwise direction Empty/ outof-pocket image sensor Output or takeup reel

Supply reel with carrier tape

Taper alignment screws

Figure 2-50: Reels on Taper

The carrier tape is fed in a counterclockwise direction, forward along the underside of the tape track, then backward along the top of the tape track. On the top surface, the gap sensor detects the hole in the center of the empty pocket, and signals the position to the pickup head. When the empty pocket intersects the path of the pickup head, the pickup head places a passed device into the tape pocket.

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Tape-and-Reel Assembly

How Z Distances Are Measured

Pickup head nozzle

Gap sensor

Figure 2-51: Tape Track with Sensors and Pickup Head

Behind the path of the pickup head, an image sensor ensures that a device is present and seated correctly in each tape pocket. Then the filled carrier tape is sealed, either with pressure-sensitive sealing tape or heatsealed cover tape. If pressure heads are used to seal, the pressure is continuous; but if heat seal heads are used to seal, the heat seal heads are pressed against the tape only intermittently to prevent burning. A fiberglass inset sits on the tape track just under the heat seal head. It retains heat at the sealing site instead of being dispersed to the rail. This inset is replaceable when worn. Wheels under the PSA seal head blade facilitate the tapes movement and reduce pulling tension from the drive gear.

Figure 2-52: Pressure Roller Block, Seal Head, and Image Sensor

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When a specified number of pockets have been filled, the takeup reel motor is activated long enough to wind the slack tape onto the upper takeup reel. The drive gear drives the tape along, with teeth that protrude upward to fit the holes on the side of the carrier tape. The pinch roller on the pressure roller block presses down on the tape, keeping it meshed with the teeth of the drive gear (Figure 2-53).

Figure 2-53: Pressure Roller Block (Left); Pinch Roller on Pressure Roller Block (Right)

Emergency Stop Button


The EMO (emergency stop) button on the taper plate shuts down everything on the taper only, including the heat seal; whereas the EMO button on the body of the handler stops all motors. Pressing the tapers EMO button causes a taper error message to be displayed on the Auto Run window. The operator then has the option of aborting the job run, or making any necessary adjustments and then selecting the option to continue the run.

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CE Marking Standard Practice and Options

Override Buttons

Override Buttons
The override buttons on the taper plate accomplish the same thing the software can do, but in a more direct way. Either may be used, according to the operators convenience.

Figure 2-54: Taper Override Buttons

Taper Buttons Button Top white Second blue Third yellow Affects Seal head Action When pressed, seal head is lowered onto the tape (Figure 2-52)

Customizable option n/a Takeup reel motor When pressed, takeup reel moves, tightening tape slack

Bottom green Customizable option n/a

CE Marking Standard Practice and Options


Certain options may help your handler meet certain local or federal standards, such as the European CE Marking. The features shown below do not constitute a warranty that a handler equipped with them will meet any particular standards. We self-certify our products as CE Marking-compliant. Some handlers have been CE Marking certified by independent parties. If you need third-party CE Marking certification, you can order this as an extra option.

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Figure 2-55: Main Disconnect SwitchIn OFF Position with Lock (Left), In OFF Position (Center), in ON Position (Right)

All Model 900s built on their own frame (not benchtop models) are equipped with a main disconnect switch (Figure 2-55). Turning off this switch shuts off all AC power to the handler and computer(s). Therefore, all computers connected to the handler should be shut down properly before turning off this switch.

Figure 2-56: Gold Alodine Finish on Interior Surfaces

Conductive gold alodine (Figure 2-56) is a microscopic thin film Exatron uses on aluminum sheeting to provide increased corrosion resistance and impose desired electrical resistance characteristics; that is, to help with EMI shielding.

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Override Buttons

Figure 2-57: Ferrite EMI Noise Filter

An EMI filter is available as an extra option when CE Marking certification is desired. The EMI line filter smoothes out noise signals coming in on the power line.

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Chapter 3: Hardware and Software Setup


Chapter Overview
This chapter discusses the following main topics: Topic Setting Up Your New Handler Changing Device Sizes Powering Up the System Switching Between System Computers Shutting Down the System Securing Trays or Tubes Calibrating Procedures for Tube Devices Calibrating and Loading a Detaper Setting Up a Taper Getting Acquainted with the Main Window Managing Job Files Checking the Settings Fine Tuning Overview Changing the Password Page 3-1 3-3 3-6 3-8 3-8 3-9 3-11 3-14 3-23 3-46 3-47 3-51 3-54 3-54

Setting Up Your New Handler


Your new Model 900 handler comes complete and set up, including the software and the job file to get you started.

Benchtop Models
If you have a benchtop model, be sure to mount it securely to a stable surface to ensure reliability and functionality.

Cabinet ModelsLeveling Feet


If you have a cabinet model, you must lock the wheels (castors) and extend the anti-vibration feet to make the handler level. This increases handler stability and helps prevent movement in case of earthquake. If desired, use brackets to anchor the feet to the floor after leveling.

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When you get the handler to the exact position you want it, lock the wheels down by pressing down on the lever of each wheel to prevent movement. Then you can engage the leveling feet.

Figure 3-1: Wheel Unlocked (Left), Locked (Right)

Each anti-vibration foot (Figure 3-2) is attached with a right-handed thread. Level the handler by screwing each foot down. Use a carpenters level for best results.

Figure 3-2: Anti-Vibration Foot

If you have a tester from another vendor, you will need to install it at the test site. Follow the instructions from the tester vendor.

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Cabinet ModelsLeveling Feet

If Exatron was supplied with sample trays and devices from your company while your handler was being built, the job file that is installed on your handlers computer is factory preset to work with your tray configuration. All you need to do is verify that all the parameters are to your liking. This prodecure is covered in "Verifying the Factory-Installed Job File" on page 3-47. NOTE: Exatron recommends that if you make changes to the job file, you save the changes with a new file name, so that the original job file is preserved with its initial parameters. Instructions on saving a job file are found in "Copying the Job File for Modifications" on page 3-48. If at a later time you change your tray configuration or some hardware, you may need to set up a new job file. Instructions for calibrating a new configuration are found under the section "Fine Tune Window" on page 5-51.

Changing Device Sizes


Changing device sizes for processing may require changing some or all of the following components (changeover kits).
Seal Head Blade TAPE-869-C 8mm TAPE-872-D 12mm TAPE-872-D 12mm TAPE-873-B 16mm TAPE-873-B 16mm Cover Tape Guide TAPE-680-D TAPE-680-D TAPE-766-B TAPE-935-B TAPE-935-B

Pickup Head PET-C68-TR-A 4 mm pitch PET-S52-TR-E 4 mm pitch PET-S53-TR-C 8 mm pitch PET-S53-TR-C 8 mm pitch PET-S53-TR-C 8 mm pitch

Tape Track TAPE-925-1-B 8mm-.116 TAPE-924-1-A 12mm-.158 TAPE-779-1-G 12mm-.238 TAPE-923-1-A 16mm-.330 TAPE-923-1-A 16mm-.330

Check or change the following changeover kits. Component


Pickup head Detaper Tape-and-reel assembly

Instructions on Page
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Replacing the Pickup Head


When changing device sizes, you may need to replace the pickup head. To replace the pickup head: 1. Press in the EMO button to turn off the motors. 2. Slide the pickup head to an open place where you can reach it easily. 3. Pull down on the pickup head so it is at the bottom of the Z travel. 4. Note the position of each colored air hose before removing. 5. Remove all air hoses on the pickup head by pressing on each orange fitting latch and pulling out the hose. 6. Using an Allen wrench, loosen but do not remove the two screws in the upper part of the head (Figure 3-3).

Figure 3-3: Screws To Be Loosened When Changing Pickup Head

7. Pull down on the head and remove it from the shaft. 8. With the air fittings on the left, push the new pickup head up onto the end of the shaft. Make sure it is all the way up on the shaft. 9. Partially tighten the two screws on the side of the pickup head.

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Replacing the Pickup Head

Shaft hole

Part number

Figure 3-4: Pickup Heads for Two Sizes of Device

10. Push the pickup assembly to the right, to where the head is flush against the side of the tray. Make sure both front and back ends of the pickup head are evenly against the tray (Figure 3-5). 11. Tighten the two screws on the pickup head. 12. Attach the air hoses in the same order to each nozzle.

Figure 3-5: Pickup Head Firm Against Tray Side

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Powering Up the System


Before you power up the system: 1. Make sure the system has been properly mounted on a secure table top. 2. Make sure the daily maintenance has been performed. (See Chapter 6.) 3. Check that all power cables, connecting cables, monitor, mouse, and keyboard are plugged in. 4. Check that the air regulator is on and has the correct pressure. 5. Close and latch all covers. 6. Check that the EMO (emergency stop) button is pushed in. To power up the system: 1. Turn the Baco lockable disconnect switch on the handler clockwise to the ON position (Figure 3-6).

Figure 3-6: Main Disconnect SwitchIn OFF Position with Lock (Left), In OFF Position (Center), in ON Position (Right)

2. If your handler has a black power switch on the computer, turn it clockwise to the ON position. > Benchtop systems have the computer inside the handler, so the yellow CPU reset switch (power button) is on the front of the handler, under the tray carriages (Figure 3-7, left).

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Powering Up the System

Replacing the Pickup Head

> Systems attached to a cabinet have a separate computer, which is located directly behind the front door of the cabinet (Figure 3-7, right).

Figure 3-7: Powering Up a Benchtop System (Left); Powering Up a Cabinet System (Right)

3. Press the yellow CPU reset switch button. This will power up the computer system. 4. Turn on the monitor if necessary, and at the Windows password prompt, type the username and password. Both username and password are factory-set to exatron. 5. Turn the red EMO (emergency stop) button clockwise to release it. This will power up all the system mechanics. NOTE: On systems using an automatic air shut-off valve, it is especially important to turn on the air regulator before releasing the EMO button. If this is not done, an unpleasant but harmless noise may issue until the EMO button is depressed and released again.

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Switching Between System Computers


If your system includes a peripheral that has its own computer (such as a laser or inspection camera), they may all be using one monitor and keyboard. Switch between computers by pressing the <Scroll Lock> key twice, then the Up or Down arrow key one or more times to scroll to the desired computer. If the keyboard has a Function key, use it concurrently with the Scroll Lock key.

Shutting Down the System


Before you turn the handler off, you must properly shut down the computer. To shut down the system: > If a process is running, click the Abort Process button in the Auto Run window. 1. Click the Exit button on the Exatron Auto Run window. 2. Click the Exit button on the Exatron main window. 3. Perform the normal Windows shutdown on the handler computer: Click the Start button in the lower left corner of the screen. Click Turn Off Computer.

Figure 3-8: Shutting Down Windows from the Start Button

4. In the Turn Off Computer dialog box, click Turn Off.

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Securing Trays or Tubes

Replacing the Pickup Head

Figure 3-9: Selecting the Turn Off Option

> The yellow CPU button light will go off when Windows has shut down. 5. You can leave the black power switch turned on. 6. Push in the red EMO (emergency stop) button. 7. If the handler is equipped with a Baco lockable disconnect switch, turn it counterclockwise a quarter turn to the OFF position.

Securing Trays or Tubes


CAUTION: Be careful when carrying or moving filled trays. Jerking the trays can dislodge devices from their pockets, costing clean-up time. NOTE: There is usually no need to loosen or tighten the screws when securing or removing a tray. To secure a tray on the tray carriage: 1. Loosen the tray clamp on the carriage by pulling it toward the front of the handler. 2. Place a tray on the carriage, and gently slide the tray all the way to the back of the carriage. 3. Firmly push the tray clamp toward the back of the carriage until the tray is secure against the spring clip at the back of the carriage.

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Figure 3-10: Two Styles of Tray Clamps (Left, Center); Spring Clip (Right)

To secure a tube on the tube holder: 1. Hold the tube with the dowel hole at the top end.

Dowels on tube holder

Dowel hole on tube

Figure 3-11: Dowel on Holder Fits Dowel Hole on Tube

2. Slide the tube up the tube track, holding on the bottom end out away from the dowel.

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Replacing the Pickup Head

Figure 3-12: Tube Held Out Away from Dowel

3. When the tube reaches the top, push in the bottom end until you hear the dowel snap into the tube hole.

Figure 3-13: Tube Snapped Into Place on Holder

Calibrating Procedures for Tube Devices


If your handler is equipped with a tube holder and tubes, include the following procedures in your setup. The path under the pickup head into which the input tubes vibrate their devices is called the dead nest (dead because unlike the input tubes, this area does not vibrate).

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Figure 3-14: Tube Dead Nest Area

Two adjustments can be made to accomodate the size of the devices in the tube dead nest area. One is the length of the dead nest, and the other is the height of the dead nest.

Setting Dead Nest Length


According to the length of the device, the dead nest can be shortened or elongated by dropping a dowel at each end of the dead nest into a hole for sizing devices with 16, 20, or 28 pins. As Figure 3-15 shows, the dowel placed in the 28-pin hole allows for a longer dead nest than the 16- or 20-pin hole.

Figure 3-15: Tube Dead Nest Area Resized from 16 to 28-Pin Device

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Setting Dead Nest Height

This dimension is important because if the dead nest is too short to accomodate the device, the device will be up-ended, and the pickup head cannot get a grip on the device. If the dead nest is too long, the pickup head may get the device near one end, and it will not be placed into the test site properly.

Setting Dead Nest Height


On the back of the dead nest apparatus is the dead nest adjustment leg, which can be raised or lowered to set the height of the dead nest.

Figure 3-16: Dead Nest Adjustment Leg in Partially Raised Position

To raise or lower the adjustment leg, loosen the four screws and push the leg up or down to the correct position. Then tighten the screws.

Figure 3-17: Dead Nest Adjustment Leg in Lowered Position

This dimension is important because if the dead nest is too high, the device will not slide out of the tube smoothly. If the dead nest is too low, devices will be vibrated out and stacked on top of one another before the pickup head comes along.

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Calibrating and Loading a Detaper


If your handler has a Hover-Davis detaper, this short guide will get you started. See the manufacturers documentation for more details.

Figure 3-18: Tape Threading Diagram on Side of Detaper

Loading the Detaper


Follow the directions in the Hover-Davis manual for threading the detaper. Just a few extra guidelines and points to note are included here. To note when threading the detaper: 1. Fit the supply reel onto the shaft, with the supply tape coming clockwise off the top of the reel. 2. Fit the tensioner arm down over the lip of the supply reel (Figure 3-19). This prevents the spool from falling off the shaft as it spins.

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Loading the Detaper

Figure 3-19: Detaper Supply Reel Tensioner Arm

3. Thread the tape forward under both of the rollers (Figure 3-20).

Figure 3-20: Carrier Tape from Supply Reel Threaded Under Both Rollers

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Figure 3-21: Tape Window LatchClosed (Left), Opened (Right)

4. Open the front tape window latch by pulling it up, then out (Figure 3-21). 5. Raise the tape window and pull the tape through (Figure 3-22). 6. Peel the cover tape back over the top of the window (Figure 3-22).

Figure 3-22: Tape Window Raised

7. Thread the cover tape over the roller behind the tape window and then under the takeup reel, in a clockwise direction. Tape the end to the reel with ESD-safe

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Calibrating and Loading a Detaper

Loading the Detaper

tape (not Scotch tape) and wind it one or two revolutions. CAUTION: Do not use adhesive tape on the carrier tape, as it contains static electricity and can ruin the static-free condition of the carrier tape.

Figure 3-23: Winding Cover Tape Onto Reel

Figure 3-24: Cover Tape Wound Onto Reel

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Figure 3-25: Tape Sprockets Fitting Over Gear Teeth

8. Fit the tape sprockets over the gear teeth (Figure 3-25).

Figure 3-26: Tape Sprockets Fitting Over Gear Teeth

9. Adjust the tape so it is positioned with the ridge between pockets lining up with the grooves at the front of the tape window (Figure 3-26). 10. Fasten down the tape window, and give a little tug on the front of the carrier tape to ensure the sprocket teeth are engaged in the tape. If it is necessary to adjust the tape position, see the next section.

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Calibrating and Loading a Detaper

Aligning the Detaper with the Path of the Pickup Head

Aligning the Detaper with the Path of the Pickup Head


If you determine that the only site out of line with the path of the pickup head is the detaper, you can move it forward in tiny adjustments. CAUTION: It is better to start with the detaper just behind the correct path rather than in front of the path. This is because the adjustment screw can push the detaper forward in tiny amounts, but it cannot pull it back. It would have to be pulled back by hand and the process of alignment begun all over again.

To align the detaper forward: 1. Loosen the 6 locking screws on the side plate (Figure 3-27), but do not remove them.

Figure 3-27: Detaper Locking Screws on Side Plate

2. Turn the adjustment screw in the back just 1/4 turn (Figure 3-28).

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Figure 3-28: Detaper Adjustment Screw

3. Using the Fine Tune window of Exatron Diagnostics, pick a device from the detaper with the pickup head and put it in the test site. 4. Pick the device back up from the test site and move it over the detaper. 5. Visually inspect its position in relation to the tape. > If its position looks good at this height, lower the pickup head to the Z-put position. > If further adjustment is needed, turn the adjustment screw just 1/4 turn at a time until the device fits perfectly in line with the other sites along the path of the pickup head. 6. When you have finished adjusting the detaper position, tighten the 6 locking screws on the side plate.

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Calibrating and Loading a Detaper

Using the Control Panel

Using the Control Panel


On the top of the detaper sits the control panel.

Status light

Forward Feed button

Single Hole Feed button

Reverse Feed button Decrease Pitch Index button Pitch Index Display Increase Pitch Index button
Figure 3-29: Detaper Control Panel

The Pitch Index display number at the bottom of the panel signifies the number of sprocket holes between each pocket center (Figure 3-30, left) or, in the case of multiple simultaneous pickups, between the center of the first pocket to be picked and the center of the last pocket to be picked. Note in Figure 3-30, right, that although each pocket has 2 sprocket holes, the total is only 6, not 8. They are counted from pocket center to pocket center. Thus, 4 pockets at a time will be moved.

Figure 3-30: Counting Number of Sprocket Holes Between Pocket Centers Between Single Pockets (Left), Between Four Pockets (Right)

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To increase this number, press the Increase Pitch Index (+ sign) button below the display once for each increment. To decrease this number, press the Decrease Pitch Index (- sign) button above the display once for each decrement. Above the Pitch Index Display are three directional buttons. The Reverse Feed button is the lowest, surrounded by a down-pointing arrow. The Single Hole Feed button is in the middle, surrounded by a rectangle. The Forward Feed button is the highest, surrounded by an up-pointing arrow. Above the buttons is the status indicator light. To make the detaper ready when the status light is yellow, press the Single Hole Feed button. The status light turns green. To move the tape forward the distance of one pocket, press the Forward Feed button. To move the tape backward the distance of one pocket, press the Reverse Feed button. To move the tape forward the distance of one sprocket hole, press the Forward Feed button while you are holding down the Single Hole Feed button. To move the tape backward the distance of one sprocket hole, press the Reverse Feed button while you are holding down the Single Hole Feed button.

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Setting Up a Taper

Using the Control Panel

Setting Up a Taper
Supply reel with sealing tape Tape trackcounterclockwise direction Empty/ outof-pocket image sensor Output or takeup reel

Supply reel with carrier tape

Taper alignment screws

Figure 3-31: Model 202 Taper

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If your handler has a taper, include the following procedures in your setup. Task
Changing Taper Changeover Kit for Different Device Sizes Mounting a Takeup Reel Mounting a Supply Reel Replacing the Tape Track Loading the Carrier Tape Loading the Sealing Tape Adjusting the Position of the Taper Adjusting Seal Head Setting Temperature for Heat Seal Head

Page
3-24 3-26 3-27 3-28 3-30 3-33 3-37 3-38 3-45

Changing Taper Changeover Kit for Different Device Sizes


The tape-and-reel assembly is one of the components that should be changed before processing a new device size. For the other components, see "Changing Device Sizes" on page 3-3. To change the taper changeover kit: 1. Push in the EMO button on the taper (Figure 3-31) to make sure the heat seal head is turned off. If the seal head was on, wait until it is cold. 2. Lift the pressure roller block out of the way by raising the top screw with your index finger and holding it while you push the keeper pin to the right, into the pressure roller block (Figure 3-32). This holds the pressure roller block in the raised position.

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Changing Taper Changeover Kit for Different Device Sizes

Figure 3-32: Lifting Pressure Roller Arm and Pushing In Keeper Pin

3. Cut and remove the carrier tape and cover tape and the reels they are on. 4. Mount the new size of carrier tape and cover tape reels as described in "Mounting a Takeup Reel" on page 3-26 and "Mounting a Supply Reel" on page 3-27, but do not thread them yet. 5. Replace the tape track tooling as described in "Replacing the Tape Track" on page 3-28. 6. Replace the seal head blade as described in "Changing Seal Head Blade" on page 3-40. 7. Thread the carrier tape and cover tape as described in "Loading the Carrier Tape" on page 3-30 and "Loading the Sealing Tape" on page 3-33. 8. Turn on the handler computer to provide power to the taper. 9. Push and turn the EMO button on the taper control panel to release it. 10. Adjust the gap sensor by loosening the red thumbscrew (Figure 3-33, left) and sliding the sensor left or right a little until the sensor beam sees through the hole in the bottom of the tape pocket. When it does, the Gap LED on the taper control panel lights up (Figure 3-33, right). When the sensor is positioned, retighten the red thumbscrew.

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Figure 3-33: Gap Sensor (Left); Gap Sensor LED Lit (Right)

Make any other necessary adjustments to the taper as described in the rest of this chapter.

Mounting a Takeup Reel


To mount an empty takeup reel: 1. Loosen the thumbscrew on the locking hub of the takeup wheel drive shaft located on the extreme left of the taper (Figure 3-34). Remove the hub and place an empty takeup reel onto the drive shaft. 2. With the three hub pins aligned to the three pinholes in the center of the reel (Figure 3-34), slide the locking hub over the reel and back into place. 3. Tighten the thumbscrew to lock the takeup reel in position.

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Setting Up a Taper

Mounting a Supply Reel

Figure 3-34: Locking Hub on Takeup Reel with Alignment Pins

Mounting a Supply Reel


Slide the carrier tape supply reel onto the three center prongs of the supply wheel so that the carrier tape unwinds from the bottom of the reel toward the right (Figure 3-31, Figure 3-35).

Figure 3-35: Center Prongs of Supply Reel

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Replacing the Tape Track


To replace the tape track: 1. Turn off the air regulator. 2. Unscrew and remove the two screws on the side of the tape track (Figure 3-36). 3. Remove the air hose (Figure 3-36, right) by pushing up and holding the orange ring and pulling down on the vinyl air hose.

Figure 3-36: Screws on Side of Tape Track to Be Removed

4. Loosen the screw on the cover tape guide block assembly and push it to the left (Figure 3-38). 5. Slide the track out to the side and remove. 6. Slide in the new tape track. > You can confirm the size device the tape track uses in two ways. The sample of the correct tape is attached to the side of the track, and the part number is etched on the fiberglass inset on the top of the track (Figure 3-37).

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Setting Up a Taper

Replacing the Tape Track

Figure 3-37: Tape Track with Part Number and Sample Tape

7. Screw in the two track screws. 8. Insert the air hose into the fitting.

Figure 3-38: Cover Tape Guide Block Assembly Pushed Left

> If you need to change the guide block, slip it off the guide rod and replace the new guide block on the rod (Figure 3-39).

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Figure 3-39: Guide Block Partly Removed from Rod

9. Adjust the guide block to fit directly over the carrier tape and sealing tape. 10. Push the guide block down so that it is flush against the carrier tape. 11. While holding the thin edge down, tighten the adjustment screw on the guide block assembly (Figure 3-51).

Loading the Carrier Tape


To load the carrier tape: 1. Feed the leading end of the carrier tape (the leader) toward the sealing tape guide as shown above, making sure that the rear edge of the tape is under the guide at the rear of the track.

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Loading the Carrier Tape

Figure 3-40: Carrier Tape Under Guide At Bottom Rear of Track

2. Push it toward the front of the underside of the tape track. Until it gets to the front, there are no more guides to thread it through. You can see the tape slack under the track. 3. At the bottom front is another guide. Thread the tape through it. 4. Bring the tape to the top side and thread it through the guides.

Figure 3-41: Carrier Tape Under Guide At Top Front of TrackSide View (Left); Top View (Right)

5. Continue feeding the carrier tape leader under the sealing heads. The sealing heads should be raised above the level of the carrier tape at this point. 6. When the carrier tape leader in the track reaches the pressure roller block, raise the top screw with your index finger and hold it while you push the keeper pin to the right, into the pressure roller block. This holds the pressure roller

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block in the raised position while you feed the carrier tape along the track underneath.

Figure 3-42: Lifting Pressure Roller Arm and Pushing In Keeper Pin

7. Feed the carrier tape under the projecting takeup arm. Insert the carrier tape leader into the takeup reel according to the manufacturer's specifications. Wind the carrier tape around the takeup reel until it is secured in place. The carrier tape should move freely back and forth underneath the takeup arm.

Figure 3-43: Tape Under Takeup Arm

8. Let down the pressure roller block by slowly pulling the keeper pin out to the left until the pinch roller is lowered and just the right pressure on the tape.

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Setting Up a Taper

Loading the Sealing Tape

Loading the Sealing Tape


To load the sealing tape: 1. Sandwich a roll of sealing tape between the two sealing tape plates, making sure the roll is snugged around the larger raised circle on the inside (Figure 344).

Figure 3-44: Sealing Tape PlatesOutside (Left), Inside (Right)

2. Suspend the reel on the sealing tape supply reel rod in the center of the taper between the two blue delrin supply reel adjustment collars (Figure 3-45), with the tape coming off the bottom of the reel.

Figure 3-45: Adjustment Collar on Sealing Tape Supply Reel

3. Viewing from above, position the sealing tape supply reel centered over the carrier tape in the carrier tape track. Tighten the adjustment set screw on each

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supply reel adjustment collar to secure the sealing tape supply reel in this position on the rod. 4. As shown in Figure 3-46, the sealing tape unwinds from the bottom of the reel in a counterclockwise direction toward the sealing tape guide assembly. Feed the sealing tape to the right over both pins of the sealing tape guide assembly and then under the guide block to the left. Notice that the tape rests on the upper, larger projecting pin but never touches the lower, smaller projecting pin.

Figure 3-46: Sealing Tape Threaded to Sealing Tape Guide Assembly

Figure 3-47: Model 202 Sealing Tape Threaded to Sealing Tape Guide Assembly (Left); Sealing Tape Threaded Under Guide Block (Right)

> Guide blocks come in widths from 8 mm to 72 mm (up to 120 mm by special order). There are two sets of grooves on the underside of the guide block.

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Setting Up a Taper

Loading the Sealing Tape

The outer set of grooves guides the carrier tape. The inner set of grooves guides the sealing tape.

Figure 3-48: Two Widths of Guide BlocksTop View (Left); Bottom View (Right)

Figure 3-49: Placement in Grooves of Guide Blockof Sealing Tape (Left) and Carrier Tape (Right)

5. Check to make sure the guide block is the right width for the tape you are using. 6. Loosen the side screw on the guide block assembly. > If you need to change the guide block, slip it off the guide rod and replace the new guide block on the rod (Figure 3-50).

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Figure 3-50: Guide Block Partly Removed from Rod

7. Adjust the guide block to fit directly over the carrier tape and sealing tape. > Push the guide block down so that it is flush against the carrier tape. > While holding the thin edge down, tighten the adjustment screw on the guide block assembly (Figure 3-51). The carrier tape should now be inside the outer set of grooves on the guide block.

Figure 3-51: Guide Block Assembly

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Setting Up a Taper

Adjusting the Position of the Taper

8. Use light pressure or heat to attach the sealing tape to the carrier tape. CAUTION: Do not use adhesive tape on the carrier tape, as it contains static electricity and can ruin the static-free condition of the carrier tape. 9. Feed the sealing tape under the guide block assembly. Advance the tape until approximately five inches of sealing tape extends past the sealing heads. The sealing tape should now be in between the inner set of grooves on the guide block.

Adjusting the Position of the Taper


NOTE: This feature is available only if the Model 202 tape track is parallel to the path of the pickup head. If the tape track is perpendicular to the path of the pickup head, any adjustments can be done in the Exatron software. NOTE: Perform this task after you have calibrated the other positions in the path of the pickup head(s), as described in Chapter 5. The taper is set at the factory to be perfectly in line with the path of the pickup head. However, if at some time you remove the taper or make major adjustments, the procedure for realigning the taper is straightforward. To align the tape track with the path of the pickup head: 1. Loosen the 4 bolts at the base of the taper (Figure 3-52) but dont remove them. 2. Turn the taper alignment knob slightly to change the position of the tape track so it is in line with the path of the pickup head.

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Figure 3-52: Taper Alignment Knob Above Base Bolts

3. Using the Exatron Diagnostics software, place a set of devices in the tape with the pickup head. > If necessary, readjust the taper alignment knob and repeat the placement test. 4. When the alignment is perfect, retighten the 4 bolts.

Adjusting Seal Head


Several adjustments may need to be done for a seal head: lateral alignment, downward pressure, and speed of descent and ascent of seal head. Correct lateral alignment assures that the seal heads are on the sealing edges of the tape; correct pressure balances the degree of heat needed to seal without tape damage. Additionally, the sealing blade will need to be changed on occasion.

Understanding Blade Sizes and Orientation


Common tape widths are shown below, with part numbers for the corresponding seal head blade and cover tape guide. Size
8 mm 8 mm 12 mm 12 mm

Type
Heat seal PSA Heat seal PSA

Blade Number
TAPE-869 TAPE-953 TAPE-872 TAPE-952

Cover Tape Guide Number


TAPE-680 TAPE-680 TAPE-766 TAPE-766

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Setting Up a Taper

Adjusting Seal Head

Size
16 mm 16 mm

Type
Heat seal PSA

Blade Number
TAPE-873 TAPE-954

Cover Tape Guide Number


TAPE-723 (cover tape width 0.525) or TAPE-935 (cover tape width 0.545) TAPE-723 (cover tape width 0.525) or TAPE-935 (cover tape width 0.545)

Figure 3-53: Two Sizes of Heat Seal Blades: 16mm, Top, and 12mm, Bottom

Notice in Figure 3-53 that whereas different blade sizes are the same length, the spacing of the runners is what determines the width in millimeters. The runners on the top blade are spaced 16 mm apart, while the runners on the bottom blade are spaced only 12 mm apart. Pressure seal blades

Heat seal blades


Figure 3-54: Top Side of Blades As They Slide into Seal Head (Left); Bottom Side of Blades That Contact Tape (Right)

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Changing Seal Head Blade


You need to change the blade in the bottom of the seal head in two circumstances: You are changing tape width to accommodate a different size of devices. You are changing between heat and pressure sealing tape. To change the seal head blade: 1. To remove the blade, insert a screwdriver as shown in Figure 3-55 and push up on the movable screw and hold it. Pull the blade out to the left as shown.

Figure 3-55: Replacing Heat Seal Head Blade

Figure 3-56: Seal Head with Empty Rails for Blade Insertion (Back View)

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Setting Up a Taper

Adjusting Seal Head

2. To insert a different blade, insert a screwdriver as shown in Figure 3-55 and push up on the movable screw and hold it. Slide the blade in from the left with the smooth side up and the dowel hole toward you (Figure 3-57), then release the screw. 3. Center the blade under the seal head, sliding it back and forth until you can hear it snap and feel it catch.

Figure 3-57: Pressure Seal Blade Inserted Partway into RailTop View (Left), Side View (Right)

Notice that the blade must be inserted with the smooth side up and the hole out toward the operator (Figure 3-57, left). When it is slid into the rails of the seal head, it does not touch the surface of the tape track (Figure 3-57, right).

Adjusting Seal Heads Lateral Position


Use this procedure to align the lateral position of the seal head. This should need to be done very seldom; only when changing tape width by a large amount. To align lateral position of the seal head: 1. Make sure the heater is off and that the seal head is cool. 2. Loosen slightly but do not remove the six screws on the back side of the taper that are connected to the seal head (Figure 3-58). 3. Turn the red thumbscrew for small adjustments to move seal head away from taper base. Push gently with hand to move seal head closer to taper base.

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Figure 3-58: Six Lateral Adjustment Screws for Seal Head; Thumbscrew for Small Adjustments

4. Retighten the six screws. 5. Once the head is aligned, turn the heat to the sealing head back on. Set the temperature on the heater to the desired heat. Wait until the display has stabilized. WARNING! Do not touch the heat seal heads directly when the heat is turned on. 6. After the sealing head has warmed up, check the seal on the sealing tape. Manually engage the seal head. Apply pressure to the sealing tape for 3 to 5 seconds. Use the takeup arm to engage the head. This should cause a good seal to the carrier tape. Manually advance the carrier tape and inspect the seal. 7. Run the carrier tape for several pockets with the seal head engaged. NOTE: You may need to practice this adjustment a few times by running the machine briefly at the start of a job and inspecting the seal for quality.

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Setting Up a Taper

Adjusting Seal Head

Figure 3-59: Example of Good Tape Seal

Adjusting Seal Heads Downward Pressure


You may need to adjust the pressure of the seal head. This pressure is controlled by the auxiliary air regulator on the back side of the tape track. To adjust pressure of seal head: Pull out the black adjustment valve just below the seal head. > Turn the valve clockwise to increase the pressure. > Turn the valve counterclockwise to decrease the pressure. 8. Push the black adjustment valve back in to lock it when you have finished the adjustment.

Adjustment valve
Figure 3-60: Auxiliary Air Regulator for Seal Head Pressure

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Adjusting Speed of Seal Head


For lighter weight and smaller devices, the descent and/or ascent of the seal head may need to be slowed, to prevent devices from bouncing out of the tape pockets. See Figure 3-61. To change the upward speed of the seal head, adjust the outward-facing air flow control adjustment knob on the seal head. To change the downward speed of the seal head, adjust the right-facing air flow control adjustment knob (the one closest to the image sensor) on the seal head. To adjust the air flow at the air valve: 1. Turn the lock nut counterclockwise to unlock the adjustment knob. 2. Turn the air flow control adjustment knob: > Turn the knob clockwise to lessen the air flow and slow the speed of the seal head, or... > Turn the knob counterclockwise to increase air flow and quicken the speed of the seal head. 3. When air flow is appropriate, turn the lock nut clockwise to tighten it.

Adjustment knob Lock nut


Figure 3-61: Outward-Facing Knob Adjusts Upward Speed; Right Knob Adjusts Downward Speed

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Setting Up a Taper

Setting Temperature for Heat Seal Head

Setting Temperature for Heat Seal Head


The displayed temperatures are the actual or current temperatures. The temperature displays may be set to show Celsius or Fahrenheit. In Figure 3-62, the top left display is adjusting its temperature, as shown by the small 1 in the upper left corner above the C. In contrast, the temperatures in the other three displays are stable, because there is no number above the C or F. Also, the top left display is hot, whereas the other three displays are room temperature.

Figure 3-62: Heater Controller Displaysin Celsius (Left), in Fahrenheit (Right)

A general guideline may be to use somewhere around 275 to 325 degrees Fahrenheit for a heat seal. A narrow carrier tape takes a lower temperature to prevent burning. If in doubt, it is better to start with a lower temperature and test it, then increase little by little as needed. To set the temperature: On the Taper window of Exatron Diagnostics, set the temperature to the desired temperature (in Celsius) and then click the Set Temperature button. Temperature in Fahrenheit
77 275 300 325 350

Temperature in Celsius
25 135 149 163 177

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See also "Checking Omega Temperature Controller" on page 6-66. However, be aware that the Exatron software settings will override any different settings manually set. To turn off the heat seal head: On the Taper window of Exatron Diagnostics, set the temperature to 25 degrees Celsius and then click the Set Temperature button.

Getting Acquainted with the Main Window


The buttons on the Main window are described below.

Figure 3-63: Main Window

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Managing Job Files

Verifying the Factory-Installed Job File

. Buttons on Main Window Button Function Diagnostic Open a window with tabs to access various software settings and diagnostic procedures. For More Information Chapter 5

Auto Mode Open a window to do a production job in Auto Run.

page 4-2

Change Password Change a password.

page 3-54

Exit Close the Exatron software.

Managing Job Files


A job file contains the distances each part of the handler must move to get to various destinations, the number of trays, the delay times, and other settings related to the movement of the devices through the system. The job file is different from a log file; the job file does not record passes and fails or any other results data from a tester or other peripheral.

Verifying the Factory-Installed Job File


The procedures for verifying the settings of your factory-installed job file and building a new job file are similar. When building a new job file, it is better to copy an existing, proven file, and modify it. To verify your file, just check the settings and distances, and make changes wherever needed. This section discusses each part of this procedure: Task Copying the factory-installed job file to modify Opening the modified job file Checking the settings
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Copying the Job File for Modifications


Exatron recommends that you save the factory-preset job file under a new name before you begin to work with it, to prevent making accidental changes to the original file. To save a job file with a new name: 1. Right-click the Start button at the bottom left corner of your Windows screen. 2. Click Explore. Windows Explorer opens.

3. In Explorer, find the Exatron folder directly under the C drive, thus: C:\Exatron. Double-click it to open it.

4. Find the job file. It has the filename extension of .job or .edf (Exatron data file). 5. Right-click on the job file. A context menu opens. 6. Click Copy on the context menu.

7. Deselect the job file name by clicking somewhere else on the screen. 8. Right-click on the screen. A context menu opens.

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Managing Job Files

Opening a Job File

9. Click Paste on the context menu.

10. Scroll to the bottom of the screen and find the copied file. Its name is Copy of ___.job or Copy of ___.edf. 11. Click once on the file to select it.

12. Click inside the filename. The cursor appears, indicating that you can retype the name.

13. Type a new name.

14. Press the Enter key on your keyboard. Now the copy has a new name. Make any modifications to this copy. Make sure the file is saved to the Exatron folder.

Opening a Job File


The Exatron software should open upon system startup. If it does not, double-click the Exatron icon on the desktop. The main window opens. To open a job file: 1. On the main window, click the Diagnostic button.

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Figure 3-64: Entering Password

2. Enter the correct password. The factory-set password is P1. This may be changed at any time with the Change Password button. 3. Inside the dialog box, open the file containing the factory presets.

Figure 3-65: Opening a Job File

CAUTION: It is strongly recommended that you dont make changes to the factoryset job file. If you need to make changes, first make a backup copy of the original job file, and experiment with the copy.

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Checking the Settings

Saving a Job File

The job file that came with your handler has been preset to fit the configurations you specified. You need to do a verification of all the settings and distances in the job file before you begin a production job in Auto Run. See the next section.

Saving a Job File


There are two ways to save a job file. If you click the Save Parameters button on any window, the changes are saved to the job file that is currently open. If you click the OK button at the bottom right of any window, a dialog box opens that allows you to save changes under a new file name. > Make sure the file is saved to the Exatron folder. Click the Save button. To discard changes without saving, click the Cancel button at the lower right of the window.

Checking the Settings


Before starting a new job, you may need to check some or all of the following settings: Settings to Check Job count and failure parameters Number of rows and columns in trays or waffle packs Offset of other test site(s), if any Y distances to test sites Pickup heads rotation options Z-get distance at test site Z-put distance at test site Y distances to tray pockets X distances to tray pockets Z-get distance at trays Z-put distance at trays Y distances to tape Z-put distance at tape Tape pocket widths Timing delays Disabling test sites or input trays 5-32 5-39 5-65 5-74 5-33 5-78 5-77 5-82 5-83 5-78 5-77 5-104 5-104 5-107 5-29; 5-35 5-38 Page

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Settings to Check Destinations for various sort categories Set temperatures for thermal testing 5-44 5-100

Page

Setting the Number of Rows and Columns in Trays or Waffle Packs


If desired, you can set a different configuration for each tray. To set the number of rows and columns in a tray or waffle pack: 1. From the main window, click the Diagnostic button. 2. Click the Setup Parameters tab. 3. Select the tray or waffle pack whose rows and columns you want to define. 4. Type the number of rows and columns in the tray or waffle pack (Figure 3-66).

Figure 3-66: Tray Information

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Checking the Settings

Setting the Number of Rows and Columns in Trays or Waffle

Figure 3-67: Example of Row and Column Layout for Tray

Both for trays and for waffle packs, rows are counted from the back of the tray to the front. Columns are counted from left to right.

X1_3 Column 1

X1_3 Column 6

X1_3 Row 2 X1_3 Row 5

Figure 3-68: Example of Row and Column Layout for Waffle Pack

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Fine Tuning Overview


The following procedure is to be used only as a quick reference. Before performing this procedure for the first time, please read the sections under "Fine Tune Window" on page 5-51. To fine-tune any position: 1. Select the position for a component from the Selections drop-down box. 2. Type the approximate distance of the position from the motors zero position. 3. Type the scale by which you want to jog the motor. 4. Click the Move To button to move the motor to the position selected. 5. Click either of the jog arrow buttons (left or right; up or down) to jog the motor away from the position shown, by the scale shown.

Changing the Password


To make access to your machine secure, you can change the password initially or periodically. To change the password: 1. On the Exatron main window, click the Pwds button. 2. In the Change Passwords dialog box, type the current password in the Old Password box. 3. Type it again in the Re-type the Old Password box to confirm. 4. Type the new password in the New Password box. 5. Type it again in the Re-type the New Password box to confirm. Click OK.

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Changing the Password

Setting the Number of Rows and Columns in Trays or Waffle

Figure 3-69: Changing Password

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Chapter 4: Auto Run


Chapter Overview
This chapter discusses the following main topics: Topic Halt, Run, and EMO Buttons Starting an Auto Run Auto Run Window Features Page 4-1 4-2 4-3

NOTE: Before beginning a production run, be sure the input devices are secured, as discussed in "Securing Trays or Tubes" on page 3-9.

Halt, Run, and EMO Buttons


The EMO (emergency stop) button can be pushed in anytime there is a need to instantly disable the motors and shut off the 24-volt AC. However, it leaves the computer running, so that when Auto Run is continued, the operator is given the choice of restarting where the handler left off with the device count.

Figure 4-1: EMO (Emergency Stop) Button

To release the EMO button, turn it clockwise until it pops out again. Some handlers have HALT and RUN buttons near the EMO button. These hardware buttons work just like the Exatron software buttons Pause or HALT and Continue or RUN in the Auto Run window.

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Pressing HALT pauses the handler, while it keeps count of the devices. NOTE: After depressing the HALT button, you must press HALT a second time to release it and permit RUN to be pressed. Pressing RUN resumes the Auto Run where it left off.

Starting an Auto Run


Running parts in Auto Run requires a predefined job file, as explained in "Verifying the Factory-Installed Job File" on page 3-47 and "Keeping Your Original Job File" on page 5-2. To open the Auto Run window, click the Auto Mode button on the main window. To start an Auto Run, click the Auto Run button on the Auto Run window.

Figure 4-2: Auto Run Window

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Auto Run Window Features

Auto Run Window Features


Job Path In the upper left corner, confirmation is displayed of the job file you opened and its path or location. Verify that it is the correct file. The log file will be saved with the same name as the job file, but with the extension .log. If a work mode has been selected in the job file, it too is displayed. As the Auto Run progresses, the number of devices sorted to each bin is incrementally displayed. As the Auto Run progresses, the total number of devices sorted to all bins is incrementally displayed. The total number of devices to be processed in the production run is displayed. The current number of seconds is displayed: from the time each pickup nozzle gets a device from the input until the time that same pickup nozzle gets the next device from the input. The current average number of units processed is displayed. Above the Messages area is the display of whether a simulation or a real test has been set up. Initially the Messages display is blank. As the Auto Run progresses, each action is displayed here. You can scroll up to see previous messages. You can also check the log file later. This button is enabled only after a run has been started by clicking the Auto Run button. Click this button to pause the job. The handler keeps count of the devices already sorted and those to be sorted. This button is enabled only after a run has been started and the Pause button has been clicked. Click this button to restart the job where it left off.

Log File

Work Mode

Count

Current Total Parts

Total Job Count

Test Cycle Time

Units Per Hour [test/simulation display]

Messages

Pause

Continue

Enable/Disable Socket On This button is displayed for handlers having more than one The Fly test site. If one site becomes dysfunctional, you do not have

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to stop the job and leave Auto Run. You can click this button to continue the job using only the functional test site. If you need to disable a socket during the production run, click Pause, then click the Enable/Disable Socket On The Fly button. Then click Continue to proceed without exiting the Auto Run window.

Clear X[n]

If you stop the handler in the middle of a job, one or more trays may still be in the work area. To home them, or move them out of the way to the front, click the button that controls each tray: Clear X1, Clear X2, etc. Click this button to begin the processing of devices in Auto Run. First, the Load Job dialog box is displayed (Figure 4-3). Open the file that corresponds with the type of device you want to run. Next, a dialog box is displayed (Figure 4-4) that lets you specify the first tray pockets to pick from (input) and put to (output). To start at the beginning of each tray, click the Reset Input/Output Trays buttons. Or you can type a different row and column to start with for the input and/or output, if you had stopped in the middle of a run.

Auto Run

End of Lot

Click this button to stop the handler from searching for more devices before the number of empty pockets specified has been reached. Any devices that remain at the test site(s) are tested, then the pickup head takes these last tested devices to their sorted destination. Then all motors are sent home. The Stop button completely stops the motors. However, the part count for the current run is kept. You will have the option to continue the counts where you last stopped when you restart the run. Click Exit to return to the main window.

Stop

Exit

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Auto Run Window Features

Figure 4-3: Opening a Job File for Auto Run

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Figure 4-4: Starting Input and Output Pockets

Process Instructions and Description


CAUTION: Be careful when carrying or moving filled trays. Jerking the trays can dislodge devices from their pockets, costing clean-up time. To run a job in Auto Run: 1. Place the devices to be processed in the appropriate trays or tubes. Load the trays or tubes onto the handler. Make sure each tray is snug up against the back of the tray carriage and is secured with the tray clamp. 2. Close the clear tray cover. 3. Click the Auto Run button.

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Auto Run Window Features

Process Instructions and Description

4. In the Load Job dialog box, select the correct job file to load. 5. In the Start Picking Up dialog box, specify the tray row and column to start with. > You will be asked whether you want to continue the counts where you last stopped, or to reset all counts. Reset All Counts Click this button to reset the total counts to zero. If the handler has a taper, the number of pockets specified (on the Setup Parameters window, Figure 4-5) between the pickup head drop-off and the image sensors inspection will not be inspected for devices present. Click this button to start where you stopped before. If the handler has a taper, the number of pockets specified (on the Setup Parameters window, Figure 4-5) between the pickup head drop-off and the image sensors inspection will be inspected for devices present.

Continue

Figure 4-5: Drop-Off to Inspection Gap

The handler first checks that all the test sites are empty. If there are any devices in the test sites, they are moved to the flush bin. Next the handler begins testing devices. After testing, each device is placed in the next consecutive pocket, both for pass and fail locations. The order of placement is as follows: rows 1 to last in column 1 are filled, then rows 1 to last in column 2 are filled, etc. As each device is processed, its sort category is added to the count. When an input tray or tube is empty, a message is displayed to replace the input tray or tube. If this is the end of the job, click End of Lot. If more devices need to be tested, load more devices and click Continue. When an output tray or tube is full, a message is displayed to replace the output tray or tube. If this is the end of the job, click End of Lot. If more devices need to be tested, load more devices and click Continue. If you click Pause, you must first click Continue before you can click End of Lot to interrupt and go back to Diagnostics. Clicking End of Lot clears any parts out of the system that are in progress. Now you can click Exit to close Auto Run. Then you can re-enter Diagnostics if desired.

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Figure 4-6: Auto Run Window During Run

In Figure 4-6, a running account of the actions is shown in the Messages display.

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Auto Run Window Features

Auto Run Using Tape and Reel

Auto Run Using Tape and Reel


When you click the Auto Run button on a system using a tape and reel, the Initializing Tape and Reel dialog box is displayed. The options available here enable you not to leave an empty pocket if you have had to leave Auto Run in the middle of a job. Alternatively, you can specify a certain number of empty tape pockets on one reel between jobs for various purposes.

Figure 4-7: Initializing Taper Before Auto Run

Would you like to initialize Click Yes or No. Tape and Reel? Clicking Yes has the same effect as clicking the Initial Taper button on the Taper window in Diagnostics. It homes the tape, or moves it to the Gap sensor and then to where the next empty pocket is under the path of the pickup head. Click No if you want to restart a job that is already in the correct position. The tape is not advanced before Auto Run begins. Advance Leader Counts This is the the number of empty tape pockets to be advanced at the start of Auto Run, or when the Advance Leader button is clicked on the Auto Run window. The default number comes from the Leader Count box in the Taper window of Diagnostics. You can type a different number of leader pockets for the current run, but the changed value is not saved. The next time Auto Run is opened, the default value will be shown again. This is the number of empty tape pockets to be advanced at the end of Auto Run, or when the Advance Trailer button is

Advance Trailer Counts

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Chapter 4: Auto Run

clicked on the Auto Run window. The default number comes from the Trailer Count box in the Taper window of Diagnostics. You can type a different number of trailer pockets for the current run, but the changed value is not saved. The next time Auto Run is opened, the default value will be shown again. Current Tape Counts The number of devices already placed in the tape is displayed incrementally. You can change this number if necessary. For example, if the number of devices previously processed in this job was 3, but the tape has advanced two empty pockets, you can manually place two passed devices in the empty pockets behind the pickup head. Then you can change the number 3 to 5, and the count will be correct again. Total Tape Counts The total number of devices to be placed in the reel of tape is displayed here. You can change this number if necessary. Type the total number of devices to be run in a job. This number may be equal to or greater than the number in the Tape Total Count box. If this number is greater, when the tape is filled with its quota, a message is displayed in Auto Run. If the option to Continue is selected, the extra devices in the job run will be placed in a tray rather than in the tape. Click this button to start the Auto Run. Click this button to close this box and return to the Auto Run window.

Total Job Counts

OK Cancel

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Auto Run Window Features

Auto Run Using Multiple Test Sites

Auto Run Using Multiple Test Sites

Figure 4-8: Auto Run WindowHandler Using Multiple Test Sites

If your handler uses multiple test sites, you may see an added section showing the percentage of devices tested at each socket that were passed.

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Chapter 5: Diagnostics
Chapter Overview
This chapter describes diagnostic tasks for the Model 900, accessed by clicking the Diagnostic button on the main window.

Figure 5-1: Main Window

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Chapter 5: Diagnostics

Keeping Your Original Job File


The settings displayed come from the file you opened at the beginning of the diagnostic session. If you opened the file containing the factory presets, you will likely not need to change the factory settings unless a piece of hardware or a tray configuration is changed. If you do need to make changes for any reason, it is recommended that you copy the file containing the factory settings first, then use the settings in the copy of the file as a basis for fine-tuning the measurements. Save any changes under a new file name. For information on copying and saving a job file, see "Copying the Job File for Modifications" on page 3-48 and "Saving a Job File" on page 3-51. The distances for each tray configuration need to be fine-tuned only once. If you use trays with various types of waffle packs, set up a separate job file for each tray configuration, and use it each time you use that tray configuration.

Diagnostics Windows
The windows available from the Diagnostic button allow every mechanical and electrical action of the handler to be checked and tested. Usually, best results are obtained when the windows are used in order, from left to right. However, there may be occasions when it is feasible to use the features of just one or two of the windows. The following are the windows available from the Diagnostic button. Your handler has only the ones used in your setup. You can access each of the Diagnostics windows by clicking on its tab at the top of the screen. Window Input / Output Check Function Page

Tests signals between hardware and software (This window was formerly 5-7 split into Sensor Check and Solenoid Check) Check Tube Latches Gives temporary display of output tube sensor actions 5-25 Setup Parameters Sets timing of various actions 5-26 Sort Interface Directs the disposition or placement of devices in various conditions; 5-43 determines which sort goes to which bin Motors Setup Sets or displays the speed of the various motors; tests motor movements 5-47 Fine Tune Sets distances between various motor positions and tray pockets 5-51 Thermal Setup (Optional) Sets hot/cold temperatures 5-100 Taper (Optional) Sets information about tape; sets reel motor speeds 5-103

NOTE: Your handler software may not display every box or button for various options discussed in this manual. Rest assured that your handler and its software have been customized for your companys needs.

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Diagnostics Windows

To access the Diagnostics windows: 1. On the main window, click the Diagnostic button. 2. Enter the correct password. The factory-set password is P1 (Figure 5-2).

Figure 5-2: Entering Password

> The Load Job dialog box is displayed (Figure 5-3). 3. Open the file you need to check or modify.

Figure 5-3: Opening a Job File for Diagnostics

The first window displayed is the Input / Output Check window.

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Chapter 5: Diagnostics

At the bottom right of each tabbed window in Diagnostics are two functioning buttons.

Figure 5-4: Buttons on Each Diagnostic Window

OK

Clicking this button exits Diagnostics and displays the Save As dialog box, where you are given a chance to save your changes under a new file name. Clicking this button exits Diagnostics and returns to the main window without saving any changes.

Cancel

Using Override Buttons


If an item on the Input / Output Check window does not cause the corresponding solenoid or output action, use one of the override buttons to check the solenoid itself. If the override button causes the desired action, then you know that a wire is broken to cause lack of communication from the software to the hardware. The number of override buttons on your handler depends on the number of pickup nozzles and other features that use vacuum, blow-off, etc. to move the devices from site to site and to clamp the devices into test sockets. Pressing each override button activates the corresponding vacuum, blow-off, test clamp, etc. See also "Taper Outputs" on page 5-18.

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Diagnostics Windows

Using Override Buttons

Figure 5-5: Examples of Override Buttons

Following are some examples of test site clamps, each consisting of a slider (horizontal, forward-backward motion) and a pusher (vertical, up-and-down motion).

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Figure 5-6: Push Cylinder Up (Left); Push Cylinder Down (Right)

Figure 5-7: Slide Cylinder Retracted (Left); Slide Cylinder Extended (Right)

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Input / Output Check Window

Using Override Buttons

Input / Output Check Window


The Input / Output Check window is divided into the Input and Output group boxes, where you can test the inputs and outputs. The Input group box is equivalent to the Sensor Check window on some software versions. The Output group box is equivalent to the Solenoid Check window on some software versions.

Figure 5-8: Input / Output Window

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Input Group Box


The inputs allow you to test the functioning of each sensor in the system. It tests: The sensor state Whether the software recognizes the sensors change in state You can manually block or actuate each sensor, and the corresponding checkmark or light should toggle. See the sensor manufacturers manual for more information on the sensors.

Output Group Box


This tests signals from the Exatron software to the handler. It allows every solenoid and light in the system to be tested. Placing a check mark in each check box should activate the corresponding solenoid or light.

Buttons on All I/O Port Pages

Figure 5-9: Buttons Turning All Motors On or Off

All Motors Off All Motors On

Click this button to turn off all the motors. Click this button to turn on all the motors.

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Input / Output Check Window

Ports on Circuit Boards

Ports on Circuit Boards


The inputs and outputs are grouped according to which port they are connected to.

Figure 5-10: Corresponding Ports on Circuit Boards

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Chapter 5: Diagnostics

Selecting a Port to Check


Each port page gives access to a different group of inputs and outputs. Your handler may have two or three boards of ports.

Figure 5-11: Port Selection Drop-Down ListBoards 1, 2, and 3

Port Selection

Click the dropdown arrow to the right of the box, and click the port page you want to access. For each input, a checkmark toggles on or off when the input is activated. For each output, click to place a checkmark and toggle on or off the output.

Input

Output

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Input / Output Check Window

Selecting a Port to Check

Figure 5-12: Input / Output Check WindowPort for Pickup Nozzle Vacuums

Figure 5-13: Input / Output Check WindowPort for Safety Features

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Figure 5-14: Input / Output Check WindowPort for Motors Homing and Thermal Heads

Figure 5-15: Input / Output Check WindowPorts for Signal Lights, Run and Halt Buttons

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Input / Output Check Window

Motor Home Position Sensors

Figure 5-16: Input / Output Check WindowPort for Handler with Four Pusher/Sliders

A few of the sensors are pictured in the following photos.

Motor Home Position Sensors

Figure 5-17: Y Motor Home SensorSignal Low

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Y motor sensor closed

Figure 5-18: Y Motor Home SensorSignal High

Figure 5-19: X Motor Home Sensors

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Input / Output Check Window

Thermal Head Sensors

Figure 5-20: Z Motor Home Sensor

Thermal Head Sensors


If the handler has one or more thermal heads, the sensor that detects when the head assembly is home on the Y axis is shown in Figure 5-21.

Figure 5-21: Thermal Head Car Home Sensor

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Figure 5-22: Thermal Cylinder Sensors on Sensor Check Window

The extra sensors here apply to the thermal head cylinders. Left Thermal 1 Up This sensor detects when the left thermal cylinder on the left thermal head assembly (Y2) is up, at its home position. This sensor detects when the right thermal cylinder on the left thermal head assembly (Y2) is up, at its home position. This sensor detects when the left thermal cylinder on the right thermal head assembly (Y3) is up, at its home position. This sensor detects when the right thermal cylinder on the right thermal head assembly (Y3) is up, at its home position.

Left Thermal 2 Up

Right Thermal 1 Up

Right Thermal 2 Up

Figure 5-23: Thermal Head Up Sensor

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Input / Output Check Window

Tube Inputs and Outputs

Tube Inputs and Outputs


If the handler has tubes input and/or output, these I/Os are displayed.

Figure 5-24: Input / Output Check WindowPort for Handler with Tubes

Lead In [1-8]

These are output tube counter sensors. Each time a device passes the sensor and drops into one of the 8 output tubes, the count for that tube is incremented, and a checkmark flashes briefly. To view a record of which tubes had devices pass these sensors, see "Check Tube Latches Window" on page 5-25.

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Chapter 5: Diagnostics

Switch Tube [1-8]

These are output tube present sensors. When a tube is present, the corresponding box is checkmarked. When you check any of these boxes, the corresponding LED on the output tube holder lights up.

Tube Output LED [1-8]

Taper Inputs and Outputs


If the handler has a taper attached, those I/Os are displayed.

Figure 5-25: Input / Output Check WindowPort for Handler with Taper

Taper Outputs

Output Seal Head Down Carrier Tape Vacuum Take Up Motor On Trigger Camera Lower seal head

Check Box To...

Turn on carrier tape vacuum under the pickup head drop site; helps to seat devices in pocket Turn on takeup reel Trigger an inspection of a tape pocket by the image sensor

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Input / Output Check Window

Taper Inputs and Outputs

Output Load Inspection Job Inspect Job Bit 0 Inspect Job Bit 1 Inspect Job Bit 2

Check Box To... Load the inspection file specified in the following 3 boxes Switch the binary bit in the 0 position to a high signal to load an inspection file to the camera Switch the binary bit in the 1 position to a high signal to load an inspection file to the camera Switch the binary bit in the 2 position to a high signal to load an inspection file to the camera

Loading an Inspection File to the Camera


A three-bit high/low signal is sent to the camera (image sensor) to specify the inspection file to load. (Because this 3-bit procedure can encompass only 8 files, any additional inspection files must be manually loaded to the camera.) The binary digit positions are counted from right to left: bit 0, bit 1, and bit 2. A 1 in a bit position sends a high signal; a 0 in a bit position sends a low signal. With three digits, eight combinations are possible, with each one indicating an individual inspection file. The slot for each inspection file is shown on the Setup Parameters window; the drop-down list is shown in Figure 5-26. Bit 2 Position
0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1

Bit 1 Position
0 0 1 1 0 0 1 1

Bit 0 Position
0 1 0 1 0 1 0 1

Combined Binary Number


000 001 010 011 100 101 110 111

Device Type (Write Yours Here)

Inspection Slot Number


0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7

Figure 5-26: Example of Inspection Files with Their Slot Numbers

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Chapter 5: Diagnostics

Thus, the boxes checked correspond with the binary digit positions. A checked box sends a 1 or high signal; an unchecked box sends a 0 or low signal. Thus, if the Inspect Job Bit 0 box is checked but the other two are not checked, the signal sent is 001, where bits 2 and 1 are zeros and bit 0 is 1.

Binary signal 000

Binary signal 001

Binary signal 010

Figure 5-27: Bit Settings for Inspection Files with Binary Numbers 000, 001, and 010

Binary signal 011

Binary signal 100

Figure 5-28: Bit Settings for Inspection Files with Binary Numbers 011 and 100

After you have set the bits by checking the appropriate Inspect Job Bit boxes, then check the Load Inspection Job box to load the specified inspection file to the camera. Loading an inspection file by these job bits can hold only 8 files. You must manually load additional files to the camera.

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Input / Output Check Window

Taper Inputs and Outputs

Taper Override Buttons


The tapers override buttons are on the taper control panel, on the side of the taper box.

Taper Solenoid Override Buttons


Button White Blue Yellow Green Affects Seal head Output 1 Takeup reel Output 3 Action When pressed, the seal head is lowered Spare button for extra options When pressed, the takeup reel motor is activated, turning the reel Spare button for extra options

Sensor lights

Override buttons

Figure 5-29: Taper Control Panel with Sensor Lights and Override Buttons

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Taper Inputs
Input Empty, Out of Pocket, Tape Inspection Gap Heater Alarm Slack Switch Tape Out Error Box Is Checked When... Pocket under sensor is not empty Gap sensor cannot see through pocket hole Present value and set value are same temperature Tape is not taut and takeup arm is down Tape is not out; continuing tape supply

Empty/out-ofpocket sensor

Pickup head nozzles

Figure 5-30: Tape Track with Empty/Out-of-Pocket Sensor and Pickup Head

The image sensor performs the function of an Empty/Out of Pocket sensor. The image sensor is located behind or to the left of the pickup heads drop point for the taper. If a device is missing or not seated correctly in the tape pocket, the Empty/Out of Pocket sensor stops the taper and a message is displayed onscreen. The Gap sensor is located in front of or to the right of the pickup heads drop point for the taper. It finds the home position for the tape and ensures correct offset after homing.

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Input / Output Check Window

Taper Inputs and Outputs

Heater controller display

Slack switch sensor opensignal high

Figure 5-31: Taper Model 202 with Slack Switch and Heat Sensors

The Slack Switch sensor is located on the side of the taper plate (Figure 5-31). When the motor for the takeup reel turns on, the tape is wound onto the takeup reel. The tape becomes taut and raises the tape arm to block the slack switch sensor (Figure 5-32). When the sensor is blocked, it stops the motor on the takeup reel. After a number of tape pockets have been filled and advanced, the tape arm again falls, the sensor is uncovered, and the takeup motor again turns to take up the slack.

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Figure 5-32: Slack Switch Sensor Blocked

The Heater Alarm sensor is located inside the heating unit seal head (Figure 5-33). The heater controller display is located on the side of the tape-and-reel plate (Figure 5-31).

Figure 5-33: Seal Head

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Check Tube Latches Window

Taper Inputs and Outputs

Check Tube Latches Window


The latches on this window provide a temporary record of which output tubes have had action taken.

Figure 5-34: Check Tube Latches Window

Lead In [1-8]

These are output tube counter sensors. Each time a device passes the sensor and drops into one of the 8 output tubes, the count for that tube is incremented, and a checkmark is placed in the corresponding checkbox until the Clear Lead In Latches button is clicked. These are output tube present sensors. Each time a tube is withcrawn from the output tube holder, a checkmark is placed in the corresponding checkbox until the Clear Tube Switch Latches button is clicked. Click this button to clear the checkmarks from all the Lead In checkboxes. Click this button to clear the checkmarks from all the Tube Switch checkboxes.

Tube Switch [1-8]

Clear Lead In Latches

Clear Tube Switch Latches

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Chapter 5: Diagnostics

Setup Parameters Window


This window sets the timing of various actions. To refer to a specific area of this window, find the group box in the following list. The options vary according to which features are on your handler. Group Box or Area
Test Site Delay Group Box Rotation / Taper Group Box Test Interface Group Box Work Mode Group Box Tray Delay Group Box Tape Delay Group Box Tape and Reel Group Box Precisor Delay Group Box Enable Trays Group Box Tray Information Group Box Enable Test Sites Group Box Enable Tubes Group Box Bucket Full Count Group Box Simulated Fixed Test Results Group Box Rub Routine Group Box Thermal Soak Time Delay Group Box

Handlers Using
Test sites Pickup head rotation/taper Test sites Custom Trays Taper Taper Precisor Trays Trays Multiple test sites Tubes "Smart" buckets Multiple test sites Custom Thermal heads/preheat sites

Page
5-29 5-32 5-33 5-34 5-35 5-36 5-36 5-37 5-38 5-39 5-39 5-40 5-40 5-41 5-41 5-42

NOTE: The settings displayed come from the file you opened at the beginning of the diagnostic session. If you opened the file containing the factory presets, you will likely not need to change the factory settings unless a piece of hardware or a tray configuration is changed. If you make changes, save them under a new file name.

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Setup Parameters Window

Taper Inputs and Outputs

Figure 5-35: Setup Parameters WindowOne Version

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Figure 5-36: Setup Parameters WindowAnother Version

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Setup Parameters Window

Test Site Delay Group Box

Test Site Delay Group Box

Figure 5-37: Test Site Delay Group Box

The following parameters apply to events occurring at the test site. Vacuum On After issuing the command to turn on the vacuum, the handler waits the number of milliseconds shown before giving the next command (to check the vacuum sensor to see if a device is attached to the pickup head). You may have to change this setting for different devices due to size, weight, test time, etc. Vacuum Off After issuing the command to turn off the vacuum, the handler waits the number of milliseconds shown before giving the next command (to turn on the air blower). You may have to change this setting for different devices due to size, weight, test time, etc. Air Blow On After the vacuum is turned off, this is the number of milliseconds the air blower stays on to blow a device off the pickup head.

Z Put (Before Vacuum Off) After issuing the command to move the pickup head to the Zput position, the handler waits the number of milliseconds shown before giving the next command (to turn the vacuum off). Socket Open/Close After actuating the socket, the handler waits the number of milliseconds shown.

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Push Cylinder Up

After issuing the command to retract the push cylinder up from the test site, the handler waits the number of milliseconds shown before giving the next command. After issuing the command to extend the push cylinder down to the test site, the handler waits the number of milliseconds shown before giving the next command (to begin the test). After issuing the command to extend the slide cylinder out over the test site, the handler waits the number of milliseconds shown before giving the next command (to extend the pusher down to the test site). This option is available only for handlers that use a slider/pusher cylinder for depositing devices in the test socket.

Push Cylinder Down

Slide Cylinder Out / Extended

Slide Cylinder In / Retracted

After issuing the command to retract the slide cylinder in from the test site, the handler waits the number of milliseconds shown before giving the next command (to check the home sensor to see if the slider is at its home position). This option is available only for handlers that use a slider/pusher cylinder for depositing devices in the test socket.

Enable Z Plunger as Top Pusher

If your handler is equipped with auxiliary push/slide cylinders or a Y2 head used as a plunger, this option is available. Check this box if you want to use the Z plunger/pickup head as the top pusher. Unheck this box if you want to use the normal top pusher.

When you use the normal top pusher, the Z pickup head drops the device into the test socket, then raises and waits for the slider/pusher cylinder to move in and clamp the device into place during the test. After the slider/pusher cylinder retracts, the Z pickup head again lowers and picks up the device to move it to its destination. > If you are using more than one test site, you

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Setup Parameters Window

Test Site Delay Group Box

must use the normal top pusher.

When you use the Z plunger/pickup head as the top pusher, the Z pickup head never lifts off the device, but is used to clamp the device in place while its in the test site. > Using the Z plunger/pickup head as the top pusher is faster than using the normal top pusher if you have only one test site. Also, you can use it if you enable only one test site.

Figure 5-38: Using Normal Top Push Cylinder (Left); Using Z Plunger/Pickup Head (Right)

Enable Z[n] Motor

Check this box to activate the specified pickup nozzle to be part of the normal pick-and-place routine. Uncheck this box to deactivate the specified pickup nozzle. Check this box to get devices from the golden unit at tray 2 for testing. Uncheck this box to get devices from the precisor/golden unit tray by the test site for testing.

Enable Golden Unit

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Rotation / Taper Group Box

Figure 5-39: Rotation / Taper Group Box

Rotate Delay (msec)

Type the number of milliseconds given the rotation to finish before any other action occurs on the handler. Type the number of degrees each device is to be rotated clockwise from the input to the test site. See "Results of Rotation Combinations" on page 5-33 for examples. Type the number of degrees each device is to be rotated clockwise from the input to the tape. See "Results of Rotation Combinations" on page 5-33 for examples. Type the number of degrees each device is to be rotated clockwise from the input to the output tray. Type the number of tape pockets to fill with devices and seal in a job. Type the total number of devices to be run in a job. This number may be equal to or greater than the number in the Tape Total Count box. If this number is greater, when the tape is filled with its quota, a message is displayed in Auto Run. If the option to Continue is selected, the extra devices in the job run will be placed in a tray rather than in the tape. Type the allowable number of consecutive empty tray pockets before a message to add a tray of devices is displayed in the Auto Run window. Type the number of milliseconds after the seal head goes down to the tape before the tape is moved.

Rotation Delay (msec) Test Site Rotation (Degree) Taper Output Rotation (Degree)

Tray Output Rotation (Degree) Tape Total Count

Job Total Count

Consecutive Empty Cells

Seal Head Down Delay (msec)

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Setup Parameters Window

Results of Rotation Combinations

Thermal Seal Head Up Delay (msec)

Type the number of milliseconds after the heat seal head rises from the tape before it can be lowered again. This box is used only for handlers designed such that the time between deposits into the tape is so short that there is danger of melting the tape from almost constant thermal tape sealing.

Results of Rotation Combinations


The input is always considered to be zero degrees rotation, and any rotation after that is counted from the input. The following examples show what happens for various rotation combinations.
Rotation Combinations Positions Test Rotation +90 Tape Rotation +90
Input

Actions The pickup nozzle gets a device and rotates it clockwise 90 degrees from the input before placing it at the test site. Because the tape rotation is the same degree, the device is then placed in the tape at the same angle. Rotation occurs only once during this process.

Test

Output

Test Rotation 0 Tape Rotation +90


Input Test Output

The pickup nozzle carries an unrotated device to the test site and tests it. Then it rotates it clockwise 90 degrees from the input before placing it into the tape pocket. Rotation occurs only once during this process.

Test Rotation +90 Tape Rotation 0


Input Output

Test

The pickup nozzle gets a device and rotates it clockwise 90 degrees from the input before placing it at the test site. After testing, it then rotates the device counterclockwise before placing it into the tape pocket. Thus, the devices rotation at the tape in relation to its original position at the input is 0. Rotation occurs twice during this process.

Test Interface Group Box


Select the appropriate interface for the type of tester you are using. Or you may choose one of the test simulation modes. The simulation modes do not do actual testing; rather, they are used for checking out the system and running diagnostics. NOTE: Only the interface(s) you have contracted for will be available to use.

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Figure 5-40: Test Interface Group Box

Handler Port TTL

If your handler uses Transistor-Transistor Logic (TTL, 0 to 5 volt) to communicate with the test site, select this option. See your tester manual for details. All devices will be placed in the destination for passed devices. No actual testing of devices will occur. All devices will be placed in the destination(s) for failed devices. No actual testing of devices will occur. Devices will be randomly placed in the destinations for passed and failed devices. No actual testing of devices will occur. If your handler uses one of the RS-232 languages to communicate with the test site, select this option. See your tester manual for details. See also "Exatron RS-232 Commands" on page A-10. If your handler uses the GPIB interface to communicate with the test site, select this option. Rather than using a random simulation, you can specify the exact results for each test socket. Use this option along with the values you type in the Simulated Fixed Test Results group box, described in "Simulated Fixed Test Results Group Box" on page 5-41.

Simulate All Pass

Simulate All Fail

Simulate All Pass/Fail

RS-232

GPIB

Simulated Fixed Test Results

Work Mode Group Box


Work modes are sets of instructions preprogrammed by Exatron for specific activities. Work modes may specify the input and outputs, or whether testing or other processes are to occur or not. Each work mode is specific to the needs of an individual company.

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Setup Parameters Window

Tray Delay Group Box

Figure 5-41: Examples of Various Work Modes

Tray Delay Group Box


The following parameters apply to events occurring at the trays.

Figure 5-42: Tray Delay Group Box

Vacuum On/Off

After issuing a vacuum command, the handler waits the number of milliseconds shown before checking the vacuum sensor to see if a device is attached to the pickup head. You may have to change this setting for different devices due to size, weight, test time, etc.

Air Blow On

After the vacuum is turned off, this is the number of milliseconds the air blower stays on to blow a device off the pickup head.

Z Put (Before Vacuum Off) After the pickup head moves to the Z-put position, the handler waits the number of milliseconds shown before turning the vacuum off.

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Tape Delay Group Box


The following parameters apply to events occurring at the tape.

Figure 5-43: Tape Delay Group Box

Vacuum Off

After issuing the command to turn off the vacuum at the taper, the handler waits the number of milliseconds shown before raising the pickup nozzle. You may have to change this setting for different devices due to size, weight, test time, etc.

Air Blow On

After the vacuum is turned off, this is the number of milliseconds the air blower stays on to blow a device off the pickup head.

Z Put (Before Vacuum Off) After the pickup head moves to the Z-put position, the handler waits the number of milliseconds shown before turning the vacuum off.

Tape and Reel Group Box

Figure 5-44: Tape and Reel Group Box

Enable Tape Vacuum

Check this box to turn on the vacuum at the tape pockets under the pickup head. Uncheck this box to turn off the vacuum.

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Setup Parameters Window

Precisor Delay Group Box

Number of Pockets Before Type the number of tape pockets to advance between the Start Checking for back pocket under the pickup head and the first pocket under Devices in Tape Pockets the image sensors vision. This prevents the image sensor from checking empty pockets before the filled tape reaches the image sensor. Tape Total Count Type the number of tape pockets to fill with devices and seal in a job. Type the total number of devices to be run in a job. This number may be equal to or greater than the number in the Tape Total Count box. If this number is greater, when the tape is filled with its quota, a message is displayed in Auto Run. If the option to Continue is selected, the extra devices in the job run will be placed in a tray rather than in the tape.

Job Total Count

Precisor Delay Group Box

Figure 5-45: Precisor Delay Group Box

Vacuum On

After issuing the command to turn on the vacuum, the handler waits the number of milliseconds shown before giving the next command (to check the vacuum sensor to see if a device is attached to the pickup head). You may have to change this setting for different devices due to size, weight, test time, etc.

Vacuum Off

After issuing the command to turn off the vacuum, the handler waits the number of milliseconds shown before giving the next command (to turn on the air blower). You may have to change this setting for different devices due to size, weight, test time, etc.

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Air Blow On

After the vacuum is turned off, this is the number of milliseconds the air blower stays on to blow a device off the pickup head.

Z Put (Before Vacuum Off) After issuing the command to move the pickup head to the Zput position, the handler waits the number of milliseconds shown before giving the next command (to turn the vacuum off). Y1 Precisor Offset This is the distance the pickup nozzle moves to the left before dropping the device at the precisor. Check this box to cause an air blast in each precisor tray pocket to snug the device against the upper right corner. Check this box to lower the pickup nozzle from the Z-put to the Z-get position, and then to the Z-compress position before turning off the nozzles vacuum. Uncheck this box to allow the device to fall free from the Z-put position.

Enable Precisor

Enable Putting Device Directly in Socket

Enable Trays Group Box


If your handler is set up for waffle packs, but you want to use a single JEDEC tray, disable the auxiliary tray configurations here. You can do this by selecting just the first section of each tray (as shown in Figure 5-46) and configuring the Tray Information group box (page 5-39) to use the full number of rows and columns in the entire tray. The example in Figure 5-46 uses 3 waffle packs for tray 1 as input, and 8 waffle packs for tray 2 as output.

Figure 5-46: Enable Trays Group Box

Enable Input Tray X[n]

Check this box to enable, or use, the designated tray or waffle pack as an input. Uncheck this box to disable the designated tray or waffle pack.

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Setup Parameters Window

Tray Information Group Box

Enable Output Tray X[n]

Check this box to enable, or use, the designated tray or waffle pack as an output. Uncheck this box to disable the designated tray or waffle pack.

Tray Information Group Box


This area specifies the number of rows and columns in each tray or waffle pack. Even if your handler software allows for the use of waffle packs, you can set it up to use full JEDEC trays by combining the setup here with that in the Enable Input Trays group box (page 5-38).

Figure 5-47: Tray Information Group Box

Select Tray

Click the drop-down arrow and select the tray or waffle pack whose dimensions you want to describe. Type the number of rows in your tray or waffle pack. Rows are counted from the back of the tray to the front. Type the number of columns in your tray or waffle pack. Columns are counted from left to right. After defining the number of rows and columns for the first tray or waffle pack, you can click this button to apply the same number of rows and columns to all trays or to all waffle packs. Only the ones checked in the Enable Input Trays group box will be used.

Number of Rows

Number of Columns

Apply Number of ROW, COL

Enable Test Sites Group Box


This group box enables you to use only one of the test sites rather than both. However, you must enable at least one test site to do a run.

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Figure 5-48: Enable Test Sites Group Box

Enable Test Site 1

Check this box to enable TS1 (the left test site). Uncheck this box to disable TS1. Check this box to enable TS2 (the right test site). Uncheck this box to disable TS2.

Enable Test Site 2

Enable Tubes Group Box


This group box enables you to use only specified tubes. Usually you will have to select a work mode (page 5-34) that uses tubes as well.

Figure 5-49: Enable Tubes Group Box

Enable Tube[n]

Check any or all of these boxes to enable the corresponding tubes.

Bucket Full Count Group Box


Bucket [n] Full Count For each bucket, type the number of devices that will make the bucket full.

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Setup Parameters Window

Simulated Fixed Test Results Group Box

Simulated Fixed Test Results Group Box

Figure 5-50: Simulated Fixed Test Results Group Box

This bypasses the tester for diagnostics. You can set fixed test results here rather than random pass/fail diagnostic results, so you know whether the exact same results are being returned. For each test site, the left input box is for the leftmost LZ1 nozzle, working right until the right input box is for the rightmost LZ6 nozzle. To use the simulated fixed test results feature, in the Test Interface box, select the Simulated Fixed Test Results option. Then type the desired sort in each box.

Rub Routine Group Box


In rare cases you may want to enable the rub routine. If there seems to be an excessive amount of slop, or play, of the device in the tray pocket, you may want to enable the rub routine. When turned on, the rub routine causes the device to be pushed or "rubbed" toward the upper left corner of the tray pocket. This is accomplished by the pickup head touching the device and holding it while the X tray moves toward the front of the handler and the Y gantry moves to the left. All this happens before the vacuum is turned on. This insures that every device is in the same corner of the tray pocket and is picked at exactly the same location.

Figure 5-51: Rub Routine Group Box

Type, in inches, the distance you want the tray to move toward the front of the handler while rubbing. This applies only if you enable the rub routine. Type, in inches, the distance you want the Y gantry to move to the left while rubbing. This applies only if you enable the rub routine.

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Type, in inches, the distance you want the Z pickup head to lower while rubbing. This distance should be 0.005 or 0.010 mm more than the Z-get distance. This applies only if you enable the rub routine. Check this box to enable the rub routine. Uncheck this box to disable the rub routine.

Rubbing On/Off

Thermal Soak Time Delay Group Box


If your handler has one or more thermal heads and preheating plates, the software will include the appropriate delays. Note that all the times except one are in seconds.

Figure 5-52: Thermal Soak Time Delay Group Box of Setup Parameters Window

Test Site 0 Soak Time

This is the number of seconds after the thermal heads lower to touch the devices in test site 0 (the left test site) before the test begins. This is the number of seconds after the thermal heads lower to touch the devices in test site 1 (the right test site) before the test begins. This is the number of seconds after the devices are placed in the back row of the preheating plate before they are moved on to the test site. This is the number of seconds after the devices are placed in the middle row of the preheating plate before they are moved on to the test site. This is the number of milliseconds after the handler software issues the command to lower the thermal head cylinders before the next command is issued, to test the devices.

Test Site 1 Soak Time

Heating Site 0 Soak Time

Heating Site 1 Soak Time

Thermal Cylinder Down

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Sort Interface Window

Thermal Soak Time Delay Group Box

Thermal Head Time Out

This is the number of seconds after the handler requests a temperature reading from the thermal head and the handler waits for a temperature response before it times out. Click this button only if you want to save changes under the current file name. To open a dialog box so you can save changes under a new file name, click the OK button instead.

Save Parameters

Sort Interface Window


This window directs the disposition or placement of devices in various pass/fail conditions; it determines which sort goes to which bin. The features of this window may vary according to the features designed for your handler. Figure 5-53 and Figure 5-54 show representative examples.

Figure 5-53: Sort Interface Window

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Test Sort Result Group Box


In Figure 5-53, devices classified as sort 1 are placed in the taper. Devices classified as sort 2 are placed in bucket 2. Sort 3 goes to bucket 3, filling its waffle packs in the same order; and sort 4 goes to bucket 4. Sort 8 goes to tray (waffle pack) X1_1. When waffle pack 1_1 is full, 1_2 will be filled, then 1_3. After that, the waffle packs on the second tray will be filled in order. Whenever a tray or waffle pack is filled, if no further tray or waffle pack is designated for that Sort category, the handler will pause and a message will be displayed, telling which tray is full and requesting a replacement tray. The yellow light on the light pole will turn on to alert the operator.

Figure 5-54: Sorts for Output Tubes

Test Sort Result

Sorts are logical categories determined from the tester (or inspection, if used). For each destination, type the number of the designated sort category to be placed there. NOTE: All like sites are numbered from left to right.

[Destination]

Tester Setting Group Box


Test Time Out (second) Type the number of seconds that the handler will wait after the command is issued to begin testing. If the device times out, it is sorted to the fail tray and the current run continues.

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Sort Interface Window

Handler Port (TTL Signals) Group Box

Start Test Delay (msec)

Type the number of milliseconds the handler will wait after a device is placed in a test socket and before the device testing begins.

Handler Port (TTL Signals) Group Box


The Sort Latch is a way of testing the communication from the tester to the handler software. It temporarily records the sort result of the current device.

Figure 5-55: Handler Port Group Box

Sort Latch [n]

After a device test, a checkmark is displayed in the corresponding sort box according to which sort the tester sent to the handler software. Put a device in the test site, then press the Start Test button. The tester sends the sort result to the software, which places a checkmark in one of the 8 sort boxes according to the correct sort result. To confirm the sort result, compare the display here with the display in your tester software window. When you have finished confirming the result, click the Clear Latch button to clear the checkmarks from the latch displays.

Start Test

Clear Latch

Taper and Bucket Latch Group Box


This group box allows a temporary record to be displayed of taper events that occurred. If the LED lights up but the software does not display a check in the box, then the sensor is working but has lost communication with the software. If the LED does not light up but the software displays a check in the box, then the sensor is working but the wiring connection to the taper cabinet is lost or the LED bulb is burned out. If neither does the LED light up, nor does the software display a check in the box, then the sensor is not working.

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Pocket Pitch or Gap Sensor Latch

When the Gap sensor sees through the hole in the center of the tape pocket, the LED light on the taper cabinet turns on, and the software places a checkmark in this checkbox. When the Out-of-Pocket sensor sees a blockage across the top of the tape pocket, the LED light on the taper cabinet turns on, and the software places a checkmark in this checkbox. When the Empty Pocket sensor sees through the hole in the center of the tape pocket, the LED light on the taper cabinet turns on, and the software places a checkmark in this checkbox. When the Bucket Full sensor sees a device drop past it into the specified bucket, the software places a checkmark in this checkbox. When the Tape Out sensor sees no more carrier tape, the software places a checkmark in this checkbox. When you have finished confirming the results, click the Clear Latch button to clear the checkmarks from the latch displays.

Out of Pocket Sensor Latch

Empty Pocket Sensor Latch

Bucket [n] Sensor Latch

Carrier Tape Out Sensor Latch Clear Latch

Save Parameters

Click this button only if you want to save changes under the current file name. To open a dialog box so you can save changes under a new file name, click the OK button instead.

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Motors Setup Window

Taper and Bucket Latch Group Box

Motors Setup Window


To refer to a specific area of this window, find the group box in the following list.
Group Box or Area Setup Motor Parameters Motor Test Cycle Used for Handlers All All Page 5-48 5-49

This window sets or displays the speed of the various motors and tests motor movements. The settings on this window allow you to move the motors manually. This is a way to test, exercise, and clean the motors. You can select the motor you want to test. CAUTION: Before you move the motor positions, make sure there is no interference that will produce a collision. You can also use this window to turn off one or all motors. When a motor is turned off, the assembly it controls is freely movable by hand. Thus, you can move an assembly out of the way to perform inspections or repairs. To turn the selected motor back on, click the Motor On button; or to turn all motors back on, click All Motors On. When you first access the Motors Setup window after each computer startup, the motors reset. You see the message: Resetting Motors, please wait... When all the motors have moved to their home positions, this window becomes available.

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Figure 5-56: Motors Setup Window

Setup Motor Parameters Group Box


Select Servo Motor This drop-down list allows you to select one of the motors your handler is equipped with. All the parameters shown here will apply to the motor you select. Your motors may include: Acceleration Y motor (or Y1 and Y2) Z motor (or LZ1, LZ2, etc.; RZ1, RZ2, etc.) X1, X2, etc. motor (Other motors, if your handler is equipped with them)

The motor acceleration, or RPM2, is displayed. This setting can be changed only by the administrator. The motor speed, or RPM, is displayed. This setting can be changed only by the administrator. The motor deceleration is displayed. This number is a percentage of the acceleration. For example, if the acceleration

Velocity

Deceleration (% of Acceleration)

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Motors Setup Window

Motor Test Cycle Group Box

is 2000 RPMs and the deceleration is 100 percent of that, then the deceleration is also 2000 RPMs. If the deceleration is 50 percent of that, then the deceleration is 1000 RPMs. This setting can be changed only by the administrator. CAUTION: Changing motor settings may cause damage to the handler and devices. Position (inches) Type a distance from home position, in inches, that you want the specified motor to move to when you click the Motor Move To button. Click this button to move the selected motor to the position shown. Click this button to move the selected motor to its home position. Click this button to turn off the selected motor, enabling the corresponding component to move freely. Thus you can adjust its position manually. Click this button to turn on the selected motor and give it control of the corresponding component.

Motor [Name] Move To

Home Motor

Motor Off

Motor On

Motor Test Cycle Group Box


A motor test may also be set up to test a particular motor. Select one of the motors. Define two different positions as number of inches from the motors home position. These positions cannot exceed the predefined travel limits. Delay time is the amount of time between motor movements. Repeat is the number of times this test will repeat itself before turning off the motors. Position 1 Type a beginning position from home, in inches, for a test cycle. Type an ending position from home, in inches, for a test cycle. Type the delay time in milliseconds between each test cycle. Type the number of times you want the test cycle to repeat. This display box counts the number of repeats that have occurred. It starts with 0 before the test, and increments by 1 after each cycle has finished. At the end of the test, it displays the same number that is shown in the Repeat box. Click this button to begin the test cycle.

Position 2

Delay (msec) Repeat Count

Start Test

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Abort

Click this button to stop the test cycle immediately, before the cycle is finished. Click this button to turn all motors off. Click this button to turn all motors on. Click this button to instruct the motors to find their home positions. If any motor speeds have been changed, you can click this button to restore the factory-set default speeds. A handler that has an input tube insert on tray X1 may have this button. Click to shake the input tubes back and forth once to drop devices to the dead nest.

All Motors Off All Motors On Home All Motors

Set Default Speed

Shake X1 Motor for Input Tubes

Save Parameters

Click this button only if you want to save changes under the current file name. To open a dialog box so you can save changes under a new file name, click the OK button instead.

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Fine Tune Window

Motor Test Cycle Group Box

Fine Tune Window


When you first access the Fine Tune window after each computer startup, the motors reset. You see the message: Resetting Motors, please wait... When all the motors have moved to their home positions, this window becomes available.

Figure 5-57: Fine Tune Window

The function of each feature of this window is described first. Afterward, a sample procedure for calibrating various distances is described, starting in "Setting Distances to Various Positions" on page 5-68.

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To refer to a specific area of this window, find the group box in the following list. Group Box or Area
Selections Group Box X Distance Calibration Group Box Y Distance Calibration Group Box Z-Get Distance Calibration Group Box Z-Put Distance Calibration Group Box Pitch and Teach Group Box Z Vacuums Group Box Test Site Clamp Group Box Rotation Group Box Z Compress Group Box Socket Offsets Group Box Air Pressure Group Box Other Buttons

Page
5-53 5-54 5-55 5-56 5-56 5-57 5-62 5-62 5-64 5-64 5-65 5-67 5-67

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Fine Tune Window

Selections Group Box

Selections Group Box


Selections Click the drop-down arrow to the right of the box and select the distance you want to calibrate. The selections vary according to the features of your handler.

Figure 5-58: Examples of Drop-Down List of Selectionswith Four Trays (Left); with Waffle Packs (Right)

Figure 5-59: Examples of Drop-Down List of Selections with Tube Outputs (Left); with Bowl Feeder, Inspection, and Taper (Right)

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X Distance Calibration Group Box

Figure 5-60: X Distance Calibration Group Box

X[n] Distance from Home to [position]

In the input box, type the distance from the selected trays X home to the selected position (first pocket or last pocket under path of pickup head). Click this button to move the specified tray to the specified destination. You must click this button before you can make fine-tune adjustments with the jog buttons.

Move X[n] To

[Increase distance]

If the selected tray pocket is too far forward of the pickup head and the suction cup is over the back side of the device, increase the distance from X home by clicking the [Increase Distance] jog button. Each time you click this button, the tray moves back by the distance shown in the Scale (inches) input box. If the selected tray pocket is too far behind the pickup head and the suction cup is over the front side of the device, decrease the distance from Z home by clicking the [Decrease Distance] jog button. Each time you click this button, the tray moves forward by the distance shown in the Scale (inches) input box. Click this button to move the specified pickup head to its home position.

[Decrease distance]

X[n] Home

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Fine Tune Window

Y Distance Calibration Group Box

Scale

Type the scale, or size, of each increment or decrement by which a motor should move when one of the jog buttons is clicked. For example, if the value here is 0.005 and the value in one of the distance boxes is 17.505, then when the Increase Distance or left jog button for that distance box is clicked, the value changes to 17.510. Other examples follow. Current Value 10.365 0.96 Incremented Value 10.370 0.965 Decremented Value 10.360 0.955

Y Distance Calibration Group Box

Figure 5-61: Y Distance Calibration Group Box

Y[n] Distance from Home to [position] Move Y[n] To

In the input box, type the distance from the selected pickup heads Y home to the selected position. Click this button to move the specified pickup head to the specified destination. You must click this button before you can make fine-tune adjustments with the jog buttons.

[Left/right]

If the alignment is off in the Y direction, make any small adjustments by clicking the left or right jog buttons. The pickup head moves left or right by the distance shown in the Scale input box, and the number shown in the Distance input box changes accordingly. Click this button to move the specified pickup head to its home position. Type the scale, or size, of each increment or decrement by which a motor should move when one of the jog buttons is clicked.

Y[n] Home

Scale

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Z-Get Distance Calibration Group Box

Figure 5-62: Z-Get Distance Calibration Group Box

Z Get Distance

In the input box, type the distance from the selected pickup heads home to the selected position. Click this button to move the pickup nozzle down to the Z-get position shown in the Z Get Distance input box. You must click this button before you can make fine-tune adjustments with the jog buttons.

Move ZGet To

[Up]

If the suction cup is too close to the device, raise the pickup head by clicking the Up jog button. Each time you click this button, the pickup head moves closer to Z home position by the distance shown in the Scale input box, and the number in the Z Get Distance input box gets smaller by the same scale. If the suction cup is not close enough to the device, lower the pickup head by clicking the Down jog button. Each time you click this button, the pickup head moves away from Z home position by the distance shown in the Scale input box, and the number in the Z Get Distance input box gets larger by the same scale. Click this button to raise the pickup head to its Z home position. Type the scale, or size, of each increment or decrement by which a motor should move when one of the jog buttons is clicked.

[Down]

Z Home

Scale

Z-Put Distance Calibration Group Box

Figure 5-63: Z-Put Distance Calibration Group Box

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Fine Tune Window

Pitch and Teach Group Box

Z Put Distance

In the input box, type the distance from the selected pickup heads home to the selected position. Click this button to move the pickup nozzle down to the Z-put position shown in the Z Put Distance input box. You must click this button before you can make fine-tune adjustments with the jog buttons.

Move ZPut To

[Up]

If the suction cup is too close to the device, raise the pickup head by clicking the Up jog button. Each time you click this button, the pickup head moves closer to Z home position by the distance shown in the Scale input box, and the number in the Z Put Distance input box gets smaller by the same scale. If the suction cup is not close enough to the device, lower the pickup head by clicking the Down jog button. Each time you click this button, the pickup head moves away from Z home position by the distance shown in the Scale input box, and the number in the Z Put Distance input box gets larger by the same scale. Click this button to raise the pickup head to its Z home position. Type the scale, or size, of each increment or decrement by which a motor should move when one of the jog buttons is clicked.

[Down]

Z Home

Scale

Pitch and Teach Group Box


If your handler has multiple Z nozzles on one assembly so that they all move in tandem on the Y gantry, or if it uses waffle packs, the software will include a group box that allows you to set the distances between each and then teach or apply that distance to the other like units.

Figure 5-64: Pitch and Teach Group BoxUsing Tubes

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Compare the available features in Figure 5-64 and Figure 5-66. NOTE: Before teaching tray distances, check that the correct number of columns and rows for each tray have been specified. See "Tray Information Group Box" on page 5-39. Y Distance Between Tubes Y Distance Between Z1 and Z2 Type the distance between the leading edge of one tube and that of the one next to it. Type the distance from the center of the Z1 nozzle to the center of the Z2 nozzle.

X Distance Between Trays Type the distance, on the X axis, between the leading edge of one tray and that of the one next to it. Y Distance Between Trays Type the distance, on the Y axis, between the leading edge of one tray and that of the one next to it. Display Tray Drawing To determine which dimension is X and which is Y, click this button.

First do all the measurements for the first tray or unit, then use this box, and it extrapolates the measurements for the other trays or units. It is recommended that you run the Teach routine first to obtain approximate distances, then fine-tune the distances for each tray individually. Teach Test Site, Precisor, Golden Unit Site Teach All Trays from TrayX1_1 Only Teach Tubes and Trays from TrayX2_1 Click this button to apply the stated distance to each unit in the series. Click this button to apply the distances specified for tray X1_1 to each tray in the series. Click this button to apply the distances specified for tray X2_1 to each tray and tube in the series.

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Fine Tune Window

Pitch and Teach Group Box

Figure 5-65: Tray Dimension Drawing

Figure 5-66: Pitch and Teach Group BoxUsing Waffle Packs on Both Trays

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Distance A (inches)

Type the distance between the left edge of waffle pack 1_1 and the left edge of waffle pack 1_2, both on tray X1. See Figure 5-67. Type the distance between the back edge of waffle pack 1_1 and the back edge of the waffle pack just in front of it, as shown in both Figure 5-67 and Figure 5-68. Type the distance between the left edge of waffle pack 1_1 on tray X1 and the left edge of waffle pack 2_1 on tray X2, as shown in both Figure 5-67 and Figure 5-68. Click this button to display the diagram showing the A, B, and C distances between two-inch waffle packs, shown in Figure 5-67. Click this button to display the diagram showing the B and C distances between four-inch waffle packs, shown in Figure 568.

Distance B (inches)

Distance C (inches)

Display Tray Drawing 2 Inch Waffle Tray

Display Tray Drawing 4 Inch Waffle Tray

Figure 5-67: Tray Drawing for Two-Inch Waffle Packs

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Fine Tune Window

Pitch and Teach Group Box

Figure 5-68: Tray Drawing for Four-Inch Waffle Packs

Teach All TrayX from Tray Click this button to teach the A, B, and C distances from waffle pack 1_1 to 1_2, 1_3, and 2_1 to the distances to all the X1_1, Using 2x2 Waffle other waffle packs. Trays for Both Tray X1 and X2 This teaches identical distances for both trays. It assumes that both trays are using eight 2" by 2" waffle packs. Teach All TrayX from Tray Click this button to teach the B and C distances from waffle X1_1, Using 4-Inch Waffle pack 1_1 to 1_2 and 2_1 to the distances to all the other waffle packs. Trays for Both Tray X1 and X2 This teaches identical distances for both trays. It assumes that both trays are using three 4" by 4" waffle packs. Teach All Tray X1s from Tray X1_1, Using 4-Inch Waffle Trays Click this button to copy the B distance from waffle pack 1_1 to 1_2 to the distance from 1_2 to 1_3. This teaches distances for only tray X1. It assumes that tray X1 is using three 4" by 4" waffle packs. Thus, you can use a different waffle pack configuration on the other tray.

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Teach All Tray X2s from Tray X2_1, Using 4-Inch Waffle Trays

Click this button to copy the B distance between waffle pack 2_1 and 2_2 to the distance between 2_2 and 2_3. This teaches distances for only tray X2. It assumes that tray X2 is using three 4" by 4" waffle packs. Thus, you can use a different waffle pack configuration on the other tray.

Teach All Tray X1s from Tray X1_1, Using 2-Inch Waffle Trays

Click this button to teach the A and B distances from waffle pack 1_1 to 1_2 and 1_3 to the distances to all the other waffle packs though 1_8. This teaches distances for only tray X1. It assumes that tray X1 is using eight 2" by 2" waffle packs. Thus, you can use a different waffle pack configuration on the other tray.

Teach All Tray X2s from Tray X2_1, Using 2-Inch Waffle Trays

Click this button to teach the A and B distances from waffle pack 2_1 to 2_2 and 2_3 to the distances to all the other waffle packs though 2_8. This teaches distances for only tray X2. It assumes that tray X2 is using eight 2" by 2" waffle packs. Thus, you can use a different waffle pack configuration on the other tray.

Z Vacuums Group Box


LZ[n] Vac On Check the box to turn on the corresponding left Z nozzle vacuum. Uncheck the box to turn off the vacuum. Check the box to turn on all the left Z nozzle vacuums. Uncheck the box to turn off all the vacuums. Check the box to turn on the corresponding right Z nozzle vacuum. Uncheck the box to turn off the vacuum. Check the box to turn on all the right Z nozzle vacuums. Uncheck the box to turn off all the vacuums.

All LZs Vac On

RZ[n] Vac On

All RZs Vac On

Test Site Clamp Group Box


Socket [n] Opened/Closed Check this checkbox to close the socket. The slider/pusher mechanism extends to clamp the device in the test socket. Uncheck this checkbox to open the socket. The slider/pusher mechanism retracts from the test socket. In the example in Figure 5-69, the test site clamp is retracted, allowing the pickup head to access the device. In Figure 5-70, the test site clamp is forward and down, in a testing position.

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Fine Tune Window

Test Site Clamp Group Box

Figure 5-69: Test Sockets Open

Figure 5-70: Test Sockets Closed

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Rotation Group Box


For the 360-degree rotation head, the following features are available.

Figure 5-71: Rotation Group Box; 360-Degree Rotation Head

Rotation (Degree)

Type the degrees of rotation desired. To rotate the pickup nozzle in a clockwise direction, type a positive number. To rotate the pickup nozzle in a counterclockwise direction, type a negative number (prefixed by a -).

[Repetitions]

Type the number of rotation repetitions desired in testing the motor. Click this button to rotate the pickup nozzle one time by the degrees specified. This button causes the nozzle to rotate but not to return to its home position. Click this button to rotate the pickup nozzle the number of repetitions specified by the degrees specified. Click this button to rotate the pickup nozzle back to its home position after clicking the Rotate button. Click this button to rotate the pickup nozzle back to its default home position.

Rotate

Test Rotate

Rotate to Zero Position

Reset Rotate Motor

Z Compress Group Box


The Z-compress feature is available only for the test site. The Z-compress distance is added to the Z-get distance in Auto Run. When lowered, the pickup nozzle moves at the normal speed down to the Z-get position, then slowly down to the Z-compress position. By setting individual values for Z-get and Z-compress, you can use this feature as a separate test site clamp. If you need to clamp the device closer in the test socket, use this feature.

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Fine Tune Window

Socket Offsets Group Box

Figure 5-72: Z Compress Group Box

Z Compress Distance

Type the distance in inches you want to add to the Z-get distance for the test site. Click this button to lower the pickup head to the position that is the sum of the Z-get distance plus the Z-compress distance.

Move to Z Compress

To use the Z-compress distance: 1. In the Selections box, select Y1 to Test Site. 2. Type identical distances in the Z Get Distance box and the Z Put Distance box. 3. Type a very small distance in the Z Compress Distance box.

Socket Offsets Group Box


If your handler has more than one test site, the Socket Offsets group box is visible on the Fine Tune window. If the test sockets are not precisely in line with each other, you can use this feature to align the X movement of the devices. First use the one that is precisely in line with the movement of the Y pickup head. This is the one on whose position the distances on this window are based. Because both the test sites and the Y pickup head are fixed in the X-axis direction, any needed adjustment on the X axis must take place with the X tray. The X tray must move slightly on the X axis before the pickup head picks up the device. Then the pickup head can pick up the device slightly off-center, so that when it drops it into the test site that is also offset, the device will be centered in the test socket. If socket 1 is the offset one, type a number, in inches, in the Socket 1 Offset input box. A negative number moves the X tray (with the device) toward the front of the handler. A positive number moves the X tray (with the device) toward the back of the handler.

Figure 5-73: ExamplePositive Socket Offset

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In Figure 5-73, tray X1 is designated as the input tray. Socket 1, the leftmost test site, is recessed toward the back of the handler just five thousandths of an inch. So the pickup head needs to grab the device near its front to place it precisely into the test socket. For this to happen, the X tray also needs to move toward the back of the handler just five thousandths of an inch.

Figure 5-74: ExampleNegative Socket Offset

In Figure 5-74, tray X2 is designated as the input tray. Socket 2, the test site on the right (or second from the left, if more test sites exist on the handler), is extended toward the front of the handler one one-hundredth of an inch. So the pickup head needs to grab the device near its back to place it precisely into the test socket. For this to happen, the X tray also needs to move toward the front of the handler one one-hundredth of an inch. X[n] Socket[n] Offset If this tray is designated as the input tray and this test site is offset a bit, type a number in fractions of an inch. If the test site is too far back, causing the device to be placed to the front of the test site, type a positive number. If the test site is too far forward, causing the device to be placed to the back of the test site, type a negative number.

Which Box Should You Use? If the input tray is...


X1

and the test site that is offset is...


Socket 1 (left) Socket 2 (right)

Type a number here

X2

Socket 1 (left) Socket 2 (right)

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Air Pressure Group Box

Air Pressure Group Box


Air cylinders use positive air pressure to extend thermal heads or test site clamps to the test site. The amount of air pressure is regulated by the voltage set here. The following table shows a rough correlation between the voltage input and the pressure output.
Set Air Pressure (Volts) 0.25 0.5 0.75 1 1.25 1.5 1.75 2 2.25 2.5 Pounds of Pressure 3 6 10 13 16 19 23 26 29 32

Set Air Pressure Set Air Pressure Voltage

Type the voltage to apply to the air pressure cylinder. Click this button to apply the voltage to the air cylinder.

Other Buttons
The other buttons available on the Fine Tune window are explained as follows.

Figure 5-75: Fine Tune Buttons

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Move to Get Position

Click this button to move the selected Y pickup head to the position named in Selections. It also moves it to the Z height specified in the Z Get Distance box. Click this button to move the selected Y pickup head to the position named in Selections. It also moves it to the Z height specified in the Z Put Distance box. Click this button to move the X1 tray to its home position. Click this button to move the X[n] tray to its home position. Click this button to move all motors to their home positions. Click this button only if you want to save changes under the current file name. To open a dialog box so you can save changes under a new file name, click the OK button instead.

Move to Put Position

Home Tray 1 Home Tray [n] Home All Motors Save Parameters

Setting Distances to Various Positions


This section explains how to set, or calibrate, critical locations and distances between various motor positions and device destinations, whether tray, tube, or tape. X motors, moving the trays in and out of the pickup area Y motor, moving the pickup head from the trays to the test site(s) and back Z motor, lowering and raising the pickup head from the surface of the trays and test site(s) The selections on this window allow you to emulate the entire automatic routine, part by part. The goal of the fine tuning is to adjust the motor positions such that the handler can pick up the devices, place them onto the test site, and unload the devices with precision. Fine tuning includes positioning the devices correctly at the sensors for proper detection. The order of tasks to follow in calibrating distances is shown in the following list.
Calibration Procedure Test SiteY Distance Test SiteZ-Get Distance Test SiteZ-Put Distance TrayY Distance TrayX Distance TrayZ-Put Distance TrayZ-Get Distance Page 5-74 5-78 5-77 5-82 5-83 5-77 5-78

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Setting Distances to Various Positions

Calibration Procedure Test SiteSocket Offset TaperY Distance TaperZ-Put Distance

Page 5-65 n/a 3-37

After all the procedures are explained, the distances are illustrated conceptually in the sections "Example of Calibrating Distances for Four JEDEC Trays" on page 5-85 and "Example of Calibrating Distances for Waffle Packs" on page 5-90.

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Positions to Be Calibrated
Click the drop-down arrow to the right of the Selections box. From the available selections, click the position you want to fine-tune. Your available selections will depend on the number of trays or waffle packs you have set up, as well as the number of test sites you have.

Figure 5-76: Selections for 4 Trays and 2 Test Sites

Figure 5-77: Selections for 4 Trays with Waffle Packs and 2 Test Sites

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Positions to Be Calibrated

Figure 5-78: Selections for Preheating Tray and Multiple Test Sites with Thermal Heads

The following table shows example distances, listed in the direction the devices travel. Your distances may vary. 1 You can use the second table as your worksheet to record correct distances calibrated for your handler.

Example Y and Z Distances from Home Positions to Key Sites


Site Bowl feeder Bucket 3 Inspection site Precisor tray (Y1) Precisor tray (Y2) Test site 2 (TS2, right) n/a Test site 1 (TS1, left) Bucket 2 Bucket 1 Transfer tray Taper n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a Y1 Distance 0.706 5.57 8.515 13.32 29.95 23.588 15.632 11.46 9.24 5.978 0.1 Y2 Distance n/a n/a n/a Z-Get 0.625 n/a n/a 0.58 1.025 2.98 2.98 n/a n/a 0.635 0.5 n/a 0.535 0.91 2.88 2.88 0.4 0.4 0.5 0.86 Z-Put

The shaded yellow boxes in the table show that while a value is possible, it would rarely, if ever, be used in diagnostics, and never in Auto Run. The shaded red boxes show where a value would never be used.

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X, Y, and Z Distances from Home Positions to Key SitesBlank Table


Site Tray 1, first pocket Tray 1, last pocket Tray 2, first pocket Tray 2, last pocket Tray 3, first pocket Tray 3, last pocket Tray 4, first pocket Tray 4, last pocket Detaper Bowl feeder Inspection site Precisor tray Transfer tray Test site 1 Test site 2 Bucket 1 Bucket 2 Bucket 3 Taper X Distance Y Distance Z-Get Distance Z-Put Distance

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Setting Test Site Distances

Setting Test Site Distances


Start by setting, or calibrating, distances for the test site closest to tray X1. This is the reference point used to calibrate all the motor positions.

Test Site 1

Test Site 2

Tray X1

Tray X2

Tray X3

Tray X4

Fixed reference point Define this test site first

Define tray X1 before other trays

Figure 5-79: Where to Start Setting Distances

Figure 5-80: Test Site Selected

If you selected a test site, the top group box under Selections becomes blank. The distances to be set for a test site are:
Setting Procedure Y Distance Z-Get Distance Z-Put Distance Page 5-74 5-78 5-77

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Setting the Y Distance to a Test Site


The Y distance is from the Y motor home position to the center of the drop-off point for the test site pocket.

Figure 5-81: Y Distance Group Box

To fine-tune the Y distance to a test site: 1. Place a device by hand into the test site closest to tray X1. 2. Select the test site in the Selections box, using the drop-down arrow. 3. Type a measurement estimated to be correct in the input box labeled Y Distance From Home to Center of Socket [n]. 4. Click the button Move Y To. > This moves the pickup head on the Y motor to a position over the test site. 5. Look to see whether the pickup head is exactly over the test socket. > If the alignment is off in the Y direction, make any small adjustments by clicking the left or right jog buttons. The motor will move left or right by the distance shown in the Scale (inches) input box. > If the alignment is off in the X direction, see further instructions under "Socket Offsets Group Box" on page 5-65. 6. To retest, click Y Home and then Move Y To again. After calibrating the Y distance, set the Z-get distance (page 5-78) and then the Z-put distance (page 5-77). Then, before calibrating the tray distances, pick up the device again with Z-get.

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Setting Test Site Distances

Comparing the Z Distances


The two Z distances are: Z-getthe distance from the Z home position to the device pickup position Z-putthe distance from the Z home position to the device release position Z-get picks up a device from a tray or test site, so it must be a bit closer to the surface of a device than Z-put, which is required only to drop the device into the pocket.

Figure 5-82: Example Z Distances to Test Site

In Figure 5-82, the Z-get distance is larger than the Z-put distance because its farther from the top, Z home. Furthermore, the Z distances for an X tray may be different than those for a test site.

Figure 5-83: Example Z Distances to X Tray

NOTE: These measurements are examples only. Your measurements may differ. The key to defining a Z-get distance is to have the suction cup just touching the device, but not flattened on it. The suction cup should be high enough that when you turn on the vacuum, you can see the device lift slightly against the suction cup.

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Figure 5-84: Suction Cup at Z-Get (Pick Height)

Notice that the suction cup at Z-get (pick height) is just touching the device, but not flattened on it.

Figure 5-85: Suction Cup at Z-Put (Put Height)

Notice that the suction cup at Z-put (put height) is not quite touching the device.

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Setting Test Site Distances

Setting the Z-Put Distance

Figure 5-86: Z-Put Distance Group Box

To fine-tune the Z-put distance: 1. Type a measurement estimated to be correct in the input box labeled Z Put Distance. CAUTION: If in doubt, make this distance smaller than you think necessary, then jog the pickup head down by steps to prevent damage from crashing the pickup nozzle into the socket. NOTE: The Z-put distance should be smaller than the Z-get distance, so that the suction cup is higher with Z-put. 2. Click the button Move ZPut To. >If the suction cup is too close to the device, raise the pickup head by clicking the Up jog button. Each time you click this button, the pickup head moves closer to Z home position by the distance shown in the Scale (inches) input box, and the number in the Z Put Distance input box gets smaller by the same scale. >If the suction cup is not close enough to the device, lower the pickup head by clicking the Down jog button. Each time you click this button, the pickup head moves away from Z home position by the distance shown in the Scale (inches) input box, and the number in the Z Put Distance input box gets larger by the same scale. 3. Turn the pickup head vacuum off by clicking the Vacuum On/Off checkbox. > The pickup head drops the device into the pocket. 4. Click the Z Home button to raise the pickup head from the socket.

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Setting the Z-Get Distance

Figure 5-87: Z-Get Distance Group Box

To fine-tune the Z-get distance: 1. Type a measurement estimated to be correct in the input box labeled Z Get Distance. CAUTION: If in doubt, make this distance smaller than you think necessary, then jog the pickup head down by steps to prevent damage from crashing the pickup nozzle into the socket. 2. Click the button Move ZGet To. >If the suction cup is too close to the device, raise the pickup head by clicking the Up jog button. Each time you click this button, the pickup head moves closer to Z home position by the distance shown in the Scale (inches) input box, and the number in the Z Get Distance input box gets smaller by the same scale. >If the suction cup is not close enough to the device, lower the pickup head by clicking the Down jog button. Each time you click this button, the pickup head moves away from Z home position by the distance shown in the Scale (inches) input box, and the number in the Z Get Distance input box gets larger by the same scale. 3. Turn the pickup head vacuum on by clicking the Vacuum On/Off checkbox. 4. Click the Z Home button to raise the device from the socket or pocket. By alternating among the Move ZGet To, Move ZPut To, and jog buttons, and the Vacuum On/Off checkbox, you can pick and drop the device until you are sure the distances are correct. If you have more than one test site, work your way to the left in defining test sites. For example, if you have four test sites, calibrate number 4 first, then 3, then 2, and then 1, on the extreme left. If any test sites are offset forward or backward, calibrate the trays first, then calibrate the test site offsets. See further instructions under "Socket Offsets Group Box" on page 5-65.

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Understanding Tray and Waffle Pack Numbering

Understanding Tray and Waffle Pack Numbering


Single JEDEC trays are numbered from left to right: X1, X2, etc.

Test Site 1

Test Site 2

Tray X1

Tray X2

Tray X3

Tray X4

Figure 5-88: Tray Numbering

When waffle packs are used, they are numbered back to front, and left to right. X2_1 X1_1 X2_3 X1_2 X2_5 X2_6 X2_4 X2_2

X1_3 X2_7 X2_8

Figure 5-89: Waffle Pack Numbering

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Setting Tray Distances


NOTE: Before setting tray distances, check that the correct number of columns and rows for each tray have been specified. See "Tray Information Group Box" on page 5-39. When setting the tray distances, first pick a device from the test site with the pickup head and carry it about. It is easier to see whether the pickup head is positioned correctly over a tray pocket if it is holding a device. After you have calibrated the test site distances, calibrate the tray distances. Always begin by calibrating tray X1, and working your way to the right. When you select an X tray, the top group box under Selections reflects the tray and pocket you selected.

Figure 5-90: Tray X1, First Pocket Selected (Left); Tray X4, Last Pocket Selected (Right)

The distances to be set for each tray are:


Setting Procedure Y Distance X Distance Z-Get Distance Z-Put Distance Page 5-82 5-83 5-78 5-77

Two locations on each tray must be calibrated, in terms of distances each motor must travel: Pocket in first row and column Pocket in last row and column

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Setting Tray Distances

Furthermore, if a handler is set up to use waffle packs, then each of these distances and locations must be calibrated for each waffle pack. For more conceptual information, see the sections "Example of Calibrating Distances for Four JEDEC Trays" on page 5-85 and "Example of Calibrating Distances for Waffle Packs" on page 5-90.

Calibration Order for Tray Pockets


Calibrate tray pockets in the order shown.

Figure 5-91: Order of Calibrating Distances for Multiple Trays

Calibrate the first pocket of the first waffle pack of tray X1, followed by the last pocket of that waffle pack. Then work your way forward for that tray. Do all the waffle packs for that tray before moving to tray X2.

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Figure 5-92: Order of Calibrating Distances for Multiple Trays with Multiple Waffle Packs

Setting the Y Distances to a Tray


Before starting, make sure the device picked up at the test site is still attached to the pickup head, according to the instructions on page 5-78. The Y distance is the distance the Y motor must move from the Y motor home position to get the pickup nozzle over the center of the drop-off point for the selected tray column.

Figure 5-93: Y Distance Group Box

To fine-tune the Y distances to a tray: 1. Place empty trays onto each tray shelf, ensuring they are fully seated and secured in place by the colored tray clamp. 2. Using the drop-down arrow, select tray X1, first row, first column, in the Selections box.

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Setting Tray Distances

> If you are using waffle packs, select tray X1_1, the top left waffle pack. 3. Type a measurement estimated to be correct in the input box labeled Y Distance From Home to Center of First Pocket. 4. Click the button Move Y To. > This moves the pickup head on the Y motor to a position over the tray. 5. Look to see whether the pickup head is exactly over the first pocket. > If the alignment is off in the Y direction, make any small adjustments by clicking the left or right jog buttons. The motor will move left or right by the distance shown in the Scale (inches) input box. 6. To retest, click Y Home and then Move Y To again. When the Y distance to the first pocket is correct, calibrate its X distance.

Setting the X Distances for a Tray


Before starting, make sure the device picked up at the test site is still attached to the pickup head, according to the instructions on page 5-78. The X distance is the distance the X motor must move from the X motor home position to get the center of the drop-off point for the selected tray row under the pickup nozzle.

Figure 5-94: X Distance Group Box

To fine-tune the X distances for a tray: 1. Place empty trays onto the X1 and X2 tray shelves, ensuring they are fully seated and secured in place by the colored tray clamp. 2. Using the drop-down arrow, select tray X1, first row, first column, in the Selections box. > If you are using waffle packs, select tray X1_1, the top left waffle pack. 3. Type a measurement estimated to be correct in the input box labeled X Distance From Home to Center of First Pocket. 4. Click the button Move X To.

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> This moves the tray to a position under the path of the Y motor. 5. Look to see whether the pickup head is exactly over the first pocket. >If the selected tray pocket is too far forward of the pickup head and the suction cup is over the back side of the device, increase the distance from X home by clicking the [Increase Distance] jog button. Each time you click this button, the tray moves back by the distance shown in the Scale (inches) input box. >If the selected tray pocket is too far behind the pickup head and the suction cup is over the front side of the device, decrease the distance from Z home by clicking the [Decrease Distance] jog button. Each time you click this button, the tray moves forward by the distance shown in the Scale (inches) input box.

Setting the Z Distances for a Tray


The procedure for defining the Z-put and Z-get distances at the tray is the same as the procedure at the test site. Follow the instructions under the section "Comparing the Z Distances" on page 5-75. For each location, calibrate Z-put first and then Z-get.

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Example of Calibrating Distances for Four JEDEC Trays

Example of Calibrating Distances for Four JEDEC Trays


In the example in Figure 5-95, each tray has 7 columns and 17 rows.

Figure 5-95: Four Trays with 7 x 17 Configuration

Defining Y Distances for JEDEC Trays


When each tray of a 4-tray handler is used as a single unit, eight Y distances are needed, two for each tray. The conceptual diagram in Figure 5-96 shows the Y distances for a hypothetical tray setup.

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Figure 5-96: Y Motor Diagram for 4-Tray Handler

In Figure 5-96, the only movement we are dealing with is that of the Y motor, which moves the pickup head. So the distances to be calibrated are the distances the Y motor carrying the pickup head must move to be positioned over the centers of specific device pockets. These distances have been filled in for each tray, for the first column and last column. Also, the distance to the spare tray is calibrated. These are shown as follows.
Tray and Location X1, first column X1, last column X2, first column X2, last column X3, first column X3, last column X4, first column X4, last column Spare tray Distance Y Motor Must Travel to Get Pickup Head Over Center of Pocket 23.87" 19.65 17.6 13.41 11.354 7.153 5.096 0.903 23.843

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Example of Calibrating Distances for Four JEDEC Trays

If you analyze these distances, you can see a pattern. Each trays first column appears to be approximately 6.25 inches from the next, and each trays last column appears to be approximately 6.25 inches from the next. The Y motor carrying the pickup head must move less than an inch to get from its home position to the last column of tray X4, then another 4 inches to get to the first column of tray X4. A move of another 2 inches takes the pickup head to the last column of tray X3, then another 4 inches to get to the first column of tray X3.

Figure 5-97: Y Distances to Tray X1

Figure 5-97 shows how these Y distances to tray X1 are calibrated on the Fine Tune window.

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Defining X Distances for JEDEC Trays


When each tray of a 4-tray handler is used as a single unit, eight X distances are needed, two for each tray. The conceptual diagram in Figure 5-98 shows the X distances for a hypothetical tray setup. It follows the example shown in Figure 5-95, each tray having 7 columns and 17 rows.

Figure 5-98: X Motor Diagram for 4-Tray Handler

In Figure 5-98, the only movement we are dealing with is that of the X motors and trays. The pickup head stays in the back. Each tray must slide a certain distance toward the back, to get the proper device pocket under the pickup head. So the distances to be calibrated are the distances the X tray must move to get the centers of specific device pockets under the pickup head. When the tray moves about 3 inches toward the back, the first row is under the Y pickup head. When the tray moves about 14.5 inches, the last row is under the pickup head. These distances have been filled in for each tray, for the first row and last row. Also, the distance to the spare tray is calibrated. These are summed up as follows.
Tray and Location X1, first row X1, last row X2, first row Distance X Motor Must Travel to Get Center of Pocket Under Pickup Head 3.3265" 14.531 3.3295

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Example of Calibrating Distances for Four JEDEC Trays

Tray and Location X2, last row X3, first row X3, last row X4, first row X4, last row Spare tray

Distance X Motor Must Travel to Get Center of Pocket Under Pickup Head 14.53 3.329 14.54 3.329 14.551 16

NOTE: These measurements are examples only. Your measurements may differ. Notice that the farther the X tray must move, the larger the distance. These measurements are about the same for each tray, because each tray must travel about the same distance to get to the pickup head area, the Y gantry. The X trays must move a little over 3 inches to get the first row positioned under the pickup head, but they must move about 14.5 inches to get the last row under the pickup head.

Figure 5-99: X Distances for Tray X1

Figure 5-99 shows how these X distances for tray X1 are calibrated on the Fine Tune window.
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Example of Calibrating Distances for Waffle Packs


The outline dimensions of the trays are the JEDEC standard. If a company uses trays within these outline trays, the company-specific waffle packs may be any dimensions that fit.

Figure 5-100: Waffle Packs

In the example in Figure 5-100, each waffle pack has 5 rows and 6 columns.

Defining Y Distances for Waffle Packs


When each tray of a 4-tray handler has 3 waffle packs, 24 Y distances are needed, two for each waffle pack. In Figure 5-101, the only movement we are dealing with is that of the Y motor, which moves the pickup head. So the distances to be calibrated are the distances the Y motor carrying the pickup head must move to be positioned over the centers of specific device pockets.

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Example of Calibrating Distances for Waffle Packs

Figure 5-101: Y Motor Diagram for 4-Tray Handler with 12 Waffle Packs

These distances have been filled in for each waffle tray, for the first column and the last column. These are shown as follows.
Tray and Location X1_1, first column X1_1, last column X1_2, first column X1_2, last column X1_3, first column X1_3, last column X2_1, first column X2_1, last column X2_2, first column X2_2, last column X2_3, first column Distance Y Motor Must Travel to Get Pickup Head Over Center of Pocket 22.665" 20.41 22.671 20.39 22.695 20.38 16.424 14.27 16.457 14.19 16.481

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Tray and Location X2_3, last column X3_1, first column X3_1, last column X3_2, first column X3_2, last column X3_3, first column X3_3, last column X4_1, first column X4_1, last column X4_2, first column X4_2, last column X4_3, first column X4_3, last column

Distance Y Motor Must Travel to Get Pickup Head Over Center of Pocket 14.15 10.152 7.993 10.179 7.89 10.183 7.904 3.912 1.663 3.917 1.638 3.917 1.643

NOTE: These measurements are examples only. Your measurements may differ.

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Example of Calibrating Distances for Waffle Packs

Figure 5-102: Y Distances to Tray X4

Figure 5-102 shows how these Y distances to tray X4 are calibrated on the Fine Tune window.

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Defining X Distances for Waffle Packs


When each tray of a 4-tray handler has 3 waffle packs, 24 X distances are needed, two for each waffle pack. The conceptual diagram in Figure 5-103 shows the X distances for a hypothetical tray setup. It follows the example shown in Figure 5-100, each tray having three waffle packs. The packs are labeled with the tray number and the waffle suffix. Thus, the packs in tray X1 are labeled X1_1, X1_2, and X1_3. The packs in tray X2 are labeled X2_1, X2_2, and X2_3. Again in Figure 5-103, the only movement we are dealing with is that of the X motors and trays. The pickup head stays in the back. Each tray must slide a certain distance toward the back, to get the proper device pocket under the pickup head. So the distances to be calibrated are the distances the X tray must move to get the centers of specific device pockets under the pickup head. The difference here from the previous example is that the position of the first and last pockets of each waffle pack must be measured.

Figure 5-103: X Motor Diagram for 4-Tray Handler with 12 Waffle Packs

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Example of Calibrating Distances for Waffle Packs

These distances have been filled in for each waffle tray, for the first row and last row. These are shown as follows.
Tray and Location X1_1, first row X1_1, last row X1_2, first row X1_2, last row X1_3, first row X1_3, last row X2_1, first row X2_1, last row X2_2, first row X2_2, last row X2_3, first row X2_3, last row X3_1, first row X3_1, last row X3_2, first row X3_2, last row X3_3, first row X3_3, last row X4_1, first row X4_1, last row X4_2, first row X4_2, last row X4_3, first row X4_3, last row Distance X Motor Must Travel to Get Center of Pocket Under Pickup Head 3.48" 6.1 7.513 10.21 11.54 14.39 3.515 6.16 7.57 10.27 11.7 14.4 3.5 6.2 7.581 10.31 11.685 14.41 3.515 6.208 7.61 10.32 11.7 14.42

NOTE: These measurements are examples only. Your measurements may differ.

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Figure 5-104: X Distances for Tray X4

Figure 5-104 shows how these X distances for tray X4 are calibrated on the Fine Tune window.

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Example of Distances for Preheating Tray and Dual Test

Example of Distances for Preheating Tray and Dual Test Sites


The next example uses the options of a moving preheating tray and dual test sites on either side of the trays (Figure 5-105).

Figure 5-105: Moving Preheating Tray (Left); Thermal Test Site (Right)

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Figure 5-106: Y Motor Diagram for 3-Tray Handler with Preheating Tray and Dual Test Sites

In Figure 5-106, the distances and destinations are shown for the Y1 pickup assembly. From its home position at the extreme right (but to the left of the Y3 thermal head assembly), the pickup assembly must move 0.691 inch to get centered over TS1R (the right half of test site 1), so that each of the four Z nozzles fit into the four right sockets. It must move roughly another 3.5 inches, or a total of 4.128 inches from home, to get to the center of TS1L, or the left half of the same test site. The preheating tray is also divided into halves. Therefore, the Y1 pickup assembly must move roughly 10.4 inches from its home position to get to the center of the right half of the preheating tray. Another 2 inches gets it to the left half. NOTE: These measurements are examples only. Your measurements may differ.
Chapter 5: Diagnostics

The distances are shown which the pickup assembly must move to get its four nozzles centered over the first four pockets of each tray. Finally, the largest distances it must travel are to the two halves of the left test site.

Fine Tune Window

Example of Distances for Preheating Tray and Dual Test

Defining X Distances for Three Trays and Moving Preheating Tray

Figure 5-107: X Motor Diagram for 3-Tray Handler with Moving Preheating Tray

On the X axis, only the three tray carriages and the preheating tray move. In Figure 5-107, the distances each entity must travel on its X axis are shown. For example, each tray must move the small distance of just over 3 inches to get the first pocket under the path of the pickup assembly. However, each tray must move over 14 inches toward the back to get the last pocket under the path of the pickup assembly. The preheating tray must move just under an inch from its home position at the front, toward the back, to get the back row under the path of the pickup assembly. It must move another inch to get the middle row under the path of the pickup assembly. NOTE: These measurements are examples only. Your measurements may differ.

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Thermal Setup Window (Optional)


If your handler is equipped with thermal test heads and possibly a chiller/circulator, the Exatron software includes a window that resembles the one in Figure 5-108.

Figure 5-108: Thermal Setup Window

Hot Thermal Omega Group Box


The Hot Thermal Omega group box controls the hot test head. [Select thermal head] Click the drop-down arrow to the right of the box and select the thermal head you want to set. The selections vary according to the features of your handler. Type the desired hot Celsius temperature for the left thermal head. The allowed variance above the set temperature on the left thermal head is displayed.

Set Temperature

+ Guard Band

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Thermal Setup Window (Optional)

Cold Thermal Julabo/Huber Group Box

- Guard Band

The allowed variance below the set temperature on the left thermal head is displayed. The actual or current Celsius temperature on the left thermal head is displayed. Click this button to save the desired hot Celsius temperature for the left thermal head, typed in the Set Temperature box. Click this button to display the current Celsius temperature on the left thermal head.

Current Temperature

Set Left Temperature

Read Left Temperature

Cold Thermal Julabo/Huber Group Box


The Cold Thermal group box controls the chiller for the cold head. Set Cold Temperature Type a number that is several degrees colder than the desired Celsius temperature in the Set Cold Temperature input box. This is the temperature the handler will send to the chiller to set to that temperature. This is the temperature that the handler will use to compare with the cold chiller temperature. The handler will use the Omega temperature controller to read the temperature from the cold thermal head and then check to see if its in the range of the Right Head Temperature plus or minus the guard band. The allowed variance above the set temperature on the right thermal head from the set temperature is displayed. The allowed variance below the set temperature on the right thermal head is displayed. The actual or current Celsius temperature on the right thermal head is displayed. Click this button to save the desired Celsius temperature for the right thermal head, typed in the Set Temperature box. Click this button to turn off the chiller circulator. Click this button to turn on the chiller circulator. Click this button to display the current Celsius temperature on the right thermal head.

Compared Cold Head Temperature

+ Guard Band

- Guard Band

Current Temperature

Set Right Temperature

Turn Off Circulator Turn On Circulator Read Right Temperature

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Socket Pressure Group Box

Figure 5-109: Socket Pressure Group Box (Left); Head Air Pressure (Right)

Set Air Pressure

Type the voltage desired to apply air pressure on the sockets from the thermal heads. A possible ratio might be something like the following; however, it varies from handler to handler. Air Pressure Voltage Input 0.25 0.5 0.75 1 1.25 1.5 1.75 2 Pounds of Air PressureOutput 3 6 10 13 16 19 23 26

Set Air Pressure Voltage Cold Head Soak Time

Click this button to apply the voltage. Type, in milliseconds, the desired time duration after the cold thermal head clamps on the device in the test socket and before the handler gives the command to start testing. Type, in milliseconds, the desired time duration after the hot thermal head clamps on the device in the test socket and before the handler gives the command to start testing. Click this button only if you want to save changes under the current file name. To open a dialog box so you can save changes under a new file name, click the OK button instead.

Hot Head Soak Time

Save Parameters

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Taper Window (Optional)

Socket Pressure Group Box

Taper Window (Optional)


For those handlers having a tape and reel attached, an additional window is available. It sets measurements and distances in relation to the tape and sets reel motor speeds. The selections under each group box are discussed together.

Figure 5-110: Taper Window

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Taper Fine Tune Group Box

Figure 5-111: Taper Fine Tune Group Box

Select Z Nozzle

Click the drop-down arrow to the right of the box and select the Z nozzle you want to calibrate. The selections vary according to the features of your handler. In the input box to the right of the Head Go To Tape Reel button, type the distance from the Y pickup heads home to the tape track. Click this button to move the Y pickup head to the tape track position shown in the input box to the right. You must click this button before you can make fine-tune adjustments with the jog buttons.

[Y distance to tape drop]

Head Go To Tape Reel

[Left/Right]

If the alignment is off in the Y direction, make any small adjustments by clicking the left or right jog buttons. The pickup head moves left or right by the distance shown in the Scale input box, and the number shown in the Distance input box changes accordingly. Click this button to move the Y pickup head to its home position.

Y[n] Home

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Taper Window (Optional)

Taper Fine Tune Group Box

Scale

Type the scale, or size, of each increment or decrement by which a motor should move when one of the jog buttons is clicked. For example, if the value here is 0.005 and the value in one of the distance boxes is 17.505, then when the Increase Distance or left jog button for that distance box is clicked, the value changes to 17.510. Other examples follow. Current Value 10.365 0.96 Incremented Value 10.370 0.965 Decremented Value 10.360 0.955

Y[n] Pick Devices from Tray / Transfer Site / Bowl Feeder Put Device To Tape Reel

Click this button to cause the pickup head to get a device from the designated input.

Click this button to cause the pickup head to put a device in the tape pocket. In the input box to the right of the Go to Put Height button, type the distance from the pickup heads Z home to the Z-put position at the tape track. Click this button to move the pickup nozzle down to the Z-put position shown in the input box to the right. You must click this button before you can make fine-tune adjustments with the jog buttons.

[LZ Distance to Z-Put]

Go to Put Height

[Up]

If the suction cup is too close to the device, raise the pickup head by clicking the Up jog button. Each time you click this button, the pickup head moves closer to Z home position by the distance shown in the Scale input box, and the number in the Z Put Distance input box gets smaller by the same scale. If the suction cup is not close enough to the device, lower the pickup head by clicking the Down jog button. Each time you click this button, the pickup head moves away from Z home position by the distance shown in the Scale input box, and the number in the Z Put Distance input box gets larger by the same scale.

[Down]

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[Z Distance to Z-Get]

In the input box to the right of the Go to Pick Height button, type the distance from the pickup heads Z home to the Z-get position at the tape track. Click this button to move the pickup nozzle down to the Z-get position shown in the input box to the right. You must click this button before you can make fine-tune adjustments with the jog buttons.

Go to Pick Height

[Up]

If the suction cup is too close to the device, raise the pickup head by clicking the Up jog button. Each time you click this button, the pickup head moves closer to Z home position by the distance shown in the Scale input box, and the number in the Z-Get Distance input box gets smaller by the same scale. If the suction cup is not close enough to the device, lower the pickup head by clicking the Down jog button. Each time you click this button, the pickup head moves away from Z home position by the distance shown in the Scale input box, and the number in the Z-Get Distance input box gets larger by the same scale. Click this button to raise the pickup head to its Z home position.

[Down]

Z Home

Seal Head Group Box

Figure 5-112: Seal Head Group Box

Seal Head Down Delay (msec) Tape Total Count

Type the number of milliseconds after the seal head goes down to the tape before the tape is moved. Type the number of pockets to fill with devices and seal in a job.

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Taper Window (Optional)

Tape and Reel Group Box

The temperature set here for the heat seal head overrides any manual settings made on the heater controller itself. The input temperature must be in Celsius. Following is a short conversion table that can be used as a rough reference. Temperature in Fahrenheit
77 250 275 300 325 350

Temperature in Celsius
25 121 135 149 163 177

Set Temperature

Type the desired hot temperature in Celsius for the seal head. Click this button to start the heater heating to the set temperature. Click this button to read and display the current temperature on the seal head. After you click the Read Temperature button, the current temperature on the seal head is displayed.

Set Temperature

Read Temperature

Current Temperature

Tape and Reel Group Box

Figure 5-113: Tape Reel Group Box

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Gap Offset (Steps)

Type the number of motor steps needed to move the tape from the offset position identified by the gap offset sensor to the center of the pocket. Because of various tape pocket sizes, when the tape is in position so the gap sensor "sees" through the hole in the middle of the empty pocket, the corresponding tape pocket under the pickup head is likely not centered under the pickup head nozzle. Therefore, the tape needs to be advanced the correct number of motor steps, so the pickup head can place the device into the center of the pocket and not on the pocket edge. Notice that in Figure 5-114, when the pocket is centered under the pickup head, the gap sensor is between pockets. This is the gap offset.

Pickup head nozzle

Gap sensor

Figure 5-114: Gap Sensor Offset from Pickup Head

Initial Taper

Click this button to initialize the taper. This advances the tape until the next tape pocket hole is under the front Gap sensor. From there, it moves the number of motor steps specified in the Gap Offset (Steps) input box to get the next emptypocket hole under the pickup head, and stops. This is the homing process for the taper. After you click Initial Taper, the buttons below it are enabled.

Leader Count (# of Pockets)

Type the number of pockets needed from the back edge of the tape track to the output reel takeup spool. This is the

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Taper Window (Optional)

Tape and Reel Group Box

number of empty pockets passed before the machine begins putting devices in the pockets. Advance Leader Click this button to advance the tape by the number of pockets specified in the Leader Count box.

Ending point for leader count

Starting point for leader count

Figure 5-115: Leader Pockets

Trailer Count (# of Pockets)

Type the number of empty pockets to be passed after the empty pocket sensor. The tape will continue to be sealed to this number of pockets after the specified number of devices have filled the specified number of pockets for the job. Click this button to advance the tape by the number of pockets specified in the Trailer Count box.

Advance Trailer

Take-up Motor Count (# of Type the number of pockets required for the tape to go from Pockets) a slack position until the slack switch blocks the slack switch sensor and turns on the output reel motor (Figure 5-116). Abort Click this button to stop the action caused by the Advance Leader, Advance Trailer, or Advance Pockets buttons. For example, if the number of leader pockets is set at 50, and you have clicked Advance Leader, and ten leader pockets have advanced, this button aborts the tape advancement immediately at ten.

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Figure 5-116: Output Tape Slack (Left); Output Tape Taut, Raising Takeup Arm (Right)

Number of Holes Between Type the number of sprocket holes between the hole in one Pockets pocket and the hole in the pocket next to it. Always count between single pockets, even when dropping from multiple pickup nozzles to the tape. The software adjusts the tape movement according to how many devices were dropped into the tape at one pass. In the example in Figure 5-117, there are three sprocket holes between pocket centers.

Figure 5-117: Counting Number of Sprocket Holes Between Pocket Centers

Number of Pockets

Type the desired number of test leader pockets to advance (optional). Click this button to advance the tape by the number of pockets specified in the Number of Pockets box (optional).

Advance Pockets

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Taper Window (Optional)

Vacuum Group Box

Number of Pockets Before Type the number of pockets to be advanced after the tapeCheck Tape Out Error out error sensor first detects no tape and before the machine stops and gives a tape-out message. Enable Seal Head Check this box to turn on the seal head and seal the tape after inserting the devices. Uncheck this box to turn off the seal head. Select the desired option to seal with pressure-sensitive tape or thermal (heat) tape.

PSA/Thermo

Vacuum Group Box


Z All Vacuum On Check the box to turn on all the Z nozzle vacuums. Uncheck the box to turn off all the vacuums. Check the box to turn on the vacuums for the taper pockets. Uncheck the box to turn off the vacuums.

Tape Vacuum On

Motor Group Box


These parameters apply to the taper motor.

Figure 5-118: Motor Group Box

Speed AC DC (% of AC)

Type the desired motor speed. Type the acceleration speed. Type the deceleration speed as a percentage of the acceleration speed. For example, if the acceleration speed is 50, and the deceleration speed should be the same as the acceleration, type 100 in the DC box, for 100 percent of the acceleration speed. If the deceleration speed should be half the acceleration speed, type 50 in the DC box.

Steps

Type the number of steps you want to move the motor. Note that 50,000 steps complete one revolution.

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Enable Motor Motor Off Motor Go

Click this button to turn on the motor. Click this button to turn off the motor. Click this button to move the motor the number of steps displayed in the Steps box to the left.

Other Buttons
Z1 Pick Device from Test Site Z1 Put All Devices to Taper Save Parameters Click this button to cause the pickup head to get device(s) from the test site. Click this button to cause the pickup head to put device(s) in the tape pockets. Click this button only if you want to save changes under the current file name. To open a dialog box so you can save changes under a new file name, click the OK button instead.

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Chapter 6: Servicing and Troubleshooting


Chapter Overview
This chapter is broken into discrete topics which may bear no relation to each other, but which are designed to assist the operator and/or technician to troubleshoot error conditions in the Exatron system. This chapter discusses the following maintenance tasks and their frequency: Task Backing Up the Computer Cleaning the Handler Cleaning or Replacing the Suction Cup Lubricating the Bearing Shafts Checking Lead Screw/Coupling Tightness Motor Replacement Master and Slave Cool Muscle Motors Setting Up a Cool Muscle Motor Controller Replacing a Cool Muscle Servo Motor Programming a Cool Muscle Motor Checking Motor Serial Cables Air Regulator Maintenance Checking Incoming Air from the House Supply Checking the Moisture/Dirt Trap in the Air Regulator Checking the Air Regulator Shutoff Valve Automatic Air Shut-Off Valve Adjusting Air Pressure on the Regulator Adjusting Auxiliary Air Regulator Adjusting Air Valves Adjusting Air Pressure on a Digital Pressure Switch Unlocking or Locking a Digital Air Pressure Switch Changing Settings on a Digital Air Pressure Switch Vacuum Generator Maintenance Troubleshooting Vacuum Assemblies Checking and Replacing a Vacuum Air Filter Adjusting Pickup Nozzle Blow-Off Cleaning Vacuum Assemblies Checking and Setting the Vacuum Generator Solenoid Maintenance Opening the Computer for Part ReplacementCabinet Models Frequency Monthly Daily Weekly Monthly or quarterly Monthly As needed Before installing motor As needed After installing motor Monthly Weekly Weekly Monthly As needed As needed As needed As needed As needed As needed As needed Monthly or quarterly As needed As needed As needed As needed As needed Page 6-3 6-3 6-3 6-3 6-5 6-5 6-6 6-8 6-13 6-16 6-18 6-19 6-19 6-19 6-22 6-23 6-24 6-24 6-25 6-26 6-27 6-31 6-39 6-42 6-42 6-43 6-46 6-50 6-58 6-58

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Chapter 6: Servicing and Troubleshooting

Task Opening the Computer for Part ReplacementBenchtop Models Fiberoptic Photoelectric Sensor Guidelines Taper Maintenance Checking Omega Temperature Controller Thermal Heads Air Pressure Laser Servicing Networking Internet Access Setting LAN Connections and Required IP Addresses Testing Network Communication with Peripherals Remote Handler Control with WebEx Replacing Exatron Program File with an Upgrade Troubleshooting This chapter also discusses the following problems: Topic Motors Move Very Slowly Tray Carriage Alignment Is Faulty System Does Not Pick Up Devices Reliably System Noise When Y Gantry Moves

Frequency As needed As needed As needed As needed As needed As specified by OEM As needed Always As needed As needed As needed As needed As needed

Page 6-61 6-64 6-65 6-66 6-71 6-71 6-71 6-71 6-72 6-77 6-80 6-82 6-85

Page 6-85 6-85 6-85 6-87

Preventive maintenance on the Model 900 is fairly simple. Following this schedule will help to assure your Model 900 handler will continue to perform properly. WARNING! Keep fingers, hair, and clothing away from any moving parts on the handler. Its motors are very powerful and can cause severe injury. WARNING! Always reset all motors before running the machine. Do not run it without homing the motors. WARNING! Never try to stop an action of the handler with your hands or any other device. To stop the handler, press the EMO (emergency stop) button or click Pause on the screen. CAUTION: Do not lubricate any lead screws! Lubricating the screws will void the warranty. CAUTION: Do not use any cleaners or solvents on any bearings or lead screws!

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Backing Up the Computer

CAUTION: Always power off the system before doing any maintenance.

Backing Up the Computer


As job files and other data are created or modified, you will need to back up the computer system as a precaution against hard drive failure. Appendix B explains how to back up the entire system. Alternatively, you can back up a few files to a CD or DVD. CAUTION: Back up the computers hard drive monthly or oftener to prevent loss of data.

Cleaning the Handler


Include the following in a daily cleaning routine for longer trouble-free operation: Use a camel-hair brush to remove dust from any optics such as a laser lens. Wipe the lead screw and linear bearing slides with a clean, lint-free cloth. Vacuum any debris and dust from inside the cabinets. Vacuum any debris from the computer chassis.

Cleaning or Replacing the Suction Cup


The suction cup on each pickup head of the Model 900 is subject to fairly serious performance degradation with dirt and oil buildup. This buildup may be due to substances on the devices themselves, such as mold release agent, oils and soaps from anti-static containers, etc. Wipe the suction cup with a cotton swab dipped in isopropyl alcohol or other suitable (evaporative) cleaning agent. This is best performed when the system is switched off to avoid any motor movement during the cleaning process. Depending on volume of use, the suction cup may require replacement. A list of replacement part numbers can be found in Chapter 7.

Lubricating the Bearing Shafts


The bearings on the Y gantry and X axes are lubricated at the factory. However, these bearings need relubrication at regular intervals. The lubrication interval will be different for each handler because this interval is dependent on several factors. These factors are: Operation hours Speed Load Temperature Stroke

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Environmental conditions The two factors that will change from handler to handler are operating hours and environmental conditions. Exatron recommends that the bearing shafts be lubricated every month at a minimum. Exatron strongly recommends the lubrication be done weekly, especially if the handler is in extreme environmental conditions or is operated more than 80 hours per week. Use visual inspection to determine when lubrication will be required in these cases. You should see a thin, clean layer of grease on the stainless steel bearing guide shafts. If grease is not seen, or if they are dirty, the shafts should be cleaned and re-lubed. Manufacturer Kerk Thomson NB THK NSK NSK Thomson Thomson Product Lead screws Bearings Bearing shafts Bearing shafts Bearing shafts self-lubricating Bearing shafts non-self-lubricating Bearing shafts Linear rails NONE NONE Linear Lube (Thomson brand) Linear Lube (Thomson brand) NONE Linear Lube (Thomson brand) M1 (Starrett brand) Linear Lube (Thomson brand) Self-lubing shafts have no lubrication fitting Non-self-lubing shafts have a lubrication fitting M1 is petroleum-based, removes moisture Treatment Comment Black TFE coated screws are never lubed Bearings are Super 4, Super 8, and Super 8 OPN

To lubricate the bearing shafts: 1. Power down the entire system. CAUTION: Do not use water or any cleansers to clean the bearing shafts. This will cause rust damage to the bearings. Also, do not lubricate any of the leadscrews; lubricate only the bearing shafts. 2. Apply an appropriate type of grease to a soft, clean, dry lint-free cloth. Wipe the cloth along the bearing shaft, making sure no grease drops onto the lead screw. Be sure to remove all the old grease and debris. Exatron recommends a Teflon-based grease or M1. Exatron uses Linear Lube grease manufactured by Thomson.

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Checking Lead Screw/Coupling Tightness

> The amount of grease used is difficult to specify. The goal is to attain a thin layer of grease along the entire length of the shaft. 3. On a linear motor track, apply a small dab of grease at one point. Then by hand move the Z-axis block along the entire length of the shaft several times. > If no film of grease is seen, apply another small dab of grease and repeat the process. > If there is any clumping of grease along the length of the shaft, remove the excess grease with a dry cloth. Once again move the Z axis block manually several times until a thin film is achieved.

Checking Lead Screw/Coupling Tightness


Mechanical alignment of this system relies on the lead screws and motor coupling being tight. To tighten lead screws and motor coupling screws: 1. With the power to the system off, open the two hinged covers and manually push and pull on the lead screws. They should not be loose in their long axis (they will turn, but should not pull in and out at all). 2. Using a #6 (7/64") hex driver (preferably without ball tip), make sure the screws on the motor coupling are tight. The screws are accessible through the slots in the motor mounting bracket. Turn clockwise to tighten. The screws should be tight, but do not over-tighten, as it is possible to break the screws. 3. If the lead screws seem at all loose, it will be necessary to tighten them against the motor coupling. Tighten the lead screws only with the power off! Using a #6 (7/64") hex driver (preferably without ball tip) loosen the screw on the motor coupling, accessible through the slots in the motor mounting bracket. Loosen only the screw nearest the lead screw, not nearest the motor. 4. When that screw is loose, push on the lead screw, towards the coupling, to seat the lead screw tightly against the bearing mounted in the system wall. 5. With the lead screw tight against the coupling, tighten the coupling screw again.

Motor Replacement
When replacing a motor, several tasks may be involved. These are explained in the following sections. For a Cool Muscle motor, you may need to adjust the configuration before installing it; and after installation, you need to program the motor.

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Chapter 6: Servicing and Troubleshooting

Cool Muscle motors can be used as master or slave motors. You can program a replacement Cool Muscle motor through the Exatron software. See "Programming a Cool Muscle Motor" on page 6-16 for instructions.

Master and Slave Cool Muscle Motors


This section applies to Cool Muscle motors used as master and slaves. Several principles regarding master and slave motors need to be considered. A master motor is always powered through the terminal block on its network card (Figure 6-1, bottom; and Figure 6-2, left). A slave motor can be powered through either of two methods: > Through the terminal block on its network card (Figure 6-2, middle and right), or > Through an RS-232 cable attached to the input connector on its network card (Figure 6-1, top; and Figure 6-3, middle and right).

Input connector

Terminal block + = 24V -- = GND 3 & 4 unused


Figure 6-1: Terminal Block and Input Connector on Network Card

The following partial diagrams illustrate the differences.

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Master and Slave Cool Muscle Motors

Figure 6-2: Slave Boards Powered Through Terminals

Figure 6-3: Slave Boards Powered Through RS-232 Cables

Notice that in both Figure 6-2 and Figure 6-3, the master board on the left (circled in blue) is powered through its terminal. In Figure 6-2, the slave boards (middle and right, circled in red) are likewise powered through their terminals, as shown by the red wires. In this case, only the sensors are powered through the RS-232 cables. However, in Figure 6-3, the slave boards (middle and right, circled in red) are powered through their RS-232 cables, since no terminal wires are present. In this case, both the slave boards and the sensors are powered through the RS-232 cables.

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A master motor uses a network card equipped with an interface card. The cards together are called a master set. A slave motor uses a network card without an interface card.

Setting Up a Cool Muscle Motor Controller


If you have ordered a master motor controller (a network card with interface card), it will look like the board at the right side of Figure 6-4. It has a small board (the interface card) piggybacked on top.

Figure 6-4: Cool Muscle Motor ControllersSlave on Left; Master on Right with Piggybacked Network Card

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Setting Up a Cool Muscle Motor Controller

Figure 6-5: Cool Muscle Motor ControllersSlave on Left, Master on Right; Jumpers in Opposite Configurations

If you are going to use the controller as a master, leave the JP3, JP4, and JP5 jumpers in the position shown at the right side of Figure 6-5. If you are going to use the controller as a slave, pull off the JP3, JP4, and JP5 jumpers and replace them in the position shown at the left side of Figure 6-5.

Master Network Card with Interface Card (See Figure 6-6)


Jumper
JP1 JP2 JP3 JP4 JP5

Pins Connected (Covered)


2 (open) 2 (open) 2&3 2&3 2&3

Used When...
Power is supplied through terminal block on card. Power is supplied through terminal block on card. Interface card is attached to network card. Interface card is attached to network card. Interface card is attached to network card.

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Slave Network Card Powered Through Terminal Block (See Figure 6-7)
Jumper
JP1 JP2 JP3 JP4 JP5

Pins Connected (Covered)


2 (open) 2 (open) 1&2 1&2 1&2

Used When...
Power is supplied through terminal block on card. Power is supplied through terminal block on card. NO interface card is attached to network card. NO interface card is attached to network card. NO interface card is attached to network card.

Slave Network Card Powered Through RS-232 Cable (See Figure 6-8)
Jumper
JP1 JP2 JP3 JP4 JP5

Pins Connected (Covered)


1 & 2 (closed) 1 & 2 (closed) 1&2 1&2 1&2

Used When...
Power is supplied through RS-232 serial cable. Power is supplied through RS-232 serial cable. NO interface card is attached to network card. NO interface card is attached to network card. NO interface card is attached to network card.

Interface Card Piggybacked on Master Network Card (See Figure 6-6, Left)
Jumper
JP1 JP2

Pins Connected (Covered)


1&2 2&3

Used When...
RS-232 is used rather than RS-485. RS-232 is used rather than RS-485.

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Setting Up a Cool Muscle Motor Controller

JP5 - Pins 2 & 3 connected Interface Card: JP1 - Pins 1 & 2 connected

JP3 - Pins 2 & 3 connected

JP2 - Pins 2 & 3 connected

JP4 - Pins 2 & 3 connected

JP1 open

JP2 open

Figure 6-6: Master Network Card with Interface Card on Top

JP5 - Pins 1 & 2 connected

JP3 - Pins 1 & 2 connected

JP4 - Pins 1 & 2 connected

JP1 open

JP2 open

Figure 6-7: Slave Network Card Powered Through Terminal Block

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JP5 - Pins 1 & 2 connected

JP3 - Pins 1 & 2 connected

JP4 - Pins 1 & 2 connected

JP1 JP2 Pins 1 & 2 connected on both


Figure 6-8: Slave Network Card Powered Through RS-232 Cable

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Replacing a Cool Muscle Servo Motor

Replacing a Cool Muscle Servo Motor


The instructions in this procedure apply to Cool Muscle motors. To replace a servo motor, use the instructions in this section. The new parts to be assembled and installed are shown in Figure 6-9. # 4 x 1/4" x 1/4" diameter nylon spacers # 4 split washers 4/40 x 2.125" # 4 x 9/16" x 1/4" diameter nylon spacers Motor drive board cover (PET-K66-A) # 4 nylon washers 4/40 x 1/4" Serial port/network card cover (PET-H39-C)

Motor drive board (inside cover) (MOT16-001)

Nema 17 Motor (MOT16-001)

Client network card (MOT16-020)

Short style motor communication cable (MOT16-033)

Figure 6-9: New Motor Assembly to Be Installed

To replace a servo motor: 1. Place the two nylon washers on the 4/40 x 1/4" screws, and place the screws into the holes of the motor drive board, as shown in Figure 6-10. 2. Place the motor drive board inside the cover with the two screw holes aligned (Figure 6-10).

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Figure 6-10: Screwing Motor Drive Board in Cover

3. Wrap the rubber grommet around the wires, and slide the grommet into the grommet holder, as shown in Figure 6-11. 4. Slide the #4 split washers onto the long screws, and slide the four screws through the serial port/network card cover (Figure 6-11). Slide the short (1/4"long) nylon spacers onto the screws.

Figure 6-11: Adding Grommet and Long Screws

5. Slide the client network card onto the long screws, with the connectors facing the cover holes, as shown in Figure 6-12. 6. Slide the long (9/16"-long) nylon spacers onto the screws (Figure 6-12).

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Motor Replacement

Replacing a Cool Muscle Servo Motor

Figure 6-12: Sliding Network Card into Cover; Adding Long Spacers

7. Slide the motor driver board in its cover onto the long screws so the two covers are piggybacked, as shown in Figure 6-13. 8. Press the short style motor communication rainbow cable into the connectors of both boards (Figure 6-13).

Figure 6-13: Sliding Both Covers Together; Adding Rainbow Cable

9. Attach the assembly to the handler.

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Chapter 6: Servicing and Troubleshooting

Programming a Cool Muscle Motor


After you have replaced an old Cool Muscle motor with a new one, you need to program its parameters (sometimes called initializing the motor). The Exatron software streamlines this process for you. To program a new Cool Muscle servo motor: 1. Open the Exatron software. 2. On the Main window, click the Function menu, and click Initialize Motors.

Figure 6-14: Initialize Motors Menu Item

3. In the Initialize Motors dialog box, click the drop-down arrow to the right of the Select Motor box, and click the motor you want to initialize (Figure 6-15). 4. Click Initialize Motor. 5. Click Exit.

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Programming a Cool Muscle Motor

Replacing a Cool Muscle Servo Motor

Figure 6-15: Initialize Motors Dialog Box

For more information, see the motor manufacturers manual.

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Chapter 6: Servicing and Troubleshooting

Checking Motor Serial Cables


The motors on the Model 900 are attached to the system via short serial cables. Check that these cables are plugged in tightly to the CPU box, and the DB-9 connectors are securely screwed to the motors themselves.

Figure 6-16: Serial Cables

If your handler has a large number of motors, it may have a serial or network hub to add serial COM ports. Make sure all these connectors are secure, also.

Figure 6-17: Serial Hub

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Air Regulator Maintenance

Checking Incoming Air from the House Supply

Air Regulator Maintenance


Most Exatron handlers use compressed air, which also requires an air regulator. A high quality air regulator with coalescing air filter and shutoff valve is supplied on your handler. It supplies air at the pressure you specify for the whole handler. Some handlers may also have a digital sensor, which shuts down the handler if the incoming air pressure drops below the limit you set on the digital sensor. See several sections starting with "Adjusting Air Pressure on a Digital Pressure Switch" on page 6-26 for more information. CAUTION: NEVER operate any Exatron equipment which requires compressed air without an approved air regulator and shutoff valve. The external air regulator assembly includes one or two oil/water particulate traps which should be visually inspected on occasion. This regulator should be set at factory air pressure of 80 PSI. The system requires a minimum of 80 PSI to operate properlyspecifically, to generate sufficient vacuum through the venturi to pick up devices from the trays. The incoming air line exits the regulator and splits to supply the vacuum generator and the internal air regulator/test site manifold.

Checking Incoming Air from the House Supply


The first step in ensuring a trouble-free air supply is to ensure the incoming air is adequate. Make sure the incoming air supply is at least 3 CFMs (cubic feet per minute). Make sure the needle on the handlers air regulator is not spiking or pulsing. If it is, the house air supply is inadequate.

Checking the Moisture/Dirt Trap in the Air Regulator


Check the moisture/dirt trap on the air regulator and the coalescing filter chamber. Verify that they are clean, empty and dry. There should be no oil and no water in any chamber. If they are dirty, physically disconnect the incoming air pressure supply from the air regulator and clean the trap and filter as needed. Excessive moisture and/or particulate buildup in the filter traps suggests the air supply to the system is too wet and/or dirty. CAUTION: Excessive moisture in the system can damage the vacuum generator and air valves.

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Figure 6-18: SMC Air Regulator

Follow this procedure for your SMC brand air regulator. To check or replace the air filter: 1. Unscrew the small black screw at the bottom of the filter chamber and remove. If water is present, there is water in the air lines and you have a problem that you must correct.

Figure 6-19: Small Black Screw Removed

2. Unscrew the metal casing.

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Air Regulator Maintenance

Checking the Moisture/Dirt Trap in the Air Regulator

Figure 6-20: Metal Casing Unscrewed

3. Snap off the clear glass casing.

Figure 6-21: Clear Glass Casing Snapped Off

4. Unscrew the black inner screw that has edges like propeller blades.

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Figure 6-22: Large Black Inner Screw Removed

5. Remove the white filter and clean or replace if necessary, and reassemble in reverse order. If you find it necessary to clean the trap and/or filter more often than once a month, you should correct the problem at your in-house air compressor. Check your manufacturers manual for the exact procedure necessary.

Checking the Air Regulator Shutoff Valve


Check the operation of the shutoff valve once a month. To check the operation of the shutoff valve: 1. Turn the Off/On switch off and verify that the air is indeed off. Turn the switch back on. 2. Check the PSI setting. > Some special-case changeover kits may require less than 80 PSI. However, in general, set the air regulator to 80 PSI. If the air regulator is turned off, turn it on by turning the Off/On switch one quarter-turn counterclockwise. You can leave the air regulator turned on except when you are checking its operation.

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Air Regulator Maintenance

Automatic Air Shut-Off Valve

Adjustment knob On/off switch in OFF position On/off switch in ON position

Figure 6-23: SMC Air Regulator Turned Off (Left), On (Right)

Automatic Air Shut-Off Valve


Some models have an optional automatic air shut-off valve as part of the air regulator (Figure 6-24). This shut-off valve automatically cuts off air to the handler and to the vacuum generators when the power is shut off or any EMO button is pushed. If the air to the handler is turned off or disconnected and then turned back on while the handler is powered up, an unpleasant but harmless noise may issue from the shut-off valve. This may be quickly remedied by depressing and releasing the EMO button.

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Chapter 6: Servicing and Troubleshooting

Figure 6-24: Automatic Air Shut-Off Valve

Adjusting Air Pressure on the Regulator


You can increase air pressure at the air regulator. To adjust the air pressure: 1. Pull up on the black adjustment knob above the display, and turn it. > Turn it clockwise to increase the pressure. > Turn it counterclockwise to decrease the pressure. 2. Push the knob back down to lock it when you have finished the adjustment. If your handler has an auxiliary or internal (pusher) air regulator, see the next subsection.

Adjusting Auxiliary Air Regulator


The auxiliary or internal air regulator (or auxiliary pusher regulator; Figure 6-25) "steps down" the air pressure for use by the test site air cylinders on those systems using them. The air cylinders found on most test sites require only 30 to 50 PSI to operate properly, and over-driving the cylinders can shorten the life expectancy of both the cylinders and the test sockets. Some sockets require more force than others to operate. The air pressure exerted on the sockets should be adjusted to be just enough for the particular sockets in use. Pull out the black adjustment valve and turn it to step down the pressure here to 30-50 PSI.

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Air Regulator Maintenance

Adjusting Air Valves

Adjustment valve
Figure 6-25: Auxiliary Air Regulator

Adjusting Air Valves


Pressurized air for the air cylinders at the test sites (and thermal heads, if so equipped) is controlled by a series of 24-volt DC air valves mounted on a manifold block. Each air valve is wired through an override button which will turn the valve on while it is pressed. However, the override button will not turn off a valve which has been actuated by the handler itself.

Lock nut

Air flow control adjustment knob


Figure 6-26: Air Valves with Control Adjustment

To adjust the air flow at the air valve: 1. Turn the lock nut counterclockwise to unlock the adjustment knob.

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2. Turn the air flow control adjustment knob: > Turn the knob clockwise to lessen the air flow, or... > Turn the knob counterclockwise to increase air flow. 3. When air flow is appropriate, turn the lock nut clockwise to tighten it.

Adjusting Air Pressure on a Digital Pressure Switch


The external air regulator may be attached to a digital pressure switch display on the outside of the handler. The incoming air pressure is sensed, and compared to a low level limit you set. If the incoming air pressure ever drops below the limit set at the digital pressure switch, the handler stops and an error message is displayed. This prevents malfunctioning and damage to devices. When air pressure to the handler is turned off, the reading on the digital air pressure display is something like .01 or .03, and the OUT1 and OUT2 displays are not lit.

Figure 6-27: OUT Lights Off and Fractional ReadingNo Air Pressure

During handler operation, the OUT 1 light on the digital air pressure display should be green.

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Air Regulator Maintenance

Unlocking or Locking a Digital Air Pressure Switch

Figure 6-28: OUT1 Light GreenNormal Air Pressure

If the OUT1 light is off when the air pressure is on, as signified by the pressure reading being more than something like .01 or .03, you need to do one of two things: On the handler, increase the air pressure on the main air regulator until it is greater than the P1 setting (page 6-24), or... On the digital air pressure switch, lower the value of P1 until it is lower than the current air pressure. However, never set P1 lower than a minimum of 65!

Unlocking or Locking a Digital Air Pressure Switch


The digital air pressure switch is set with the appropriate settings by Exatron, and the settings may be locked. You need to unlock the digital air pressure switch before you can access or change the settings. Afterward, be sure to relock the settings so they cant be accidentally changed.

Unlocking or Locking SMC Model ITV


If, by some chance, the settings become changed, you can change them back to the factory recommendation by using the buttons on top of the digital air pressure switch (for Model ITV, Figure 6-29).

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Figure 6-29: Control Buttons on Top of Digital Air Pressure Switch

Before you can review the settings, you must unlock the settings buttons. To unlock Model ITV: 1. Press and hold down the (left) UNLOCK button (the down arrow) for 3-4 seconds or until the display flashes Loc (Figure 6-30, left). This means the settings are currently locked. 2. Press the (middle) SET button to unlock the settings. > The display briefly flashes unL (Figure 6-30, right). This means the settings are now unlocked.

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Unlocking or Locking a Digital Air Pressure Switch

Figure 6-30: Display Locked (Left); Unlocked (Right)

To lock Model ITV: 3. Whenever you are ready to exit the programming cycle, press and hold down the (right) LOCK button (the up arrow) for 3 seconds or until the display flashes unL. This means the settings are still unlocked. 4. Press the SET button to lock the settings. > The display briefly flashes Loc. This means the settings are again locked.

Unlocking or Locking SMC Models ISE40 and ZSE40


To unlock Models ISE40 and ZSE40: 1. Press and hold the SET button 4-5 seconds. The display reads LoC. 2. Press the down-arrow button. The display changes to UnL. 3. Press the SET button to return to normal operations in Measure Mode.

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Figure 6-31: Display Locked (Left); Unlocked (Right)

To lock Models ISE40 and ZSE40: 1. Press and hold the SET button 4-5 seconds while the display cycles. The display reads P_1, then PSI, and finally UnL. 2. Press the up-arrow button. The display changes to LoC. 3. Press the SET button to return to normal operations in Measure Mode.

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Air Regulator Maintenance

Changing Settings on a Digital Air Pressure Switch

Changing Settings on a Digital Air Pressure Switch


If you replace the digital air pressure switch, you need to reset the settings to Exatrons factory settings. Other circumstances may require some small readjustments.

Changing Settings on SMC Model ITV


The following parameters are available on this model: Setting F_1 F_2 P_1 P_2 G.L. S.L. Significance minimum PSI air pressure maximum PSI air pressure monitor/sensor output pressure a monitor/sensor output pressure speed of gain sensitivity

a. The sensor output mode is determined by the relationship between the P_1 and P_2 values. When the P_1 value is smaller than the P_2 value, this is called comparator mode. The output goes on whenever the outlet pressure is greater than P_1 but less than P_2. See the ITV2000 Easy Programming Guide, page 5, for more details.

To review or change air regulator settings: 1. Unlock the settings, as described in "Unlocking or Locking SMC Model ITV" on page 6-27. > A flashing display of F_1 alternates with the value it is set to (Figure 6-32).

Figure 6-32: F_1 Alternating with Set Value

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2. If necessary, press either the up or down arrow button to change the number. > Press and release the up arrow button (the LOCK button) to increase the number by one. (To rapidly increase the numbers, hold down the button.) > Press the down arrow button (the UNLOCK button) to decrease the number by one. (To rapidly decrease the numbers, hold down the button.) CAUTION: Changes in the F_1 or F_2 pressure values take effect as soon as you press the SET button. Be careful to avoid damage or injury. 3. Press the SET button to advance to the next setting. > A flashing display of F_2 alternates with the value it is set to (Figure 6-33).

Figure 6-33: F_2 Alternating with Set Value

4. If necessary, press either the up or down arrow button to change the number. 5. Press the SET button to advance to the next setting. > A flashing display of P_1 alternates with the value it is set to (Figure 6-34).

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Air Regulator Maintenance

Changing Settings on a Digital Air Pressure Switch

Figure 6-34: P_1 Alternating with Set Value of 0

6. If necessary, press either the up or down arrow button to change the number. 7. Press the SET button to advance to the next setting. > A flashing display of P_2 alternates with the value it is set to (Figure 6-35).

Figure 6-35: P_2 Alternating with Set Value of 1

8. If necessary, press either the up or down arrow button to change the number. 9. Press the SET button to advance to the next setting.

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> A steady, non-flashing display of G.L. plus the value is shown (9 is the fastest gain).

Figure 6-36: G.L. Showing Fastest Gain of 9

10. Press the SET button to advance to the next setting. > A steady, non-flashing display of S.L. plus the value is shown (0 is the best sensitivity).

Figure 6-37: S.L. Showing Best Sensitivity of 0

11. Press the SET button.

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Air Regulator Maintenance

Changing Settings on a Digital Air Pressure Switch

Figure 6-38: Displays of Air Pressure in PSI

> A non-flashing display (Figure 6-38) shows the air pressure in PSI (pounds per square inch). > If you want to cycle through the settings again to confirm they are correct, you can keep pressing the SET button. 12. Whenever you are ready to exit the cycle, relock the settings as described in "Unlocking or Locking SMC Model ITV" on page 6-27.

Changing Settings on SMC Models ISE40 and ZSE40


This is the Initial Setting procedure as described in the SMCs documentation. This applies to SMC models ISE40 and ZSE40. To review or change air regulator settings: 1. Press and hold the SET button 2-4 seconds to enter the Initial Set mode. The display reads bAr. 2. Press the up or down arrow buttons on the digital display one or more times, until the display reads (PSI; Figure 6-39).

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Figure 6-39: Unit Set to PSI

3. Press the SET button to advance to the OUT1 setting. 4. Set the output mode for OUT1 to (1 normally open) by pressing one of the arrow buttons one or more times (Figure 6-40, left). 5. Press the SET button to advance to the OUT2 setting. 6. Set the output mode for OUT2 to buttons (Figure 6-40, right). (2 normally open), using the arrow

Figure 6-40: Output Mode 1 Normally Open (Left); Output Mode 2 Normally Open (Right)

7. Press the SET button to advance to the response time setting.

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Air Regulator Maintenance

Changing Settings on a Digital Air Pressure Switch

8. Set the response time to ure 6-41, left).

(2.5 miliseconds), using the arrow buttons (Fig-

9. Press the SET button to advance to the Auto/Manual mode. 10. Set the mode to (manual), using the arrow buttons (Figure 6-41, right). This mode must be selected before you can set the P1 value as described in the next subsection. 11. Press the SET button a final time to return to normal operations in Measure Mode.

Figure 6-41: Response Time 2.5 MS (Left); Manual Mode (Right)

Setting Minimum Air Pressure on SMC Models ISE40 and ZSE40


The P1 value sets the trip point. If at any time the air pressure goes below the value set in P1, the handler will stop. This is the Manual Pressure Setting procedure as described in the SMCs documentation. This applies to SMC models ISE40 and ZSE40. NOTE: The digital pressure switch must have been set in Manual mode before you can enter this Manual Pressure Setting procedure. If necessary, do the previous procedure before you do this one.

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To set the minimum air pressure: 1. Press the SET button until the display reads . The flashing P_1 display alternates with the value at which P1 is currently set. 2. Press the up or down arrow buttons repeatedly until the P1 value is lower than the current air pressure. CAUTION: Never set the P_1 value below 65! Doing so will cause the handler to continue operating at too low air pressure, causing serious problems to the handler. 3. Press SET again repeatedly to scroll through P_2, P_3, P_4, C_S, and back to normal operations in Measure Mode.

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Vacuum Generator Maintenance

Changing Settings on a Digital Air Pressure Switch

Vacuum Generator Maintenance


Exatron uses one of three types of SMC brand vacuum assemblies on the handlers, depending on the handler setup.
Type Exatron part number SMC part number Port configuration Vacuum supply valve Solenoid valves Interface plates Blow-off screw location Number of air tubes Usage Handler model

K15 Vacuum Generator


PNE022-100 NZX1102-K15LZ-D23CL 1 (PV<-->PS<-->PD) a Normally closed (NC) Short (Figure 6-43, top) 1 (Figure 6-44) PS port (Figure 6-46, left) 1 (Figure 6-42) Has built-in venturi Used by most Model 900s

K35 Vacuum Generator


PNE022-007 NZX1102-K35LZ-D23CL 3 (PV<-->PS<-->PD) b Normally open (NO) Long (Figure 6-43, bottom) 2 stacked (Figure 6-44) PS port (Figure 6-46, left) 1 (Figure 6-42) Has built-in venturi Used by many Model 8000s

K35 Vacuum Switch


PNE022-023 NZX100-K35LZ-D21CL 3 (PV) (PS<-->PD) c Normally open (NO) Long (Figure 6-43, bottom) 2 stacked (Figure 6-44) PD port (Figure 6-46, right) 2 (Figure 6-45) Uses vacuum pump Used for large number of pickup nozzles or complex air pressure needs

a. The PV, PS, and PD ports are all common to one another. b. The PV, PS, and PD ports are all common to one another. c. The PS and PD ports are common to each other.

PD port PS port

PV port

Figure 6-42: K15 Vacuum Generator

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PD (upper hole, Figure 6-42) is the air supply port for the release valve. PS (middle hole, Figure 6-42) is the air supply port for the vacuum valve. PV (lower hole, Figure 6-42) is the vacuum supply port.

Figure 6-43: Vacuum AssembliesK15 (Top); K35 Switch for Vacuum Pump (Bottom)

The black solenoid valves for K35 are longer than those for K15 (Figure 6-43). Also, K35 has two interface plates, whereas K15 has only one.

Figure 6-44: Extra Holes in K15 Interface Plate

The locations of the holes in the interface plates (Figure 6-44) serve to redirect the internal air flow. Vacuum switches require the use of a separate vacuum pump.

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Vacuum Generator Maintenance

Changing Settings on a Digital Air Pressure Switch

Figure 6-45: K35 Vacuum SwitchUsed with Vacuum Pump

PD portBlow-off adjustment screw location when vacuum pump is used

PS portBlow-off adjustment screw location when in-house air is used

Figure 6-46: Blow-Off Adjustment Screw Locationon Vacuum Generator (Left); on Vacuum Switch (Right)

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Troubleshooting Vacuum Assemblies


Air Regulator
Keep the air regulator set to 80 PSI. If the needle on the air regulator varies more than 10 lbs, there is not enough air flow, although there may be enough air pressure. The reduced air flow will confuse the software and cause improper handling because not enough air is being supplied. If ithe air regulator is set a little higher, it harmlessly bleeds the excess air. However, it should not go above 90 or 100 PSI. If the air regulator drops drastically, perhaps by 40 lbs. or more, not enough air is being supplied, and the source of the problem is somewhere outside the handler. Check your in-house air supply. Are too many machines being supplied by one compressor? Is the compressor dirty or wet? If the problem develops gradually, it may be caused by water in the line. If the problem does not appear at startup but only after the handler has run awhile, again it may be caused by water in the line. If water gets into the vacuum generator or switch, it causes plugging so it loses vacuum and wont pick up devices. This can be due to improper air compressor maintenance.

Vacuum Generators
When the air regulator shows enough pressure but the vacuum at the pickup nozzle is too low, the origin of the problem is somewhere between the air regulator and the vacuum generator. If a problem appears consistently, even at startup, it may be dirt in the air filter. Check for: Dirty air filter in the vacuum generator Loose or pinched air hose Loose air fitting

Vacuum Switches Used with Vacuum Pump


When using a vacuum switch with a vacuum pump, the danger is in turning the air pressure too high. The maximum air pressure coming from the vacuum pump must be no higher than 50 PSI. Any greater air pressure may damage components and will void the Exatron warranty. CAUTION: When using a vacuum pump, set the maximum air pressure no higher than 50 PSI to avoid damage.

Checking and Replacing a Vacuum Air Filter


Whether your handler uses a vacuum generator or a vacuum switch, it has a built-in replaceable air filter (#PNE022-020). The see-through plastic housing for this filter can be removed by hand. Replace the filter when it becomes visibly dirty, gray, or has obvious particulate matter buildup. If particle buildup is evident, the air supply lines should be checked for contaminants. Also, the moisture/dirt trap on the incoming air regulator should be checked. See "Checking the Moisture/Dirt Trap in the Air Regulator" on page 6-19 for instructions.

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Vacuum Generator Maintenance

Adjusting Pickup Nozzle Blow-Off

Inspect the vacuum generators air filter weekly. The filter should be clean and white. CAUTION: A dirty filter means poor handler operation. Replace your filter!

Figure 6-47: Dirty Filter (Left) Versus Clean Filter (Right)

Adjusting Pickup Nozzle Blow-Off


The procedure in this section allows you to adjust the blow-off strength for each pickup nozzle individually. You can adjust the blow-off for each individual pickup nozzle at the vacuum generators. There is one vacuum generator for each nozzle. You adjust one screw on each vacuum generator or switch, but the screw location differs according to whether: Your handler has a vacuum generator and is attached to an in-house air supply, or Your handler has a vacuum switch and is attached to its own vacuum pump (perhaps because of having many pickup nozzles). See the locations compared in Figure 6-46.

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Adjusting Blow-Off for Handler Using In-House Air Supply


If the handler uses an in-house air supply, the vacuum/blow-off is connected to the PV port (the lowest hole, Figure 6-48) and you can adjust the screw in the PS port. Turning it one complete revolution often makes an adequate adjustment. CAUTION: Do not over-adjust the blow-off adjustment screw. If the screw is turned too much, it will come out and make the blow-off inoperable. To increase the blow-off, turn the screw counterclockwise to loosen the screw. To decrease the blow-off, turn the screw clockwise to tighten the screw.

PS portBlow-off adjustment screw when in-house air is used

PV portconnection for air supply or vacuum pump


Figure 6-48: Blow-Off Adjustment Screw at PS Port When Using In-House Air

Adjusting Blow-Off for Handler Using Vacuum Pump Air Supply


Compare the following locations with Figure 6-49. If the handler has its own vacuum pump and chamber(s) as shown in Figure 6-50 and Figure 6-51, the vacuum pump is connected to the PV port (the lowest hole, with the black tube). Therefore, the usual blow-off adjustment screw is removed and the blow-off fitting is attached to the PS port (the yellow tube), where the blow-off adjustment screw would have been. In that case, you must adjust the upper setscrew at the PD port (just above the yellow blow-off tube) instead. Do not turn it more than only one-eighth to one-fourth of a revolution. CAUTION: Do not over-adjust the blow-off adjustment screw. If the screw is turned too much, it will come out and make the blow-off inoperable. When using a vacuum switch with vacuum pump, 1/8" to 1/4" should be the maximum adjustment. To increase the blow-off, turn the screw counterclockwise to loosen the screw. To decrease the blow-off, turn the screw clockwise to tighten the screw.

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Vacuum Generator Maintenance

Adjusting Pickup Nozzle Blow-Off

PD port

PS port

PV port

Figure 6-49: Blow-Off Adjustment Screw at PD Port When Using Vacuum Pump

Figure 6-50: Various Styles of Vacuum Pumps

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Figure 6-51: Vacuum Chamber

Cleaning Vacuum Assemblies


This section shows a quick way of cleaning a vacuum assembly. WARNING! Always wear safety glasses before cleaning a vacuum assembly. To clean a vacuum assembly: 1. Turn off the air supply, and turn off the air regulator to release air pressure. 2. Unscrew and remove the two screws from each of the two solenoid valves on each vacuum assembly (Figure 6-52).

Figure 6-52: Vacuum Assembly with Four Screws Highlighted

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Cleaning Vacuum Assemblies

3. Remove the two solenoid valves (Figure 6-54).

Figure 6-53: Vacuum Assembly with One Solenoid Valve Removed

Figure 6-54: Vacuum Assembly with Both Solenoid Valves Removed

4. Remove the gaskets from both solenoid valves (Figure 6-55). Be careful not to cut or damage the gaskets.

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Figure 6-55: Removing Gasket from Vacuum Assembly

Figure 6-56: Vacuum Assembly with Gasket Still Attached

> Occasionally a gasket may get stuck to the venturi when the solenoid valve is removed (Figure 6-56). Remove the gasket and save it.

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Cleaning Vacuum Assemblies

Figure 6-57: Vacuum Assembly with Both Solenoid Valves and Gasket Removed

5. Turn the air supply on and let it blow out the venturi. 6. Use a hand-held air supply to blow out each solenoid valve by hand. 7. Ater all parts are cleaned out, turn the air supply off before reassembling. 8. Press the gaskets back into the solenoid valves. 9. Replace the solenoid valves on the venturi and screw them in.

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Chapter 6: Servicing and Troubleshooting

Checking and Setting the Vacuum Generator


The vacuum generator is fitted with an electronic sensor that measures the strength of the vacuum drawn through the air lines. The sensor displays the result on the small LCD screen of the vacuum generator. When the vacuum is engaged, the display should give a reading for the level of vacuum in the system. (The kPa or mPa value is a percentage of the PSI.) The sensor puts out a signal when a given level of vacuum is reached, indicating the vacuum has a secure hold on the device being lifted. To check the vacuum generator adjustment: 1. Turn on the vacuum using the handlers vacuum override button, but do not attach a device to the nozzle or block it. 2. Cover the vacuum hole in the pickup nozzles suction cup with a device. > You will hear a noticeable change in the sound of the vacuum as it intercepts the device, and the green indicator LED should turn on. If the valves in the vacuum generator assembly become plugged with dirt, you may send the assembly back to Exatron Customer Service where it will be repaired, if possible, for a fee. Damage caused by a dirty air supply is not covered by the Exatron warranty. If you are experiencing dirt-clogged vacuum generator valves, check the air regulator. Verify that it is clean and properly installed. See "Air Regulator Maintenance" on page 6-19. Contact the Exatron factory for assistance as needed. The vacuum generator setting is more or less permanent. It should rarely, if ever, need to be recalibrated. The handler has one vacuum generator for each pickup head.

Figure 6-58: Vacuum Generator Controls

When the P1 value is reached, the signal is turned on. From this value and above, the handler considers that a device is attached to the pickup nozzle. When the P2 value is reached, the signal is turned off. For Exatron handlers, the P2 maximum value is set to 101 so that it will never be reached.

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Checking and Setting the Vacuum Generator

As a general principle, a larger hole in the suction cup of the pickup nozzle will show a lower baseline value (when no device is attached) because the air flow is not obstructed as much as it is with a smaller suction cup hole (Figure 6-59). When the suction cup hole is smaller, the baseline pressure is higher (Figure 6-60).

Figure 6-59: Vacuum Generator Optimal Pressurefor Nozzle with Larger Hole

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Figure 6-60: Vacuum Generator Optimal Pressurefor Nozzle with Smaller Hole

If you replace a vacuum generator with a new one, you need to calibrate its settings. A new vacuum generator has both P1 and P2 set at zero, and EC set at 3. You will need to change these settings. The modes cycle through P1, P2, P3, (P4 is added for a vacuum switch using a vacuum pump system), and EC with repeated pressing of the SET button. Mode
P1 P2 P3 P4 EC Low limit High limit For other sensor For switch using a vacuum pump system Error code

Meaning

Desired Setting
8-10 points higher than vacuum on w/ no device present; minimum 60 101 61 or lowest n/a 0

Result
Device is considered as attached to pickup; green light on No device is considered as attached to pickup; green light off Not used Not used Not used

You can use either the vacuum override buttons on the handler, or the tiny vacuum override button on the vacuum generator itself (Figure 6-62).

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Vacuum Generator Maintenance

Checking and Setting the Vacuum Generator

Vacuum button

Blow-off button

Figure 6-61: Vacuum and Blow-Off Override Buttons on Vacuum Generator

To calibrate the vacuum generator: 1. Power on with no air. > A 1 or 0 should be displayed on the LCD screen. 2. Turn on the air and the vacuum, using the software. Do not attach a device yet. 3. Press the vacuum override button with no device attached to the nozzle and note the setting. This is the baseline value (Figure 6-62).

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Figure 6-62: P1 Baseline Value Example

4. Press the SET button to enter the programming modes. > P1 with the value is displayed. P1 sets the minimum limit at which the sensor detects a device. 5. Press one of the green arrow-shaped buttons to set the number at least 8 to 10 points higher than the baseline value (with no device attached), but no lower than 60 (Figure 6-63). The minimum should be 60. > Press the up-arrow button to increase the number displayed. > Press the down-arrow button to decrease the number displayed. > Factors such as weight of the device or rotation of the pickup nozzle may affect the number that works best for your handler.

Figure 6-63: P1 Set at Least 8-10 Points Higher Than Baseline

6. Press the SET button to advance to the P2 setting.

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Checking and Setting the Vacuum Generator

> P2 with the value is displayed. P2 sets the maximum limit beyond which the sensor no longer detects a device. 7. Press the up-arrow button repeatedly to set the P2 number at 101, the maximum limit (Figure 6-64).

Figure 6-64: P2 Set to 101

8. Press the SET button to advance to the unused P3 setting. 9. Press the down-arrow button repeatedly to set the P2 number at 61 or the minimum limit. 10. Press the SET button to advance to the EC setting. > EC with the value is displayed. 11. Press the down-arrow button repeatedly to set the EC number at 0 (Figure 665). 12. Press the SET button again to return to normal operation mode.

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Figure 6-65: Error Code Set to Zero

Now you can check the settings. To check vacuum generator settings: 1. Power on with no air. > A 1 or 0 should be displayed on the LCD screen. The green light on the vacuum generator stays on. 2. Turn on the air and the vacuum, using the software. Do not attach a device yet. 3. Press the vacuum override button with NO device attached to the nozzle and note the setting. > The setting with no device attached should be at least 8 points lower than the P1 setting. 4. Now attach a device to the nozzle and press the vacuum override button. Note this setting number. > The setting with a device attached should be at least 68-75 or higher, or at least 5 points higher than the P1 setting. Lower numbers may indicate some problem with the air line, perhaps the tubes or compressor. 5. Finally, to test your settings, put a device on the nozzle and press the override button. With a device attached, a green indicator light is displayed on the vacuum generator (Figure 6-66). With no device attached, the light goes off (when EC is set to 0; if EC were set to 3, the indicator light would be red when no device is attached).

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Checking and Setting the Vacuum Generator

Figure 6-66: Green Indicator Light with High Number Showing Device Attached

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Solenoid Maintenance
CAUTION: NEVER use oil or lubricant of any kind on solenoids. Keep the solenoids as clean as possible. If the handler is used with devices which have excessive mold flash, the solenoids will require cleaning regularly. The frequency is dependent upon how much mold flash gets into the solenoids. When cleaning solenoids, take care not to put excessive stress on solenoid wiring. Check all wiring for signs of wear, exposed conditions, or broken connections. Replace as needed with identical type of wire: standard or flex, same gauge, insulation, color, etc. When cleaning solenoids, check the plungers to be sure there are no burrs of any kind on their shafts. Solenoid life is proportional to the handler environment and how often the solenoids are cleaned. We recommend that all solenoids be replaced every two million cycles as part of a good preventive maintenance program. Replace any bent or damaged solenoid return springs with new parts from the Exatron factory. Refer to the hardware specifications in Chapter 7 for the part numbers of all solenoids and springs in your handler.

Opening the Computer for Part Replacement


Cabinet Models
The computer inside the Model 900 cabinet slides out on rails, making it easier to change any part of the computer (Figure 6-67).

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Opening the Computer for Part Replacement

Cabinet Models

Figure 6-67: Computer Sliding Out of Cabinet on Rails

To replace a computer part on a cabinet-based model: 1. Unscrew and remove the 4 allen screws that bolt the computer to the computer base (Figure 6-68).

Figure 6-68: Four Computer Base Bolts

2. Pull the computer out by the top rim (Figure 6-69).

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Figure 6-69: Sliding Computer Out of Cabinet

3. Unscrew and remove the 2 bolts at the top front of the computer that secure the lid (Figure 6-70).

Figure 6-70: Front Bolts Securing Lid

4. Unscrew and remove the 6 bolts along the top edges of the computer (3 on each side; Figure 6-71).

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Benchtop Models

Figure 6-71: Top Bolts Securing Lid

5. Lift off the lid. 6. Replace any part that needs to be replaced. 7. Reassemble the computer in reverse order.

Benchtop Models
If any part inside the computer needs to be replaced on a benchtop model, you can take the following steps to avoid turning the handler upside down. NOTE: It is helpful to have two persons doing the work in order to hold the assemblies in place without stressing the connections on the cables. You will need a medium flat-head screwdriver and standard and metric allen key sets for this procedure. It will also be helpful to have a small sturdy box to rest the faceplate on while replacing the hard drive or other part. To replace a computer part on a benchtop model: 1. Power off the handler and set the front of the handler onto blocks elevating the front legs off the work surface (Figure 6-72).

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Figure 6-72: Benchtop Handler Elevated on Blocks

2. Identify the keyboard and mouse jacks with a label or pen. Although each one is identified on the face plate, you will be separating the face plate from the jacks.

Figure 6-73: Marking Jacks

3. Remove keyboard and mouse cables. 4. Unscrew the small screws holding the mouse and keyboard jacks. 5. Remove the screws on the perimeter of the face plate and carefully pull the face plate forward.

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Opening the Computer for Part Replacement

Benchtop Models

Figure 6-74: Removing Face Plate

NOTE: The bearings at the end of the lead screw will come loose, so be careful not to drop them. The EMO (emergency stop) and power button wires will restrict the face plate from extending farther than five or six inches, so it will be helpful to have a box to rest the face plate on while removing the ribbon cables and replacing the hard drive. 6. Replace computer part and replace ribbon cables. 7. Reassemble the jacks. 8. Reassemble the face plate.

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Fiberoptic Photoelectric Sensor Guidelines


Each sensor on your handler is connected to a sensor controller, which displays whether the sensor is "seeing" any object. Most fiberoptic sensor controllers are set to L-ON (light on) by Exatron. This causes the output transistor to turn on when light is received by the sensor.

Figure 6-75: Omron Sensor Controller Set to L-ON

Figure 6-76: Green and Red Indicator Lights

The green light is the Stable Operation Indicator. When the sensor is operating normally under stable conditions, the green light should be ON. The red light is the Light Reception Indicator. When the sensor is receiving light, the red light should be ON.

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Taper Maintenance

Benchtop Models

Figure 6-77: Conditions of Indicator Lights

For both types of sensor (through-beam and reflective), the red light on means nothing is there; nothing is blocking or reflecting the sensor beam. If the red light is off, something is there, interfering with the sensor beam.

Taper Maintenance
If your handler uses a tape and reel, you need to keep the seal head clean. If you use a heat seal blade, clean the blade with a cotton swab dipped in acetone, isopropyl alcohol, or other suitable (evaporative) cleaning agent. Be sure to do this when the heat seal is cold. If you use a pressure-sensitive seal blade, wipe the pressure roller wheels with a clean dry cloth. The wheel bearings are sealed from the factory and need no maintenance. Clean the sensor optics of dust with a very low blast of air.

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Checking Omega Temperature Controller


To determine whether the desired temperature that is set in the Exatron software has been read by the Omega temperature controller, you can read it from the temperature controller display panel (Figure 6-78).

Figure 6-78: Omega Temperature Controller Display Panel

The display at the right is for the pre-heat tray. It is connected at the light blue plug in the back of the box.

Figure 6-79: Back of Box with Pre-Heat Plug-in

Before you begin, the display panel shows the current temperature of the clamp head (Figure 6-80).

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Checking Omega Temperature Controller

Benchtop Models

Figure 6-80: Current Temperature Displayed

Four buttons allow viewing or changing the desired set temperature. Buttons on Temperature Controller Display Panel Button Function Menu Changes the display to configuration mode and advances through menu items. Up Arrow Increases set temperature. Down Arrow Decreases set temperature. Enter Enters a submenu or saves a change made in the current submenu. NOTE: Any set temperature changes made on the control panel will be overridden by the Exatron software settings.

To view or change the set temperature: 1. Press the Menu button. The display reads SP1 (Figure 6-81).

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Figure 6-81: Setpoint 1 Menu Item Displayed

2. Press the Enter button. The set temperature is displayed, with the rightmost digit flashing (Figure 6-82). You can tell this is different from the current temperature display because instead of a C or F at the left of the display, now a small 1 is visible, signifying that this is displaying the Setpoint 1 value.

Figure 6-82: Setpoint 1 Value Displayed

> If you do not want to change the set temperature, go to step 3. > If you want to increase the set temperature, press the Up arrow button (Figure 6-83). Holding it down for 3 seconds speeds up the rate of increment. To save your change, press the Enter button. The display reads StRd (stored; Figure 6-84).

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Checking Omega Temperature Controller

Benchtop Models

> If you want to decrease the set temperature, press the Down arrow button. Holding it down for 3 seconds speeds up the rate of decrement. To save your change, press the Enter button.

Figure 6-83: Setpoint 1 Value Increased

Figure 6-84: Setpoint 1 Value Saved

3. Press the Menu button. The display reads SP2 (Figure 6-85). The Exatron system does not use the second setpoint.

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Figure 6-85: Setpoint 2 Menu Item Displayed

4. Press the Menu button. The display reads CNFG (Figure 6-86).

Figure 6-86: Configuration Menu Item Displayed

5. Press the Menu button. The display reads RUN briefly before it returns to Run mode, displaying the current temperature again.

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Thermal Heads Air Pressure

Internet Access

Thermal Heads Air Pressure

Figure 6-87: Dynamic Socket Pressure Controls

The amount of air pressure applied by the thermal heads at the test socket is set in the Diagnostic software (see "Socket Pressure Group Box" on page 5-102). To manually raise or lower each thermal head, flip the corresponding switch. To turn the air pressure on or off, flip the top switch.

Laser Servicing
If the handler is equipped with a laser, see the manufacturers manual for service instructions. WARNING! Only a qualified in-house laser safety officer (LSO) should service the laser.

Networking
The next few subsections discuss ways of troubleshooting over a network.

Internet Access
It is strongly recommended that your handler be equipped with Internet access, without which Exatron cannot help you troubleshoot the handler remotely.

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Setting LAN Connections and Required IP Addresses


The handler and its peripherals are on its own private network. To ensure communication between the Exatron software and peripheral devices such as the inspection camera, the IP addresses are static, set to the handlers own private network. Keeping the IP addresses as they come from the factory enables the handler software to communicate with the peripherals. CAUTION: Do not change any IP address associated with the handler or its peripherals unless specifically approved by Exatron. Changing IP addresses can make service billable even when the handler is under warranty. Because Exatron has optimized communication on this private network, performance cannot be guaranteed if additional devices are connected or additional non-Exatron software is installed. In order to connect the handler to a LAN for the purpose of remote servicing, Exatron requires the use of a network interface adapter. Exatron can supply a USB-to-Ethernet adapter as an option. Use this adapter to connect to the LAN; do not attach the handlers private network to the LAN. See the following chart for required IP addresses.

Required IP Addresses
IP Address
192.168.12.1 192.168.12.11 through 192.168.12.29 192.168.12.3 192.168.12.4 192.168.12.41 192.168.12.42 192.168.12.5 192.168.12.51 through 192.168.12.59

Component or Peripheral
Exatron PC Handler motors, sensors, PLCs Laser PC Camera/machine vision PC Camera 1 Camera 2 Peregrine tester Other testers

A computer may have more than one LAN (local area connection) setup. In this example, LAN 3 is used. To set the LAN connection: 1. Double-click the icon in the lower left corner of Windows desktop to open a LAN connection setup (Figure 6-88).

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Networking

Setting LAN Connections and Required IP Addresses

Figure 6-88: LAN Setup Icon

> The Local Area Connection Status dialog box is displayed (Figure 6-89).

Figure 6-89: Local Area Connection Status Dialog BoxGeneral Tab

2. Set the parameters on each tab as shown in the following figures.

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Figure 6-90: Local Area Connection Properties Dialog BoxGeneral Tab

3. Under the General tab of the Local Area Connection Status dialog box, click the Properties button (Figure 6-90). > The Local Area Connection Properties dialog box is displayed.

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Networking

Setting LAN Connections and Required IP Addresses

Figure 6-91: Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) Properties Dialog BoxGeneral Tab

4. Under the General tab of the Local Area Connection Properties dialog box, click the connection Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) (Figure 6-91). 5. Click the Properties button. > The Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) Properties dialog box is displayed.

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Figure 6-92: Local Area Connection Properties Dialog BoxAdvanced Tab

6. Under the Advanced tab of the Local Area Connection Properties dialog box, in the Windows Firewall group box, click the Settings button (Figure 6-92). > The Windows Firewall dialog box is displayed. 7. Under the General tab of the Windows Firewall dialog box, make sure the Dont Allow Exceptions box is not checked.

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Networking

Testing Network Communication with Peripherals

Figure 6-93: Windows Firewall Dialog BoxExceptions Tab

8. Under the Exceptions tab of the Windows Firewall dialog box, check all the pcAnywhere... and Remote... boxes (Figure 6-93). 9. Click OK. 10. Click OK repeatedly to close the LAN setup.

Testing Network Communication with Peripherals


If your handler has peripherals such as an inspection camera and/or laser, you can test the TCP/IP connections from the Exatron PC to the laser or camera. To test TCP/IP connections: 1. Close all application programs. 2. Click the Start button at the lower left corner of the screen. Click Run.

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Figure 6-94: Selecting Run Option

3. In the Run dialog box, type cmd.exe and click OK.

Figure 6-95: Opening a DOS Window

4. In the DOS window that opens, at the C:\ prompt, type PING followed by a space and then the IP address of the peripheral with which you want to test communication.

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Networking

Testing Network Communication with Peripherals

Figure 6-96: PING Command with Replies

> You should see a series of replies like the ones shown in Figure 6-96. All packets sent should have been received, with none lost. 5. To show the IP address of the host (Exatron) PC, in the DOS window type IPCONFIG /ALL.

Figure 6-97: IPCONFIG Command with Reply

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> You should see information similar to that shown in Figure 6-97. The host (Exatron) IP address in this example is 192.168.10.110.

Remote Handler Control with WebEx


The engineers at Exatron can help you diagnose handler problems with your Internet connection and the WebEx Internet service. When you contact Exatron for troubleshooting, you may receive an e-mail inviting you to a WebEx meeting (Figure 6-98).

Figure 6-98: E-mail Invitation to WebEx Meeting

To join the meeting, just click the link that is displayed in the e-mail message and follow the instructions shown.

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Remote Handler Control with WebEx

Figure 6-99: WebEx Meeting Information

If you have any problems, click on the help link from WebEx at the bottom of the e-mail. Their support is thorough.

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Replacing Exatron Program File with an Upgrade


Upgrades to the Exatron program software may be done in order to add or remove features or functions, or to debug the main system controller software. The Exatron program is a file named [YourCompany]_[Model#]_[suffix]_[date_time]_[version].exe where the date, time, and version of the latest upgrade are included in the filename. It is located on the CPU in the directory C:\Exatron\ . It is important to maintain a backup of all files previously used and tested. If a newly updated file won't perform properly, a copy of the backup may be reinstalled back into the proper working directory. CAUTION: Do not delete the 3 essential system files: WinIO.dll, WinIO.sys, and WinIO.vxd (Figure 6-100).

Figure 6-100: Exatron Directory with Job Files, 3 Essential System Files, and Existing Program File

Following this procedure will insure that a backup is maintained of the original and all subsequent upgrades. CAUTION: Do not delete any previous zip files from the Backup directory. Always maintain an additional up-to-date copy of all the contents in the C:\Exatron\Backup\ directory on external media such as a CD-ROM or a set of floppy disks. Exatron may send zip files by e-mail with modified file extensions so the files don't get stripped or blocked by the firewalls at client sites. Prior to extracting from these files, rename the zipped file, changing the extension back to *.zip. To install the Exatron software: 1. Close all applications and open Windows Explorer to navigate and edit file directories. 2. Copy the current Exatron program file into the C:\Exatron\Backup directory.

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Remote Handler Control with WebEx

3. Copy the .edf or .job files for the jobs/setting files you are currently running into the same Backup directory. Rename these backup files to include date and time in the file name so you can identify and reuse these files if necessary. 4. In the C:\Exatron\ directory, delete the [YourCompany]_[Model#]_[suffix]_[date_time]_[version].exe file. (A backup is already in the C:\Exatron\Backup\ directory.) 5. Copy the attached .zip file into this same directory (C:\Exatron\Backup).

Figure 6-101: Backup Directory with Job Files, Old Program File, and New Zipped File

6. Double-click on this new *.zip file and extract it into the directory C:\Exatron\ where the previous program file was deleted. It has a newer date/time/version than the previous program file.

Figure 6-102: Exatron Directory with Job Files and New Program File

Typically a shortcut is placed into the C:\Documents and Settings\All Users\Start Menu\Programs\Startup directory so that this program will automatically launch when Windows is started. This shortcut must be replaced with a shortcut pointing to the new program file. 7. Right-click on the filename and select Create Shortcut from the context menu to make a shortcut for the new file.

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8. Click and drag the shortcut (not the original file!) into the directory C:\Documents and Settings\All Users\Start Menu\Programs\Startup. 9. Copy this shortcut to the desktop and delete the old shortcut. 10. Restart appropriate applications, or restart the CPU and the applications will automatically start. The new executable program file is ready to use. When an original .edf or .job file is opened using this new program file, you may see an error message: Unexpected file format. If this happens, it is because the new program file contains new data fields that require values from the job file, so the job file is not properly formatted.

Figure 6-103: Error Message

To reformat the job file: 1. Click OK in the error message dialog box. 2. Click the Diagnostics button and check the various windows for new fields. 3. Enter valid data in any new fields or input boxes. 4. Finally, save these settings before exiting the program. Bacause you have saved the new variable into this .edf or .job file, the next time you open this .edf or .job file, the Unexpected file format error will not appear.

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Troubleshooting

Motors Move Very Slowly

Troubleshooting
The following are problems that have been encountered occasionally, and their solutions.

Motors Move Very Slowly


If the motors seem to be moving too slowly, reboot the computer.

Tray Carriage Alignment Is Faulty


If the tray calibration is not holding, the tray carriage alignment may be loose. The first thing to do is test to make sure the X and Y leadscrews are tight in the system. With the power off and the covers open, push and pull on the tray carriages and the Y head. These should not move easily, and should only move when the lead screw turns. If the head or carriages can move, even a little, but the lead screw does not turn, then the lead screw is loose, which will cause serious misalignment problems. It is necessary to tighten the lead screws against the motor coupling. Fixing this problem is best left to a test technician or engineer. WARNING! Tighten lead screws only with the power off. To tighten the lead screws: 1. Power down the entire system. 2. Using a #6 (7/64") hex driver (preferably without ball tip), loosen the screw on the motor coupling, accessible through the slots in the motor mounting bracket. > Loosen only the screw nearest the lead screw, not nearest the motor. 3. When that screw is loose, push on the lead screw, toward the coupling, to seat the lead screw tightly against the bearing mounted in the system wall. 4. With the lead screw tight against the coupling, tighten the coupling screw again. After doing this procedure, recalibrate the trays using the software diagnostics.

System Does Not Pick Up Devices Reliably


If the system is not picking devices out of the input tray, there are several possible causes: Pickup height (Z-get) is not set correctly in the Exatron Model 900 software. > If a new type of device, or new brand or model of tray is used, the pickup height previously programmed may be wrong. Ideally, the bottom of the suction cup should be about .050" (1.2 mm) from the top of the device before

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the rub cycle. If the gap is significantly larger or smaller (.015" or more), then the software setting in the Exatron software should be adjusted accordingly. Vacuum cup is dirty or worn out. > Check the vacuum cup. Visually inspect the suction cup to make sure it is physically intact, i.e., no tears or chunks missing. Then, using a cotton swab dipped in isopropyl alcohol, clean the inside surface of the suction cup bellows. Vacuum adjustment is wrong. > The Model 900 has a vacuum sensor that tells the system when a vacuum is detected, which means there is a part seated on and being held by the vacuum cup. The vacuum sensor has a small LCD display which shows the strength of the vacuum, as measured in centimeters of mercury (cmHg). The sensor is set at a given measurement, and when the actual vacuum measured in the sensor is higher than that number, it tells the system a part is captured. To determine the set point, flip the small switch on the vacuum housing to "SET." Then, with the switch back at "RUN," press the vacuum override button on the side of the handler near the vacuum sensor assembly. This will draw a vacuum and the sensor will show the measurement. Block the pickup head manually with a device to see that setting. The actual measurement should be at least 10 cmHg above the set point. You should see a red light illuminate on the vacuum sensor when a vacuum is measured at or above the set point. Typically, the set point will be around 50 cmHg and the actual measurement with a device present will be around 60 65 cmHg. If your numbers are significantly different than these numbers, you should carefully inspect the rest of the pneumatic system for blockages, breaks, etc., as explained next. Air lines blocked or broken/worn/disassembled. While unlikely, it is possible for the air lines to become broken, blocked, or otherwise rendered non-functional. This can happen due to wear, particulate or liquid contaminants in the air supply lines. > Check all air fittings to assure the air tubing is well seated in the fitting. > Visually inspect all the air lines and the incoming air regulator assembly for wear, discoloration or cracking. Replace any air line that appears compromised. Check for liquid in the reservoirs of the incoming air regulator. If either is full, you must remove the regulator from the system and drain the unit. Disconnect the incoming air supply and tip the unit to allow liquids to drain out. EXATRON STRONGLY RECOMMENDS REPLACING THE REGULATOR UNIT IF THIS PROBLEM HAPPENS MORE THAN ONCE. MOREOVER, THE CUSTOMER SHOULD ATTEMPT TO IMPROVE THE INCOMING AIR SUPPLY TO ASSURE IT IS CLEAN AND DRY.

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Troubleshooting

System Noise When Y Gantry Moves

Blow-off is not working properly. In addition to creating the vacuum, the vacuum generator unit also acts as a regular air valve. The Model 900 relies on this feature to send a blast of positive air pressure through the vacuum line in order to break the residual vacuum pressure after the vacuum is turned off. Without the blow-off, it is possible for devices to stick to the pickup head due to this residual vacuum. > Test the blow-off function by pressing the blow-off override button on the side wall of the handler base near the vacuum generator unit. A small positive air flow should be felt at the suction cup. If no pressure is felt, the unit may be malfunctioning or set too low. > A small adjustment screw can be found on the vacuum generator unit which will increase or decrease the blow-off pressure. Care should be taken when adjusting this screw, as loosening it will have the effect of increasing the blow-off pressure, but if the screw is turned too much, it will come out and render the blow-off inoperable. See "Adjusting Pickup Nozzle Blow-Off" on page 6-43. Pickup head shaft is loose and out of position. > The pickup head shaft is retained by a clamp at the top of the Y gantry unit. If this clamp is loose, it is possible for the shaft to "migrate" up, thus eventually getting out of position. If this happens, the shaft can be pushed back down and re-tightened, or tightened in the new position and the various job software settings adjusted accordingly. The first course of action is preferable but must be done carefully. In most cases, the migration will be no more than .050" and so only a small adjustment must be made. If the adjustment makes the head too low, it may place unacceptable pressure on the devices in the trays. Thus, make a very small adjustment and test the new setting to see if it picks up devices. Watch carefully for over-travel.

System Noise When Y Gantry Moves


The Y gantry head moves very quickly during normal operation. If a banging or crashing noise is heard when this head moves (and more particularly when it stops at a new location), the problem is likely caused by the Y gantry lead screw being loose. The lead screw is machined down at both ends to allow it to pass through ball bearings. The screw is retained at one end by a ball bearing, and at the other by the motor coupling, after passing through a bearing mounted in the wall of the axis housing. The lead screw should be tight against the motor-end wall of the axis housing (i.e. at the motor end, you should not see any of the machined part of the lead screw on the inside of the wall). WARNING! Tighten lead screws only with the power off. With the power off, manually push and pull the Y lead screw in its axis of travel to see if it is loose; i.e. can the lead screw move away from the motor-end wall? If so, you must tighten it against the wall. First, loosen the motor coupling using a 7/64" (#6) hex head driver (DO NOT

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USE A BALL HEAD DRIVER). Loosen only the screw nearest the lead screw, not the motor. Access the screw head through the slots in the motor mount block. When the screw is loose, manually push the lead screw as hard as possible against the motor-end wall of the axis housing. While maintaining this pressure, tighten the motor coupling screw. Recheck the lead screw to make sure it no longer moves away from the wall.

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Chapter 7: Parts List


Chapter Overview
This chapter discusses the following main topics: Topic Obtaining Replacement Parts Guide to the Parts List List of Parts Page 7-1 7-4 7-6

Obtaining Replacement Parts


Spare parts can be obtained from Exatron. It has always been Exatron policy to support all the equipment we have ever manufactured. If the part is still available, or can be made, we will get it for you. In most cases, faxed requests and shipment of replacement parts orders are processed within twenty-four hours of receipt by Exatron. The following sections discuss things to note when ordering replacement parts.

Suction Cups
Exatron stocks three sizes of anti-static silicone suction cups for the Model 900: 4 mm, 6 mm, and 8 mm diameter. The correct size for a given suction cup will depend on the size of the device. Choose a suction cup so that when the vacuum is applied the edge of the cup is at least .020" from any edge of the device (or leads if the device is dead-bug). Keep in mind to use the largest cup that fits this requirement. Exatron part numbers are: 2mm: PNE042-412 4mm: PNE042-414 6mm: PNE042-416 8mm: PNE042-418

The 2 and 4 mm cups fit over one mounting stud, while the 6 and 8 mm cups require a different stud. In most cases, Exatron systems ship with the correct stud for the 6 and 8 mm cups. These studs can be purchased separately, and come with either a 2 mm, 4 mm, or 6 mm cup attached. The part numbers are:

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Stud with 2 mm Cup: PNE042-402 Stud with 4 mm Cup: PNE042-404 Stud with 6 mm Cup: PNE042-406

Vacuum Generator Air Filter


The vacuum generator air filter must be replaced when it is visibly dirty or contaminated. The Exatron part number is PNE022-020.

Z Chain
This is a 70-link hard plastic chain or belt. The Exatron part number is BEA12-003.

Hose Sizes
Hoses are ESD (electro-static discharged) for handler safety. The size is stamped on the hose: 5/32" or 1/8" or 1/4" or 3/8", to enable you to order the right size.

Relays
The mechanical relay (or contactor) inside the Exatron PC acts as a safety circuit; it cuts power when necessary. When changing out to a new one, make sure you order the right one, either 12 volt or 24 volt (Figure 7-1).

Figure 7-1: Relays12-Volt (Left); 24-Volt (Right)

Motor Controllers
When ordering Cool Muscle motors, be aware that master and slave motors are somewhat different. The master has a secondary circuit board piggybacked on top; the slave does not (Figure 7-2). Exatron recommends that you order a master, because you can use a master as a slave if it becomes desirable; but you cannot use a slave as a master.

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Obtaining Replacement Parts

Motor Controllers

Figure 7-2: Cool Muscle Motor ControllersSlave on Left; Master on Right with Piggybacked Board

Figure 7-3: Cool Muscle Motor ControllersSlave on Left, Master on Right; Jumpers in Opposite Configurations

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Notice that the jumper configurations are different for the master than for the slave. The slave has the black jumpers all the way to the left; the master has them all the way to the right (Figure 7-3). These jumper configurations can be changed just by pulling them off and replacing them on different pins.

Guide to the Parts List


This guide shows how to use the parts list to determine the exact part number of any custom part in your machine in order to replace it if necessary. The parts list contains the items that Exatron has custom manufactured. They include machined parts, sheet metal, printed circuit boards, cables, and standard vendor parts that have been modified by Exatron. A limited number of standard vendor parts are also listed here. The title shown at the top of the list indicates the type of parts list. This should match your system's hardware. The parts list may change as Exatron improves each model with each new generation. If you have different generations of the same model, the parts lists will vary. Whenever possible, Exatron makes design improvements capable of being used in older versions of the same model. The date on the parts list indicates the date of the last revision of the list, not necessarily the last revision of the system hardware. An explanation of the column categories in the parts list follows.

Exatron (Part Number)


The first column contains the number assigned by Exatron to a specific part; for example, 8000-D14 or PET-R44. The part number usually has two sections or number/letter sets. The first set of alphanumeric characters (e.g. 1900, 8000, PET, TAPE) indicates the model number of the system for which the part was originally designed. We use designs of parts from different models to lower inventory costs and to speed the design of custom handlers. The next three alphanumeric characters (e.g. 906, C06, P14) are simply the numerical count of the part as it was designed. These are the three characters that are stamped or laser marked onto most machined parts. Exatron occasionally uses additional letters or numbers to indicate special features. We use R and L to specify right and left hand parts. AM or HR will indicate parts for Ambient Machines or Hot Rails. We use 62 or 75 to indicate specific sizes of solenoid plungers. There are other special notations that may be used as part of our numbering system and that may change with time. Please contact the Exatron factory for assistance with any questions regarding special letters or numbers attached to part numbers.

Part Quantity Columns


The next two or three columns indicate the quantity of the specific part used in the manufacture of this system. This information may be useful in determining the correct part number and was used to build an assembly kit when your system was originally built.

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Guide to the Parts List

Manual

Manual
Each row that has a 1 in this column has a corresponding wiring print in this manual. The print is identified by the part number.

Description
This is the name assigned to the part. In most cases, this description will clearly designate the part you wish to locate. Please include this description when ordering replacement parts.

Assembly
This column indicates which major system sub-assembly the part belongs to. In most cases, the "Assembly" can be ordered as a complete replacement part.

Size
These are dimensions in inches. The dimesions are listed left to right from smallest to largest: A x B x C. This is the starting size of the part prior to being machined.

C B A
Figure 7-4: Dimensions Listed From Smallest to Largest

Imagine a cube drawn around a part you are trying to identify. The dimensions of this cube can be checked against this size dimension and may be of assistance in determining a required part number. When the parts list indicates another Exatron part number in the size column, then the part was made by modifying an existing Exatron part. The modification is required for this handler only. When ordering replacement parts, be sure to use the part number and not the size. If the size column contains SEE PRINT, then the part is made from sheet metal or a PC board, or is something which is not made from a solid cube of material.

Finish
This column designates the finish used on the part. The following list is in alphabetic order. ALODINE: A non-anodic protective coating, a microscopic thin film commonly prescribed on aluminum to provide increased corrosion resistance and impose desired electrical resistance characteristics. BLACK: Black anodizing.

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BLUE: Blue anodizing. CLEAR: Clear anodizing, silver in color. HCR: Non-conductive, hard finish, dark green in color. NEDOX: Conductive, hard finish, silver in color, that eliminates static build-up and provides good electrical conductivity. Aluminum parts coated with nedox exhibit the hardness of steel without the weight. The finish protects against abrasive wear and corrosion. The dry-lubricated, non-stick surface also reduces friction of moving or sliding parts. NICKEL: Bright nickel plating, silver-chrome in color. NONE: No finish, natural material. PAINT: Painted part; colors may be beige, black or blue. RED: Red anodizing.

List of Parts
A parts list specific to each handler is included with each manual. See the following inserted pages.

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Chapter 8: Prints
A set of prints specific to each handler is included with each manual. See the following inserted pages. Additionally, an optional seismic tie-down kit is available from Exatron (see Figure 8-1 on page 8-2). Call for a quote.

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Figure 8-1: PET-V84-B

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Appendix A: Test Interfaces


Chapter Overview
This chapter discusses the following main topics: Topic Components of Test Interfaces TCP/IP Interface TTL Handler Port Interface Serial Port Commands Exatron RS-232 Commands Exatron Plus RS-232 Commands Serial Commands for Multiple Test Sites with One Serial Port GPIB Test Interface Decimal-Hexadecimal-Binary-ASCII Conversion Table Setting Up HyperTerminal Page A-1 A-3 A-4 A-9 A-10 A-12 A-18 A-21 A-24 A-26

This information applies to both pick-and-place handlers and gravity-feed handlers. NOTE: All the interface types discussed in this chapter are options. No one interface type is included automatically. Whereas every handler has an RS-232 port and an ethernet port (hardware), the software drivers and the interfaces used for your handler will depend on your needs and the features you order.

Components of Test Interfaces


Every test interface has 2 parts: DUT Controllers

DUT InterfaceHardware
DUT (Device Under Test) interface connects the handlers test contacts to the testers test socket. A direct dock interface provides the best performance, although other interface methods are available.

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Control InterfaceMethod of Communication


The control interface allows the handler to send a Start to the tester and subsequently allows the tester to instruct the handler how to process the device under test. The means of access include: Exatrons TTL "Handler Port" An RS-232 serial port The tester sort signals will come into the handler via either the handler port or the RS-232 port. All the interface protocols discussed in this chapter are options. No one protocol is included automatically. Protocols available from Exatron include: TTL RS-232 RS-485 GPIB

Some factors to consider when selecting a protocol include: Serial cable RS-232 interfaces between only 2 entities, but RS-485 allows a daisy chain configuration among multiple entities. These two protocols use slightly different hardware. If a tester uses RS-485, it may not work with Exatrons RS-232. The GPIB language set is quite complex. Its customization for your needs requires a separate quote. The protocol for each handler is custom-designed for the handler and the tester it will use. There are many options that can be selected to customize this interface to your specific application. Each handlers interface is specific to that handler, but it is usually a variation of the RS-232.

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TCP/IP Interface

Control InterfaceMethod of Communication

Serial ports Serial ports

Handler port
Figure A-1: Ports

In Figure A-1, the Handler Port uses TTL.

Distinguishing Features of Control Interfaces


Control Interface Port type/category of interface Number of pins/wires on connecter Communication type TTL 24 Hi/low signal (+5v/0v) TTL Serial 9 ASCII character string RS-232

TCP/IP Interface
With the TCP/IP protocol interface, the handler acts as the client, and the tester acts as the server. To use this interface, the tester software is opened first. The tester software waits for the Winsock connection over the ethernet from the handler software. After the tester software is running, the Exatron software is opened. The Exatron software connects through Winsock with the tester computer. They use standard serial commands.

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TTL Handler Port Interface


This interface is an option on Model 900 handlers. It is not always installed. There are some other seldom-used options that might not allow this interface to be installed. If this interface is required, it should be installed while the handler is still at Exatron. The TTL Handler Port interface uses simple +5 volt TTL-compatible signals to control the handler. This specialized parallel port interface uses an optional 24-pin "D" connector on the back of the control PC (Figure A-2). It has been designed to be compatible with all Exatron gravityfeed Model 2000, 3000, 5000, and 6000 handlers.

Figure A-2: 24-Pin D Connector on Handler

The TTL Handler Port on a Model 900 is connected inside the control PC to Port #3 on the 902 I/O PCB, PET-C06. On handlers with PET-C06 Rev A to Rev E, this Port #3 is not protected with opto-isolation. On these older revisions of PET-C06, use cable PET-G70-C which removes the handler +5 VDC from the 24-pin D connector. Connecting the handler's +5 VDC to the tester's +5 VDC is not allowed. Connecting the Tester +5 to the Handler +5 will result in a blown-up PET-C06 PCB, which is not covered by the handler's warranty. Handlers equipped with PET-C06 Rev F or newer 902 I/O PCBs use an opto-isolated Port #3 (Figure A-3). It is highly recommended that when the TTL Handler Port interface is required, older handlers be upgraded. Handlers with opto-islated Port #3 use cable PET-H07-A or newer. The opto-isolated TTL interface will require tester-supplied +5 VDC and tester-supplied ground to be functional. Never connect the handler's +5 VDC or +24 VDC supplies to anything other than the handler.

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TTL Handler Port Interface

Start Test Output

Figure A-3: TTL 24-Pin Connector with Pin Designations

Start Test Output


The handler moves a device into the test site. After allowing time for the device to settle, the handler issues a start-test pulse (Pin 10) to the tester. The start-test pulse width is pre-set to 50 milliseconds. This pulse is normally High (+5) and goes Low for the pulse width. There are optional outputs that may or may not be used in special cases.

Sort Test Result


To complete the test, the tester must send back one of eight sort signals. These signals must be normally High and go Low for at least two milliseconds. The sorts must appear on Pin 1 through Pin 8 on the handler port connector. We recommend that you use Pin 1 for PASS and Pin 2 for FAIL when using the handler in PASS/FAIL applications. The Input Sort is connected to a latch. The latch sets on the falling edge of the sort signal. Make sure that your interface does not allow fast glitches which may become latched, causing the handler to mis-sort.

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End of Test
If desired, you can request an "End of Test" be added to your handler software. In this case, the End of Test signal will be connected to Sort 8 on the 24-pin D connector. The End of Test and just one of the other 7 sorts must be low at the same time, for at least 2 milliseconds.

Sort to Bin Selection


The setup window called Sort Interface (Figure A-4) in the Exatron Diagnostics software defines which tester sorts are sent to which handler outputs that your handler is equipped with: trays, tubes, tape, or some other. See "Sort Interface Window" on page 5-43 for more information on mapping each tester sort to a corresponding handler bin.

Figure A-4: Sort Interface Window

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TTL Handler Port Interface

Handler Port Diagnostics

Handler Port Diagnostics


The Setup Parameters window in the Exatron Diagnostics software allows the user to test the TTL handler port Inputs and outputs. See "Simulated Fixed Test Results Group Box" on page 5-41 for more information on how to use this diagnostic.

Handler Port Simulator


An optional 8-bit LED Checker (#3000-521; see Figure A-5) is available from Exatron that will allow the user to test the TTL Handler Port. This "blue box," as it is referred to at Exatron, will allow the user to test the handler I/O and can be used as a simulator. You can operate the handler without the tester connected. It also has LEDs connected to each input/output. This will help troubleshoot any interface problems. You can see the LEDs blink or not when a signal is either sent or received.

Figure A-5: Eight-Bit LED Checker #3000-521

For PET-C06 Rev F I/O PCBs with opto-isolation, it is necessary to use an extension cable with the LED checker that allows the handler's +5 VDC and Ground to be connected.

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Figure A-6: TTL 24-Pin Connector with Pin Designations

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Serial Port Commands

Handler Port Simulator

Serial Port Commands


Unless specifically requested, all RS-232 ports are set to: Alphabetic command Baud = 9600 Databits = 8 Stop bit = 1 Parity = N (none)

All commands are standard uppercase ASCII characters. Typically, a NULL modem, female/female, 9-pin RS-232 cable is required for each port. The testers should always include a "\r" carriage return after every command. The handler will send a "\r" after every response. The RS-232 serial ports use only 3 wires to transport ASCII, or serial strings: Send Receive Ground

Figure A-7: Typical RS-232 Interface Cable

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Exatron RS-232 Commands


NOTE: These are standard ethernet commands, used over an ethernet cable. The following is a definition of a standard RS-232 control interface from an Exatron handler to one or more testers. Each tester is controlled by its own RS-232 port, thus: 1 tester = 1 port, 2 testers = 2 portsup to 16 ports. This interface can also be used by a single tester with multiple test sites. Using separate RS-232 ports for each test site makes it very easy for the handler to keep track of the status of each test site. For single testers using only one RS-232 port, but with multiple test sites, Exatron has a different RS-232 command set. See "Serial Commands for Multiple Test Sites with One Serial Port" on page A-18.

Beginning the Connection


Once the handler is powered up, all motors homed, and a job is loaded, the operator can start the handler. The handler will send a "H\r" before it picks up the first device to be tested. The tester should respond with a "R\r" if it is completely ready to start testing. Handler sends to the tester: "H\r" (Handler ready to cycle) Tester sends back: "R\r" (Tester is ready to test) > If nothing is received back from the tester, the handler will time out and display an error message. The operator should check that the tester is in fact ready to test and that all cables are properly plugged in. > If the tester sends back an unrecognized answer, the handler will display an error message, and if possible, display what was sent by the tester. Tester sends: "EOL\r" (Command to stop getting device from input; this is optional command) Handler sends: "EOL\r" (Signal that handler finished getting device from input; this is optional command)

Starting the Test


Once the handler receives the "R\r", the handler will pick up a device and place it in the test socket. Once the device is fully clamped in the test socket, the handler will send a "S\r". The tester should start its test.

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Exatron RS-232 Commands

After the Test Is Completed

After the Test Is Completed


Once the tester has completed its test of a device, it needs to send back a Sort Command. The handler will accept up to 8 sorts from the tester. Typically a sort "1\r" is a pass and all other sorts are types of fails. Exactly which sorts mean pass/fail/tape/tube/bucket outputs depend on the options your handler is equipped with. Use the handler's setup software to define the meanings of each sort for your specific application. "1\r" "2\r" "3\r" "4\r" "5\r" "6\r" "7\r" "8\r" = = = = = = = = Sort #1 Sort #2 Sort #3 Sort #4 Sort #5 Sort #6 Sort #7 Sort #8

Once the handler receives the sort command from the tester, the handler picks up the now tested device and sorts it to the predetermined output. This completes a normal test cycle. The handler will move over the next untested device to be picked up and sends a "H\r" to the tester and a new cycle is started. Handler sends: "INPUT_TRAY_EMPTY\r" (Handlers input is empty; it displays message to load more devices)

Cycle Summary
For each cycle, the following exchange occurs. Handler sends: "H\r" (Cycle?) Tester sends: "R\r" (Ready) Tester sends: "EOL\r" (Stop getting device from input) Handler sends: "EOL\r" (Finished getting device from input) Handler sends: "S\r" (Start test) Tester sends: "1\r" (Sort 1) or "2\r" (Sort 2) or "3\r" (Sort 3) or "4\r" (Sort 4) or "5\r" (Sort 5) or "6\r" (Sort 6) or "7\r" (Sort 7) or "8\r" (Sort 8)

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Exatron Plus RS-232 Commands


The Exatron Plus interface is an extension of the standard EXATRON RS-232 interface. The user will be able to select either Exatron or Exatron Plus interface. If you want to implement the Exatron Plus interface, contact Exatron at 800-EXA-TRON. In addition to the command exchange explained under "Exatron RS-232 Commands" on page A-10, the Exatron Plus interface will have the following enhancements:

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Command Meaning Remote reset Explanation At any point the tester can send a "*\r". When the handler receives an asterisk it will immediately stop its current operations. The handler resets as if the handler has just powered up. Any devices in any of the test sites will be automatically removed and placed in the Dump tray. The handler is equipped with a dump tray on the end of the first X1 tray. The tester can send a "?\r", to the handler to cause the handler to place the tested device in the dump tray. No count is maintained for the dump tray. The operator also needs to keep the dump tray empty to prevent devices from piling up on one another. The dump tray is basically a bucket sort. If at any time a retest is required by the tester, the tester can send back a "0\r". The Handler sends: S\r" (Start test) handler will do one of the following, depending on the type of test socket being used: Tester sends: 0\r" (Retest with mechanical Pick up the device and reseat it socket cycle) Open and close the open top socket, or Cycle the hold-down plunger Handler sends: S\r" (Start test) Tester sends: 0\r" (Retest with mechanical The handler will then send a new "S\r" command to the tester. This cycle can be socket cycle) done over and over as many times as required by the tester. The handler will not Handler sends: S\r" (Start test) sort the tested device until a correct sort command is received. Tester sends: 1\r" (Sort 1) (Sort the nowtested device)
Appendix A: Test Interfaces

Example

Send to dump tray sort

0\r

Remote retest sort

9\r

Return to If the handler receives a "9\r" for a test sort, the handler will return the device to the pickup sort exact pocket it was picked up from. If the pocket to return to already has a device, which is remotely possible in some configurations, the device will be sorted to the dump pocket on the end of tray #1. Pause han- At the start of any cycle, the tester can send a Pause command to the handler. Handler sends: H\r" (Cycle?) dler When the handler receives a "P\r", the handler will stop cycling and post a message Tester sends: P\r" (Pause handler) to the operator. The handler will remain paused until the operator restarts the handler's operation from the handler's control panel. Once the handler is restarted, it will continue with its operations from the point it left off.

P\r

Exatron Plus RS-232 Commands


Command Meaning Z\r Zero all counts Explanation Example

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Exatron Plus RS-232 Commands

At the start of any cycle, the tester can send a zero all counts command to the han- Handler sends: H\r" (Cycle?) dler. This command is typically to be used at the start of a new lot of devices. The Tester sends: \r" (Zero counts) handler will send "H\r" to the tester. The tester will send back a "Z\r" to the handler. The handler will stop and display an Are you sure message to the operator. The operator will be given the opportunity to either reset all counts to zero or to continue on with the cycle with counts saved from the previous cycle. The handler will also give the operator an opportunity to reload or replace any trays of devices in the handler.

X\r

Disable socket

This is a way to have the handler "skip" any combination of test sockets, on the fly, Handler sends: "H\r" (Cycle?) when testing with more than one test socket. Tester sends: "X\r" (Skip cycle) The handler will move on to the next cycle for The handler will send a "H\r" at the start of each subsequent cycle. To permanently the next test site. have the handler skip a test site requires changing the handler's set up before starting any test cycles. This command allows the tester to remotely send the handler into an end-of-lot cycle. The handler can also be sent to an end-of-lot cycle from its control panel by the operator. Handler sends to the tester: "H\r" (Handler ready to cycle). The tester sends back a "E\r" (End Of Lot) The handler will go into its end-of-lot cycle. On single test site handlers, the handler will simply stop testing and display the End Of Lot message to the operator. On handlers with multiple test sites, the handler will stop loading untested devices. It will then either: Automatically remove any devices still being tested and return them to the same place they were picked up from, or Finish any devices still being tested and sort as required. The user can go to the handler's set up to select one of these two options for end-oflot test socket unloading. Once all sockets are emptied the handler will display the End Of Lot message to the operator and stop cycling. If the operator should go to end-of-lot from the handler control, the handler will stop loading untested devices. It will then do one of the two things just described. The user can go to the handler's setup to select one of these two options for end-of-lot test socket unloading. Once all sites are empty, "E\r" will be sent by the handler to every test site. No response is required back from any of the testers. Handler sends: "H\r" (Cycle?) Tester sends: "E\r" (End Of Lot, stop cycle)

E\r

End of lot

Cycle Summary

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Command Meaning G[a][n]\r Explanation Example Handler sends: "H \r" (Cycle?) Tester sends: "GA1\r" (Test Golden Unit from pocket A at test site 1)

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Golden Unit If the handler is set up with a Golden Unit Tray Option, this exchange is used. cycle The handler sends the preliminary handshake: "H\r". The tester sends a response like "GC2\r" specifying the source pocket from which to get the Golden Unit, and the destination test site into which to put it.

(The unit specified may be any Golden Unit from A to G, and may be designated for any The handler picks up a device and places it in the test socket specified by the tester. test site available, thus: GA2, GG1, GF2, etc.) Once the device is fully clamped in the test socket, the handler sends a command to start testing that designates the same test site requested by the tester, like "S2\r". Handler places unit, sends: "S1" (Start testing at test site 1) Once the tester has completed its test, it needs to send back a Sort command, like "1\r" or "7\r". The handler accepts any of 8 sorts from the tester. The handler then Tester finishes test, sends sort result: picks up the device and places it back in the pocket where it was picked up, regard- "1\r" less of the sort received from the tester. This completes a Golden Unit test cycle. Handler retrieves unit into original pocket. The cycle repeats, beginning with the tester sending another source-to-destination command, like "GD1\r". Tester sends another test request: "GB2" The handler can be commanded to pick up any device, from any pocket, from any input tray. This is an option that must be selected prior to cycling the handler. The handler will normally pick untested devices from the first left hand pocket of an input tray and then automatically index to the next pocket or tray until all input pockets are emptied or until the handler reaches a predetermined number of empty pockets in a row. Handler sends: "H \r" (Cycle?) Tester sends string: "T ## _ R # # _ C # #\r" where: T (Tray) # (Tray carriage number, 1 to 5) # (Sub Trayuse 0 for JEDEC trays; use 1 to 8 for 2"/4" waffle packs) The user must select either sequential input pick up or "Pick Up Specific _ (Underscore) Device" prior to cycling the handler. The two choices cannot be intermixed in R (Row) a given setup. Either the handler is in control or the tester is in control. # (Row number, use 0 for rows 1 thru 9) # (Row number, 1 to 9) The handler will go to the specified pocket and attempt to pick up the device. If a _ (Under score) device is found the device will be loaded into the test socket and a test cycle will be C (Column) started. If no device is found, the handler will pause, display an error message, and # (Column number, use 0 for column 1 thru 9) then automatically return to the start of the next cycle. # (Column number, 1 to 9) \r (End of string) At the end of test, the tester can either send the now-tested device back to the pocket it was picked from, or sort it normally. See the above sort commands for details.

T ## _ R # Pick up # _ C # #\r specific device

Appendix A: Test Interfaces

Exatron Plus RS-232 Commands


Command Meaning TRAY <SP> FULL\r Explanation Example

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Exatron Plus RS-232 Commands

Output tray At some point the handler output tray(s) will reach its last pocket. The handler will full stop and display a message to the operator. The handler will also be at the start of the next cycle at this point. The handler will send: "TRAY <SP> FULL\r" to the next test socket to be loaded. No answer is required from the tester. This string will be sent only to the next test socket/tester. The operator will be given several choices at this point: The operator can choose to go into an end-of-lot cycle as described above. The operator can reload empty tray(s) as required. Then a new cycle can be started by the operator. A new "H\r" will be sent to the test socket/tester. Output tape Some handlers are equipped with optional output tape-and-reel assemblies. At full some point the taper will reach its preset full count. The handler will stop and display a message to the operator. The handler will also be at the start of the next cycle at this point. The handler will send: "T A P E <SP> F U L L\r" to the next test socket to be loaded. No answer is required from the tester. This string will be sent only to the next test socket/tester. The operator will be given several choices at this point. The operator can choose to go into an end-of-lot cycle as described above. The operator can reload new supplies or a new empty reel as required. Then a new cycle can be started by the operator. A new "H\r" will be sent to the test socket/tester. Output tube Some handlers are equipped with optional output tube holders. At some point the full tube(s) will reach its preset full count. The handler will stop and display a message to the operator. The handler will also be at the start of the next cycle at this point. The handler will send: "T U B E <SP> F U L L\r" to the next test socket to be loaded. No answer is required from the tester. This string will be sent only to the next test socket/tester. The operator will be given several choices at this point. The operator can choose to go into an end-of-lot cycle as described above. The operator can reload new empty tubes as required. Then a new cycle can be started by the operator. A new "H\r" will be sent to the test socket/tester.

TAPE <SP> FULL\r

TUBE <SP> FULL\r

Cycle Summary

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Exatron Plus RS-232 Commands


Command Meaning Explanation Example

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S ## _ R # Device out- The handler can be preset to attach the output sort location of each device just after TRAY outputs example: # _ C # #\r put sort the device is placed in its output. This option must be turned on or off in the hanS12_R01_C23\r location dler's setup prior to cycling. S (Sort) # (Tray carriage number, 1 to 5) After the handler drops off a tested device into the tray, it can be preset to send back # (Sub Trayuse 0 for JEDEC trays; use 1 to the following string "S ## _ R # # _ C # #\r". See example for bucket, tape & reel, 8 for 2'/4" waffle packs) and output tube sorting responses. _ (Underscore) R (Row) No response is required back from the tester for any of these messages. The han- # (Row number, use 0 for rows 1 thru 9) dler then moves on to the next cycle. # (Row number, 1 to 9) _ (Underscore) C (Column) # (Column number, use 0 for column 1 thru 9) # (Column number, 1 to 9) \r (End of string) BUCKET outputs example: B1\r B (Bucket) # (Bucket number) \r (End of string) TAPE-AND-REEL outputs example: T256\r T (Tape) # (current pocket count) # # # \r (End of string)

Appendix A: Test Interfaces

OUTPUT TUBE outputs example: O3_15\r O (Output tube) # (Tube number) _ (Under score) # (current pocket count) # # \r (End of string)

Exatron Plus RS-232 Commands

Command Set Summary

Command Set Summary


If at any time the tester sends: " *\r" (remote handler reset) Cycle start: Handler sends: "H\r" (Cycle?) Tester sends: "R\r" (Ready; handler then begins normal cycle) or Tester sends: "P\r" (Pause handler) or Tester sends: "E\r" (End Of Lot, stop cycle) or Tester sends: "X\r" (Skip cycle/test site) or Tester sends: "Z\r" (Zero counts) or Tester sends: "GA1\r" (Test Golden Unit A at test site 1) GB[n]\r" (Test Golden Unit B at designated test site) GC[n]\r" (Test Golden Unit C at designated test site) GD[n]\r" (Test Golden Unit D at designated test site) GE[n]\r" (Test Golden Unit E at designated test site) GF[n]\r" (Test Golden Unit F at designated test site) GG[n]\r" (Test Golden Unit G at designated test site) or Tester sends: "T ## _ R # # _ C # #\r" (Pick up specific device) Test cycle: Handler sends: "S\r" (Start test) Tester sends: "1\r" (Sort 1) "2\r" (Sort 2) "3\r" (Sort 3) "4\r" (Sort 4) "5\r" (Sort 5) "6\r" (Sort 6) "7\r" (Sort 7) "8\r" (Sort 8) "9\r" (Return to pick up) "0\r" (Remote retest) "?\r" (Send to dump tray; no count is maintained for dump tray) At device output drop off/sort: Nothing is sent back to the tester as a standard setup.

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No response is required back from the tester. Other possible handler start of cycle messages: Note: none of these messages require a response back from the tester. "TRAY FULL\r" "TAPE FULL\r" "TUBE FULL\r" "E\r" (End Of Lot)

Serial Commands for Multiple Test Sites with One Serial Port
This interface is an extension of the standard EXATRON RS-232 interface. NOTE: If you want to implement this interface, contact Exatron at 800-EXA-TRON. This interface requires optional test site hardware and software. In addition to the command exchange explained under "Exatron RS-232 Commands" on page A-10, this interface has the following enhancements:

Command Set Summary


Cycle Start: Handler sends: "H\r" (Cycle?) Tester sends: "R\r" (Ready, handler begins normal cycle) Handler sends: "S1\r" (Start test site 1) Handler sends: "E1\r" (Request for end-of-test result from site 1) Tester sends: "1B\r" (Test site 1 busy) > If testers reply is busy, the handler pickup nozzle moves to another test site and sends another "E[n]\r" request; for example, "E2\r". > The handler will later issue a new "E1\r" when the pickup nozzle has moved back to test site #1 and is ready to sort test site #1. If test site #1 is not busy, it sends one of the following signals. Tester sends: "11\r" (Site 1 sort 1) or "12\r" (Site 1 sort 2) or "13\r" (Site 1 sort 3) or "14\r" (Site 1 sort 4) or

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Serial Commands for Multiple Test Sites with One Serial Port

Command Set Summary

"15\r" (Site 1 sort 5) or "16\r" (Site 1 sort 6) or "17\r" (Site 1 sort 7) or "18\r" (Site 1 sort 8) or Tester sends: "10\r" (Retest test site 1) Note that the tester can send a result only from the test site queried by the handler. For example, if the handler request is "E4\r" for test site 4, then the response must be from test site 4. The interchange would be as follows: Handler sends: "S4\r" (Start test site 4) Handler sends: "E4\r" (Request for end-of-test result from site 4) Tester sends: "4B\r" (Test site 4 still busy; handler pickup nozzle then moves to another test site) or Tester sends: "41\r" (Site 4 sort 1) or "42\r" (Site 4 sort 2) or "43\r" (Site 4 sort 3) or "44\r" (Site 4 sort 4) or "45\r" (Site 4 sort 5) or "46\r" (Site 4 sort 6) or "47\r" (Site 4 sort 7) or "48\r" (Site 4 sort 8) or Tester sends: "40\r" (Retest test site 4) As the handler is at various times in a mechanical position to remove devices from any of the test sites, the handlers start test and its request for test results may not be in the order of E1, E2, E3, E4. Rather, the requests may come in any order: E3, E2, E4, E1. The reply from the tester must be concerning the test site specified by the handlers request.

Multiple Sockets in Multiple Sites


An option for testers with multiple sockets in multiple sites is the handlers specifying of which sockets contain devices. This is accomplished by a string of numerics after the starting "S"; for example, "S210\r". The digit on the left signifies the test site; the second digit signifies socket 1. The third digit signifies socket 2, the fourth digit signifies socket 3, etc. A 1 means "true"; there is a device in the socket. A 0 means "false"; there is no device in the socket. Handler sends: "S111\r" (Site 1 holds devices in sockets 1 and 2) or "S110\r" (Site 1 holds a device in socket 1 but not in socket 2) or "S101\r" (Site 1 holds no device in socket 1, but there is a device in socket 2) or "S211\r" (Site 2 holds devices in sockets 1 and 2) or

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"S210\r" (Site 2 holds a device in socket 1 but not in socket 2) or "S201\r" (Site 2 holds no device in socket 1, but there is a device in socket 2)

Request for Tester Results


When the handler is ready to read the test result, it sends a request to the tester for the results, and the tester responds. Handler sends to the tester: "E1\r" (Request for result from test site 1) > If the tester is still busy testing, it sends back: "R1B\r" (Site 1 is still busy) or "R2B\r" (Site 2 is still busy) Tester sends: "R10\r" (Requested sites socket 1 result is sort 1; socket 2 holds no device) or "42\r" (Site 4 sort 2) or "43\r" (Site 4 sort 3) or "44\r" (Site 4 sort 4) or "45\r" (Site 4 sort 5) or "46\r" (Site 4 sort 6) or "47\r" (Site 4 sort 7) or "48\r" (Site 4 sort 8) or

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GPIB Test Interface

If the Tester Controls the Testing

GPIB Test Interface


The GPIB interface is similar to the handler port interface, but it is smarter, with multiple commands. Each socket position is represented in hexadecimal numbering. See "Decimal-Hexadecimal-Binary-ASCII Conversion Table" on page A-24 for details. This interface allows for up to 32 test sockets, with each position represented by "A" or a number in a string of 32 characters separated into 4 groups of 8 bits by commas. Notation \r \n A [ ] Meaning Carriage return Line feed Null value as placeholder Substitute correct value; not literal

The beginning and ending interface commands for both tester-controlled and handler-controlled temperatures are the same. With tester-controlled, the testers setting of test temperature, the testers request for tested temperature, and the handlers supplying of tested temperature are added in the middle.

If the Tester Controls the Testing


Once the handler is powered up, all motors homed, and a job is loaded, the operator can start the handler. The following is the exchange for just one device. (The \r dictates a carriage return.) Handler sends to the tester: H\r (Handler ready to cycle) Tester sends back the location of the device to be tested: R\r (Regular device; handler should get device from tray) or... A\r (handler should get device from Golden Part A pocket) or... B\r (handler should get device from Golden Part B pocket) or... C\r (handler should get device from Golden Part C pocket) Handler sends: S\r (Handler has gotten device from specified location & requests which thermal head to use at what temperature.) Tester specifies which thermal head and what testing temperature (in Celsius) to use: Set_Temp##_R\r (Room-temperature head; temperature is irrelevant) or...

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Set_Temp##_C\r (Cold head with temperature) or... Set_Temp##_H\r (Hot head with temperature) Handler sends: Ok\r (Handler has clamped device with specified thermal head and applied specified temperature.) Tester sends Read_Temp?\r (Request for heads temperature.) Handler sends: Temp##.##\r (Handler sends temperature with two decimal places.) At this point, if the thermal heads temperature is outside the range of tolerance, the tester will repeat the request for the heads temperature until it is within the range. Then, if the device passes the test, the tester may ask the handler to test the same device with another thermal head; and the cycle repeats, starting with the testers command Set_Temp##_[C/H/R]. At the end of the testing cycle of one device, or when it has failed a test, the tester gives the sort category: Tester sends: Bin[1-8]. This completes the test cycle for one device.

If the Handler Controls the Testing


Again, the following is the exchange for just one device. (The \r dictates a carriage return.) Handler sends to the tester: H\r (Handler ready to cycle) Tester sends back the location of the device to be tested: R\r (Regular device; handler should get device from tray) or... A\r (handler should get device from Golden Part A pocket) or... B\r (handler should get device from Golden Part B pocket) or... C\r (handler should get device from Golden Part C pocket) Handler sends: S\r (Handler has gotten device from specified location & decides which thermal head to use at what temperature.) Tester sends: Bin[1-8]. (Tester has tested the device at the specified temperature and sends the sort result.) This completes the test cycle for one device.

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GPIB Test Interface

If the Handler Controls the Testing

Exatron uses hexadecimal as an easy way of representing binary. It allows the transmission of an instruction of 2 digits rather than an instruction of 8 digits. The handler decodes the hex instructions into a binary map. Each hex character represents 4 binary digits and 4 sockets. The numbers represent the following outputs. In binary notation, 1 = TRUE and 0 = FALSE. So only the columns, or sockets, with 1s receive devices.

Comparison of Number Systems


Hexadecimal 00 01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 0A 0B 0C 0D 0E 0F 10 20 30 40 FF FFF9 Binary 0000 0000 0000 0001 0000 0010 0000 0011 0000 0100 0000 0101 0000 0110 0000 0111 0000 1000 0000 1001 0000 1010 0000 1011 0000 1100 0000 1101 0000 1110 0000 1111 0001 0000 0010 0000 0011 0000 0100 0000 1111 1111 Result No device in any socket. Devices in socket 1 only. Devices in socket 2 only. Devices in sockets 1 and 2. Devices in socket 3 only. Devices in sockets 1 and 3. Devices in sockets 2 and 3. Devices in sockets 1 through 3. Devices in socket 4 only. Devices in sockets 1 and 4. Devices in sockets 2 and 4. Devices in sockets 1, 2, and 4. Devices in sockets 3 and 4. Devices in sockets 1, 3, and 4. Devices in sockets 2 through 4. Devices in sockets 1 through 4. Devices in socket 5 only. Devices in socket 6 only. Devices in sockets 5 and 6. Devices in socket 7 only. Devices in sockets 1 through 8. Devices in sockets 1 through 14.

Lets suppose that devices are in sockets 1-4, 7, and 8; but not in sockets 5 and 6. The hex value sent by the handler is CF. The binary code into which the tester would translate this is shown in the bottom row, following. Notice that each bin designated as yes, put here, has a 1 for TRUE.
Socket 8 1 Socket 7 1

Socket 6
0

Socket 5 0

Socket 4 1

Socket 3 1

Socket 2 1

Socket 1 1

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Decimal-Hexadecimal-Binary-ASCII Conversion Table


Decimal
0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33

Hex
00 01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 0A 0B 0C 0D 0E 0F 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 1A 1B 1C 1D 1E 1F 20 21

Binary
0000 0001 0010 0011 0100 0101 0110 0111 1000 1001 1010 1011 1100 1101 1110 1111 0001 0000 0001 0001 0001 0010 0001 0011 0001 0100 0001 0101 0001 0110 0001 0111 0001 1000 0001 1001 0001 1010 0001 1011 0001 1100 0001 1101 0001 1110 0001 1111 0010 0000 0010 0001

ASCII

Decimal
34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65

Hex
22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 2A 2B 2C 2D 2E 2F 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 3A 3B 3C 3D 3E 3F 40 41 42 43

Binary
0010 0010 0010 0011 0010 0100 0010 0101 0010 0110 0010 0111 0010 1000 0010 1001 0010 1010 0010 1011 0010 1100 0010 1101 0010 1110 0010 1111 0011 0000 0011 0001 0011 0010 0011 0011 0011 0100 0011 0101 0011 0110 0011 0111 0011 1000 0011 1001 0011 1010 0011 1011 0011 1100 0011 1101 0011 1110 0011 1111 0100 0000 0100 0001 0100 0010 0100 0011

ASCII
" # $ % & ( ) * + , . / 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 : ; < = > ? @ A B C
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Space !

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If the Handler Controls the Testing

Decimal
68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101 102 103

Hex
44 45 46 47 48 49 4A 4B 4C 4D 4E 4F 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 5A 5B 5C 5D 5E 5F 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67

Binary
0100 0100 0100 0101 0100 0110 0100 0111 0100 1000 0100 1001 0100 1010 0100 1011 0100 1100 0100 1101 0100 1110 0100 1111 0101 0000 0101 0001 0101 0010 0101 0011 0101 0100 0101 0101 0101 0110 0101 0111 0101 1000 0101 1001 0101 1010 0101 1011 0101 1100 0101 1101 0101 1110 0101 1111 0110 0000 0110 0001 0110 0010 0110 0011 0110 0100 0110 0101 0110 0110 0110 0111

ASCII
D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z [ \ ] ^ _ a b c d e f g

Decimal
104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 121 122 123 124 125 126 127 128 129 130 131 132 133 134 135 136 137 138 139

Hex
68 69 6A 6B 6C 6D 6E 6F 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 7A 7B 7C 7D 7E 7F 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 8A 8B

Binary
0110 1000 0110 1001 0110 1010 0110 1011 0110 1100 0110 1101 0110 1110 0110 1111 0111 0000 0111 0001 0111 0010 0111 0011 0111 0100 0111 0101 0111 0110 0111 0111 0111 1000 0111 1001 0111 1010 0111 1011 0111 1100 0111 1101 0111 1110 0111 1111 1000 0000 1000 0001 1000 0010 1000 0011 1000 0100 1000 0101 1000 0110 1000 0111 1000 1000 1000 1001 1000 1010 1000 1011

ASCII
h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z { | } ~

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Setting Up HyperTerminal
You can set up HyperTerminal in MS Windows as a way of testing communication between the Exatron handlers CPU and a tester. HyperTerminal emulates the communication protocol used by the tester, and displays the results of checking this communication. HyperTerminal uses a serial interface to communicate with the handler. NOTE: You cannot use the Exatron program while you are using HyperTerminal. Before you open HyperTerminal, close the Exatron software. Each message is in uppercase ASCII characters, followed by a carriage return. This ensures that all cables are secure and all communication is taking place.

Configuring a Connection Session


To set up a new connection session in HyperTerminal: 1. Click the Windows Start button, and select Programs Accessories Communications HyperTerminal.

Figure A-8: Getting to HyperTerminal

> A brief splash screen is displayed. Wait a second for the window to appear.

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Setting Up HyperTerminal

Configuring a Connection Session

> On some systems, an intermediate window may appear. If so, double-click the HYPERTRM.EXE program icon to open the program. If not, go to the next step.

Figure A-9: Opening the HyperTerminal Program

2. In the Connection Description dialog box, type a name for your new connection, and click an icon to identify it. Click OK.

Figure A-10: Naming a New Connection

3. In the Connect To dialog box, click the drop-down arrow by the Connect Using

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box. Select the COM port you want to use. Click OK.

Figure A-11: Selecting the Connection

4. In the Properties dialog box, make the selections as shown in Figure A-12. Click OK.

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Setting Up HyperTerminal

Configuring a Connection Session

Figure A-12: Selecting the Port Settings

If your typed commands are not reflected onscreen, you can change the settings to display them. To display commands typed in HyperTerminal: 1. In the main window, click the Properties button.

Figure A-13: Getting to Connection Properties

2. In the Properties dialog box, under the Settings tab, click the ASCII Setup button.

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Figure A-14: Getting to ASCII Setup

3. In the ASCII Setup dialog box, check the Echo typed characters locally box to display what you type onscreen. 4. Check Send line ends with line feeds and Append line feeds to incoming line ends to continue displaying what was typed previously. (Thus you can scroll up to view the record, or history, of commands.)

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Setting Up HyperTerminal

Testing Communication Between Handler and Tester

Figure A-15: Displaying Typed Commands Onscreen

5. Click OK. 6. Click OK in the other dialog box. 7. Save your session configurations.

Testing Communication Between Handler and Tester


HyperTerminal displays communication between handler and tester. To test communication between handler and tester: 1. Ensure the tester is turned on and ready. 2. Turn on the handler and get it ready. 3. Open HyperTerminal on the Exatron CPU. 4. Click the Call button to ensure they are connected.

Figure A-16: Using Call to Connect

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5. Press H (always use capitals) on the handler keyboard. > The tester should send an R that is displayed in HyperTerminal. If so, you know that the serial ports between the two machines are connected correctly. 6. Press S on the handler keyboard. > The tester should send a sort number, such as 0, that is displayed in HyperTerminal. If so, you know that the communication is working correctly. 7. To disconnect, click the Disconnect button.

Figure A-17: Disconnecting

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Appendix B: System Backup and Recovery


Chapter Overview
This chapter is a quick guide to backing up and restoring the contents of the handler computer, using Acronis True Image software. For more information, see the Acronis Users Guide included on the Acronis software disk. This chapter discusses the following main topics: Topic Setting a Computer to Boot from CD-ROM Creating a Secure Zone on the Hard Disk Backing Up a Hard Disk Copying Archive Files to CDs or DVDs Restoring a Disk or Partition Backup from CD-ROM Restoring a Backup Under Windows Page B-1 B-6 B-15 B-28 B-28 B-40

Setting a Computer to Boot from CD-ROM


Your computer may well be already set up to boot from a CD-ROM if a bootable CD is in the drive at bootup. If not, you can set it to boot from CD-ROM this way. To set the computer to boot from the CD-ROM drive: 1. Turn on the computer and watch carefully during the bootup process for your chance to enter Setup. 2. Press the significant key (usually the <Delete> key) during bootup. > The CMOS Setup Utility is displayed (Figure B-1).

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Figure B-1: CMOS Setup Opened to Main Menu

3. Press the right arrow key to select the Advanced menu (Figure B-2).

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Setting a Computer to Boot from CD-ROM

Figure B-2: CMOS Setup Changed to Advanced Menu; Advanced BIOS Features Selected

4. Press the up or down arrow key to select Advanced BIOS Features. 5. Press the Enter key to enter Advanced BIOS Features (Figure B-3).

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Figure B-3: Advanced BIOS Features Screen

6. Press the down arrow key repeatedly until the Second Boot Device line is selected (Figure B-3). 7. Press the Enter key to change its value.

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Setting a Computer to Boot from CD-ROM

Figure B-4: Selecting CD-ROM Drive as Boot Device

8. Press the down arrow key repeatedly until the CDROM line has the square selection mark (Figure B-4). 9. Press the Enter key to confirm this selection.

Figure B-5: CD-ROM Drive Selected as Boot Device

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10. Press the F10 key to save your settings.

Figure B-6: Saving Changes

11. Press the Enter key to save and exit (Figure B-6).

Creating a Secure Zone on the Hard Disk


The Acronis Users Guide says, "The Acronis Secure Zone is a special hidden partition for storing archives on the computer system itself. For archive security purposes, ordinary applications cannot access it....Acronis Secure Zone is necessary for using Acronis Startup Recovery Manager and Acronis Snap Restore features." (page 13) This feature is useful if you have the space on your hard disk for the backup. If not, you can back up to portable storage media instead. In that case, skip to the next section, "Backing Up a Hard Disk" on page B-15. To create the Secure Zone: 1. Make sure there is no floppy in the floppy drive. 2. Open Acronis by double-clicking its icon on the desktop.

Figure B-7: Acronis Program Icon

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Creating a Secure Zone on the Hard Disk

Figure B-8: Acronis Main Window

The Acronis main window opens.

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Figure B-9: Manage Acronis Secure Zone Button

3. Click the Manage Acronis Secure Zone button at the upper left (Figure B-9).

Figure B-10: Manage Acronis Secure Zone WizardWelcome

4. Click the Next button (Figure B-10).

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Creating a Secure Zone on the Hard Disk

Figure B-11: Creating Secure Zone in Unallocated and Free Space

5. Click to place a checkmark and select the disk or partition where you want to create the Secure Zone (Figure B-11). 6. Click the Next button.

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Appendix B: System Backup and Recovery

Figure B-12: Specifying Size of Secure Zone

7. Specify the size of the Secure Zone, either by clicking on and dragging the slider, or by typing the size in the Partition size box (Figure B-12). NOTE: It is recommended that you use approximately one-third of the drive size, or 33%, for the Secure Zone. 8. Click the Next button.

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Creating a Secure Zone on the Hard Disk

Figure B-13: Activating Acronis Startup Recovery Manager

This allows you to press the F11 key during startup to activate the Recovery Manager.

Figure B-14: Alternate SelectionDo Not Activate Acronis Startup Recovery Manager

9. Click to make your selection (Figure B-11). 10. Click the Next button.

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Appendix B: System Backup and Recovery

Figure B-15: Confirming Settings Before Creating Secure Zone

11. Verify the proposed operations and settings. > If you want to make any changes, click the Back button one or more times until you reach the settings to be changed, and make any desired changes. Then click Next until you get back to the window shown in Figure B-15. 12. Click the Proceed button.

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Creating a Secure Zone on the Hard Disk

Figure B-16: Secure Zone Successfully Created

You can review the parameters of the Secure Zone at any time by clicking the Secure Zone button.

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Appendix B: System Backup and Recovery

Figure B-17: Reviewing Properties of the Created Secure Zone

After you have examined the properties, you can click Cancel to exit, or you can make changes as desired.

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Backing Up a Hard Disk

Backing Up a Hard Disk


When you make a backup, you can back up selected files and/or folders, or you can back up an entire hard disk or partition. While it is useful to back up selected files on a periodic basis, it is also recommended that you back up the entire hard disk in case of hard disk failure. Exatron makes a full backup of your handlers hard disk before the handler is shipped to you. In case of emergency, you can use the original backup disks to restore the handler computer to its original factory condition.

Figure B-18: Backup Disk Shipped with Handler

To make the backup: 1. On the main window, click the Backup option (Figure B-19).

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Appendix B: System Backup and Recovery

Figure B-19: Selecting the Backup Option

Figure B-20: Create Backup WizardWelcome

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Backing Up a Hard Disk

2. Click the Next button.

Figure B-21: Selecting Entire Disk or Partition Backup

Figure B-22: Alternate SelectionIndividual Files and Folders Backup

Selecting the entire disk or partition is simpler and ensures no files are omitted, but the backup takes more space. Selecting individual files and folders takes less space, but some files may be inadvertently omitted. 3. Click to make your selection (Figure B-11). 4. Click the Next button.

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Appendix B: System Backup and Recovery

Figure B-23: Selecting Partitions to Back Up

5. Click to check all the selections you want. 6. Click the Next button.

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Backing Up a Hard Disk

Figure B-24: Explanation of Differences Between Full and Incremental Backups

A full backup contains all the data on the partition or hard disk. It is complete. An incremental backup contains only the data changed since the last backup, whether full or incremental. Therefore, if you have done three incremental backups since the full backup, you need all three incremental backups plus the full backup in order to restore the data. Each incremental is based on the incremental before that. Full backup + incremental + incremental + incremental = Restore
Figure B-25: Restoration Based On Incremental Backups

A differential backup contains all the data changed since the last full backup. Therefore, if you have done three differential backups since the last full backup, you need only the latest differential backup plus the full backup in order to restore the data. Each differential is based only on the full backup, and disregards any differential backups created before it. Full backup + differential ... differential ... differential = Restore
Figure B-26: Restoration Based On Differential Backups

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Appendix B: System Backup and Recovery

Figure B-27: Selecting Backup Storage Destination

7. Select the location in which to store the backup and click Next (Figure B-27).

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Backing Up a Hard Disk

Figure B-28: Selecting a Full Backup

Figure B-29: Selecting an Incremental Backup

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Appendix B: System Backup and Recovery

Figure B-30: Selecting a Differential Backup

8. Select the type of backup you wantfull, incremental, or differential. 9. Click Next.

Figure B-31: Selecting Backup Options

You may want to set the options manually. Among these options are password protection, compression level, and specifying the size of the backup files for transference to various portable media (Archive splitting, Figure B-32).

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Backing Up a Hard Disk

Figure B-32: Archive SplittingAutomatic

10. Click any of the options in the left box to examine and set the options. Archive splitting can be set to automatic or fixed size. NOTE: It is strongly recommended that you use the Fixed size option and back up to another hard drive first, splitting archive files small enough to fit at least two archive files on each anticipated CD or DVD; then afterward copy the backup files to CDs or DVDs. See "Copying Archive Files to CDs or DVDs" on page B-28. Automatic size is for backing up directly to a series of CDs or DVDs. When each disk is full, you will be prompted for another one. This method is not recommended, as the backup is unreliable. Fixed size is good if you are backing up to a hard drive now, with the intention of copying the backup to a specific set of portable media afterward.

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Appendix B: System Backup and Recovery

Figure B-33: Archive SplittingFixed Size

Figure B-34: Drop-Down List of Fixed Sizes

11. It is recommended that you select a size small enough to get at least two of the archive files (the first and last files) on one media. > For example, if you will be copying the files to DVDs, then select the 650 or 700 MB size, to get multiple files on one disk. But if you will be copying the files to CDs, then select the 100 MB size, to get multiple files on one disk. 12. Select the desired options and click Next.

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Backing Up a Hard Disk

Figure B-35: Adding Optional Archive Comments

13. Type any descriptions of the contents of the disk or folders. 14. Click Next.

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Appendix B: System Backup and Recovery

Figure B-36: Confirming Settings Before Creating Backup

15. Verify the proposed operations and settings. > If you want to make any changes, click the Back button one or more times until you reach the settings to be changed, and make any desired changes. Then click Next until you get back to the window shown in Figure B-36. 16. Click the Proceed button. During the backup, the progress bar shows how the backup is progressing (Figure B-37).

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Backing Up a Hard Disk

Figure B-37: Progress Bar Displayed While Backup Is Created

Figure B-38: Successful Completion

Figure B-39: Archive Files Created

After the backup is complete, you can see the archive file(s) on your storage media.

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Appendix B: System Backup and Recovery

Copying Archive Files to CDs or DVDs


If you have backed up to a second hard drive using fixed file size and archive splitting as recommended, you should next copy the archive files to CD or DVD. Copy the first and last archive files to the first CD or DVD, so the program will know how many archive files to request. Then copy the other archive files to other CDs or DVDs if necessary, so that all the archive files are included.

Restoring a Disk or Partition Backup from CD-ROM


If you have backed up an entire disk or partition and Windows cannot load, you will need to boot from the bootable Acronis CD-ROM. Do it this way. To restore the backup: 1. Make sure there is no floppy in the floppy drive. 2. Insert the Acronis boot disk in the CD-ROM drive. The Acronis splash screen is displayed, followed by the main window (Figure B-40, Figure B-41).

Figure B-40: Acronis Boot Disk Inserted in Drive (Left); Acronis Splash Screen (Right)

3. Double-click the Restore Image selection (Figure B-41).

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Restoring a Disk or Partition Backup from CD-ROM

Figure B-41: Acronis Main Screen with Restore Option

4. Remove the Acronis boot disk from the CD-ROM drive, and insert the CD-ROM containing the last file in the backup series of CD-ROM disks. CAUTION: Be sure to insert the last recovery disk first. If you insert any CDROM out of order, or dont start with the last one, you will see an error message (Figure B-42). Insert the correct CD and continue.

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Appendix B: System Backup and Recovery

Figure B-42: Error Messages Due to Inserting Wrong Backup Disk

Figure B-43: Restore Image WizardWelcome

The Restore Image Wizard displays the Welcome screen. 5. Click the Next button.

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Restoring a Disk or Partition Backup from CD-ROM

Figure B-44: Selecting Archive File for Restoration

6. Double-click the CD-ROM drive to display its contents (Figure B-44). 7. Click the Next button.

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Appendix B: System Backup and Recovery

Figure B-45: Option to Verify Archive

If you are overwriting the contents of the hard disk with the recovery, you may want to verify the archive before overwriting. 8. Select whether or not to verify before restoring. 9. Click the Next button.

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Restoring a Disk or Partition Backup from CD-ROM

Figure B-46: Selecting Partition or Disk to Restore

10. Check the disk partition you want to restore. 11. Click the Next button.

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Appendix B: System Backup and Recovery

Figure B-47: Option to Resize Partitions

You have the option to resize partitions. Doing so may be useful if you are migrating to a larger hard disk, 12. Select whether or not to resize partitions. 13. Click the Next button.

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Restoring a Disk or Partition Backup from CD-ROM

Figure B-48: Resizing Partitions

14. Click to select the disk location. 15. Slide to resize each partition. 16. Click the Next button.

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Appendix B: System Backup and Recovery

Figure B-49: Deleting Partitions on Destination HD

17. Click Yes to delete all the partitions on the destination drive. NOTE: If you click No, the restoration process stops. 18. Click the Next button.

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Restoring a Disk or Partition Backup from CD-ROM

Figure B-50: Option to Restore Additional Partition

You are given the option to restore an additional partition. 19. Make your selection and click Next.

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Appendix B: System Backup and Recovery

Figure B-51: Confirming Settings Before Restoring Partition

20. Verify the proposed operations and settings. > If you want to make any changes, click the Back button one or more times until you reach the settings to be changed, and make any desired changes. Then click Next until you get back to the window shown in Figure B-51. 21. Click Proceed. As the recovery progresses, you are asked to insert the backup disks in order. 22. Insert each requested disk when prompted (Figure B-52).

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Restoring a Disk or Partition Backup from CD-ROM

Figure B-52: Prompts to Insert Series of Recovery Disks

Figure B-53: Successful Completion

The restoration is completed.

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Appendix B: System Backup and Recovery

Restoring a Backup Under Windows


If Windows is running normally, you should use Acronis True Image under Windows, because it provides more functionality. Do it this way. To restore a backup under Windows: 1. Open Acronis by double-clicking its icon on the desktop (Figure B-7). 2. Click the Recovery selection (Figure B-54).

Figure B-54: Selecting the Recovery Option

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Restoring a Backup Under Windows

Figure B-55: Restore Data WizardWelcome

3. Click Next.

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Appendix B: System Backup and Recovery

Figure B-56: Selecting Location of Archive File

4. Select the location where your archive file is stored and the name of the archive file. 5. Click Next.

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Restoring a Backup Under Windows

Figure B-57: Selecting Original or New Location for Restoration

Figure B-57 asks for the location where you want the files restored: the same location they were in originally, or a new location. 6. Select original or new location. 7. Click Next.

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Appendix B: System Backup and Recovery

Figure B-58: Selecting Restoration Destination

If you selected a new destination, Figure B-58 asks you to specify the destination of the restoration. 8. Select the destination for the restoration. 9. Click Next.

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Restoring a Backup Under Windows

Figure B-59: Selecting Archive Files to Be Restored

10. Select the archive files to be restored. 11. Click Next.

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Appendix B: System Backup and Recovery

Figure B-60: Selecting Restoration Options

12. Select default or manual options for restoration. 13. Click Next.

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Restoring a Backup Under Windows

Figure B-61: Selecting Restoration Options Manually

If you selected manual options, a list of available options is showed at the left of Figure B-61. 14. Select any options for restoration. 15. Click Next.

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Appendix B: System Backup and Recovery

Figure B-62: Selecting Whether to Overwrite Existing Files

16. Select whether to overwrite existing files. 17. Click Next.

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Restoring a Backup Under Windows

Figure B-63: Confirming Settings Before Restoring Data

18. Verify the proposed operations and settings. > If you want to make any changes, click the Back button one or more times until you reach the settings to be changed, and make any desired changes. Then click Next until you get back to the window shown in Figure B-63. 19. Click Proceed.

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Appendix B: System Backup and Recovery

Figure B-64: Progress Bar Displayed While Data Is Restored

Figure B-65: Successful Completion

Figure B-66: Restored Files

After the restoration is complete, you can see the restored files in the selected location.

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Index
A
air blow. See blow-off air dryer 1-36 air filter 1-5, 2-22, 6-42 air flow 6-25, 6-42 air flow control adjustment knob 3-44 air pressure 2-21, 6-24 see also blow-off adjusting 6-26 fittings 1-5, 6-86 recommended range 6-42 setting minimum 6-38 setting parameters 6-31, 6-35 thermal heads 2-28, 5-67, 5-102, 6-71 air regulator 6-19, 6-86 adjusting pressure 6-24 auxiliary 2-20, 6-24 digital pressure switch 2-20, 6-26 SMC Model ITV 6-27, 6-31 SMC Models ISE40 & ZSE40 6-29, 6-35, 6-37 locking in OFF position 1-3 main 2-19, 6-23 replacing 6-20 air supply 1-2, 1-5, 6-19, 6-42, 6-86 air valves 2-23, 6-25 alignment. See calibration alodine, conductive gold 2-42 archive files, in backup 10-23, 10-24 ASCII values 9-24 Auto Run log files 4-3 messages 4-3, 4-8 multiple test sites 4-11 pausing 4-1, 4-3 restarting 4-1, 4-3 taper settings 4-9 tracking device counts 2-21, 4-3 automatic air shut-off valve 2-19, 3-7, 6-23 auxiliary pusher regulator. See air regulator, auxiliary axes X 1-24, 2-31, 2-33 Y 1-24, 2-7, 2-31, 2-34 Z 1-24, 2-31, 2-35

B
bearing shafts, lubrication 6-3 bearings 6-3 benchtop handlers 1-6, 2-42, 3-6 binary values 9-24 bins 1-22 blow-off 1-22, 2-18, 2-21 adjustment screw 2-22, 6-43, 6-87 delay 5-29, 5-35, 5-36, 5-38 operation 2-21, 6-87 override buttons 5-4 bowl feeder 1-30, 1-31, 1-33 see also Bowl Feeder Supplement buckets 2-9, 5-71 buttons see also under window names CPU 3-7, 3-9 EMO (emergency stop) 1-2, 2-11, 2-40, 3-7, 3-9, 4-1, 6-2 Exatron software Diagnostic 5-2 Main window 3-46 OK 3-51, 5-43 Save Parameters 3-51, 5-43 HALT and RUN 2-11, 4-1 override blow-off 2-22, 5-4 pusher and slider 2-23, 5-5 taper 5-21 vacuum 2-22, 5-4 Windows Start 3-8

C
calibration buckets 5-71 dead nest for tube devices 3-11 examples trays 5-85 to 5-89 waffle packs 5-90 to 5-96 pickup heads Y positions 2-34 Z positions 2-35 to 2-37 software order of tasks 5-68, 5-73 thermal heads temperature 5-100 X distance for trays 5-83 Y distance to test site 5-74 continued on next column

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Index-1

Model 900 Manual

calibration continued software continued Y distance to trays 5-82 Z-get distance 5-78 Z-put distance 5-77 taper 5-71 pickup heads 5-104 seal head 3-38 software 5-103 test sites 5-65, 5-71 tray or test site selection 5-70 trays 2-33 tube holders 3-11 vacuum generator 6-50 waffle packs 2-32, 2-33 worksheet 5-72 camera. See image sensor cautions and warnings see also safety and security adjusting blow-off screw 2-22 back up hard drive regularly 6-3 changing motor speeds may cause damage 5-49 connect power to grounded outlet 1-5 define tray columns and rows before calibration 5-80 digital air pressure sensor setting minimum 6-38 dispose of chiller fluid according to law 1-2 dont change factory-set job file 3-50, 5-2 dont change IP addresses 6-72 dont interfere with moving parts 1-1 dont jerk filled trays 3-9, 4-6 dont lubricate lead screws 6-2 dont lubricate solenoids 6-58 dont over-adjust blow-off screw on vacuum generator 6-44 dont over-adjust blow-off screw on vacuum switch 6-44 dont remove safety covers during operation 1-2 dont touch adhesive tape to carrier tape 3-17, 3-37 dont touch hot taper seal heads 3-42 dont unplug air hose when air regulator on 1-3 dont use cleaners on bearings or lead screws 6-2, 6-4 dont use handler without approved air regulator 1-2 home all motors before starting 1-1 insert last recovery disk first 10-29 keep away from moving parts 1-1 lock air regulator in OFF position before repairing handler 1-3 lock wheels and level feet 1-6 continued on next column

cautions and warnings continued maintain file backups on external media 6-82 maximum air pressure 50 PSI from vacuum pump 6-42 mount benchtop handler securely 1-6 power off system before maintenance 6-3 prevent excess moisture in air regulator and air valves 6-19 preview movement to avoid collisions 5-47 replace dirty vacuum filter 2-22, 6-43 servicing of laser should be done by LSO 1-3, 6-71 tighten lead screws only with power off 6-85, 6-87 CE Marking upgrade options 2-41 changeover kits 3-3 Check Tube Latches window 5-25 chiller 1-27, 1-36 fluid as hazardous waste 1-2 software 5-100, 5-101 columns calibration 5-80, 5-81 numbering 2-31, 5-39 communication between handler software and hardware 5-4, 5-7 motors 2-3 peripherals 9-26 tester 5-45, 9-1, 9-31 thermal temperature controller 6-66 computer boards 5000-M42 2-15 8000-D14 2-16 accessing 6-58 PCM-6896 2-14 PET-C06 2-15 computers backing up hard disk 10-15 opening 6-58 restoring hard disk 10-28, 10-40 shutting down 2-10, 2-42, 3-8 switching 3-8 conductive gold alodine 2-42 contracts preventive maintenance 1-12 service 1-9 counting. See numbering covers and doors 1-2 CPU button 3-7, 3-9 CPU. See computers

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Index

customization hardware 2-1 software 5-2

D
decimal values 9-24 delays before air blow-off 5-29, 5-35, 5-36, 5-38 before starting test 5-45 before vacuum off 5-29, 5-35, 5-36, 5-38 push cylinder 5-30 rotation 5-32 seal head 5-32, 5-33, 5-106 setting 5-26 slide cylinder 5-30 tape 5-36 test sites 5-29 trays 5-35 vacuum 5-29, 5-35, 5-36, 5-37 detaper 1-25, 1-26, 1-34, 3-14 to 3-22 devices changing sizes 3-3 sorting 5-44 totals 4-3, 4-10, 4-11 types 5-19 Diagnostics windows. See under software, Exatron, windows disconnect switch 1-4, 2-10, 2-42, 3-6, 3-9 distances. See positions documentation typography significance 1-22 version number significance 1-21 doors 1-2 drive gear (taper) 2-40

files archive 10-23, 10-24 backing up 6-3 inspection 5-19 job see job files log 4-3 software upgrades 6-82 system 6-82 Fine Tune window 5-51 fuses 2-13

G
gap offset 4-9, 5-108 GPIB test interface 5-34, 9-21

H
HALT button 2-11, 4-1 handler benchtop 2-42, 3-6 examples 1-34, 1-37 installing 1-6, 3-1 opening computer 6-61 cabinet-based examples 1-26, 1-27, 1-35, 1-39 installing 1-6, 3-1 opening computer 6-58 cleaning 6-3 communication see communication between handler and customization 2-1 end-of-life disposal 1-21 operation overview 2-2 powering up 3-6 remote control 6-80 requirements electrical 1-4 environmental 1-4 Internet access 1-5 pressurized air 1-5 servicing 6-1 shutting down 3-8 troubleshooting 6-85 handler parts see also individual part names, test sites air filter 2-22, 6-43 air pressure fittings 1-5, 6-86 air regulator auxiliary 2-20, 6-24 digital pressure switch 2-20, 6-26, 6-27, 6-31 main 2-19, 6-23 continued on next column

E
earthquake safety 1-6, 3-1 electrical capability 1-4 EMO (emergency stop) button 6-2 starting 3-7 stopping 1-2, 2-11, 3-9, 4-1 taper 2-40 end-of-life disposal 1-21 environmental requirements 1-4

F
facilities requirements 1-4 feet, leveling 2-9, 3-1

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Index-3

Model 900 Manual

handler parts continued automatic air shut-off valve 2-19, 3-7, 6-23 bearings 6-3 brand names Baco disconnect switch 1-4, 2-10, 2-42, 3-6, 3-9 Cool Muscle motors 6-8, 6-16 Hover-Davis detaper 3-14 Huber chiller 5-101 Julabo chiller 5-101 Kerk lead screws 6-4 NSK bearing shafts 6-4 Omega temperature controller 1-43, 5-100, 6-66 Omron fiberoptic sensor controllers 6-64 SMC air regulators 6-20, 6-23 SMC digital air pressure switch 6-26, 6-31 SMC vacuum generators 6-39 SMC vacuum switches 6-39 Thomson bearing shafts 6-4 Thomson bearings 6-4 Thomson linear motor tracks 6-4 buckets 2-9, 5-71 buttons HALT and RUN 2-11, 4-1 override blow-off 2-22, 5-4 pusher and slider 2-23, 5-5 taper 2-41 vacuum 2-22, 5-4 chains 2-7, 7-2 computer boards 2-14 connectors 24-pin D 9-4, 9-5 covers and doors 1-2 CPU button 3-7, 3-9 disconnect switch 1-4, 2-10, 2-42, 3-6 docking plates 2-25 docking ring 2-25 EMO (emergency stop) button 1-2, 2-11, 3-7, 3-9, 4-1, 6-2 feet, leveling 2-9, 3-1 fuses 2-13 HALT and RUN buttons 2-11, 4-1 hub 2-16, 6-18 interlocks 1-2 lead nut 2-8 lead screws 2-3, 2-5, 2-8, 6-5, 6-85, 6-87 light pole 2-18 line filter 2-43 main disconnect switch 2-10, 2-42, 3-6 manifold 2-23 motor serial cables 6-18 continued on next column

handler parts continued motors 2-3, 5-111, 6-85, 6-87 network hub 2-16, 6-18 optional features 2-1 photos 1-25 to 1-43, 2-3 to 2-43 pickup heads 2-3 ports 5-10 power supplies 2-11 power switch 3-7, 3-9 precisor tray 5-38, 5-71 preheating trays 1-28, 1-31, 1-41 pusher/slider 2-23, 2-24, 5-5, 5-13 sensors 2-22, 6-50 see also sensors serial adapter 2-16, 6-18 solenoids 5-8 suction cups 2-18, 6-3 temperature controller 1-43, 6-66 transfer tray 5-71 tray carriages 2-7, 3-9 tray clamps 3-9, 3-10 tray spring clips 3-10 trays 2-30 tubes 3-10, 3-11 vacuum generators see vacuum generators vacuum pump 6-44, 6-45 wiring 2-7, 2-15 handler port simulator 9-7 hardware. See handler parts hazardous waste 1-2 heat seal heads (taper) blade sizes 3-39 intermittent tape contact 2-39 setting temperature 3-45 heater controller display (taper) 3-45 hex values 9-24 home positions 2-31 hub 2-16, 6-18 HyperTerminal 9-26

I
image sensor (taper) 2-38, 2-39 see also inspection files drop-off to inspection gap 4-7, 5-37 function 5-22 inspection trigger 5-18 Input/Output Check window inspection files 5-19 installation 1-6 5-7

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Index

interface card 6-8 interfaces 5-33 GPIB 5-34, 9-2, 9-21 RS-232 5-34, 9-2, 9-9, 9-10 RS-485 9-2 TTL 5-34, 9-2, 9-4 interlocks 1-2 IP addresses 6-72, 6-77

J
JEDEC trays 2-30, 5-73, 5-85 job files copying 3-48, 5-2 definition 3-47 factory preset 3-3 for various tray configurations 5-2 opening 3-49, 4-5 saving 3-51 settings 3-51 verifying 3-47 jobs number of devices in tape 4-10, 5-32, 5-37, 5-106 running 4-1, 9-1, 10-1

L
LAN connections 6-72 laser 1-27, 1-28, 1-35, 6-71 lead nut 2-8 lead screws 2-5, 2-6, 2-7, 2-8, 6-5, 6-85, 6-87 LED checker 9-7 leveling feet 2-9, 3-1 light pole 2-18 line filter 2-43 lock-out/tag-out (LOTO) procedures 1-3 log file 4-3 lubrication 6-3

MEMS testing 1-28, 1-32 messages between handler and tester 9-1 color-coded 2-18 in Auto Run 4-3, 4-8 resetting motors 5-47, 5-51 motor controllers 6-8 motors 2-3 coupling 2-3, 6-85, 6-87 homing 5-49, 5-50, 5-68 master vs. slave 6-8, 6-9 positions 5-68 programming 6-16 replacing 6-13 scale 5-74 speeds 5-48, 5-49 taper 5-111 turning on and off 5-47, 5-49 X 2-33 examples 5-88, 5-94 movement 5-68 X sensor 5-14 Y 2-3, 2-34 examples 5-86, 5-90 movement 5-68 troubleshooting 6-87 Y sensor 5-13 Z 2-35 movement 5-68 Z sensor 5-15 Motors Setup window 5-47

N
network cards 6-8 network hub 2-16 networking Internet access 1-5 IP addresses 6-72 LAN connections 6-72 remote handler control 6-80 numbering columns and rows 5-39 test sites 2-32 trays 2-32, 5-79 waffle packs 2-33, 5-79

M
machine. See handler main disconnect switch 2-10, 2-42, 3-6 maintenance. See preventive maintenance, tasks manifold 2-23 manual, users typography significance 1-22 version number significance 1-21 measurements. See positions

O
offsets gap (taper) 4-9, 5-108 socket 5-65

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Index-5

Model 900 Manual

P
passwords 3-7, 3-50, 3-54, 5-3 PCBs. See computer boards PCs. See computers peel tester (taper) 3-32 photos, handler parts 1-25 to 1-43, 2-3 to 2-43 pick height. See Z-get pickup heads assembly 2-7 blow-off 6-43 home position 2-32 looseness 6-87 multiple 2-2, 2-4 multiple nozzles setting detaper for 3-21 setting taper for 5-110 positions 2-34, 2-35, 6-87 rotation 2-2, 2-3 delay 5-32 results 5-33 suction cups 5-76, 6-3, 6-86 vs. push cylinder as clamp 5-30 Y distance to taper 5-104 Y distance to test site 5-74 Y distance to trays 5-82 Z-get distances 5-71, 5-78 Z-put distances 5-71, 5-77 pin 1, location 2-32 pin designations 9-5 pockets. See calibration ports 5-10, 9-2, 9-3, 9-26 TTL Handler Port 9-4, 9-7 positions see also under calibration calibrating 2-33 to 2-37, 3-11, 5-51 to 5-96 columns and rows 2-31 pickup heads 2-34, 2-35 trays 2-33 waffle packs 2-33 worksheet 5-72 Z-get vs. Z-put 5-75, 5-76 Z-put 5-38 power supplies 2-11 power switch 3-7, 3-9 precisor tray 5-38, 5-71 preheating trays 1-26, 1-28, 1-31, 1-41 pressure roller block (taper) 2-40 pressure seal head (taper) blade sizes 3-38 continuous tape contact 2-39

preventive maintenance 6-1 preventive maintenance contract 1-12 push cylinder delay 5-30 override buttons 5-5 positions 5-6 testing 5-62 vs. pickup head as clamp 5-30 put height. See Z-put

R
remote handler control 6-80 rotation. See pickup heads, rotation rows calibration 5-80, 5-81 numbering 2-31, 5-39 RS-232 test interface 5-34, 9-9, 9-10 rub routine 5-41 RUN button 2-11, 4-1

S
safety and security see also cautions and warnings CE Marking upgrade options 2-41 earthquake safety 1-6, 3-1 handler covers and interlocks 1-2 hard disk backup 10-15 lock-out/tag-out procedures 1-3 training responsibilities 1-1 scale 5-55, 5-56, 5-57, 5-74, 5-105 seal head (taper) 2-2, 2-39, 5-24 adjusting 3-38 adjusting lateral position 3-41 adjusting pressure 3-43 blade sizes 3-38 changing blades 3-40 cleaning 6-65 delay 5-32, 5-33, 5-106 enabling or disabling 5-111 sealing temperature 5-106 setting temperature for heat seal 3-45 stopping 2-40 seismic safety 1-6, 3-1 Sensor Check window. See Input/Output Check window sensors 2-17 bucket 2-9 checking 5-7 continued on next column

Index-6

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Index

sensors continued cleaning optics 6-65 controllers 6-64 digital air regulator 2-20 taper 5-17, 5-18, 5-22 to 5-24 Empty/Out-of-Pocket 5-22 Gap 2-39, 4-9, 5-22, 5-108 Heater Alarm 5-24 Slack Switch 5-23 thermal 5-15 vacuum generator 2-22, 6-50, 6-66, 6-86 X motor 5-14 Y motor 5-13 Z motor 5-15 serial adapter 2-16, 6-18 service contract 1-9 settings file. See job files Setup Parameters window 5-26 signal tower. See light pole slide cylinder delay 5-30 override buttons 5-5 positions 5-6 testing 5-62 smart buckets 2-9 sockets 2-25 offset 5-65 pressure 5-102, 6-71 testing 5-62 software Acronis True Image 10-1 backup 10-15 emergency recovery 10-28 normal recovery 10-40 Secure Zone 10-6 Exatron customized 5-2 windows Auto Run 4-2 Diagnostics 5-2 Check Tube Latches 5-25 Fine Tune 5-51 Input/Output Check 5-7 Motors Setup 5-47 Setup Parameters 5-26 Sort Interface 5-43 Taper 5-103 Thermal Setup 5-100 Main 3-46 HyperTerminal 9-26 MS Windows, shutting down 3-8 WebEx 6-80

Solenoid Check window. See Input/Output Check window solenoids 5-7, 5-8, 6-58 Sort Interface window 5-43 Sort Latch 5-45 sorts 1-24 assigning to destinations 5-43 assigning to waffle packs 5-44 order of placement 5-44 suction cups 2-18, 6-86, 7-1 positions Z-get 5-75, 5-76 Z-put 5-76 support services 1-7, 1-8, 1-15, 1-21

T
takeup arm (taper) 3-32 takeup reel (taper) 2-38, 3-23 tape carrier 3-30, 3-35 checking pockets 5-36 delays 5-36 direction of movement 2-38 gap offset 4-9, 5-108 homing 4-9, 5-108 initializing 4-9, 5-108 leader 3-30, 4-9, 5-108, 5-109 passed devices in job 4-10, 5-32, 5-37, 5-106 pin 1 location 2-32 pockets between pickup and image sensor 5-37 rotation 5-33 sealing 3-33, 3-35 threading through assembly 3-33 trailer 4-9, 5-109 taper 2-2 alignment knob 2-38, 3-23 calibrating software 5-71, 5-103 changing seal head blade 3-40 changing tape track 3-28 drive gear 2-40 EMO (emergency stop) button 2-40 facilities requirements 1-4, 1-5 guide block 3-34, 3-35, 3-36 heater controller display 3-45 image sensor 2-38, 2-39, 5-18, 5-22 Model 201 1-25, 1-26, 3-23 Model 202 2-38, 3-23 motor 5-111 override buttons 2-41, 5-21 peel tester 3-32 continued on next column

02/2011

Copyright Exatron, 2011

Index-7

Model 900 Manual

taper continued pressure roller block 2-40 seal head heat see seal head (taper) pressure (PSA) see seal head (taper) sensors 5-17, 5-18, 5-22 to 5-24 Empty/Out-of-Pocket 5-22 Gap 2-39, 5-22, 5-108 Heater Alarm 5-24 Slack Switch 5-23 setup parameters 5-32 takeup arm 3-32 takeup reel 2-38, 3-23 tape track 2-38, 3-23, 3-37 Taper window 5-103 tasks adjusting air flow 3-44, 6-25 adjusting air pressure 6-24 adjusting blow-off 6-43 backing up PC hard disk 10-15 calibration number of rows and columns 3-52 order 5-68 positions 3-54 tubes 3-11 vacuum generator 6-53 X distance for trays 5-83 Y distance to test site 5-74 Y distance to trays 5-82 Z-compress distance 5-65 Z-get distance 5-78 Z-put distance 5-77 changing password 3-54 changing pickup head 3-4 checking air filter 6-42 checking air regulator moisture/dirt trap 6-19 checking air regulator shutoff valve 6-22 checking air supply from house generator 6-19 checking motor serial cables 6-18 checking or replacing air filter 6-20 checking vacuum generator adjustment 6-50 cleaning handler 6-3 cleaning suction cups 6-3 cleaning vacuum assembly 6-46 copying job file 3-48 creating backup Secure Zone on hard disk 10-6 displaying commands typed in HyperTerminal 9-29, 9-31 entering Diagnostics 5-3 installing Exatron software 6-82 locking air pressure switch 6-29, 6-30 lubricating bearing shafts 6-4 continued on next column

tasks continued opening computer 6-59, 6-61 opening job file 3-49 powering up system 3-6 programming motor 6-16 reformatting job file 6-84 replacing motors 6-13 restoring backup under Windows 10-40 restoring backup without Windows 10-28 running a job 4-6 securing trays on tray carriages 3-9 securing tubes on holder 3-10 setting air pressure switch 6-31, 6-35, 6-38 setting LAN connection 6-72 setting PC to boot from CD 10-1 setting test temperatures 5-100 setting up HyperTerminal 9-26 setting up temperature controller software 6-67 shutting down system 3-8 starting Auto Run 4-2 taper adjusting seal heads lateral position 3-41 adjusting seal heads pressure 3-43 adjusting seal heads speed 3-44 aligning tape track 3-37 calibrating software 5-103 changing changeover kit 3-24 changing seal head blade 3-40 changing tape track 3-28 loading carrier tape 3-30 loading sealing tape 3-33 maintenance 6-65 mounting takeup reel 3-26 setting temperature for heat seal 3-45 turning off temperature for heat seal 3-46 testing network communication with peripherals 6-77 tightening lead screws 6-5, 6-85 unlocking air pressure switch 6-28, 6-29 viewing vacuum generator settings 6-56 TCP/IP interface 9-3 teaching number of rows and columns 5-39 X and Y positions 5-57 temperature controller 6-66 temperatures, setting (taper) 3-45 temperatures, setting (tester thermal heads) 5-100 test interfaces. See GPIB test interface, RS-232 test interface, TCP/IP interface, TTL (TransistorTransistor Logic) test interface

Index-8

Copyright Exatron, 2011

02/2011

Index

test sites calibration 5-71, 5-73, 5-74 checking communication 9-26 delays 5-29, 5-44 disabling 5-39, 5-40 docking plates 2-25 docking ring 2-25 instructions from vendor 3-2 manifold 2-23 multiple 2-2, 4-11, 9-10 numbering 2-32, 5-73 push/slide cylinders 2-23, 2-24, 5-30, 5-62 rotation 5-33 sockets 2-25, 5-65 thermal temperature variances allowed 5-101 thermal heads see thermal heads testing interfaces 5-33, 9-1 magnetic 1-31 MEMS 1-28, 1-31, 1-32, 1-33 modes, real vs. simulation 5-33 thermal 1-26, 1-27, 1-31, 1-36 testing order 2-27 time out 5-44 thermal heads 1-36, 1-43 air pressure 5-102, 6-71 checking communication 6-66 options 2-2, 5-100 sensors 5-15 temperature variances allowed 2-26, 5-100, 5-101 testing order 2-27 thermal seal head (taper). See seal head (taper) Thermal Setup window 5-100 transfer tray 5-71 trays 2-2 see also waffle packs see also under calibration carriages 2-7, 2-30, 3-9 clamps 2-7, 2-31, 3-9, 3-10 configurations, combining 2-30 delays 5-35 dimension drawing 5-59, 5-60, 5-61 disabling 5-38 fill order 4-7 home position 2-31 homing 4-4, 5-68 numbering 2-32, 5-79 pin 1 location 2-32

trays continued positions calibrating 2-33 teaching 5-57 preventing device play 5-41 row and column numbering 3-52, 5-39 securing 3-9 sorted devices 5-44 spring clips 3-10 troubleshooting devices not picked up 6-42, 6-85 hard disk wont boot 10-15, 10-28 motors slow 6-85 tray carriage alignment failing 6-85 Y movement noisy 6-87 TTL (Transistor-Transistor Logic) test interface 5-34, 5-45, 9-4 TTL Handler Port 9-4, 9-7 tubes 1-38, 2-2 dead nest 3-11 dead nest adjustment leg 3-13 holders 3-10 securing 3-10 typography significance 1-22

V
vacuum 2-18 delay 5-29, 5-35, 5-36, 5-37 override buttons 5-4 sensor 6-86 vacuum generators 2-21, 2-22 blow-off adjustment 6-44 blow-off location 6-41 calibrating 6-53 checking 6-50, 6-56 cleaning 6-46 override buttons 6-53 ports 6-40 suggested settings 6-52 troubleshooting 6-42 vacuum pump 6-44, 6-45

vacuum switches see also vacuum generators blow-off adjustment 6-44 blow-off location 6-41 how different from vacuum generators vibrations. See bowl feeder or feet

6-39

continued on next column

02/2011

Copyright Exatron, 2011

Index-9

Model 900 Manual

W
waffle packs 2-2, 2-30, 2-31 calibration order 5-81 disabling 5-38 numbering 2-33, 5-79 positions 2-33 teaching dimensions 5-57 warnings. See cautions and warnings warranty agreement 1-5, 1-6, 1-7, 1-8, 6-2 WebEx 6-80 Windows, shutting down 3-8 windows. See under software wiring 2-7, 2-15 work modes 4-3, 5-34

Z-put 2-36, 5-38 calibration 5-77 defined 5-75 distance from device

2-37

X
X see also trays axis 1-24, 2-31, 2-33 conceptual diagrams calibration 5-68, 5-83 home position 2-31 5-88, 5-94, 5-99

Y
Y see also pickup heads, thermal heads axis 1-24, 2-7, 2-31, 2-34, 6-87 conceptual diagrams 5-86, 5-91, 5-98 calibration 5-68 for taper 5-104 for test site 5-74 for trays 5-82 home position 2-32

Z
Z see also pickup heads axis 1-24, 2-31, 2-35 calibration 5-68 chain 2-7, 7-2 home position 2-32 Z-compress 5-38, 5-64 Z-get 2-36, 5-38 calibration 5-78 defined 5-75 distance from device 2-36, 6-85

Index-10

Copyright Exatron, 2011

02/2011