P. 1
RILKE - Duino Elegies & Sonnets to Orpheus

RILKE - Duino Elegies & Sonnets to Orpheus

|Views: 251|Likes:
Veröffentlicht vonvagbhatta

More info:

Published by: vagbhatta on Aug 07, 2011
Urheberrecht:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

01/10/2014

pdf

text

original

buiNO eleGies

and
Tb'e SONNeTS
TOORpbeus
AL SO BY A. POULIN, JR..
The American Folk Scene: Dimensions of the Folk-
song Revival (ed. with David A. DeTurk)
In Advent: Poems
Contemporary American Poetry (ed.)
Catawba: Omens, Prayers and Chants
Rainer Maria Rilke
tJUiNO ELEljiES
and
Th'E SONNETS
TO ORphEUS
Translated by
A. Poulin, Jr.
-i-
HOUGHTON MIFFLIN COMPANY BOSTON
The German text for this book is taken from Rilke's 5tlemtliche
Werke, Volume 1, copyright e1955 by Insel Verlag, Frankfurt
am Main. All rights reserved.
An earlier version of A. Poulin, Jr.'s translation of Duirw
Elegies was originally published as" A Special APR Supple-
ment" by The American Poetry Review. Some of The Sonnets to
Orpheus originally appeared in The American Poetry Review
and in The Ohio Revkw. Grateful acknowledgment is made
to the Editors of these journals.
Copyright © 1975, 1976, 1971 by A. Poulin, Jr.
All rights reserved
For information about permission to reproduce selections
from this book, write to Permissions, Houghton Mifflin
Company, 2 Park Street, Boston, Massachusetts 02108.
Libmry of Congress ClltIlloging-in- Pubiictltion DIIt.
Rilke, Rainer Maria, 1875-1926.
Duino Elegies and The Sonnets to Orpheus.
Translation of Duineser E1egien and Die Sonette
an Orpheus.
English and German.
Includes bibliographical references.
I. Rilke, Rainer Maria, 1875-1926. DieSonnettean
Orpheus. English&tGerman. 1977.
II. Title: Duino Elegies.
PT2635.165D821977 831'.9'12 76-47553
ISBN 0-395-2.5015-3
ISBN 0-395-25058-7 (pbk.)
Printed in the United States of America
QUM 151413
PERSONAL ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
I WANT TO THANK The National Endowment for the Arts and The
Research Foundation of the State University of New York for
grants I received while working on these translations, as well as
the P.E.N. American Center for assistance in time of need. I
also want to thank Kirsten Michalski, Galen Williams, Ines Del-
gado de Torres, and Leonard Randolph personally for kindness
that far exceeded professional courtesy.
Grateful acknowledgment is due to Mr. Kurt Bernheim, Insel
Verlag's representative in the United States, for his gracious as-
sistance in securing the reprint and translations rights to Rilke's
poems for this book.
Irma Pylyshenko and Christoph Kaiser, my colleagues at the
State University of New York at Brockport, generously agreed to
read various parts and stages of my manuscript for the sake of
accuracy, as did Professor Jack Stein (Harvard University),
Stephen Conway (Boston University), and Paul Hopper
(Pennsylvania State University). Their expertise and sensitivity
elucidated difficult passages and afforded me insights that were
invaluable in my attempt to make these translations as faithful
to the original as I beJieved possible.
My friend Stephen Berg initially suggested that I translate the
Duino Elegies. From my first faltering attempts to the version
that appeared in The American Poetry Review, he offered me ad-
vice and encouragement with editiorial acumen and with that
fine sensibility that marks his own poems and translations. Ber-
trand Mathieu, Rimbaud's brilliant translator, gave me the kind
of help and encouragement that can come only from a long-time
friend, poet, scholar, and blood brother - all of which he is.
Jonathan Galassi suggested that I translate The Sonnets to Or-
vi • Personal Acknowledgments
pheus in order that this book include both of Rilke's last major
sequences. His professional vigor as my editor was surpassed
only by his friendship, his sustained loyalty, and by the per-
sonal interest he devoted to these translations.
And you, Love, for wintering out a hard-turned year.
A. P., Jr.
PREFACE
IN HIS NOTED LETTER of 1925 to Witold von Hulewicz, his Polish
translator, Rilke stated that the Duino Elegies and Sonnets to Or-
pheus "are, as could not be otherwise, of the same 'birth'" and
"filled with the same essence." Since he wrote all of the Son-
nets and completed most of the Elegies in an astoundingly short
period of time (almost entirely within the month of February,
19Z?t), Rilke's claim that these two sequences of poems "sup-
port each other constantly" is entirely plausible. Moreover, crit-
ics and scholars generally agree that an attentive reading of the
Elegies and Sonnets reveals that they do support and reaffirm
each other and are clearly filled with the same essential sensibil-
ity, artistry, and vision that distinguishes them as Rilke's
greatest achievement and one of the most fully realized artistic
statements of twentieth-century poetry.
This book marks the first time that English translations of
these two major works are being published together as the
larger interdependent whole they've always been. I've at-
tempted to make the Elegies and Sonnets as fully accessible as
translations can be to individuals who can't read German, to
remain as faithful as possible to the original, and to make them
successful poems in English. Since these are a poet's work and
not a scholar's, readers of German will note that my attempt to
be faithful to the original can't be equated with an intention to
• Rilke started writing the Elegies in 1912 and worked on them intermittently
untlll914. For a number of reasons, he did not and could not return to them
again until 1922. According to several of his letters, between February 2 and 5 of
1922 he wrote the first sequence of sonnets; by February 9 he had completed 7
elegies; on February 11 he had completed 10 elegies; and by February 20, not
only had he written stll! another elegy (now the Fifth) but also the second se-
quence of sonnets.
viii • Preface
be literal. I've taken such liberties as I felt were necessitated by
the differences between the two languages and by Rilke's
unique logic and imagery, as well as by his occasional idiosyn-
cratic use of Gennan. At times I've taken even greater liberties
because a more literal translation didn't seem to convey the full
aesthetic sense of given passages. On such occasions I invoked
RiIke's own articulation of the poet's (and the translator's) re-
sponsibility and risk: "And he obeys, even as he oversteps the
bounds."
In his letters, Rilke spoke of the Elegies and especially of the
Sonnets as "dictations" that were "entrusted" to him. Such
words may no longer be part of the idiom of contemporary
poetry; nevertheless, the translator is entrusted with a kind of
dictation, and one of the poet-translator'S responsibilities is to
try to submerge his personal sensibility into that of the poet
whose work he is translating. But he can't annihilate his own
inner poetic sense entirely. The translation that results from
such an encounter thus becomes a fusion oflanguages, cultures,
historical moments, and aesthetic personalities; it becomes a
third poem.
No less important to this kind of alchemical process and its re-
sults is the fact that, when dealing with poems like the Elegies
and Sonnets, one can't ignore the work of others or avoid in-
debtedness. Like so many others of my generation, I was intro-
duced to these poems through J. B. Leishman and Stephen
Spender's translation of the Duino Elegies and M. D. Herter Nor-
ton's versions of The Sonnets to Orpheus. Later I read C. F.
MacIntyre's translations of the Elegies and Sonnets and, more
recently, Stephen Canney and Jay Wilson's Elegies, as well as
David Young's courageous rendition of them. Such distin-
guished contemporary American poets as Randall Jarrell, Robert
Bly, and W. D. Snodgrass have also published translations of
Preface· ix
some of the Sonnets. I've read all of them, I've learned from all
of them, and now and then I've stolen a word, a phrase, a line
from one or more of them. It's simply foolhardy to try to im-
prove on what is obviously a mot juste. I hope someone else will
find a word or ph1C!se to steal from these versions.
When the work at hand is as monumental and awesome as
the Duma Elegies and Sonnets to Orpheus, Emerson's dictum that
each age must write its own books takes on a new meaning.
Each age, each generation needs many versions of great works
in translation in order to know them as variously and acutely as
possible, and to come to a fuller realization that there have been
a few among us, like Rilke, who haven't failed to use our
"generous spaces" and who still assert: "That's us . .. This
stood among men."
A. Poulin, Jr.
Brockport, New York
February, 1976
CONTENTS
Personal Acknowledgments v
Preface vii
DUINO ELEGIES
The First Elegy 5
The Second Elegy 13
The Third Elegy 19
The Fourth Elegy 27
The Fifth Elegy 33
The Sixth Elegy 43
The Seventh Elegy 47
The Eighth Elegy 55
The Ninth Elegy 61
The Tenth Elegy 69
THE SONNETS TO ORPHEUS
First Series 83
Second Series 137
Notes 199
tJUiNO ELEGiES
for Basilike
dieses ist unser, uns so zu beriihren
DUINESER ELEGIEN
Aus dem Besitz der Fiirstin
Marie von Thurn und Taxis-Hohenlohe
DUINO ELEGIES
The Property of
Princess Marie von Thurn und Taxis-Hohenlohe
4 • Duineser Elegien: Die Erste Elegie
DIE ERSTE ELEGIE
Wer, wenn ich schriee, herle mich denn aus der Engel
Ordnungen? und gesetzt selbst, es nahme
einer mich plOtzlich ans Herz: ich verginge von seinem
starkeren Dasein. Denn das Schone ist nichts
[5] als des Schrecklichen Anfang, den wir noch grade extragen,
und wir bewundem es so, weil es gelassen verschmaht,
uns zu zerstOren. Em jeder Engel ist schrecklich.
Und so verhalt ich mich denn und verschlucke den
Lockruf
dunkelen Schluchzens. Ach, wen vermOgen
[10] wir denn zu brauchen? Engel nicht, Menschen nicht,
und die findigen Tiere merken es schon,
daB wir nicht sehr verlaSlich zu Haus sind
in der gedeuteten Welt. Es bleibt uns vielleicht
irgend ein Baum an dem Abhang, daB wir ihn taglich
[15J wiedersahen; es bleibt uns die Stra1Se von gestem
und das verzogene Treusein einer Gewohnheit,
der es bei uns gefiel, und so blieb sie und ging nicht.
o und die Nacht, die Nacht, wenn der Wind voller
Weltraum
uns am Angesicht zehrt -, wem bliebe sie nicht, die ersehnte
[20] sanft enttauschende, welche dem einzelnen Herzen
miihsam bevorsteht. 1st sie den Liebenden leichter?
Ach, sie verdecken sich nur mit einander fur Los.
WeiSt du's noch nicht? Wirf aus den Armen die Leere
zu den Raumen hinzu, die wir atmen; vielleicht daB die
Vogel
Duino Elegies: The First Elegy • 5
THE FIRST ELEGY
And if I cried, who'd listen to me in those angelic
orders? Even if one of them suddenly held me
to his heart, I'd vanish in his overwhelming
presence. Because beauty's nothing
but the start of terror we can hardly bear, [5]
and we adore it because of the serene scom
it could kill us with. Every angel's terrifying.
So I control myself and choke back the lure
of my dark cry. Ah, who can we tum to,
then? Neither angels nor men, [10]
and the animals already know by instinct
we're not comfortably at home
in our translated world. Maybe what's left
for us is some tree on a hillside we can look at
day after day, one of yesterday's streets, [15]
and the perverse affection of a habit
that liked us so much it never let go.
And the night, oh the night when the wind
full of outer space gnaws at our faces; that wished for,
gentle, deceptive one waiting painfully for the lonely [201
heart - she'd stay on for anyone. Is she easier on lovers?
But they use each other to hide their fate.
You still don't understand? Throw the emptiness in
your arms out into that space we breathe; maybe birds
6 • Duineser Elegien: Die Erst Elegie
125J die erweiterte Luft fuhlen mit innigerm Flug.
Ja, die Fruhlinge brauchten dich wohl. Es muteten manche
Sterne dir zu, daB du sie spurtest. Es hob
sich eine Woge heran im Vergangenen, oder
da du voriiberkamst am geOffneten Fenster,
[301 gab eine Geige sich hin. Das alles war Auftrag.
Aber bewiiltigtest du's? Warst du nicht immer
noch von Erwartung zerstreut, als kundigte alles
eine Geliebte dir an? (Wo willst du sie bergen,
da doch die groBen fremden Gedanken bei dir
[35] aus und ein gehn und ofters bleiben bei Nacht.)
Sehnt es dich aber, so singe die Liebenden; lange
noch nicht unsterblich genug ist ihr beruhmtes Geffihl.
Jene, du neidest sie fast, Verlassenen, die du
so vie 1 liebender fandst als die Gestillten. Beginn
[40J immer von neuem die nie zu erreichende Preisung;
denk: es erhiilt sich der Held, selbst der Untergang war
ihm
nur ein Vorwand, zu sein: seine letzte Geburt.
Aber die Liebenden nimmt die erschopfte Natur
in sich zuruck, als waren nicht zweimal die Kriifte,
[45J dieses zu leisten. Hast du der Gaspara Stampa
denn genugend gedacht, daB irgend ein Madchen,
dem der Geliebte entging, am gesteigerten Beispiel
dieser Liebenden ffihlt: daB ich wurde wie sie?
Sollen nicht endlich uns diese iiltesten Schmerzen
[50] fruchtbarer werden? 1st es nicht Zeit, daB wir liebend
uns vom Geliebten befrein und es bebend bestehn:
wie der Pfeil die 5ehne besteht, urn gesammelt im
Absprung
Duino Elegies: The First Elegy • 7
will feel the air thinning as they fly deeper into themselves. [25]
Yes, Springs needed you. Many stars
waited for you to see them. A wave
that had broken long ago swelled toward you,
or when you walked by an open window, a violin
gave itself. All that was your charge. [30]
But could you live up to it? Weren't you always
distracted by hope, as if all this promised
you a lover? (Where would you have hidden her,
with all those strange and heavy thoughts
flowing in and out of you, often staying overnight?) [35]
When longing overcomes you, sing about great lovers;
their famous passions still aren't immortal enough.
You found that the deserted, those you almost envied,
could love you so much more than those you loved.
Begin again. Tryout your impotent praise again; [40]
think about the hero who lives on: even his fall
was only an excuse for another Hfe, a final birth.
But exhausted nature draws all lovers back
into herself, as if there weren't the energy
to create them twice. Have you remembered [45]
Gaspara Stampa well enough? From that greater love's
example, any girl descrted by her lover
can believe: "If only I could be like her!"
Shouldn't our ancient suffering be more
fruitful by now? Isn't it time our loving freed [50]
us from the one we love and we, trembling, endured:
as the arrow endures the string, and in that gathering
momentum
8 • Duineser Elegien: Die Erste Elegie
mehr zu sein als er selbst. Denn Bleiben ist nirgends.
Stimmcn, Stimmen. Hore, mein Herz, wie sonst nur
[55J Heilige horten: daIS sie der riesige Ruf
aufhob vom Boden; sie aber knieten,
Unmoglkhe, weiter und achtetens nkht
So waren sic horend. Nkht, daIS du Cottes ertriigest
[60] die Stimme, bei weitem. Aber das Wehende hore,
die ununterbrochene Nachricht, die aus Stille skh bildet.
Es rauscht jetzt von jenen jungen Toten zu dir.
Wo immer du eintratst, redete nicht in Kirchen
zu Rom und Neapel ruhig ihr Schkksal dkh an?
Oder es trug eine Inschrift sich erhaben dir auf,
[65] wie neulich die Tafel in Santa Maria Formosa.
Was sie mir wollen? leise solI kh des Unrechts
Anschein abtun, der ihrer Geister
reine Bewegung manchmaI ein wenig behindert.
Freilich ist es seltsam, die Erde nicht mehr zu bewohnen,
[70] kaurn erlernte Gebrauche nicht mehr zu iiben,
Rosen, und andern eigens versprechenden Dingen
nicht die Bedeutung menschlicher Zukunft zu gebcn;
das, was man war in unendlich angstlichen Handen,
nicht mehr zu sein, und selbst den eigenen Namen
[75J wegzulassen wie ein zerbrochenes Spielzeug.
Seltsam, die Wiinsche nkht weiterzuwunchen. Seltsam,
alles, was sich bezog, so lose im Raume
flattern zu sehen. Und das Totsein ist miihsam
und voller Nachholn, daB man allmiihlich ein wenig
[SO] Ewigkeit spurt. - Aber Lebendige machen
Duino Elegies: The First Elegy • 9
becomes more than itself. Because to stay is to be nowhere.
Voices, voices. My heart, listen as only
saints have listened: until some colossal [55]
sound lifted them right off the ground; yet,
they listened so intently that, impossible
creatures, they kept on kneeling. Not that you could
endure the voice of God! But listen to the breathing,
the endless news growing out of silence, [60]
rustling toward you from those who died young.
Whenever you entered a church in Rome or Naples,
didn't their fate always softly speak to you?
Or an inscription raised itself to reach you,
like that tablet in Santa Maria Formosa recently. [65]
What do they want from me? That I gently wipe away
the look of suffered injustice sometimes
hindering the pure motion of spirits a little.
It's true, it's strange not living on earth
anymore, not using customs you hardly learned, [70]
not giving the meaning of a human future
to roses and other things that promise so much;
no longer being what you used to be
in hands that were always anxious,
throwing out even your own name like a broken toy. [75]
It's strange not to wish your wishes anymore. Strange
to see the old relationships now loosely fluttering
in space. And it's hard being dead and straining
to make up for it until you can begin to feel
a trace of eternity. But the living are wrong [SO]
10 • Duineser Elegien: Die Erste Elegie
alle den Fehler, daB sie zu stark unterscheiden.
Engel (sagt man) wuSten oft nicht, ob sie unter
Lebenden gehn oder T oten. Die ewige Stromung
reiBt durch beide Bereiche alle Alter
[85] immer mit sich und ubertont sie in beiden.
SchlielSlich brauchen sie uns nicht mehr, die Fruheentriickten,
man entwohnt sich des Irdischen sanft, wie man den Briisten
milde der Mutter entwachst. Aber wir, die so groBe
Geheimnisse brauchen, denen aus Trauer so oft
[90] seliger Fortschritt entspring -: konnten wir sein ohne sie?
1st die Sage umsonst, daIS einst in der Klage urn Linos
wagende erste Musik diirre Erstarrung durchdrang;
daB erst im erschrockenen Raum, dem ein beinah gottlicher
Jiingling
plOtzlich fiir immer enttrat, das Leere in jene
[95] Schwingung geriet, die uns jetzt hinreilSt und trostet und hilft.
Duino Elegies: The First Elegy • 11
to make distinctions that are too absolute.
Angels (they say) often can't tell whether
they move among the living or the dead.
The eternal torrent hurls all ages through
both realms forever and drowns out their voices in both. [85]
At last, those who left too soon don't need us anymore;
we're weaned from the things of this earth as gently
as we outgrow our mother's breast. But we, who need
such great mysteries, whose source of blessed progress
so often is our sadness - could we exist without them? [90]
Is the story meaningless, how once during the lament for
Linos,
the first daring music pierced the barren numbness,
and in that stunned space, suddenly abandoned
by an almost godlike youth, the Void first felt
that vibration which charms and comforts and helps us [95]
now?
12 • Duineser Elegien: Die Zweite Elegie
DIE ZWEITE ELEGIE
Jeder Engel ist schrecklich. Vnd dennoch, weh mir,
ansing ich euch, fast tOdliche Vogel der Seele,
wissend urn euch. Wohin sind die Tage Tobiae,
da der Strahlendsten erner stand an der einfachen Haustiir,
[5] zur Reise ein wenig verkleidet und schon nicht mehr
furchtbar;
Oungling dem Jungling, wie er neugierig hinaussah).
Trate der Erzengel jetzt, der gefahrliche, hinter den Stemen
eines Schrittes nur nieder und herwarts: hochauf-
schlagend erschliig uns das eigene Herz. Wer seid ihr?
[10] Friihe Gegliickte, ihr Verwohnten der Schopfung,
Hohenziige, morgenrotliche Grate
aller Erschaffung, - Pollen der bliihenden Gottheit,
Gelenke des Lichtes, Gange, Treppen, Throne,
Raume aus Wesen, Schilde aus Wonne, Tumulte
[15] stiirmisch entziickten GefUhls und plOtzlich, einzeln,
Spiegel: die die entstromte eigene Schonheit
wiederschopfen zuriick in das eigene Antlitz.
Denn wir, wo wir fiihlen, verfliichtigen; ach wir
atmen uns aus und dahin; von Holzglut zu Holzglut
[20] geben wir schwachern Geruch. Da sagt uns wohl einer:
ja, du gehst mir ins Blut, dieses Zimmer, der Friihling
fUllt sich mit dir . .. Was hilfts, er kann uns nicht halten,
wir schwinden in ihm und um ihn. V nd jene, die schon sind,
ower halt sie zuriick? Vnaufhorlich steht Anschein
Duino Elegies: The Second Elegy • 13
THE SECOND ELEGY
Every angers terrifying. Almost deadly birds
of my soul, I know what you are, but, oh,
I still sing to you! What happened to the days of Tobias
when one of you stood in a simple doorway, partly
disguised for the trip, radiant, no longer appalling; [5]
(a young man to the young man as he looked out amazed).
If the archangel, the dangerous one behind the stars,
took just one step down toward us today: the quicker
pounding of our heart would kill us. Who are you?
Fortunate first ones, creation's pampered darlings, [10]
ranges, mountain tops, morning-red ridges
of all Beginning - seed of a blossoming god,
hinges of light, hallways, stairways, thrones,
spaces of being, force fields of ecstasy, storms
of unchecked rapture, and suddenly, separate, [15]
mirrors: each drawing its own widespread
streaming beauty back into its face.
But we: we vanish in our feelings. Oh, we breathe
ourselves out, and out; our smell dissolves
from ember to ember. It's true, someone may tell us: [20]
"You're in my blood, this room, Spring floods
with you ... " What good is it? He can't hold us.
We vanish in him and around him. And the beautiful,
oh, who can hold them back? Some look is always rising
14 • Duineser Elegien: Die Zweite Elegie
[25] aufin ihrem Gesicht und geht fort. Wie Tau von dem Friihgras
hebt sich das Unsre von uns, wie die Hitze von einem
heigen Gericht. 0 Uicheln, wohin? 0 Aufschaun:
neue, warme, entgehende Welle des Herzcns - ;
weh mir: wir sinds doch. Schmeckt denn der Weltraum,
[30] in den wir uns iosen, nach uns? Fangen die Engel
wirklich nur Ihrigcs auf, ihnen Entstromtes,
oder ist manchmal, wie aus Versehen, ein wenig
unseres Wesens dabei? Sind wir in ihre
Ziige soviel nur gemischt wie das Vage in die Gesichter
[35] schwangerer Frauen? Sie merken es nicht in dem Wirbei
ihrer Riickkehr zu sich. (Wie sollten sie's merken.)
Liebende konnten, verstiinden sie's, in der Nachtluft
wunderlich reden. Denn es scheint, daB uns alles
verheimlicht. Siehe, die Baume sind; die Hauser,
[40] die wir bewohnen, bestehn noch. Wir nur
ziehen aHem vorbei wie ein luftiger Austausch.
Und al1es ist einig, uns zu verschweigen, halb als
Schande vielleicht und halb als unsagliche Hoffnung.
Liebende, euch, ihr in einander Geniigten,
[45] frag ich nach uns. Ihr greift euch. Habt ihr Beweise?
Seht, mir geschiehts, daB meine Hande einander
inne werden oder daB mein gebrauchtes
Gesicht in ihnen sich schont. Das giebt mir ein wenig
Empfindung. Doch wer wagte darum schon zu seill?
[SO] Ihr aber, die ihr im Entziicken des andcrcn
zunehmt, bis er euch iiberwaltigt
anfleht nicht mehr - ; die ihr unter den Handen
Duino Elegies: The Second Elegy • 15
in their faces, and falling. Like dew on new grass, [25]
like heat from a steaming dish, everything we are rises
away from us. 0 smile, where are you going?
o upturned look: new, wann, the heart's receding wave-
it hurts me, but that's what we are. Does the cosmic
space we dissolve into taste of us, then? Do angels [30]
really absorb only what poured out of them,
or sometimes, as if by mistake, is there a trace
of us, too? Do the contours of their features bear
as much of us as that vague look on a pregnant woman's
face? Unnoticed by them in their whirling back [35]
into themselves. (Why should they notice.)
If they were understood, lovers might say marvelous
things in the night air. Because it seems everything
wants to camouflage us. Look, trees exist;
the houses we live in still hold up. But we [40]
pass by all of it like an exchange of breath.
Everything conspires to ignore us, half out of shame,
perhaps, half out of some speechless hope.
Lovers, satisfied with each other, I'm asking you
about us. You hold each other. What's your proof? [45]
Look, sometimes it happens my hands become aware
of each other, or my worn out face seeks shelter
in them. Then I feel a slight sensation.
But who'd dare to exist just for that?
Yet you, who grow in the other's ecstasy [50]
until he's overcome and begs: "No more!";
you, who in one another's hands grow
16 • Duineser Elegien: Die Zweite Elegie
euch reichlicher werdet wie Traubenjahre;
die ihr manchmal vergeht, nur weil der andre
[55] ganz iiberhand nimmt: euch frag ich nach uns. Ich weig,
ihr beriihrt euch so selig, weil die Liebkosung verhalt,
weil die Stelle nicht schwindet, die ihr, Zartliche,
zudeckt; weil ihr darunter das reine
Dauern verspiirt. So versprecht ihr euch Ewigkeit fast
[60] von der Umarmung. Und doch, wenn ihr der ersten
Blicke Schrecken besteht und die Sehnsucht am Fenster,
und den ersten gemeinsamen Gang, ein Mal durch den Garten:
Liebende, seid ihrs dann noch? Wenn ihr einer dem andern
euch an den Mund hebt und ansetzt - : Getrank an Getrank:
[65] 0 wie entgeht dann der Trinkende seltsam der Handlung.
Erstaunte euch nicht auf attischen Stelen die Vorsicht
menschlicher Geste? war nicht Liebe und Abschied
so leicht auf die SchuItern gelegt, als war es aus anderm
Stoffe gemacht als bei uns? Gedenkt euch der Hande,
[70] wie sie drucklos beruhen, obwohlin den Torsen die Kraft steht.
Diese Beherrschten wugten damit: so weit sind wirs,
dieses ist unser, uns 50 zu beriihren; starker
stemmen die Gotter uns an. Doch dies ist Sache der Gotter.
Fanden auch wir ein reines, verhaltenes, schmales
[75] Menschliches, einen unseren Streifen Fruchtlands
zwischen Strom und Gestein. Denn das eigene Herz
iibersteigt uns
noch immer wie jene. Und wir konnen ihm nicht mehr
nachschaun in Bilder, die es besanftigen, noch in
[79] gottliche Korper, in denen es groBer sich magigt.
Duino Elegies: The Second Elegy· 17
more abundant like grapes in a vintage year;
you, who sometimes disappear, but only when the other
takes over completely, I'm asking you about us. [55]
I know why you touch each other so ecstatically:
that touch lasts. That place you cover with such
tenderness doesn't vanish, because you feel a pure
duration there. In your embrace you almost find
the promise of eternity. And yet, when you've survived [60]
the fear of that first look, the longing at the window,
and that first walk in the garden, once: lovers,
are you still the same? When you lift yourselves
up to each other's lips and begin, drink for drink -
oh how strangely the drinker then slips from the role. [65]
Didn't the caution of human gestures on Attic steles
amaze you? Weren't love and separation placed
on those shoulders so lightly they seemed made
of other stuff than we are? Remember the hands:
despite the power in the torso, they lie weightless. [70]
The self-controlled knew this: we can only go this far.
All we can do is touch one another like this. The gods
can press down harder on us, but that's the gods' affair.
If only we could find something pure, contained,
narrow, human - our own small strip of orchard [75]
between river and rock. For our heart rises
out of us as it did out of the others. And we can't
follow it any longer into figures that tame it, or
into godlike bodies where it finds a greater mastery. [79J
18 • Duineser Elegien: Die Dritte Elegie
DIE DRITTE ELEGIE
Emes ist, die Geliebte zu singen. Ein anderes, we he,
jenen verborgenen schuldigen Flug-Gott des Bluts.
Den sie von weitem erkennt, ihren Jiingling, was w e ~ er
selbst von dem Herren der Lust, der aus dem Einsamen oft,
[5] ehe das Madchen noch linderte, oft auch als ware sie nicht,
ach, von welchem Unkenntlichen triefend, das Gotthaupt
aufhob, aufrufend die Nacht zu unendlichem Aufruhr.
Odes Blutes Neptun, 0 sein furchtbarer Dreizack.
o der dunkele Wind seiner Brust aus gewundener Muschel.
[10] Horch, wie die Nacht sich muldet und hohlt. Ihr Sterne,
stammt nicht von euch des Liebenden Lust zu dem Antlitz
seiner Geliebten? Hat er die innige Einsicht
in ihr reines Gesicht nicht aus dem remen Gestirn?
Du nicht hast ihm, wehe, nicht seine Mutter
[15] hat ihm die Bogen der Braun so zur Erwartung gespannt.
Nicht an dir, ihn fiihlendes Madchen, an dir nicht
bog seine Lippe sich zum fruchtbarern Ausdruck.
Meinst du wirklich, ihn hatte dein leichter Auftritt
also erschuttert, du, die wandelt wie Friihwind?
[20] Zwar du erschrakst ihm das Herz; doch altere Schrecken
stiirzten in ihn bei dem beriihrenden AnstoS.
Ruf ihn ... du rufst ihn nkht ganz aus dunkelem Umgang.
Freilich, er will, er entspringt; erleichtert gewohnt er
sich in de in heirnliches Herz und nimmt und beginntsich.
[25] Aber begann er sich je?
Mutter, du machtest ihn klein, du warsts, die ihn anfing;
Duino Elegies: The Third Elegy • 19
THE THIRD ELEGY
To sing about someone you love is one thing; but, oh,
the blood's hidden guilty river-god is something else.
Known to her only from a distance, what can her lover,
even, say about the lord of passion, who often out of
loneliness, before she could comfort him, often as if [5]
she didn't exist, raised his godhead, oh, who knows from
what depths, came streaming, and incited the night to riot.
Oh that Neptune of the blood and his terrible trident!
Oh the dark wind of his chest from that twisted conch!
Listen, how the night carves itself out and grows hollow. [10]
You stars, doesn't a lover's longing for his loved one's
face come from you? Doesn't his most intimate insight
into her purest face come from your own purest constellation?
No, it really wasn't you, nor was it his mother
who arched his brow with so much expectation. [15]
Girl who's holding him now, not for yours,
not for your lips did his thicken with passion.
You who wander like the morning breeze, do you really
think your gentle coming could convulse him so?
True, you scared his heart; but more ancient terrors [20]
rushed into him with your shocking touch. Call him ...
you can't quite call him back from that dark circle.
Yes, he tries, he docs escape; relieved, he starts
to feel at home in your comfortable heart and takes
and begins himself. But did he ever begin himself? [25]
Mother, you made him small, you started him once;
20 • Duineser Elegien: Die Dritte Elegie
dir war er neu, du beugtest liber die neuen
Augen die freundliche Welt und wehrtest der fremden.
Wo, ach, hin sind die Jahre, da du ihm einfach
[30] mit der schlanken Gestalt wallendes Chaos vertratst?
Vicles verbargst du ihm so; das nachtlkh-verdachtige Zimmer
machtest du harmlos, aus deinem Herzen voll Zuflucht
mischtest du menschlichern Raum seinem Nacht-Raum
hinzu.
Nicht in die Finsternis, nein, in dein naheres Dasein
[35] hast du das Nachtlicht gestellt, und es schien wie aus
Freundschaft.
Nirgends ein Knistern, das du nicht lachelnd erklartest,
so als wliBtest du langst, wann sich die Diele benirnmt ...
Und er horchte und linderte sich. So vieles vermochte
zartlich dein Aufstehn; hinter den Schrank trat
[40] hoch im Mantel sein Schicksal, und in die Falten des
Vorhangs
paBte, die leicht sich verschob, seine unruhige Zukunft.
Und er selbst, wie er lag, der Erleichterte, unter
schllifemden Lidem deiner leichten Gestaltung
SiiBe 16send in den gekosteten Vorschlaf - :
[45] schien ein Gehuteter . .. Aber innen: wer wehrte,
hinderte innen in ihm die Fluten der Herkunft?
Ach, da war keine Vorsicht im Schlafenden; schlafend,
aber traumend, aber in Fiebern: wie er sich ein-lieB.
Er, der Neue, Scheuende, wie er verstrickt war,
[50] mit des innern Geschehns weiterschlagenden Ranken
schon zu Mustern verschlungen, zu wurgendem Wachstum,
zu tierhaft
Duino Elegies: The Third Elegy • 21
he was new to you; over those new eyes you arched
the friendly world and shut the strange one out.
Oh, where are the years when you simply stood between
him and the surging chaos with your slender body? [30]
You hid so much from him then; at night you made
the threatening room harmless, your heart's sanctuary
mingling a more human space with his own night-space.
No, you didn't put the night-light in that darkness
but in your own nearer presence, and it glowed, friendly. [35]
There wasn't a creak you couldn't explain with a smile,
as if you'd always known just when the floor would do that ...
And he listened and was comforted. Coming to him quietly,
you could do so much; his tall, cloaked destiny stepped
behind the wardrobe, and his restless future that got out [40]
of hand so easily molded itself to the curtains' folds.
And lying there, relieved, mingling the sweetness
of your slight body with the first taste
of approaching sleep under his heavy lids,
he seemed protected ... But inside: who could [45]
stop or turn the floods of Origin in him?
Oh, there was no caution in that sleeper; sleeping,
but feverish and dreaming: what he dared!
So young and shy, how he entangled himself
in the spreading roots of events inside him, [50]
twisted patterns, strangling tendrils, shapes
22 • Duineser Elegien: Die DTitte Elegie
jagenden Formen. Wie er sich hingab -. Liebte.
Liebte sein Inneres, seines Inneren Wildnis,
diesen Vrwald in ihm, auf dessen stummem Gestiirztsein
[55] lkhtgriin sein Herz stand. Liebte. VerlieB cs, ging die
eigenen Wurzeln hinaus in gewaltigen Ursprung,
wo seine kleine Geburt schon iiberlebt war. Liebend
stieg er hinab in das altere Blut, in die Schluehten,
wo das Furchtbare lag, noeh satt von den Vatern. Vnd jcdes
[60] Schreekliche kannte ihn, blinzelte, war wie verstandigt.
Ja, das Entsetzliche Hichelte ... Sclten
hast du so zartlich gellichelt, Mutter. Wie soUte
er es nicht Heben, da es ihm lachelte. VOT rur
hat ers geliebt, denn, da du ihn trugst schon,
[65] war es im Wasser gelOst, das den Keimenden leicht macht.
Siehe, wir lieben nicht, wie die Blumen, aus einem
einzigen Jahr; uns steigt, wo wir Heben,
unvordenklicher Saft in die Arrne. 0 Madchen,
dies: daB wir liebten in uns, nicht Eines, ein Kiinftiges,
sondern
[70] das zahllos Brauende; nicht ein einzelnes Kind,
sondern die Vater, die wie Triimmer Gebirgs
uns im Grunde beruhn; sondern das trockene FluBbett
einstiger Miitter -; sondem die ganze
lautlose Landschaft unter dem wolkigen oder
[75] reinen Verhangnis - : dies kam dir, Madehen, zuvor.
Und du seiber, was weiBt du -, du locktest
Vorzeit empor in dem Liebenden. Wclche Gefiihle
wiihlten herauf aus entwandelten Wesen. Welche
Duino Elegies: The Third Elegy • 23
of preying animals. How he surrendered. - Loved.
Loved his interior world, the jungle in him, that
primal inner forest where his pale green heart stood
among the fallen and mute ruins. Loved. Then left it, [55]
going out from his own roots into violent Beginning
where his own tiny birth was already outlived. Loving,
he stepped down into the older blood, into the canyons
where terror lurked, still gorged with fathers.
And every horror knew him, winked, and seemed to
understand. [60]
Yes, the hideous smiled at him ... 0 mother,
you hardly ever smiled at him so tenderly.
How could he help but love whatever smiled at him?
He'd loved it before you; even while you carried him, it was
already dissolved in the water that makes the seed light. [65]
Look, we don't love like flowers
with only one season behind us; when we love,
a sap older than memory rises in our arms. 0 girl,
it's like this: inside us we haven't loved just some one
in the future, but a fermenting tribe; not just one [70]
child, but fathers, cradled inside us like ruins
of mountains, the dry riverbed
of former mothers, yes, and all that
soundless landscape under its clouded
or clear destiny - girl, all this came before you. [75]
And you yourself, how could you know - you've stirred
up prehistoric time in your lover. What feelings
welled up from beings no longer here.
24 • Duineser Elegien: Die Dritte Elegie
Frauen haSten dich da. Wasrur finstere Manner
[80] regtest du auf im Geider des Jiinglings? Tote
Kinder woilten zu dir ... 0 leise, leise,
tu ein liebes vor ihm, ein verUifsliches Tagwerk, - fiihr ihn
nah an den Garten heran, gieb ihm der Niichte
Obergewkht ...
[85] Verhalt ihn ...
Duino Elegies: The Third Elegy· 25
What women hated you. What sinister men
you incited in his young veins. Dead children [SO]
reached for you ... Gently, oh, gently
do a good day's work for him each day, with love,
lead him toward the garden, give him those compensating
nights ...
Hold him back. . . [85]
..
26 • Duineser Elegien: Die Vierte Elegie
DIE VIERTE ELEGIE
o Baume Lebens, 0 wann winterlich?
Wir sind nicht cinig. Sind nicht wie die Zug-
vogel verstiindigt. Uberholt und spat,
so drangen wir uns plotzlich Winden auf
[5} und fallen ein auf teilnahmslosen Teich.
Bliihn und verdorrn ist uns zugleich bewugt.
Und irgendwo gehn LOwen noch und wissen,
solang sie herrlich sind, von keiner Ohnmacht.
Uns aber, wo wir Eines meinen, ganz,
[10} ist schon des andem Aufwand fiihlbar. Feindschaft
ist uns das Nachste. Treten Liebende
nicht immerfort an Rander, eins im andcrn,
die sich versprachen Weite, Jagd und Heimat.
Oa wird fUr eines Augenblickes Zeichnung
[15] ein Grund von Gegenteil bereitet, muhsam,
daS wir sie sahcn; denn man ist sehr deutlkh
mit uns. Wir kennen den Kontur
des Flihlens nicht: nur, was ihn formt von auf5en.
Wer sag nicht bang vor seines Herzens Vorhang?
[20] Der schlug sich auf: die Szenerie war Abschied.
Leicht zu verstehen. Oer bekannte Garten,
und schwankte leisc: dann erst kam der Tanzer.
Nicht der. Genug! Und wenn er auch so lekht tut,
er ist verkleidet und er wird ein Burger
[25] und gcht durch seine Kiiche in die Wohnung.
Ich will nicht diese halbgefiillten Masken,
Duino Elegies: The Fourth Elegy • 27
THE FOURTH ELEGY
o trees of life, when is your winter?
Our nature's not the same. We don't have the instinct
of migrant birds. Late and out of season,
we suddenly throw ourselves to the wind
and fall into indifferent ponds. We
understand flowering and fading at once.
And somewhere lions still roam: so magnificent
they can't understand weakness.
Even when fully intent on one thing,
we feel another's costly tug. Hostility
is second nature to us. Havipg promised
one another distance, hunting, and home,
don't lovers always cross each other's boundaries?
Then for the sketchwork of an eye-wink,
a contrasting background's painfully prepared
to make us see it. Because it's very dear
we don't know the contours of our feeling,
but only what shapes it from without.
Who hasn't sat anxious in front of his heart's
curtain? It would go up: another parting scene.
Easy to understand. The familiar garden
swaying slightly; then came the dancer.
Not him. Enough! However graceful he may be,
he's disguised, turns into a suburbanite,
and walks into his house through the kitchen.
I don't want these half-filled masks.
[5]
[10]
[15]
[20]
[25]
28 • Duineser Elegjen: Die VieTte Elegie
Heber die Puppe. Die ist vol!. Ich will
den Balg aushalten und den Draht und ihr
Gesicht aus Aussehn. Hier. Ich bin davor.
[3OJ Wenn auch die Lampen ausgehn, wenn mir auch
gesagt wird: Nichts mehr -, wenn auch von der Blihne
das Leere herkommt mit dem grauen Luftzug,
wenn auch von meinen stillen Vorfahm keiner
mehr mit mir dasitzt, keine Frau, sogar
[35] der Knabe nicht mehr mit dem braunen Schielaug:
Ich bleibe dennoch. Es giebt immer Zuschaun.
Hab ich nicht recht? Du, der urn mich so bitter
das Leben schmeckte, meines kostend, Vater,
den ersten trliben AufguB meines Mlissens,
[40] da ich heranwuchs, immer wieder kostend
und, mit dem Nachgeschmack so fremder Zukunft
beschaftigt, pruftest mein beschlagnes Aufschaun, -
der du, mein Vater, seit du tot bist, oft
in meiner Hoffnung, innen in mir, Angst hast,
[45J und Gleichmut, wie ihn Tote haben, Reiche
von Gleichmut, aufgiebst fUr mein biBchen Schicksal,
hab ich nicht recht? Und ihr, bab ich nicht recht,
die ihr mich liebtet fUr den kleinen Anfang
Liebe zu euch, von dem ich immer abkam,
[50] wei! mir der Raum in eurem Angesicht,
da ich ihn liebte, liberging in WeI traum,
in dem ihr nicht mehr wart ... wenn mir zumut ist,
zu warten vor der Puppenbiihne, nein,
so vollig hinzuschaun, daB, um me in Schauen
[55J am Ende aufzuwiegen, dort als Spieler
Duino Elegies: The Fourth Elegy • 29
I'd rather have a doll. That's whole.
I'll put up with the empty body, the wire, and
the face that's only surface. Here. I'm waiting.
Even if the lights go out; even if
I'm told, "That's all"; even if emptiness
drifts toward me in gray drafts from the stage;
even if none of my silent ancestors
will sit next to me anymore, not a woman,
not even the boy with the squinting brown eyes-
I'll stay here. One can always watch.
Aren't I right? Father, you who found
life so bitter after tasting mine,
the first opaque infusion of my must,
[30]
[35]
as I kept growing, you kept on tasting [40]
and, fascinated by the aftertaste
of such a strange future, tried my clouded gaze -
you, my father, who in my deepest hope
so often since your death have been afraid for me
and, serene, surrendered the kingdoms of serenity [45]
the dead own, just for my bit of fate -
aren't I right? And aren't I right,
you who loved me for that first small impulse
of love for you I always turned from,
because the space in your faces, even while [SO]
I loved it, changed into outer space
where you no longer were ... when I'm in the mood
to wait in front of the puppet stage - No,
to stare into it so intensely that finally
an angel must appear, an actor to counteract [55]
30 • Duineser Elegien: Die Vierte Elegie
ein Engel hinmufS, der die Balge hochreifSt.
Engel und Puppe: dann ist endlich SchauspieI.
Dann kommt zusammen, was wir immerfort
entzwein, indem wir da sind. Dann entsteht
[60] aus unsern Jahreszeiten erst der Umkreis
des gan7.en Wandelns. Ober uns hiniiber
spielt dann der Engel. Sieh, die Sterbenden,
sollten sie nicht vermuten, wie voll Vorwand
das alles ist, was wir hier leisten. Alles
[65J ist nicht es selbst. 0 Stunden in der Kindheit,
da hinter den Figuren mehr als nur
Vergangnes war und vor uns nicht die Zukunft.
Wir wuchsen freilich und wir drangten manchmal,
bald groB zu werden, denen halb zuIieb,
[70] die andres nicht mehr hatten, als das GrofSsein.
Und waren doch, in unserem Alleingehn,
mit Dauerndem vergniigt und standen da
im Zwischenraume zwischen Welt und Spie17.eug.
an einer Stelle, die seit Anbeginn
[75] gegriindet war fUr einen reinen Vorgang.
Wer zeigt ein Kind, so wie es steht? Wer stellt
es ins Gestirn und giebt das Mag des Abstands
ihm in die Hand? Wer macht den Kindertod
aus grauem Brot, das hart wird, - oder Iagt
[80] ihn drin im runden Mund. so wie den Grops
von einem schonen Apfel? . .. Morder sind
leicht einzusehen. Aber dies: den Tod,
den ganzen Tod, noch vor dem Leben so
sanft zu enthalten und nicht bos zu sein,
[85] ist unbeschreiblich.
Duino Elegies: The Fourth Elegy • 31
my stare and pull up the empty skins.
Angel and doll: a real play at last.
Then what we continually divide
by our being here unites there.
Then the cycle of all change can finally [60]
rise out of our seasons. Then the angel
plays over and above us. Look at the dying,
surely they suspect how everything we do
is full of sham, here where nothing
is really itself. 0 hours of childhood, [65]
when more than the mere past was behind
each shape and the future wasn't stretched out
before us. We were growing; sometimes we hurried
to grow up too soon, half for the sake of those
who had nothing more than being grown-up. [70]
Yet when we were alone, we still amused
ourselves with the everlasting and stood there
in that gap between world and toy,
in a place which, from the very start,
had been established for a pure event. [75]
Who'll show a child just as he is? Who'fl set
him in his constellation and put the measure
of distance in his hand? Who'll make the death
of a child out of gray bread growing hard - or
leave it there in his round mouth like the core
of a sweet apple . . . ? Murderers are
easily understood. But this: to hold
death, the whole of death, so gently,
even before life's begun and not be mad
- that's beyond description!
[80]
[85]
32 • Duineser Elegien: Die Fiinfte Elegie
DIE FONFTE ELEGIE
Frau Hertha Koenig zugeeignet
Wer aber sind sie, sag mir, die Fahrenden, dicse ein wenig
Fliichtigern noch als wir selbst, die dringend von fruh an
wringt ein wem, wem zu Liebe
niemals zufriedener Wille? Sondern er wringt sie,
[5] biegt sie, schlingt sie und schwingt sie,
wirft sie und fangt sie zuruck; wie aus geOlter,
glatterer Luft kommen sie nieder
auf dem verzehrten, von ihrem ewigen
Aufsprung dunneren Teppich, diesem verlorcnen
[10] Teppich im Weltall.
Aufgelegt wie ein Pflaster, als hatte der Vorstadt-
Himmel der Erde dort wehe getan.
Und kaum dort,
aufrecht, da und gezeigt des Dastehns
[15] grDGer Anfangsbuchstab ... , schon auch, die starksten
Manner, roilt sie wieder, zum Scherz, der immer
kommendc Griff, wic August der Starke bei Tisch
einen zinnenen Teller.
Ach und um diese
[20] Mitte, die Rose des Zuschauns:
bluht und entblattert. Um diesen
Stampfer, den Stempel, den von dem eignen
bliihenden Staub getroffnen, zur Scheinfrucht
wieder der Unlust befruchteten, ihrer
[25] niemals bewu1lten, - gUinzend mit dunnster
Duino Elegies: The Fifth Elegy • 33
THE FIFTH ELEGY
Dedicated to Frau Hertha von Koenig
But tell me, who are they, these troupers,
even more transient than us, obsessed since childhood,
and - for whose, whose sake? - wrung
by an insatiable will? But it wrings them,
bends them, swings and twists them, [5J
tosses and catches them; and they fall,
as if through oiled and polished air,
on the threadbare carpet worn
thin by their endless leaping,
this carpet lost in space. [10J
Stretched like a plaster, as if the suburban
sky had bruised the earth.
And barely there,
erect, the essence of standing-there: the large initial
of Debut or Done - but even the strongest [15]
men are tossed up again in play by that always
returning grip, like a pewter platter
Augustus the Strong once played with at his table.
And, oh, the rose of audience
blooms and sheds [20]
around this center. Around
this pestle, this pistil pregnant with its own pollen,
fertilized again into the false fruit of
their own unconscious boredom, gleaming
with a synthetic smile, the flimsy [25]
34 • Duineser Elegien: Die Fiinfte Elegie
OberfUiche leicht scheinHichelnden Unlust.
Da: der welke, faltige Stemmer,
der alte, der nur noch trommelt,
eingegangen in seiner gewaltigen Haut, als hatte sic friiher
[30] zwei Manner enthalten, und einer
lage nun schon auf dem Kirchhof, und er iiberlebte den
andern,
taub und manchmal ein wenig
wirr, in der verwitweten Haut.
Aber der junge, der Mann, als war er der Sohn eines
Nackens
[35] und einer Nonne: prall und strammig errullt
mit Muskeln und Einfalt.
Oh ihr,
die ein Leid, das noch klein war,
einst als Spielzeug bekam, in einer seiner
[40] langen Genesungen ...
Du, der mit dem Aufschlag,
wie nur Friichte ihn kennen, unreif,
tiiglich hundertmal abfallt vom Baum der gemeinsam
erbauten Bewegung (der, rascher als Wasser, in wenig
[45] Minuten Lenz, Sommer und Herbst hat)-
abfiHlt und anpraUt ans Grab:
manchrnal, in halber Pause, will dir ein liebes
Antlitz entstehn hiniiber zu deiner selten
zartlichen Mutter; doch an deinen Korper verliert sieh,
Duino Elegies: The Fifth Elegy • 35
patina of their boredom.
There the withered, wrinkled weightlifter,
old and merely drumming now, shriveled
up in his powerful skin that looks as if
it held two men once, and now one's
already lying in the churchyard, and he's
outlived the other, deaf and a little
weird in his widowed skin.
But the young one, the man, like the offspring
[30]
of a neck and nun: taut and tense, [35]
filled with muscle and simplicity.
o you,
a still small pain
received as a plaything once
during one of its long convalescences. . . (40]
You, who fall a hundred times
a day, with the thud only green fruit
know, out of that tree rising from
a cooperation of motion (rushing faster than water
through autumn, spring, and summer in minutes) - [45]
you fall and bounce on the grave:
sometimes, half pausing, you feel a look
of love for your seldom tender mother
surge up to your face; then it loses itself
36 • Duineser Elegien: Die Fiifl/te Elegie
[SO] der es fUichig verbraucht, das schiichtern
kaum versuchte Gesicht ... Und wieder
klatscht der Mann in die Hand zu dem Ansprung, und eh
dir
jemals ein Schmerz deutlkher wird in der Nahe des immer
trabenden Herzens, kommt das Brennen der FulSsohln
[55J ihm, seinem Ursprung, zuvor mit ein paar dir
rasch in die Augen gejagten leiblichen Tronen.
Und dennoch, blindlings,
das Lacheln . . .
Engel! 0 nimms, pfiiicks, das kleinbliitige Heilkraut.
[60] Schaff eine Vase, verwahrs! Stells unter jene, uns noch
nicht
offenen Freuden; in lieblicher Ume
riihms mit blumiger schwungiger Aufschrift:
»5ubrisio Saltat. «.
Du dann, Liebliche,
[65] du, von den reizendsten Freuden
stumm Ubersprungne. Vielleicht sind
deine Fransen gliicklich fUr dich - ,
oder iiber den jungen
prallen Briisten die grune metallene Seide
[70] Whit sich unendlich verwohnt und entbehrt nichts.
Du,
immerfort anders auf alle des Gleichgewichts schwankende
Waagen
hingelegte Marktfrucht des Gleichmuts,
offentlich unter den Schultern.
[75] Wo, 0 wo ist der Ort - ich trag ihn im Herzen - ,
Duino Elegies: The Fifth Elegy • 37
in your body whose surface quickly absorbs that rippling, [SO]
shy, barely tried expression. .. And again
the man's hands are clapping for that leaping;
and before a pain has gotten near
your ever galloping heart, the burning
in the soles of your feet arrives ahead of [55]
its own spring, chasing a few live
tears into your eyes. And yet,
your blind smile . . .
Angel, oh take it! Pluck that small-flowered healing herb!
Make a vase, preserve it! Set it among those joys [60]
not open to us yet. In a lovely urn,
praise it with a high-flown, flowery inscription:
"Subrisio Saltat. "
Then you, darling,
you, silently leapt over [65]
by the most exciting joys. Maybe
your hems are happy for you -
or over your finn young breasts
the green metallic silk
feels always indulged and lacking nothing. [70]
You,
always on the swaying scales of balance
like stacked fruit of serenity
publicly displayed between shoulders.
Where, where is that place - I carry it in my heart - [75]
38 • Duineser Elegien: Die Fiinfte Elegie
wo sie noch lange nicht konnten, noch von einander
abfieln, wie sich bespringende, nicht recht
paarige Tiere; -
wo die Gewichte noch schwer sind;
[80] wo noch von ihren vergeblkh
wirbelnden SUiben die Teller
torkeln ...
Und plotzlich in diesem mtlhsamen Nirgends, plOtzlich
die unsagliche Stelle, wo sich das reine Zuwenig
[85J unbegreiflkh verwandelt - , umspringt
in jenes leerc Zuviel.
Wo die vielstellige Rechnung
zahlenlos aufgeht.
Platze, 0 Platz in Paris, unendlicher Schau platz,
[90] wo die Modistin, Madame Lamarl,
die ruhlosen Wege der Erde, endlose Bander,
schlingt und windet und neue aus ihnen
Schleifen erfindet, Ruschen, Blumen, Kokarden, kiinstliche
Fruchte - , alle
unwahr gemrbt, - rur die bi11igen
[95] Winterhiite des Schicksals.
Engel!: Es ware ein Platz, den wir nicht wissen, und dorten,
auf unsaglichem Teppich, zeigten die Liebenden, die's hier
his zum Konnen nie bringen, ihre kiihnen
hohen Figuren des Herzschwungs,
Duino Elegies: The Fifth Elegy • 39
where they still never could, where they still
fell apart like mating animals
poorly paired;
where weights are still heavy,
where their hoops still
totter away from their
futile twirling sticks ... ?
And suddenly, in this tiresome nowhere, suddenly
in this indescribable place where the pure Too-Little
mysteriously changes - springs around
into an empty Too-Much.
Where the staggering bill
adds up to zero.
Squares, 0 square in Paris, endless showplace,
where the modiste, Madame Lamort,
twists and winds the restless ways of the world,
those endless ribbons, and from them designs
new bows, frills, flowers, cockades, artificial
fruit - all cheaply dyed - for the paltry
winter hats of fate.
Angel; if there were a place we know nothing about,
and there, on some ineffable carpet, lovers revealed
everything that's impossible here: the daring
patterns of their high-flying hearts,
[80]
[85]
[90]
[95]
40 • Dui1U!ser Elegien: Die Funfte Elegie
[1001 ihre Tiirme aus Lust, ihre
langst, wo Boden nie war, nur an einander
lehnenden Leitem, be bend, - und konntens,
vor den Zuschauem rings, unzahligen lautlosen Toten:
Wiirfen die dann ihre letzten, immer ersparten,
[105] immer verborgenen, die wir nkht kennen, ewig
giiltigen Miinzen des Gliicks vor das endlich
wahrhaft lachelnde Paar auf gestilltem
[108] Teppich?
..
Duino Elegies: The Fifth Elegy· 41
their pyramids of passion, their ladders leaning [100]
long, only on each other, where there was never
any ground, trembling - and if they could, in front
of those rings of spectators, the countless silent dead:
Would they throw their last, always hoarded,
always hidden, unknown to us, forever valid [105]
coins of happiness for that couple whose smile
was genuine at last, out there on that calmed
carpet? [108]
42 • Duineser Elegien: Die Sechste Elegie
DIE SECHSTE ELEGIE
Feigenbaum, seit wie lange schon ists mir bedeutend,
wie du die BUite beinah ganz iiberschlagst
und hinein in die zeitig entschlossene Frucht,
ungeruhmt, drangst dein reines Geheimnis.
[5] Wie der Fontane Rohr treibt dein gebognes Gezweig
abwarts den Saft und hinan: und er springt aus dem Schlaf,
fast nkht erwachend, ins GlUck seiner suBesten Leistung.
Sich: wie der Gott in den Schwan .
. . . Wir aber verweilen,
[10] ach, uns nlhmt es zu bliihn, und ins verspiitete Innre
unserer endlkhen Frucht gehn wir verraten hinein.
Wenigen steigt so stark der Andrang des Handelns,
daB sie schon anstehn und gHihn in der Fiille des Hcrzens,
wenn die Verfiihrung zum Bliihn wie gelinderte Nachtluft
[15] ihnen die Jugend des Munds, ihnen die Lider beriihrt:
HeIden vielleicht und den friihe Hinuberbestimmten,
denen der gartnernde Tod anders die Adern verbiegt.
Diese stiirzen dahin: dem eigenen Uicheln
sind sie voran, wie das Rossegcspann in den milden
[20J muldigen Bildem von Karnak dem siegenden Konig.
Wunderlich nah ist der Held doch den jugendlich Toten.
Dauern
ficht ihn nicht an. Sein Aufgang ist Dasein; bestandig
nimmt er sich fort und tritt ins veranderte Sternbild
seiner steten Gefahr. Dort fanden ihn wenige. Aber,
[25] das uns finster verschweigt, das plotzlich begeisterte
Schicksal
Duino Elegies: The Sixth Elegy • 43
THE SIXTH ELEGY
Fig tree, you've been so meaningful to me so long -
the way you almost completely neglect to bloom
and then, without fanfare, pour your purest
secret into the season's determined fruit.
Your arched branches drive the sap up and down [5]
like a fountain's pipe; hardly awake, it leaps out of
sleep into the ecstasy of its sweetest accomplishment.
Sec, like the god into the swan ...
But we linger;
oh, we glory in our flowering, and so we come to [10]
the retarded core of our last fruit already betrayed.
In a few the surge of action rises so strongly that,
when the temptation to bloom touches the youth
of their mouths, of their eyelids, like gentle night air,
they're already standing and glowing with full hearts; [15]
only in heroes, perhaps, and in those destined to die young,
those in whom death the gardener has twisted the veins
differently. They plunge ahead of their own laughter
like the team of horses in front of the lovingly
chiseled reliefs of the conquering King at Karnak. [20]
The hero strangely resembles those who die young.
Survival
doesn't concern him. His rising is his Being. Time and
again
he takes off and charges into the changed constellation
of his constant danger. Only a few find him there. But
hiding the rest of us in darkness, suddenly infatuated, [25]
44 • Duineser Elegien: Die Sechste Elegje
singt ihn hinein in den Stunn seiner aufrauschenden Welt.
Hor kh doch keinen wie ihn. Auf einmal durchgeht mich
mit der stromenden Luft sein verdunkelter Ton.
Dann, wie verbarg ich mich gem vor der Sehnsucht:
o war ich,
[30] war ich ein Knabe und durft es noch werden und siifse
in die kunftigen Arme gestiitzt und lase von Simson,
wie seine Mutter erst nichts und dann alles gchar.
War er nicht Held schon in dir, 0 Mutter, begann nicht
dort schon, in dir, seine herrische Auswahl?
[35] Tausende brauten im SchoolS und wollten er sein,
aber sieh: er ergriff und lieB aus -, wilhIte und konnte.
Und wenn er Saulen zerstieB, so wars, da er ausbrach
aus der Welt deines Leibs in die engere Welt, wo er weiter
wilhIte und konnte. 0 Mutter der HeIden, 0 Ursprung
[40J reiBender Strome! Ihr SchJuchten, in die sich
hoch von dem Herzrand, klagend,
schon die Madchen gestiirzt, kiinftig die Opfer dem
Sohn.
Denn hinstiirmte der Held durch Aufenthalte der
Liebe,
jeder hob ihn hinaus, jeder ihn meinende HerzschIag,
[45] abgewendet schon, stand er am Ende der Lacheln, -
anders .

Duino Elegies: The Sixth Elegy • 45
fate sings him into the storm of its roaring world.
I don't hear anyone like him. All of a sudden, carried
by the streaming air, his dark song rushes through me.
Then how I'd like to hide from this longing. Oh I wish,
I wish it were still to come, and I was a boy sitting [30]
propped up on my future arms, reading about Samson,
how at first his mother bore nothing, then everything.
o mother, wac;n't he already a hero inside you;
didn't his powerful choice begin there inside you?
Thousands fermented in that womb and wanted to be him. [35]
But see: he seized and rejected, chose and could.
And if he demolished columns, it was when he tore out
of your belly's world into this more constricted world
where he went on choosing and doing. 0 mothers
of heroes, 0 sources of raging rivers! Gorges [40]
where wailing virgins have already leapt from
the heart's high rim, future sacrifices to the son.
For whenever the hero stormed through love's stops,
each heartbeat meant for him carried him farther.
Already turning around, he stood at the end of smiles,
someone else. [45]
46 • Duineser Elegien: Die Siebente Elegie
DIE SIEBENTE ELEGIE
Werbung nieitt mehr, nicht Werbung, entwachscne Stimme,
sei deines Schreies Natur; zwar schriccst du rein wie der
Vogel,
wenn ihn die Jahreszeit aufhebt, die steigende, beinah
vergessend,
daB er ein kiimmerndes Tier und nieht nur cin einzelnes
Herz sei,
[5] das sie ins Heitere wirft, in die innigen Himmel. Wie er, so
wiirbest du wohl, nicht minder - , daB, noch unsiehtbar,
dieh die Freundin erfiihr, die stille, in der eine Antwort
langsam erwacht und iiber dem horen sich anwarmt, -
deinem erkiihnten GefiihI die ergliihte Gefiihlin.
[10] 0 und der Friihling begriffe - , da ist keine Stelle,
die nicht triige den Ton der Verkiindigung. Erst jenen
kIeinen
fragenden Aufiaut, den, mit steigernder Stille,
weithin umschweigt ein reiner bejahender Tag.
Dann die Stufen hi nan, Ruf-Stufen hinan, zum getraumten
[151 Tempel der Zukunft - ; dann den TriIler, FonHine,
die zu dem drangenden Strahl schon das Fallen
zuvornimmt
im versprechlichen Spiel ... Und vor sieh, den Sommer.
Nicht nur die Morgen allc des Sommers - , nicht nur
wie sie sich wandeln in Tag und strahlen vor Angang.
[20] Nicht nur die Tage, die zart sind urn Blumen, und oben,
um die gestalteten Baume, stark und gewaltig.
Duino Elegies: The Seventh Elegy • 47
THE SEVENTH ELEGY
No more wooing! Voice, you've outgrown wooing; it won't
be
the reason for your cry anymore, even if you cried dear as
a bird when the soaring season lifts him, almost forgetting
he's an anxious creature, and not just a single heart
she's tossing toward brightness, into the intimate blue. [5]
Just like him, you'd be courting some still invisible,
still silent lover, a mate whose reply was slowly waking
and warming itself while she listened - the glowing
reflection of your own fired feeling.
And, oh, Spring would understand - the music [10]
of your annunciation would echo everywhere.
First that tiny swell of questioning surrounded by
the purely affirmative day's magnifying stillness.
Then the calling-intervals, the rising steps up
to the future's dreamed-of temple; then the trill, [15]
the fountain whose rising jet's already lured into
falling by the promise of play ... And ahead of it, summer.
Not only all of summer's dawns, not only
the way they tum into day and shine before beginning.
Not only the days, so delicate around flowers, above, [20]
around the molded trees, so heavy and strong.
48 • Duineser Elegien: Die Siebente Elegie
Nicht nur die Andacht dieser entfalteten Krafte,
nicht nur die Wege, nicht nur die Wiesen im Abend,
nicht nur, nach spatem Gewitter, das ahnende Klarsein,
[25] nicht nur der nahende xhlaf und ein Ahnen, abends ...
sondern die Nachte! Sondern die hohen, des Sommers,
Nachte, sondern die Sterne, die Sterne der Erde.
o einst tot sein und sie wissen unendlich,
alle die Sterne: denn wie, wie, wie sie vergessen!
[30] Siehe, da rief ich die Liebende. Aber nicht sit nur
kame ... Es kamen aus schwachlichen Grabern
Madchen und standen . .. Denn, wie beschrlink ich,
wie, den gerufenen Ruf? Die Versunkenen suchen
immer noch Erde. - Ihr Kinder, ein hiesig
[35J einmal ergriffenes Ding galte fur viele.
Glaubt nicht, Schicksal sei mehr, als das Dichte der
Kindheit;
wie iiberholtet ihr oft den Geliebten, atmend,
atmend nach seligem Lauf, auf nichts zu, ins Freie.
Hiersein ist herrlich. Ihr wugtet es, Madchen, ihr auch,
[40] die ihr scheinbar entbehrtet, versankt - , ihr, in den
argsten
Gassen der Stadte, Schwarende, oder dem AbfaH
Offene. Denn eine Stunde war je<ier, vielleicht nicht
ganz eine Stunde, ein mit den Magen der Zeit kaum
MeSliches zwischen zwei Weilen - , da sie ein Dasein
[45] hatte. Alles. Die Adem voll Dasein.
Nur, wir vergessen so leicht, was der lachende Nachbar
uns nicht bestlitigt oder beneidet. Sichtbar
Duino Elegies: The Seventh Elegy· 49
Not only the reverence of these unleashed forces,
not only the paths, not only the evening meadows,
not only the breathing freshness after late thunder,
not only the coming of sleep and a premonition [25]
at night - but also the nights! the high summer nights,
the nights and the stars, the stars of the earth.
Oh, to be dead at last and know all the stars,
forever! Then how, how, how could you forget them!
Look, I've been calling a lover. But she wouldn't come [30]
alone . .. Other girls would rise out
of those crumbling graves and stand .. , How could I
limit the call I'd made? The lost are always searching
for the earth again. - Children, just one thing
of this world suddenly understood is valid for many. [35]
Never think destiny's more than the substrate of childhood;
how often you'd catch up with a lover, panting, panting
from the happy chase, into the open, forever.
Life is glorious here. You girls knew it, even you
who seem to have gone without it - you who sank under [40]
in the cities' vilest streets festering like open sewers.
For there was one hour for each of you, maybe
less than an hour, some span between two whiles
that can hardly be measured, when you possessed Being.
All. Your veins swelled with existence. [45]
But we forget so easily what our laughing neighbor
neither confirms nor envies. We want to make it
50 • Duineser Elegien: Die Siebente Elegie
wollen wirs heben, wo doch das sichtbarste GlUck uns
erst zu erkennen sich giebt, wenn wir es innen verwandeln.
[SO] Nirgends, Geliebte, wird Welt sein, als innen. Unser
Leben geht hin mit Verwandlung. Und immer geringer
schwindet das AuBen. Wo einmal ein dauerndes Haus war,
schlagt sich erdachtes Gebild vor, quer, zu Erdenklichem
vollig gehorig, als stand es noch ganz im Gehirne.
[55] Weite Speicher der Kraft schafft sich dec Zeitgeist,
gestaltlos
wie der spannende Orang, den er aus aHem gewinnt.
Tempel kennt er nicht mehr. Diese, des Herzens,
Verschwend ung
sparen wir heimlicher ein. Ja, wo noch eins ubersteht,
ein einst gebetetes Ding, ein gedientes, geknietes -,
[60] halt es sieh, so wie cs ist, schon ins Unsichtbare hin.
Viele gewahrens nicht mehr, doch ohne den VorteH,
daB sie's nun innerlich baun, mit pfeHern und Statuen,
groBer!
Jede dumpfe Umkehr der Welt hat solche Enterbte,
denen das Friihere nicht und noch nicht das Nachste
gehort.
[65J Denn auch das Nachste ist weit fur die Menschen. Uns soli
dies nicht verwirren; es starke in uns die Bewahrung
der noch erkannten Gestalt. - Dies stand einmal unter
Menschen,
mitten im Schicksal stands, im vernichtenden, mitten
im Nichtwissen-Wohin stand es, wic seiend, und bog
[70] Sterne zu sich aus gesicherten Himmeln. Engel,
Duino Elegies: The Seventh Elegy • 51
visible, even though the most visible joy reveals
itself to us only when we've transformed it, within.
Love, the World exists nowhere but within.
Our life is lived in transformation. And, diminishing,
the outer world vanishes. Where a sturdy house
once stood, a fantastic structure rises into view, as much
at ease among concepts as if it still stood in the brain.
[50]
The Zeitgeist builds huge warehouses of power, formless [55]
as the straining urge from which it draws all else.
Temples it can't recognize anymore. Now we're saving
these extravagances of the heart secretly. Yes, even where
one single thing that was prayed to, served, and knelt to
once, survives, it endures just as it is, in the invisible. [60]
Many don't see it anymore and miss the chance to build it
again,
complete with pillars and statues, greater than ever, within.
Each slow turn of the world carries such disinherited
ones to whom neither the past nor the future belongs.
For even the immediate future is far from mankind. This [65]
shouldn't confuse us; no, it should commit us to preserve
the fonn we still can recognize. This stood among men,
once, stood in the middle of fate, the annihilator, stood
in the middle of Not-Knowing-Where-To, as if it existed,
and it pulled down stars from the safe heaven toward it. [70]
52 • Duineser Elegien: Die Siebente Elegie
dir noch zeig ich es, da! in deinem Anschaun
steh es gcrettet zuletzt, nun endlich aufrecht.
SauIen, Pylonc, der Sphinx, das strebende Stemmen,
grau aus vergchender Stadt oder aus fremder, des Doms.
[75J War es nicht Wunder? 0 staune, Engel, denn wir sinds,
wir, 0 du GroBer, erzahls, daB wir solches vermochten,
mein Atem
reicht rur die Riihmung nicht aus. So haben wir dennoch
nicht die Riiume versaumt, diese gewiihrenden, diese
unseren Riiumc. (Was miissen sie fiirchterlich groB sein,
[SO] da sie Jahrtausende nicht unseres Fiihlns iiberfiilln.)
Aber ein Turm war groB, nicht wahr? 0 Engel, er war
es,-
groB, auch noch ncben dir? Chartres war groB - , und
Musik
rekhte noch weiter hinan und iiberstieg uns. Doch selbst
nur
eine Liebende - I oh, allein am nachtlichen Fenster ...
[85] reichte sie dir nicht ans Knie - ?
Glaub nicht, daB ich werbe.
Engel, und wiirb ich dich auch! Du kommst nicht.
Denn mein
Anruf ist immer voU Hinweg; wider so starke
Stromung kannst du nicht schreiren. Wie cin gestreckter
[90] Arm ist mein Rufen. Und seine zum Greifen
oben offene Hand bleibt vor dir
offen, wie Abwehr und Warnung,
[93] UnfaBlicher, weitauf.
..
Duino Elegies: The Seventh Elegy • 53
Angel, 111 show it to you yet. There! At last
it shall stand straight, finally redeemed in your eyes.
Pillars, pylons, the Sphinx, the cathedral's striving
gray thrust out of its crumbling or alien city.
Wasn't it a miracle? Oh, Angel, marvel. That's us, [75]
us, 0 great one. Tell them that's what we could do.
My breath's too short for its praise. So, then, we
haven't failed to use these generous spaces, our
spaces. (How frighteningly huge they must be, still
not overpopulated with our feelings after thousands of
years.) [SO]
But one tower was great, wasn't it? 0 Angel, it was -
great, even when compared with you. Chartres was great-
and music soared even higher, soared far beyond us. But,
oh, even a lover, alone at the window at night ...
doesn't she reach your knee? [85]
Don't think I'm wooing you!
And, Angel, even if 1 were, you wouldn't come.
Because my call is always full of "Get away!" You
can't advance against such a powerful current. My call
is like an outstretched arm. And its clutching, upturned [90]
open hand, a defense and
a warning, is always in front of you,
up there, incomprehensible. [93]
54 • Duineser Elegien: Die Achte Elegie
DIE ACHTE ELEG IE
Rudolf Kassner zugeeigllet
Mit allen Augen sieht die Kreatur
das Offene. Nur unsre Augen sind
wie wngekehrt und ganz urn sie gestellt
als Fallen, rings urn ihren freien Ausgang.
[5J Was drauBen ist, wir wissens aus des Tiers
Antlitz allein; denn schon das friihe Kind
wenden wir urn und zwingens, daS es riickwarts
Gestaltung sehe, nicht das Offne, das
im Tiergesicht so ticf ist. Frei von Tod.
[10J Ihn sehen wir allein; das freie Tier
hat seinen Untergang stets hinter sich
und vor sich Gott, und wenn es geht, so gehts
in Ewigkeit, so wie die Brunnen gehen.
WiT haben nie, nicht einen einzigen Tag,
[15J den reinen Raum vor uns, in den die Blumen
unendlich aufgehn. Immer ist es Welt
und niemals Nirgends ohne Nicht: das Reine,
Uniiberwachte, das man ahnet und
unendlich weiS und nicht begehrt. Als Kind
[20J verliert sich eins im Stilln an dies und wird
geriittell Oder jener stirbt und ists.
Denn nah am Tod sieht man den Tod nkht mehr
und starrt hinaus, vielleicht mit groBem Tierblick.
Liebende, ware nicht der andre, der
[25] die Sieht verstellt, sind nah daran und staunen ...
Wie aus Versehn ist ihnen aufgetan
Dumo Elegies: The Eighth Elegy • 55
THE EIGHTH ELEGY
Dedicated to Rudolf Kassner
AIl other creatures look into the Open
with their whole eyes. But our eyes,
turned inward, are set all around it like snares,
trapping its way out to freedom.
We know what's out there only from the animal's [5]
face; for we take even the youngest child,
tum him around and force him to look
at the past as formation, not that openness
so deep within an animal's face. Free from death,
we only see it; the free animal [10]
always has its destruction behind
and god ahead, and when it moves,
it moves toward eternity like running springs.
Not for a single day, no, never have we had
that pure space ahead of us, in which flowers [15]
endlessly open. It is always World
and never Nowhere without No:
that pure, unguarded space we breathe,
always know, and never crave. As a child,
one may lose himself in silence and be [20]
shaken out of it. Or one dies and is it.
Once near death, one can't see death anymore
and stares out, maybe with the wide eyes of animals.
If the other weren't there blocking the view,
lovers come close to it and are amazed. . . [25]
It opens up behind the other, almost
56 • Duineser Elegien: Die Achte Elegie
hinter dem andern . .. Aber uber ihn
kommt keiner fort, und wieder wird ihm Welt.
Der Schopfung immer zugewendet, sehn
[30] wir nur auf ihr die Spiegelung des Frein,
von uns verdunkelt. Oder daB ein Tier,
ein stummes, aufschaut, ruhig durch uns durch.
Dieses heiBt Schicksal: gegeniiber sein
und nichts als das und immer gegeniiber.
[35] Ware BewuBtheit unsrer Art in dem
sicheren Tier, das uns entgegenzieht
in anderer Richtung - , riB es uns herum
mit seinem Wandel. Doch sein Sein ist ihm
unendlich, ungefaBt und ohne Blick
[40] auf seinen Zustand, rein, so wie sein Ausblick.
Und wo wir Zukunft sehn, dort sieht es Alles
und sich in AHem und geheilt fiir immer.
Und doch ist in dem wachsam warmen Tier
Gewicht und Sorge einer groBen Schwermut.
[45] Denn ihm auch haftet immer an, was uns
oft iiberwaltigt, - die Erinnerung,
als sei schon einmal das, wonach man drangt,
naher gewesen, treuer und sein AnschluG
unendlich zartlich. Hier ist alles Abstand,
[50] und dort wars Atem. Nach der ersten Heimat
ist ihm die zweite zwitterig und windig.
o Seligkeit der kleinen Kreatur,
die immer bleibt im SchooBe, der sie austrug;
o Gluck der Mucke, die noch innen hupft,
Duino Elegies: The Eighth Elegy • 57
an oversight ... but no one gets past
the other, and the world returns again.
Always facing creation, all we see
is the reflection of the frcc and open
that we've darkened, or some mute animal
raising its calm eyes and seeing through us,
and through us. This is destiny: to be opposites,
always, and nothing else but opposites.
If this sure animal approaching us
from a different direction had our kind
of consciousness, he'd drag us around
in his wake. But to the animal, his being
is infinite, incomprehensible, and blind
to his condition, pure, like his outward gaze.
And where we see the future, he sees
all, himself in all, and whole forever.
And yet the weight and care of one great sadness
lies on this warm and watching creature.
Because what often overwhelms us
also dings to him - the memory
that what we so strive for now may have been
nearer, truer, and its attachment to us
infinitely tender, once. Here all is distance,
there it was breath. After that first home,
the second seems drafty and a hybrid.
Oh, blessed are the tiny creatures
who stay in the womb that bore them forever;
oh the joy of the gnat that can still leap within,
[30]
[35]
[40]
[45]
[50]
58 • Duineser Elegie11: Die Achte Elegie
[55] selbst wenn sie Hochzeit hat: denn SchooB ist Alles.
Und sieh die halbe Sicherheit des Vogels,
der beinah beides weiS aus seinem Ursprung,
als war er eine Seele der Etrusker,
aus einem Toten, den ein Raum empfing,
[60] doch mit der ruhenden Figur als Deckel.
Und wie bestiirzt ist eins, das fliegen mulS
und stammt aus einem SchooK Wie vor sich selbst
erschreckt, durchzuckts die Luft, wie wenn ein Sprung
durch eine Tasse geht. So reiBt die Spur
[65] der Fledermaus durchs Porzellan des Abends.
Und wir: Zuschauer, immer, uberall,
dem allen zugewandt und nie hinaus!
Uns uberfiillts. Wir ordnens. Es zerfalll
Wir ordnens wieder und zerfallen selbst.
[70] Wer hat uns also umgedreht, daB wir,
was wir auch tun, in jener Haltung sind
von einem, welcher fortgeht? Wie er auf
dem letzten Hugel, der ihm ganz sein Tal
noch einmal zeigt, sich wendet, anhalt, weilt - ,
[75] so leben wir und nehmen immer Abschied.
Du;1W Elegies: The Eighth Elegy • 59
even on its wedding day; for the womb is all!
And look at the half-certainty of the bird
almost aware of both from birth,
like one of the Etruscan souls rising
from the dead man enclosed inside the space
for which his reclining figure forms a lid.
And how confused is anything that comes
from a womb and has to fly. As if afraid
of itself, it darts through the air
like a crack through a cup, the way a wing
of a bat crazes the porcelain of night.
And we: spectators, always, everywhere,
looking at everything and never from!
It floods us. We arrange it It decays.
We arrange it again, and we decay.
Who's turned us around like this,
so that whatever we do, we always have
the look of someone going away? Just as a man
on the last hill showing him his whole valley
one last time, turns, and stops, and lingers -
so we live, and are forever leaving.
[55]
[60]
[65]
[70]
[75]
60 • Duineser Elegitn: Die Neunte Elegit
DIE NEUNTE ELEGIE
Warum, wenn es angeht, also die Frist des Daseins
hinzubringen, als Lorbeer, ein wenig dunkler als alles
andere Gnln, mit kleinen Wellen an jedem
Blattrand (wie eines Windes Lacheln) - : warum dann
[5] Menschliches mussen - und, Schicksal vermeidend,
sich sehnen nach Schicksal? ...
Oh, nicht, well Gluck ist,
dieser voreilige Vortell eines nahen Vedusts.
Nicht aus Neugier, oder zur Ubung des Herzens,
[10J das auch im Lorbeer UJiire ...
Aber weil Hiersein viel ist, und wei! uns scheinbar
alles das Hiesige braucht, dieses Schwindende, das
seltsam uns angeht. Uns, die Schwindendsten. Ein Mal
jedes, nur ein Mal. Ein Mal und nichtmehr. Und wir auch
[15] tin Mal. Nie wieder. Aber dieses
ein Mal gewesen zu sem, wenn auch nur ein Mal:
irdisch gewesen zu sein, scheint nieht widerrufbar.
Und so drangen wir uns und wollen es leisten,
wollens enthalten in unsern einfachen Handen,
[20] im uberfiillteren Blick und im sprachlosen Herzen.
Wollen es werden. - Wem es geben? Am liebsten
alles behaIten fUr immer . .. Ach, in den andem Bezug,
wehe, was nimmt man hinuber? Nicht das Anschaun, das
hier
Duino Elegies: The Ninth Elegy • 61
THE NINTH ELEGY
Why, when this short span of being could be spent
like the laurel, a little darker than all
the other green, the edge of each leaf fluted
with small waves (like the wind's smile) - why,
then, do we have to be human and, avoiding fate, [5]
long for fate?
Oh, not because happiness,
that quick profit of impending loss, really exists.
Not out of curiosity, not just to exercise the heart
- that could be in the laurel, too . . . [10]
But because being here means so much, and because all
that's here, vanishing so quickly, seems to need us
and strangely concerns us. Us, to the first to vanish.
Once each, only once. Once and no more. And us too,
once. Never again. But to have been [15]
once, even if only once,
to have been on earth just on.cc - that's irrevocable.
And so we keep on going and try to realize it,
try to hold it in our simple hands, in
our overcrowded eyes, and in our speechless heart. [20]
Try to become it. To give it to whom? We'd rather
keep all of it forever ... Ah, but what can we take across
into that other realm? Not the power to see we've learned
62 • Duineser Elegien: Die Neunte Elegie
langsam erlernte, und kern hier Ereignetes. Keins.
[25J Also die Schmerzen. Also vor aHem das Schwersein,
also der Liebe lange Erfahrung, - also
lauter Unsagliches. Aber spater,
unter den Stemen, was soIls: die sind besser unsaglich.
Bringt doch der Wanderer auch yom Hange des Bergrands
[30J nicht eine Hand voll Erde ins Tal, die Allen unsagliche,
sondern
ein erworbenes Wort, reines, den gelben und blaun
Enzian. Sind wir viel1eicht hier, urn zu sagen: Haus,
Brucke, Brunnen, Tor, Krug, Obstbaurn, Fenster, -
h6chstens: Sauie, Turm ... aber zu sagen, verstehs,
[35] oh zu sagen so, wie seIber die Dinge niemals
innig meinten zu sein. 1st nicht die heimliche List
dieser verschwiegenen Erde, wenn sie die Liebenden
drangt,
daB sich in ihrem Gefiihl jedes und jedes entziickt?
Schwelle: was ists fur zwei
[40] Liebende, daB sie die eigne altere Schwelle der Tiir
ein wenig verbrauchen, auch sie, nach den vielen vorher
und vor den kiinftigen ... , leicht.
Hier ist des Siiglichen Zeit, hier seine Heimat.
Sprich und bekenn. Mehr als je
[45] fallen die Dinge dahin, die erlebbaren, denn,
was sie verdrangend ersetzt, ist ein Tun ohne BUd.
Tun unter Krusten, die willig zerspringen, sobald
innen das Handeln entwachst und sich anders begrenzt.
Zwischen den Hammern besteht
[SO] unser Herz, wie die Zunge
Duino Elegies: The Ninth Elegy • 63
so slowly here, and nothing that's happened here.
Nothing. And so, the pain; above all, the hard [25]
work of living; the long experience of love -
those purely unspeakable things. But later,
under the stars, what then? That's better left unsaid.
For the wanderer doesn't bring a handful of that
unutterable earth from the mountainside down to the valley, [30]
but only some word he's earned, a pure word, the yellow
and blue gentian. Maybe we're here only to say: house,
bridge, well, gate, jug, olive tree, window -
at most, pillar, tower ... but to say them, remember,
oh, to say them in a way that the things themselves [35]
never dreamed of existing so intensely. When this silent
earth urges lovers on, isn't it her secret reason
to make everything shudder with ecstasy in them?
Doorsill: how much it means to a pair of lovers
to wear down the sill of their own [40]
door a little more, them too, after so many
before them, and before all those to come ... gently.
This is the time for what can be said. Here
is its country. Speak and testify. The things
we can live with are falling away more
than ever, replaced by an act without symbol.
An act under crusts that will easily rip
as soon as the energy inside outgrows
them and seeks new limits.
Our heart survives between
[45]
[50]
64 • Duineser Elegien: Die Neunte Elegie
zwischen den Zahnen, die doch,
dennoch, die preisende bleibt.
Preise dem Engel die Welt, nicht die unsagliche, ihm
kannst du nicht groBtun mit herrlich Erfiihltem; im Wcltall,
[55] wo cr fiihlender fiihlt, bist du ein Neuling. Drum zeig
ihm das Einfache, das, von Geschlecht zu Geschlechtern
gestaltet,
als ein Unsriges lebt, neben der Hand und im Blick.
Sag ihm die Dinge. Er wird staunender stehn; wic du
standcst
bei dem Seiler in Rom, oder beim Topfer am Nil.
[60J Zeig ihm, wie gliicklich ein Ding sein kann, wic schuldlos
und unser,
wie selbst das klagende Leid rein zur Gestalt sich
entschlieBt,
dient als em Ding, oder stirbt in ein Ding -, und jenseits
selig der Geige entgeht. - Und diese, von Hingang
lebenden Dinge verstehn, daIS du sie riihmst; verganglich,
[65] traun sie ein Rettendes uns, den Verganglichsten, zu.
Wollen, wir sollen sie ganz im unsichtbarn Herzen
verwandeln
in - 0 unendlich - in uns! Wer wir am Ende auch seien.
Erde, ist cs nicht dies, was du willst unsichtbar
in uns erstehn? - 1st cs dein Traum nicht,
[70] einmal unsichtbar zu sein? - Erde! unsichtbar!
Was, wenn Verwandlung nicht, ist dein drangender
Auf trag?
Erde, du liebe, ich will. Oh glaub, es bediirfte
Duino Elegies: The Ninth Elegy • 65
hammers, just as the tongue between
the teeth is still able to praise.
Praise the world to the angel, not what can't be talked
about.
You can't impress him with your grand emotions. In the
cosmos
where he so intensely feels, you're just a novice. So show [55]
him some simple thing shaped for generation after
generation
until it lives in our hands and in our eyes, and it's ours.
TeU him about things. He'll stand amazed, just as you did
beside the ropemaker in Rome or the potter on the Nile.
Show him how happy a thing can be, how innocent and
ours; [60]
how even grief's lament purely determines its own shape,
serves as a thing, or dies in a thing - and escapes
in ecstasy beyond the violin. And these things, whose lives
are lived in leaving - they understand when you praise
them.
Perishing, they tum to us, the most perishable, for help. [65]
They want us to change them completely in our invisible
hearts,
oh - forever - into us! Whoever we finally may be.
Earth, isn't this what you want: to resurrect
in us invisibly? Isn't it your dream
to be invisible one day? Earth! Invisible! [70]
What's your urgent charge, if not transformation?
Earth, my love, I will. Oh, believe me, you don't
66 • Duineser Elegien: Die Neunte Elegie
nicht deiner Friihlinge mehr, mich dir zu gewinnen -,
einer,
ach, ein einziger ist schon dem Blute zu viel.
[75] Namenlos bin ich zu dir entschlossen, von weit her.
lmmer warst du im Recht, und dein heiliger Einfall
ist der vertrauliche Tod.
Siehe, ich lebe. Woraus? Weder Kindheit noch Zukunft
werden weniger . .. Oberzahliges Dasein
[SOJ entspringt mir im Herzen.
Duino Elegies: The Ninth Elegy • 67
need your Springs to win me anymore - one,
oh, one's already too much for my blood.
I'm silently determined to be YOUTS, from now on.
You were always right, and your most sacred
idea is death, that intimate friend.
Look, I'm alive. On what? Neither childhood nor
the future grows less . .. More being than I'll ever
need springs up in my heart.
[75]
[80]
68 • Duineser Elegien: Die Zeh"te Elegie
DIE ZEHNTE ELEGIE
Dass kh dereinst, an dem Ausgang der grimmigen Einsicht,
JubeI und Ruhm aufsinge zustimmenden Engeln.
DaB von den klar geschlagenen Hammem des Herzens
keiner versage an weichen, zweifelnden oder
[5] rciBenden Saiten. OafS mich mein stromendes Antlitz
gllinzender mac he; daB das unscheinbare Weinen
blUhe. 0 wie werdet ihr dann, Nachte, mir lieb sein,
geharmte. DaB ich euch knieender nicht, untrostliche
Schwestem,
hinnahm, nicht in euer gelOstes
[10] Haar mich geIOster ergab. Wir, Vergeuder der Schmerzen.
Wie wir sie absehn voraus, in die traurige Dauer,
ob sie nicht enden vieI1eicht. Sie aber sind ja
unser winterwahriges Laub, unser dunkeles Sinngriin,
eine der Zeiten des heimlichen Jahres -, nicht nur
[15J Zeit -, sind Stelle, Siedelung, Lager, Boden, Wohnort.
Freilich, wehe, wie fremd sind die Gassen der Leid-Stadt,
wo in der falschen, aus Obertonung gemachten
Stille, stark, aus der GuBform des Leeren der AusguB
prahlt: der vergoldete Uinn, das platzende Denkma!.
(2OJ 0, wie spurios zertrate ein Engel ihnen den Trostmarkt,
den die Kirche begrenzt, ihre fertig gekaufte:
reinlich und zu und enttauscht wie ein Postamt am
Sonntag.
Drau1Sen aber krauseln sich immer die Rander von
Jahrmarkt.
Duino Elegies: The Tenth Elegy • 69
THE TENTH ELEGY
One day, when this terrifying vision's vanished,
let me sing ecstatic praise to angels saying yes!
Let my heart's clear-struck keys ring and not one
fail because of a doubting, slack, or breaking string.
Let my streaming face make me more radiant, [5]
my tiny tears bloom. And then how dear
you'll be to me, you nights of anguish.
Sisters of despair, why didn't I kneel lower
to receive you, surrender myself more loosely
into your flowing hair. We waste our sufferings. [10]
We stare into that boring endurance beyond them
looking for their end. But they're nothing more
than our winter trees, our dark evergreen, one
of the seasons in our secret years - not just a season,
but a place, a settlement, a camp, soil, a home. [15]
But, oh, how strange the streets of the City of Pain
really are. In the seeming silence of noise against noise,
violent, like something cast from a mold of the Void,
the glittering confusion, the collapsing monument swaggers.
Oh, how an angel could stamp out their market of comforts, [20]
with the church nearby, bought ready-made, clean,
shut, and disappointed as a post office on Sunday.
But on the outskirts there's always the fair's spinning rim.
70 • Duineser Elegien: Die Zehnte Elegie
Schaukeln der Freiheit! Taucher und Gaukler des Eifers!
[25J Und des behiibschten GlUcks figiirliche SchieBstatt,
wo es zap pelt von Ziel und sich blechem benimmt,
wenn ein Geschkkterer trifft. Von Beifall zu Zufall
taumelt er weiter; denn Buden jeglicher Neugier
werben, trommeln und pliirrn. Fur Erwachsene aber
[30J ist noch besonders zu sehn, wie das Geld sich vermehrt,
anatomisch,
nicht zur Belustigung nur: der Geschlechtsteil des Gelds,
alles, das Ganze, der Vorgang -, das unterrichtet und
macht
fruchtbar ...
. . . Oh aber gleich dariiber hinaus,
[35] hinter der letzten Planke, beklebt mit Plakaten des
» Todlos«,
jenes bitteren Biers, das den Trinkenden siiS scheint,
wenn sie immer dazu frische Zerstreuungen kaun ... ,
gleich im Riicken der Planke, gleich dahinter, ists
wirklich.
Kinder spielen, und Liebende halten einander, - abseits,
[40J ernst, im armlichen Gras, und Hunde haben Natur.
We iter noch zieht es den Jiingling; vielleicht, daf5 er eine
junge
Klage liebt . .. Hinter ihr her kommt er in Wiesen. Sie
sagt:
- Weit. Wir wohnen dort drauBen ...
Wo? Und der Jiingling
[45] folgt. Ihn riihrt ihre Haltung. Die Schulter, der Hals -,
vielleicht
ist sie von herrlicher Herkunft. Aber er laSt sie, kehrt um
Dui110 Elegies: The Tenth Elegy • 71
Swings of freedom! High-divers and jugglers of excitement!
And the lifelike shooting galleries of garish luck: [25]
targets tumbling off the rack to the ring of tin
when a good-shot hits one. He reels through applause
toward more lock; booths that can tempt the queerest
tastes are drumming and barking. For adults only
there's something special to see: coins copulating, [30]
not just acting, but actually, their gold genitals, every
thing, the whole operation - educational and guaranteed
to arouse you . . .
Oh, but just outside, behind
the last billboards plastered with posters of "Deathless," [35]
the bitter beer so sweet to those who drink it
while chewing on plenty of fresh distractions-
just behind the billboards, right behind them, the real.
Children are playing. to one side lovers are holding each
other,
earnest in the thinning grass, and dogs are doing nature's
bidding. [40]
The young man walks farther on. Maybe he's in love with
a young
Lament. .. He follows her into the fields. She says:
"It's far. We Jive out there."
Where? And the young man
follows. He's moved by her ways: her shoulders, her
neck - [45]
maybe she comes from a noble family. But he leaves her,
turns back,
72 • Duineser Elegien: Die Zehnte Eiegie
wendet sich, winkt ... Was so11s? Sie ist eine Klage.
Nur die jungen Toten, im ersten Zustand
zeitlosen Gleichmuts, dem der Entwohnung,
[SO] folgen ihr liebend. Madchen
wartet sie ab und befreundet sie. Zeigt ihnen leise,
was sie an sich hat. Perlen des Leids und die feinen
Schleier der Duldung. - Mit Jiinglingen geht sie
schweigend.
[55] Aber dort, wo sie wohnen, im Tal, der Alteren eine, der
Klagen,
nimmt sich des Jiinglinges an, wenn er fragt: - Wir
waren,
sagt sie, em GroBes Geschlecht, einrnal, wir Klagen. Die
Vater
trieben den Bergbau dort in dem groBen Gebirg; bei
Menschen
findest du manchmal ein Stiick geschliffenes Ur-Leid
[60J oder, aus altern Vuikan, schlackig versteinerten Zorn.
Ja, das stamrnte von dort. Einst waren wir reich. -
Und sie leitet ihn leicht durch die weite Landschaft der
Klagen,
zeigt ihm die Saulen der Tempel oder die Triimmer
jener Burgen, von wo Klage-Fiirsten das Land
[65] emstens weise beherrscht. Zeigt mm die hohen
Tranenbaume und Felder bliihender Wehmut,
(Lebendige kennen sie nur als sanftes 8Iattwerk);
zeigt ihm die Tiere der Trauer, weidend, - und manchmal
Duino Elegies: The Tenth Elegy • 73
looks around, waves ... What's the use? She's only a
Lament.
Only those who die young, those in their first
moments of timeless serenity, just being weaned,
follow her lovingly. She waits for girls [50]
and befriends them. Gently she shows them
what she's wearing: pearls of pain
and the fine-spun veils of patience.
With young men she walks silently.
But there, in the valley where they live, one of the older [55]
Laments listens to the young man's questions. She says:
"We were a great clan, once, we Laments. Our fathers
worked the mines in that mountain range. Sometimes
you'll find a polished lump of ancient sorrow among men,
or petrified rage from the slag of some old volcano. [60]
Yes, that came from there. We used to be rich."
And she gently guides him through the immense Land
of Lamentation, showing him columns of temples or ruins
of the castles where the Lords of Lament wisely ruled
the country long ago. She shows him the tall trees [65]
of tears, the flowering fields of sadness
(the living know them only as tender leaves);
she shows him herds of pasturing grief; and sometimes
74 • Duineser Elegitm: Die Zehnte Elegie
schreckt ein Vogel und zieht, flach ihnen fliegend durchs
Aufschaun,
[70] weithin das schriftliche Bild seines vereinsamten
Schreis. -
Abends flihrt sie ihn hin zu den Grabern der Alten
aus dem Klagc-Gesch1echt, den Sibyllen und Warn-Herrn.
Naht aber Nacht, so wandeln sie leiser, unci bald
mondets empor, das liber Alles
[75] wachende Grab-Mal. Briiderlich jenem am Nil,
der erhabene Sphinx - : der verschwiegenen Kammer
Antlitz.
Und sie staunen dem kronlichen Haupt, das rur immer,
schweigend, der Menschen Gesicht
[80] auf die Waage der Sterne gelegt.
Nicht erfaSt es sein Blick, im Frlihtod
schwindelnd. Aber ihr Schaun,
hinter dem Pschent-Rand hervor, scheucht es die Eule.
Und sie,
streifend im langsamen Abstrich die Wange entlang,
[85] jene der reifesten Rundung,
zeichnet weich in das neue
Totengehor, liber ein doppelt
aufgeschlagenes Blatt, den unbeschreiblichen UmriB.
Und hoher, die Sterne. Neue. Die Sterne des Leidlancls.
[90] Langsam nennt sie die Klage: - Hier,
siehe: den Reiter, den Stab, und das vollere Sternbild
nennen sic: Fruchtkranz. Dann, we iter, dem Pol zu;
Wiege; Weg; Das Brennende Buch; Puppe; Fenster.
Duino Elegies: The Tenth Elegy • 75
a frightened bird flying across their line of vision
scrawls the huge glyph of its desolate cry. [70]
In the evening she leads him to the grave of the elders,
the sybils and prophets of the House of Lamentation.
But as night comes on, they walk more slowly, and soon
the tomb that watches over all rises bright
as moonlight; brother to the one on the Nile, [75J
the stupendous Sphinx: the secret chamber's face.
And they're stunned by the crowned head
that has silently poised
the features of man
on the scale of stars forever. [80J
Still dizzy from just having died, his look
can't take it in. But hers frightens
an owl from behind the double crown's rim.
And with slow, skimming strokes, the bird brushes
the cheek, the one with the fullest curve; [85]
and on the dead's newborn hearing,
as on facing pages of an opened book,
he faintly traces the indescribable outline.
And higher, the stars. New ones. Stars of the Land
of Grief. The Lament slowly names them: "Look, there: [90]
the Rider, the Staff, and they call that bigger
constellation Garland of Fruit. Then farther toward
the Pole: Cradle, Road, The Burning Book, Doll, Window.
76 • Duineser Elegien: Die Zehnte Elegie
Aber im sudlkhen Himmel, rein wie Un Innern
[95] einer gesegneten Hand, das klar ergHinzende »M «,
das die Mutter bedeutet ... -
Doch der Tote mug fort, und schweigend bringt ihn die
altere
Klage bis an die Talschlucht,
wo es schimmert im Mondschein:
[100] die QueUe der Freude. In Ehrfurcht
nennt sie sic, sagt: - Bei den Menschen
ist sie ein tragender Strom. -
Stehn am Fug des Gebirgs.
Und da umarmt sie ihn, weinend.
[105] Einsam steigt er dahin, in die Berge des Ur-Leids.
Und nkht emmal sein Schritt klingt aus dem tonlosen Los.
Aber erweckten sie uns, die unendlich Toten, ein Glekhnis,
siehe, sie zeigten vielleicht auf die Katzchen der leeren
Hasel, die hangenden, oder
[110] meinten den Regen, der fallt auf dunkles Erdreich Un
Friihjahr. -
Und wir, die an steigendes GlUck
denken, empfanden die RUhrung,
die uns beinah besturzt,
[114] wenn ein Glucklkhes fiillt.
Duino Elegies: The Tenth Elegy • 77
But in the southern sky, pure as the palm
of a consecrated hand, the bright shining M - (95]
that stands for Mothers . . ."
But the dead must go on, and silently
the old Lament brings him as far as
the gorge, where it shines in moonlight:
the source of joy. Naming it (100]
reverently, she says: "It is
an enduring stream among men."
They stand at the foot of the mountains.
And there she embraces him, weeping.
He climbs the mountains of primal pain alone. [105]
And not once does his step ring from that mute fate.
Yet, if those forever dead were waking an image
in us, look, they might point to the catkins
hanging from the empty hazels, or maybe mean
the rain falling on the dark earth in early spring. [110]
And we, who have always thought of joy
as rising, would feel the emotion
that almost amazes us
when a happy thing fulls. [114]
..
TbesONNETS
TOORpbEUS
for Daphne
Und wenn dich das Irdische vergass,
zu der stillen Erde sag: Ich rinne.
Zu dem raschen Wasser sprich: Ich bin.
DIE SONETTE AN ORPHEUS
Geschrieben als ein Grab-mal
{iir Wera Ouckama Knoop
THE SONNETS TO ORPHEUS
Written as a monument
for Wera Ouckama Knoop
FIRST SERIES
84 • Die Sonette an Orpheus: Erster Teil
1
Da stieg ein Baum. 0 reine Obersteigung!
o Orpheus singt! 0 hoher Baum im Ohr!
Und alles schwieg. Doch selbst in der Verschweigung
ging neuer Anfang. Wink und Wandlung vor.
Tiere aus Stille drangen aus dem klaren
gelOsten Wald von Lager und Genist;
und da ergab sieh, dass sie nicht aus List
und nicht aus Angst in sich so leise waren,
sondern aus Horen. Briillen, Schrei, Gerohr
schien klein in ihren Herzen. Und wo eben
kaum eine Hiitte war, dies zu empfangen,
ein Unterschlupf aus dunkelstem Verlangen
mit einem Zugang, dessen Pfosten beben, -
da schufst du ihnen Tempel im Gehor.
*
The Sonnets to Orpheus: First Series • 85
1
A tree sprang up. 0 sheer transcendence!
o Orpheus sings! 0 tall tree in the ear!
And all was still. But even in that silence
a new beginning. hint, and change appeared.
Creatures of silence crowded out of the clear
freed forest, out of their dens and lairs;
and it was clear that inner silence of theirs
wasn't out of any cunning. any fear,
but out of listening. Growl, shriek, and roar
shrank in their hearts. And where there'd been
hardly a hut before to take this in,
a dugout carved from their darkest desire
with a lintel of trembling timber -
you erected temples for them in their inner ear .

86 • Die Sonette an Orpheus: Erster Teil
2
Und fast ein Madchen wars und ging hervor
aus diesem einigen Gluck von Sang und Leier
und gUinzte klar durch ihre Fruhlingsschleier
und machte skh ein Bett in meinem Ohr.
Und schlief in mir. Vnd alles war ihr Schlaf.
Die Baume, die ich je bewundert, diese
fiihlbare Ferne, die gefiihlte Wiese
und jedes Staunen, das mich selbst betraf.
Sie schlief die Welt. Singender Gott, wie hast
du sie vollendet, dass sie nicht begehrte,
erst wach zu sein? Sieh, sie erstand und schlief.
Wo ist ihr Tod? 0, wirst du dies Motiv
erfinden noch, eh sich dein Lied verzehrte?-
Wo sinkt sie hin aus mir? . .. Ein Madchen fast.
The Sannets to Orpheus: First Series • 87
2
And yet barely a girl, and leaping
out of this happy harmony of song and lyre,
and shining clearly through her veils of Spring,
and made herself a bed inside my ear.
And slept in me. And her sleep was all.
The trees I always marveled at, those
palpable distances, the felt meadows,
and every mystery that filled me with awe.
She slept the world. How did you perfect
her, singing god, so that she didn't crave
to be awake first? See, she arose and slept.
Where is her death? Oh, will you invent the leit
motif before your song sings its own grave?
Where does she shrink to from me ... ? barely a girl yet ...

88 • Die Sonette an Orpheus: Erster Ted
3
Ein Gott vetmags. Wie aber, sag mir, soIl
ein Mann ihm tolgen durch die schmale Leier?
Sein Sinn ist Zwiespalt. An der Kreuzung zweier
Herzwege steht kein Tempel fur Apoll.
Gesang, wie du ihn lehrst, ist nicht Begehr,
nicht Werbung urn ein endlich noch Erreichtes;
Gesang ist Dasein. Fur den Gott ein Leichtes.
Wann aber sind wir? Und wann wendet er
an unser Sein die Erde und die Sterne?
Dies ists nicht, Jungling, dass du liebst, wenn auch
die Stimme dann den Mund dir aufstosst, -Ierne
vergessen dass du aufsangst. Dass verrinnt.
In Wahrheit singen, ist ein andrer Hauch.
Ein Hauch urn nichts. Ein Wehn im Gott. Ein Wind.
The Sonnets to Orpheus: First Series • 89
3
A god can do it. But tell me, will you, how
a man can trail him through the narrow lyre?
His mind is forked. Where two heart's arteries
intersect, there stands no temple for Apollo.
Singing, as you teach us, isn't desiring,
nor luring something conquered in the end.
Singing is Being. For a god, it's almost nothing.
But when do we exist? And when does he spend
the earth and stars on our being? Young man,
your loving isn't it, even if your mouth
is pried open by your voice - learn
to forget your impulsive song. Soon it will end.
True singing is a different kind of breath.
A breath about nothing. A gust in the god. A wind.
It
90 • Die Sonette an Orpheus: Erster Teil
4
o ihr Zartlichen, tretet zuweilen
in den Atem, der euch nicht meint,
lasst ihn an eueren Wangen sich teilen,
hinter euch zittert er, wieder vereint.
o ihr Seligen, 0 ihr Heilen,
die ihr der Anfang der Herzen scheint.
Bogen der PfeHe und Ziele von Pfeilen,
ewiger gHinzt euer Uicheln verweint.
Fiirchtet euch nicht zu leiden, die Schwere,
gebt sic zuriick an der Erde Gewicht;
schwer sind die Berge, schwer sind die Mcere.
Selbst die als Kinder ihr pflanztet, die Baume,
wurden zu schwer Hingst; ihr triiget sie nicht.
Aber die Liifte ... aber die Raume ...
..
The Sonnets to Orpheus: First Series • 91
4
o you tender ones, every now and then
step into breath that doesn't notice you;
let it touch your cheeks, divide in two;
behind you it will tremble together again.
o you who are blessed, you who are whole,
you who seem to be the beginning of hearts,
bows for the arrows and the arrows' targets,
only tear-glazed will your smile forever glow.
Don't be afraid to suffer; replace
the heaviness back on the earth's own weight:
the mountains are heavy, so are the seas.
You couldn't support even the trees
you planted as children, they've grown so great.
Ah, but the breezes . . . ah, but the spaces ...
92 • Die Sonette an Orpheus: Erster Teil
5
Errichtet keinen Denkstein. Lasst die Rose
nur jedes Jahr zu seinen Gunsten bliihn.
Denn Orpheus ists. Seine Metamorphose
in clem und dem. Wir sollen uns nicht miihn
urn andre Namen. Ein fUr aile Male
ists Orpheus, wenn es singt. Er kommt und geht.
Ists nicht schon vie!, wenn er die Rosenschale
urn ein paar rage manchmal iibersteht?
o wie er schwindcn muss, dass ihrs begrifft!
Und wenn ihm selbst auch bangte, dass er schwande
Indem sein Wort das Hierscin iibertrifft,
ist er schon dort, wohin ihrs nicht beg1eitet.
Der Leier Gitter zwangt ihm nicht die Hande.
Und er gehorcht, indem er iiberschreitet.
..
The Sonnets to Orpheus: First Series • 93
5
Erect no memorial stone. Let the rose
bloom every year to remind us of him.
Because it's Orpheus. His metamorphosis
is in this, and this. No other name
should trouble us. Once and for all,
when there's song, it's Orpheus. He comes and goes.
Isn't it enough that now and then he's able
to outlive the bowl of roses a few days?
Oh how he has to vanish so you'll know!
Though he too were afraid of vanishing.
Even while his word's transcending being
here, he's already there, where you don't follow.
The lyre's lattice doesn't snare his hands.
And he obeys, even as he oversteps the bounds.
94 • Die Sonette an Orpheus: Erster Teil
6
1st er ein Hiesiger? Nein, aus beiden
Reichen crwuchs seine weite Natur.
Kundiger boge die Zweige der Weiden,
wer die Wurreln der Weiden erfuhr.
Geht ihr zu Bette, so lasst auf dem Tische
Brot nicht und Milch nicht; die Toten ziehts-.
Aber er, der Beschworende, mische
unter der Milde des Augenlids
ihre Erscheinung in alles Geschaute;
und der Zauber von Erdrauch und Raute
sei ihm so wahr wie der klarste Bezug.
Nichts kann das giiltige BUd ihm verschlimmern;
sei es aus Gdibern, sei es aus Zimmern,
riihme er Fingerring, Spange und Krug.
The Sonnets to Orpheus: First Series • 95
6
Is he one of us? No,
his wide nature grew out of both realms.
Whoever's known the roots of the willow
is better trained to bend the willow's limbs.
Don't leave bread or milk on the table
when you go to bed: it attracts the dead.
But under the mildness of the eyelid
let him, the magician, let him mingle
their look with all that can be seen;
and let the spell of earth smoke and of rue
be as true to him as the clearest chord.
Nothing can ruin the genuine sign
for him; whether from graves or rooms,
let him praise the clasp, the ring, the gourd.
96 • Die SoneUe an Orpheus: Erster Teil
7
Riihmen, das ists! Ein zum Riihmen Bestellter,
ging er hervor wie das Erz aus des Steins
5chweigen. Sein Herz, 0 vergangliche Kelter
eines den Menschen unendlichen Weins.
Nie versagt ihm die Stimme am Staube,
wenn ihn das gottliche Beispiel ergreift.
Alles wird Weinberg, aIles wird Traube,
in seinem fiihlenden Siiden gereift.
Nicht in den Griiften der Konige Moder
straft ihm die Riihmung Liigen, oder
dass von den Gottern ein Schatten fallt.
Er ist einer der bleibenden Boten,
der noch weit in die Tiiren der Toten
Schalen mit riihmlichen Friichten hall
..
The Sonnets to Orpheus: First Series • 97
7
To praise, that's it! Called to praise,
he came like ore out of the silence
of stone. Oh, his heart's a perishable press
of a wine that's eternal for men.
When he's in a godlike example's grip,
his voice isn't graveled by drought.
All turns vineyard, all turns grape,
ripened in his sensitive South.
Neither mould in the vaults of kings
nor a shadow that falls from the gods
makes a lie out of his praise.
He's one of the messengers who stays,
still extending bowls of glorious
fruit deep inside the doors of the dead .
..
98 • Die Simette an Orpheus: Erster Teil
8
Nur im Raum der Riihmung darf die Klage
gehn, die Nymphe des geweinten Quells,
wachend fiber unserm Niederschlage,
dass er klar sei an demselben Fels,
der die Tore tragt und die Altare. -
Sieh, urn ihre stillen Schultern friiht
das Gefiihl, dass sie die jiingste ware
unter den Geschwistern im Gemiit.
Jubel weiss, und Sehnsucht ist gestandig, -
nur die Klage !ernt noch; madchenhandig
z1ihlt sie nachtelang das alte Schlimme.
Aber plotzlich, schrag und ungeiibt,
halt sie doch ein Sternbild unsrer Stimme
in den Himmel, den ihr Hauch nicht triibt.
The Sonnets to Orpheus: First Series • 99
8
Only in the sphere of praise may Lamentation walk,
water-spirit of the weeping spring
who watches closely over our cascading
so it will be clear even on the rock
that supports the gates and altars.
See, around her quiet shoulders dawns
the hovering feeling she's the youngest one
among the spirit's mood-sisters.
Jubilation knows and Longing grants -
only Lament still learns; with girlish hands
she counts the ancient evil through the nights.
But suddenly, unpracticed and askant,
she lifts one of our voice's constellations
into the sky unclouded by her breath.
100 • Die Sonette an Orpheus: Erster Teil
9
Nur wer die Leier schon hob
auch unter Schatten,
dad das unendliche Lob
ahnend erstatten.
Nur wer mit Toten vom Mohn
ass, von dem ihren,
wird nicht den leisesten Ton
wieder verlieren.
Mag auch die Spieglung im Teich
oft uns verschwimmen:
Wisse das Bild.
Erst in dem Doppelbereich
werden die Stimmen
ewig und mild.
The Sonnets to Orpheus; First Series • 101
9
Only one who's also raised
the lyre among shades
may return unending
praise with warning.
Only one who's tasted
the poppy of the dead
with them won't forget
the tone so delicate.
Although the pool's reflection
blurs before us often:
know the image.
Only in the double-world
do voices become
eternal and mild.
It
102 • Die Sonette an Orpheus: Erster Teil
10
Euch, die ihr nie mein Gefiihl verliesst,
gruss ich, antikische Sarkophage,
die das frohliche Wasser romischer Tage
als ein wandelndes Lied durchfliesst.
Oder jene so offenen, wie das Aug
eines frohen erwachenden Hirten,
- innen voll Stille und Bienensaug -
denen entziickte Falter entschwirrten;
aile, die man dem Zweifel entreisst,
gross ich, die wiedergeOffneten Munde,
die schon wussten, was schweigen heisst.
Wissen wirs, Freunde, wissen wirs nicht?
Beides bildet die zogernde Stunde
in dem menschlichen Angesicht .
..
The Sonnets to Orpheus: First Series • 103
10
You ancient limestone tombs who never
vanished from my feelings, you
who conduct the glad old Roman water
like a wandering song, I greet you.
Or those so open like the pupils
of a happy waking shepherd
- full of silence and honeysuckle -
from which charmed butterflies fluttered;
all that a person wrenches from doubt
I greet, the mouths opened again
after having known what silence means.
Do we know, friends, do we or not?
These two mold the hesitating span
of time into features of the human.
104 • Die Sonette an Orpheus: Erster Teil
11
Sieh den Himmel. Heisst kein Sternbild "Reiter"?
Denn dies ist uns seltsam eingepragt:
dieser Stolz aus Erde. Und ein zweiter,
der ihn treibt und halt und den er tragt.
1st nicht so, gejagt und dann gebandigt,
diese sehnige Natur des Seins?
Weg und Wendung. Doch ein Druck verstandigt.
Neue Weite. Und die zwei sind eins.
Aber sind sie's? Oder meinen beide
nicht den Weg, den sie zusammen tun?
Namenlos schon trennt sie Tisch und Weide.
Auch die stemische Verbindung triigt.
Doch uns £reue eine Welle nun,
der Figur zu glauben. Das genugt.
It
The Sonnets to Orpheus: First Series • 105
11
Look at the sky. Is no constellation called "Rider"?
Because this is strangely branded in us:
this earthly pride. And another
who drives and holds it and whom it carries.
Isn't this like our sinewy way of being,
to be whipped on, then reined in?
Track and turning. But one touch: understanding.
New distances. And the two are one.
But are they? Or don't both signify
the road they take together? They're already
unspeakably divided by table and trough.
Even the linking of stars is a lie.
But for a while now let's be happy
to believe the symbol. That's enough .
..
106 • Die Sonette an Orpheus: Erster Teil
12
Heil dem Geist, der uns verbinden mag;
denn wir leben wahrhaft in Figuren.
Vnd mit kleinen Schritten gehn die Vhren
neben unserm eigentlichen Tag.
Ohne unsern wahren Platz zu kennen,
handeln wir aus wirklichem Bezug.
Die Antennen fiihlen die Antennen,
und die leere Ferne trug ...
Reine 5pannung. 0 Musik der Krafte!
1st nicht durch die Hisslichen Geschafte
jede Srorung von dir abgelenkt?
Selbst wenn sich der Bauer sorgt und handelt,
wo die Saat in Sommer sich verwandelt,
reicht er niemals hin. Die Erde schenkt.
The Sonnets to Orpheus: First Series • 107
12
Hail to the spirit who can link
us: because we live in symbols, really.
And with tiny steps the clocks
walk beside our primal day.
Without knowing our real place,
we act as if we actually interacted.
Antennas feel antennas,
and the empty spaces carried ...
Pure tension. 0 music of the powers!
Don't our trivial transactions
deflect all your interruptions?
Though he works and worries, the farmer
never reaches down to where the seed turns
into summer. The earth grants .
..
108 • Die Sonette an Orpheus: Erster Teil
13
Voller Apfel, Bime und Banane,
Stachelbeere . .. Alles dieses spricht
Tod und Leben in den Mund . . . Ich ahne ...
Lest es einern Kind vorn Angesicht,
wenn es sie erschrneckt. Dies kornrnt von weit.
Wird euch langsarn narnenlos irn Munde?
Wo sonst Worte waren, fliessen Funde,
aus dern Fruchtfleisch iiberrascht befreit.
Wagt zu sagen, was ihr Apfel nennt.
Diese Siis5e, die sich erst verdichtet,
urn, im Schrnecken leise aufgerichtet,
klar zu werden, wach und transparent,
doppeldeutig, sonnig, erdig, hiesig-:
o Erfahrung, Fiihlung, Freude -, riesigl
It
The Sonnets to Orpheus: First Series • 109
13
Banana and pear, plump apple,
gooseberry . .. All these reveal
life and death inside the mouth. I feel ...
Read it in the features of a child
who's tasting them. This comes from far.
Is the unspeakable slowly growing in your mouth?
Released from the fruit's pulp, astonished,
discoveries flow where words usually were.
Dare to say what you call apple.
This sweetness that condenses first
so in the taste that's tenderly intense
it may become awake, transparent, double
meaning, clear, bright, earthy, ours-
o knowledge, feeling, joy - immense!
110 • Die Sonette an Orpheus: Erster Teil
14
Wir gehen urn mit Blume, Weinblatt, Frueht.
Sie spreehen nieht die Spraehe nur des Jahres.
Aus Dunkel steigt ein buntes Offenbares
und hat vielleicht den Glanz der Eifersueht
der Toten an sieh, die die Erde starken.
Was wissen wir von ihrem Teil an dem?
Es ist seit lange ihre Art, den Lehm
mit ihrem freien Marke zu durchmarken.
Nun fragt sieh nur: tun sie es gern? ...
Drangt diese Frueht, ein Werk von schweren Sklaven,
gebaUt zu uns empor, zu ihren Herrn?
Sind sie die Herm, die bei den Wurzeln schlafen,
und gonnen uns aus ihren Oberflussen
dies Zwischending aus stummer Kraft und Kiissen?
The Sonnets to Orpheus: First Series • 111
14
We're involved with flower, fruit, grapevine.
They speak more than the language of the year.
Out of the darkness a blaze of colors appears,
and one perhaps that has the jealous shine
of the dead, those who strengthen the earth.
What do we know of the part they assume?
It's long been their habit to marrow the loam
with their own free marrow through and through.
Now the one question: Is it done gladly?
The work of sullen slaves, does this fruit
thrust up, clenched, toward us, its masters?
Sleeping with roots, granting us only
out of their surplus this hybrid made of mute
strength and kisses - are they the masters?
..
112 • Die Sonette an Orpheus: Erster Teil
15
Wartet ... , das schmeckt ... Schon ists auf der Flucht
... Wenig Musik nur, ein Stampfen, ein Summen -:
Madchen, ihr warmen, Madchen, ihr stummen,
tanzt den Geschmack der erfahrenen Frucht!
Tanzt die Orange. Wer kann sie vergessen,
wie sie, ertrinkend in sieh, sieh wehrt
wider ihr SiiBsein. Ihr habt sie besessen.
Sie hat sich kOstlich zu euch bekehrt.
Tanzt die Orange. Die warmere Landschaft,
werft sie aus euch, dass die reife erstrahle
in Liiften der Heimat! Ergliihte, enthiillt
Diifte urn Diifte! Schafft die Verwandtschaft
mit dec reinen, sieh weigernden Schale,
mit dem Saft, der die gliickliche fii1lt!
..
The Sonnets to Orpheus: First Series • 113
15
Wait ... that tastes good ... it's already bolting .
. . . Just a little music, a tapping, a hum -
Girls, you girls who are silent and warm,
dance the taste of the fruit you've been tasting.
Dance the orange. Who can forget it,
how, drowning in itself, it refuses
its own sweetness. You've possessed it.
Exquisite, it's been transmuted into you.
Dance the orange. Discharge the warmer
landscape out of you so the ripe will glisten
in their native breezes! Glowing, strip
perfume from perfume. Become sisters
with the pure, resistant rind,
the juice that fills the happy fruit!
It
114 • Die Sonette an Orpheus: Erster Teil
16
Du, mein Freund, bist einsam, weil . . .
Wir machen mit Worten und Fingerzeigen
uns allmahlich die Welt zu eigen,
vielleicht ihren schwachsten, gefahrlichsten Teil.
Wer zeigt mit Fingern auf einen Geruch?-
Doch von den Kraften, die uns bedrohten,
filhlst du viele ... Du kennst die Toten,
und du erschrickst vor dem Zauberspruch.
Sieh, nun heisst es zusammen ertragen
Stiickwerk und Teile, als sei es das Ganze.
Dir helfen, wird schwer sein. Vor aHem: pflanze
mich nicht in dein Herz. lch wiichse zu schnell.
Doch meines Herm Hand will ich filhren und sagen
Hier. Das ist Esau in seinem Fell .
..
The Sonnets to Orpheus: First Series • 115
16
You, my friend, are lonely because ...
With pointing words and fingers
we slowly make the world our
own, perhaps its weakest, most precarious
part. Who points a finger at a smell?
But you feel many of the powers
that threaten us .. , You know the dead,
and you cower from the magic spell.
See, now we must bear the pieces and parts
together, as if they were the whole.
Helping you win be hard. Above all,
don't plant me in your heart. I'd grow too fast.
But I shall guide my master's hand and say:
Here. This is Esau in his pelt.
..
116 • Die Sonette an Orpheus: Erster Tei.l
17
Zu unterst der AIte, verworrn,
all der Erbauten
Wurzel, verborgener Born,
den sie nie schauten.
Sturmhelm und Jagerhorn,
Spruch von Ergrauten,
Manner im Bruderzorn,
Frauen wie Lauten ...
Drangender Zweig an Zweig,
nirgends ein freier . . .
Einer! 0 steig . . . 0 steig . . .
Aber sie brechen noch.
Dieser erst oben doch
biegt sich zur Leier.
It
The Sonnets to Orpheus: First Series • 117
17
Deep down, the oldest
tangled root of ail that's grown,
the secret source
they've never seen.
Helmet and horn of hunters,
old men's truths,
wrath of brothers,
women like lutes ...
Branch pushing branch,
not one of them free ...
One! oh, climb higher . . . higher . . .
Yet they still break.
But this top one finally
bends into a lyre.
118 • Die Sonette an Orpheus: Erster Teil
18
Horst du das Neue, Herr,
drohnen und beben?
Kommen Verkiindiger,
die es erheben.
Zwar ist kein Horen heil
in dem Durchtobtsein,
doch der Maschinenteil
will jetzt gelobt sein.
Sieh, die Maschine:
wie sie sich walzt und racht
und uns entstellt und schwlkht.
Hat sie aus uns auch Kraft,
sie, ohne Leidenschaft,
treibe und diene .
..
The Sonnets to Orpheus: First Series • 119
18
Do you hear the New, Master,
droning and throbbing?
Its prophesying promoters
are advancing.
No hearing's truly keen
in all this noise;
still, now each machine
part wills its praise.
See, the Machine:
how it spins and wreaks
revenge, deforms and demeans us.
Since its power comes from us,
let it do its work
and serve, serene .

120 • Die Sonette an Orpheus: Erster Teil
19
Wandelt sich rasch auch die Welt
wie Wolkengestalten,
alles Vollendete fallt
heim zum Uralten.
Uber dem Wandel und Gang,
weiter und freier,
wahrt noch dein Vor-Gesang,
Gott mit der Leier.
Nicht sind die Leiden erkannt,
nicht ist die Liebe gelemt,
und was im Tod uns entfernt,
ist nicht entschleiert.
Einzig das Lied iiberm Land
heiligt und feiert.
It
The Sonnets to Orpheus: First Series • 121
19
Even if the world changes as fast
as the shapes of clouds,
all perfected things at last
fall back to the very old.
Over what's passing and changing,
freer and wider,
your overture is lasting,
god with the lyre.
Pain's beyond our grasp,
love hasn't been learned,
and whatever eliminates
us in death is still secret.
Only the Song above the land
blesses and celebrates.
122 • Die Sonette an Orpheus: Erster Teil
20
Dir aber, Herr, 0 was weih ich dir, sag,
der das Ohr den Geschopfen gelehrt? -
Mein Erinnern an einen Friihlingstag,
seinen Abend, in Russland -, ein Pferd ...
Heriiber vom Dod kam der Schimmel allein,
an der vorderen Fessel den Pflock,
um die Nacht auf den Wiesen allein zu sein;
wie schlug seiner Ml!hne Gelock
an den Hals im Takte des Obermuts,
bei dem grob gehemmten Galopp.
Wie sprangen die Quellen des Rosseblutsl
Der fiihlte die Weiten, und ob!
der sang und der horte -, dein Sagenkreis
war in ihm geschlossen .
. Sein Bild: ich weih's.
The Stmnets to Orpheus: First Series • 123
20
But, Master, tell me what to dedicate to you, say
it, you who taught creatures their ear -
My memory of one spring day,
its evening, in Russia - a horse there ... ?
Across from the village the white horse
came, a rope on one front fetlock,
to be alone all night in the meadows;
how the shock of his mane on his neck
beat in time with his high spirits
in that clumsy-shackled gallop.
How the springs of stallion-blood leapt!
How he sang and listened! He felt
the distances - your cycle of myths
was sealed in him.
His image: I dedicate it .
..
124 • Die Sonette an Orpheus: Erster Teil
21
Fruhling ist wiedergekommen. Die Erde
ist wie ein Kind, das Gedichte weiss;
viele, 0 viele. .. Fur die Beschwerde
langen Lemens bekommt sie den Preis.
Streng war ihr Lehrer. Wir mochten das Weisse
an dem Barte des alten Manns.
Nun, wie das Griine, das Blaue heisse,
durfen wir !ragen: sie kanns, sie kanns!
Erde, die !rei hat, du gluckliche, spiele
nun mit den Kindem. Wir wollen dich langen,
frOhliche Erde. Oem Frohsten gelingts.
0, was der Lehrer sie lehrte, das Viele,
und was gedruckt steht in Wurzeln und langen
schwierigen Stammen: sie singts, sie singts!
The Sonnets to Orpheus: First Series • 125
21
Spring has returned again. The earth
is like a child who's memorized
poems; many, so many. .. It was worth
the long painful lesson: she wins the prize.
Her teacher was strict. We liked the white
in the old man's whiskers.
Now when we ask what green or blue is, right
away she knows, she has the answer!
Earth, lucky earth on vacation,
play with the children now. We long
to catch you, happy earth. The happiest will win.
Oh what her teacher taught her, all those things,
and what's imprinted on the roots and long
complicated stems: she sings it, she sings!
..
126 • Die Sonette an Orpheus: Erster Teil
22
Wir sind die Treibenden.
Aber den Schritt der Zeit,
nehmt ihn als Kleinigkeit
im immer Bleibenden.
Alles das Eilende
wird schon voriiber sein;
denn das Verweilende
erst weiht uns ein.
Knaben, 0 werft den Mut
nicht in die Schnelligkeit,
nicht in den Flugversuch.
Alles ist ausgeruht:
Dunkel und Helligkeit,
Blume und Buch.
The Sonnets to Orpheus: First Series • 127
22
We're the drivers.
But take time's stride
as trivial beside
what remains forever.
Everything hurrying
will already be over;
for only the lasting
is our initiator.
Boys, oh don't waste
your courage on being fast
or on risking flight.
All these are at rest:
darkness and light,
flower and text .
..
128 • Die Sonette an Orpheus: Erster Tefl
23
o erst dann, wenn der Flug
nicht rnehr urn seinetwillen
wird in die HirnrneIsstillen
steigen, sich seIber genug,
urn in lichten Profilen,
als das Gerat, das gelang,
Liebling der Winde zu spielen,
sicher schwenkend und schlank, -
erst wenn ein reines Wohin
wachsender Apparate
Knabenstolz iiberwiegt,
wird, iiberstiirzt von Gewinn,
jener den Fernen Genahte
sein, was er einsam erfliegt.
The Sonnets to Orpheus: First Series • 129
23
Oh only then, when flight
will no longer rise
into the sky's silences
for its own sake, self-sufficient,
so that in shining profiles,
like a successful tool,
it may play the wind's darling,
slim, confidently swaying -
only when a pure destination
means more than adolescent
pride in swelling machines,
will one, hellbent to win,
closing on the distances
be his lonely flight's own end .

130 • Die Sonette an Orpheus: Erster Teil
24
Sollen wir unsere uralte Freundschaft, die grassen
niemals werbenden Gotter, weil sie der harte
Stahl, den wir streng erzogen, nicht kennt, verstossen
oder sie plotzlich such en auf einer Karte?
Diese gewaltigen Freunde, die uns die Toten
nehmen, riihren nirgends an unsere Rader.
Unsere Gastmahler haben wir weit -, unsere Bader,
fortgeriickt, und ihre uns lang schon zu langsamen Boten
iiberholen wir irnmer. Einsamer nun aufeinander
ganz angewiesen, ohne einander zu kennen,
fiihren wir nicht mehr die Pfade als schone Maander,
sondern als Grade. Nur noch in Dampfkesseln brennen
die einstigen Feuer und heben die Hammer, die immer
grossern. Wir aber nehmen an Kraft ab, wie Schwimmer .
..
The Sonnets to Orpheus: First Series • 131
24
Shall we reject our oldest friendship,
the great undemanding gods, because
the tough steel we trained so hard does
not know them; or suddenly seek them on a map?
Although they take the dead from us,
these powerful friends never brush against
our wheels. We've moved our baths and banquets
far away, and, for years too slow for us,
we always outrun their messengers. More lonely
now, wholly dependent on ea(:h other, not knowing
each other, no longer do we build those lovely
paths rambling, but straight. Now only in boilers
do former fires burn, heaving hammers always growing
bigger. But we, we grow weaker, like swimmers.
If
132 • Die Sonette an Orpheus: Erster Teil
25
Dich aber will ich nun, dich, die ich kannte
wie eine Blume, von der ich den Namen nicht weiss,
noch ein Mal erinnern und ihnen zeigen, Entwandte,
schOne Gespielin des unuberwindlichen Schreis.
Tanzerin erst, die plotzlich, den Korper voll Zogern,
anhielt, als gOss man ihr Jungsein in Erz;
trauernd und lauschend-. Da, von den hohen Vermogern
fie! ihr Musik in das veranderte Herz.
Nah war die Krankheit. Schon von den Schatten bemachtigt,
drangte verdunkelt das Blut, doch, wie fluchtig verdachtigt,
trieb es in seinen natiirHchen Friihling hervor.
Wieder und wieder, von Dunkel und Sturz unterbrochen,
gllinzte es irdisch. Bis es nach schrecklichem Pochen
trat in das trestles offene Tor .
..
The Sonnets to Orpheus: First Series • 133
25
But you, now, you - I knew you like a flower
whose name I don't know. Once more I'll remember
and describe you to them, you who evaporated,
the unquellable cry's beautiful playmate.
Dancer first, whose body, full of hesitation, paused
suddenly, as if her youth were being cast in bronze;
mourning and listening. Then, from the great
creators music fell into her transformed heart.
Sickness was near. Already mastered by darkening,
her blood pulsed darker, but as if suspicious for
a moment, it leapt out into its natural spring.
Again and again, clotted by dark and collapse,
it gleamed earth. Until after terrible throbs
it trod through that hopelessly open door.
134 • Die Sonette an Orpheus: Erster Teil
26
Du aber, Gottlicher, du, bis zuletzt noch ErtOner,
da ihn der Schwann der vcrschmahten Manaden befiel,
hast ihr Geschrei iibertont mit Ordnung, du Schoner,
aus den ZerstOrenden stieg dein erbauendes Spiel.
Keine war da, dass sie Haupt dir und Leier zerstOr',
wie sie auch rangen und rasten; und aIle die schaden
Steine, die sie nach deinem Herzen warfen,
wurden zu Sanftem an dir und begabt mit Gehor.
Schliesslich zerschlugen sie dich, von der Rache gehetzt,
wahrend dein Klang noch in Lowen und Felsen verweilte
und in den Baumen und Vogeln. Dart singst du noch jetzt.
o du verlorener Gatt! Du unendliche Spur!
Nur weil dich reissend zuletzt die Feindschaft verteilte,
sind wir die Horenden jetzt und ein Mund der Natur.
The Sonnets to Orpheus: First Series • 135
26
But you, divine one, you resounding to the end.
When attacked by the swarm of rejected maenads,
gorgeous god, you drowned out their shrieks with order,
the architecture of your song rose from the destroyers.
Not one of them could crush your head or lyre,
despite their wrestling and raging;
and touching you, all the sharp rocks they fired
at your heart turned tender, gifted with hearing.
Ravaged by vengeance, at last they broke and tore you.
But the echo of your music lingered
in rocks and lions, trees and birds. You still sing there.
Oh you lost god! You everlasting clue!
Because hate finally dismembered, scattered
you, now we're merely nature's mouth and ears.
SECOND SERIES
138 • Die Sonette an Orpheus: Zweiter Tefl
1
Atmen, du unsichtbares Gedicht!
Immerfort um das eigne
Sein rein eingetauschter Weltraum. Gegengewicht,
in dem ich mich rhythmisch ereigne.
Einzige Welle, deren
allmahliches Meer ich bin;
sparsamstes du von allen moglichen Meeren, -
Raumgewinn.
Wie viele von diesen Stellen der Rliume waren schon
innen in mir. Manche Winde
sind wie mein Sohn.
Erkennst du mich, Luft, du, voU noch einst meiniger Orte?
Du, einmal glatte Rinde,
Rundung und Blatt meiner Worte.
The Sonnets tD Orpheus: Second Series • 139
1
Breath, you invisible poem!
Steady sheer exchange between the cosmos
and our being. Counterpoise
in which I rhythmically become.
Single wave whose
gradual sea I ami sparest
of all possible seas -
winning the universe.
How many regions in space have been
inside me already. Many winds
are like my son.
You, air, still full of places once mine,
do you know me? You, once
my words' sphere, leaf, and smooth rind .
..
140 • Die Sonette an Orpheus: Zweiter Teil
2
So wie dem Meister manchmal das eilig
nahere Blatt den wirklichen Strich
abnimmt: so nehmen oft Spiegel das heilig
einzige Uicheln der Madchen in sieh,
wenn sie den Morgen erproben, allein, -
oder im Glanze der dienenden Lichter.
Und in das Ahnen der echten Gesiehter,
spater, fallt nur ein Widerschein.
Was haben Augen einst ins umrusste
lange Vergliihn der Kamine geschaut:
Blicke des Lebens, fUr immer verlorne.
Ach, der Erde, wer kennt die Verluste?
Nur, wer mit dennoch preisenciem Laut
sange das Herz, das ins Ganze gebome .
..
The $(}nnets to Orpheus: Second Series • 141
2
Just as at times the nearest sheet of paper
quickly catches the master's genuine
stroke, so mirrors often capture
the unique sacred smile of girls in them,
when they appraise the morning all
alone - or in the glow of helpful tapers.
And later only a reflection falls
into that breath of their real features.
Into the slow-waning glow of coals
in charred fireplaces, what have eyes stared
at once: glimpses of a life forever lost.
Ah the earth, who knows her losses?
Only one who, still praising them out loud,
would sing the he.art bom into the whole .
..
142 • Die Sonette an Orpheus: Zweiter Teil
3
Spiegel: noch nie hat man wissend beschrieben,
was ihr in euerem Wesen seid.
lhr, wie mit lauter LOchern von Sieben
erfiillten Zwischenraume der Zeit.
Ihr, noch des leeren Saales Verschwender-,
wenn es diimmert, wie Walder weit . . .
Und der Luster geht wie ein Sechzehn-Ender
durch eure Unbetretbarkeit.
Manchmal seid ihr voll Malerei.
Einige scheinen in euch gegangen-,
andere schicktet ihr scheu vorbei.
Aber die Schonste wird bleiben, bis
druben in ihre enthaltenen Wangen
eindrang der klare geloste Narziss.
The Sonnets to Orpheus: Second Series' 143
3
Mirrors: no one's ever yet described
you, knowing what you really are.
T i m e ' ~ interstices, you seem filled
with nothing but the holes of filters.
You, still the squanderers of the empty hall-
when twilight comes, wide as woods . . .
And the chandelier, like a sixteen-pointer, vaults
where nothing can set foot.
At times you're full of painting. A few
seem to have seeped into you-
others you shyly sent away.
But the most beautiful will stay
until the clear freed Narcissus
penetrates there to her chaste kisses .
..
144 • Die Sonette an Orpheus: Zweiter Teil
4
o dieses ist das Tier, das es nicht gibt.
Sie wusstens nicht und habens jeden Falls
- sein Wandeln, seine Haltung, seinen Hals,
bis in des stillen Blickes Licht - geliebt.
Zwar war es nicht. Doch wei! sie's liebten, ward
ein reines Tier. Sie Hessen immer Raum.
Und in dem Raume, klar und ausgespart,
erhob es leicht sein Haupt und brauchte kaum
zu sein. Sie nahrten es mit keinem Kom,
nur immer mit der Moglichkeit, es seL
Und sie gab sokhe Starke an das Tier,
dass es aus sich ein Stirnhorn trieb. Ein Horn.
Zu einer Jungfrau kam es weiss herbei -
und war im Silber-Spiegel und in ihr .
..
The Sonnets to Orpheus: Second Series • 145
4
Oh this is the creature that doesn't exist.
They didn't know that, besides
- its neck, its bearing, and its stride,
even to the light of its calm gaze - they loved it.
In fact, it never was. But since they loved
it, a pure beast came to be. They always allowed
room. And in that room, clear and unlocked,
it freely raised its head and barely needed
to be. They didn't feed it with corn,
but always with the chance that it might
be. And this gave the creature such power,
it grew one hom out of its brow. One hom.
It came here to a virgin, all white -
and was in the mirror-silver and in her.
It
146 • Die Sonette an Orpheus: Zweiter Teil
5
Blumenmuskel, der der Anemone
Wiesenmorgen nach und nach erschliesst,
bis in ihren Schooss das polyphone
Licht der lauten Himmel sich ergiesst,
in den stillen Bliitenstern gespannter
Muske! des unendlichen Empfangs,
manchmal so von Fiille iibermannter,
dass der Ruhewink des Untergangs
kaum vermag die weitzuriickgeschnellten
Blatterrander dir zuriickzugeben:
du, Entschluss und Kraft von wieviel Welten!
Wir Gewaltsamen, wir wahren langer.
Aber wann, in welchem aller Leben,
sind wir endIich offen und Empfanger?
It
The Sonnets to Orpheus: Second Series • 147
5
Flowermuscle of the anemone, slowly,
slowly stretching open to her meadow's dawn
until the loud skies' polyphony
of light pours down into her womb,
muscle of endless reception tensed
in the still star of the bloom,
at times so fully ovennanned
that the sinking's call to calm
is barely able to recontract
the widesprung edges of your petals:
you, will and power of how many worlds!
We are the violent, we can last longer.
But when, in which of all possible
lives, are we at last open and receivers?
..
148 • Die Sonette an Orpheus: Zweiter Teil
6
Rose, du thronende, denen im Altertume
warst du ein Kelch mit einfachem Rand.
Uns aber bist du die volle zahIlose Blume,
der unerschopfliche Gegenstand.
In deinem Reichtum scheinst du wie Kleidung urn Kleidung
urn einen Leib aus nichts als Glanz;
aber dein einzelnes Blatt ist zugleich die Vermeidung
und die Verleugnung jedes Gewands.
Seit Jahrhunderten mft uns dein Duft
seine siissesten Namen heriiber;
plotzlich liegt er wie Ruhm in der Luft.
Dennoch, wir wissen ihn nicht zu nennen, wir raten ...
Und Erinnerung geht zu ihm iiber,
die wir von rufbaren Stunden erbaten .
..
The Sonnets to Orpheus: Second Series • 149
6
Enthroned rose, to them in ancient times
you were a calyx with a simple ring.
For us you are the full, the countless bloom,
the inexhaustible thing.
In your wealth you shimmer like drape
over drape on a body of nothing but splendor;
yet your single petal is both the escape
from and the denial of any attire.
For centuries your perfume has been calling
its sweetest names across to us;
suddenly, it lies on the air like fame.
Still, we don't know what to can it, we're guessing ...
And over to it memory carries
what we have begged from hours filled with names .

150 • Die Sonette an Orpheus: Zweiter Teil
7
Blumen, ihr schliesslich den ordnenden minden verwandte,
(Handen der Madchen von einst und jetzt),
die auf dem Gartentisch oft von Kante zu Kante
lagen, ermattet und sanft verletzt,
wartend des Wassers, das sie noch einmal erhole
aus dem begonnenen Tod -, und nun
wieder erhobene zwischen die stromenden Pole
fiihlender Finger, die wohlzu tun
mehr noch vermogen, als ihr ahntet, ihr leichten,
wenn ihr euch wiederfandet im Krug,
langsam erkiihlend und Warrnes von Madchen, wie Beichten,
von euch gebend, wie triibe ermiidende Siinden,
die das Gepfliicktsein beging, als Bezug
wieder zu ihnen, die sich euch bliihend verbiinden.
It
The Sonnets to Orpheus: Second Series • 151
7
Flowers, ultimately sisters of arranging hands
(those hands of girls from now and then)
who often lay from end to end across the garden
table, drooping and gently wounded,
waiting for water that would rescue you
once more from that beginning death, and now held
up again between the streaming poles
of sympathetic fingers that can do
even more good than you guessed, light ones,
when you found each other again in the vase,
cooling slowly, exuding warmth of girls like confessions
from yourselves, like dreary and exhausting
sins committed by your being plucked, but as
a bond again with them, your allies in blooming .

152 • Die Sonette an Orpheus: Zweiter Teil
8
Wenige ihr, der einstigen Kindheit Gespielen
in den zerstreuten Garten der Stadt:
wie wir uns fanden und uns zogernd gefielen
und, wie das Lamm mit dem redenden Blatt,
sprachen als schweigende. Wenn wir uns einmal freuten,
keinem gehorte es. Wessen wars?
Und wie zergings unter allen den gehenden Leuten
und im Bangen des langen Jahrs.
Wagen umroUten uns fremd, vorubergezogen,
Hauser umstanden uns stark, aber unwahr, - und keines
kannte uns je. Was war wirklich im All?
Nichts. Nur die Balle. Ihre herrlichen Bogen.
Auch nicht die Kinder ... Aber manchmal trat eines,
ach ein vergehendes, unter den fallenden Ball.
In memoriam Egon von Rilke
..
The Sonnets to Orpheus: Second Series· 153
8
You few, playmates of a childhood long ago
in the scattered gardens of the city -
how we found and liked each other timidly
and, like the lamb with the speaking scroll,
spoke silently. When all of us were happy,
it was no one's. Whose was it?
And how it melted in that crushing crowd
and in the long year's anxiety.
Carriages rolled around us, alien, stark
houses stood around us, solid but unreal - and none
ever knew us. What was real in that All?
Nothing. Only the balls. Their glorious arcs.
Not even the children . .. But sometimes one,
oh a dying one, stepped under the falling ball.
In memory of Egon von Rilke

154 • Die Sonette an Orpheus: Zweiter Teil
9
Riihmt euch, ihr Richtenden, nicht der entbehrlichen Folter
und dass das Eisen nicht Hinger an mUsen sperrt.
Keins ist gestcigert, kein Herz - , weil ein gewollter
Krampf der Milde euch zarter verzerrt.
Was es durch Zeiten bekam, das schenkt das Schafott
wieder zuriick, wie Kinder ihr Spielzeug vom vorig
alten Geburtstag. Ins reine, ins hohe, ins torig
offene Herz trate er anders, .der Gott
wirklicher MHde. Er kame gewaltig und griffe
strahlender urn sich, wie Cottliche sind.
Mehr als ein Wind fUr die grossen gesicherten Schiffe.
Weniger nicht, als die heimliche leise Gewahrung,
die uns im Innern schweigend gcwinnt
wie ein still spielendes Kind aus unendlicher Paarung.
The Sonnets to Orpheus: Second Series • 155
9
Judges, don't boast because you've abolished torture
and the neck's no longer shackled by iron.
Because a planned spasm of mercy twists you more
tenderly - no heart's elated, not one.
The scaffold will give back what it's received
for ages, as children give their last year's
birthday toys. Into the heart that's high, pure,
and open like a gate, the god of true mercy would
enter differently. He'd come gripped
with power as gods are, and as radiant.
More than a wind for the great confident ships.
Not less than the subtle secret understanding
that conquers us silently within
like a quiet playing child of a cosmic coupling .
..
156 • Die Sonette an Orpheus: Zweiter Teil
10
Alles Erworbnc bedroht die Maschine, solange
sie sich erdreistct, im Geist, statt im Gehorchen, zu sein.
Dass nicht der herrlichen Hand schoneres Zogern mehr prange,
zu dem entschlossenern Bau schneidet sie steifer den Stein.
Nirgends bleibt sie zuriick, dass wir ihr ein Mal entronnen
und sie in stiller Fabrik olend sich seIber gehort.
Sie ist das Leben, - sie meint es am besten zu konnen,
die mit dem gleichen Entschluss ordnet und schafft und zerstort.
Aber noch ist uns das Dasein verzaubert; an hundert
Stellen ist es noch Ursprung. Ein Spielen von reinen
Kraften, die keiner beriihrt, der nicht kniet und bewundert.
Worte gehen noch zart am Unsaglichen aus ...
Und die Musik, immer neu, aus den bebendsten Steinen,
baut im unbrauchbaren Raum ihr vergottlichtes Haus .
..
The Sonnets to Orpheus: Second Series • 157
10
As long as it dares to exist as spirit instead of obeying,
the machine threatens everything we've gained.
It hacks the stone starker for more determined building
so we won't be drawn by the lovelier lingering of the master-hand.
Nowhere does it stand aside so we might once escape it,
and, oiling itself in a silent factory, become its own thing.
It is life - it believes it's all-knowing,
and with the same mind makes and orders and destructs.
But for us existence is still enchanted. It's still
Beginning in a hundred places. A playing
of pure powers no one can touch and not kneel to and marvel.
Faced with the unutterable, words still disintegrate ...
And ever new, out of the most quivering
stones, music builds her divine house in useless space.
158 • Die Sonette an Orpheus: Zweiter Teil
11
Manche, des Todes, entstand ruhig geordnete Regel,
weiterbezwingender Mensch, seit du im Jagen beharrst;
mehr doch als Faile und Netz, weiss ich dich, Streifen von Segel,
den man hinuntergehangt in den hohligen Karst.
Leise liess man dich ein, als warst du ein Zeichen,
Frieden zu feiern. Doch dann: rang dich am Rande der Knecht,
-und, ausdenHohlen, dieN achtwarfeineHandvoll von bleichen
taumelnden Tauben ins Licht ...
Aber auch das ist im Recht.
Fern von dem Schauenden sei jeglicher Hauch des Bedauerns,
nicht nur vom Jager allein, der, was sich zeitig erweist,
wachsam und handelnd vollzieht.
Toten ist eine Gestalt unseres wandernden Trauerns . . .
Rein ist im heiteren Geist,
was an uns seIber geschieht .
..
The SDnnets to Orpheus: Second Series • 159
11
Insatiable conquering man, many of death's peaceful rules
have been established from the time you first insisted
on hunting. I know you better than a trap or net, strip of sail
they used to hang down into the caverns of Karst.
They lowered you softly, as if you were a signal
celebrating peace. But then a boy gave your edge a twist
- and out of the caves the night threw a handful
of tumbling pale doves into the light . . .
But even that's right.
Let every breath of pity be far from witnesses,
not only from the hunter who, alert, at the right
time, ads and accomplishes his business.
Killing's one shape of our restless affliction . ..
For the spirit that's serene,
whatever happens to us is right.
160 • Die Sonette an Orpheus: Zweiter Teil
12
Wolle die Wandlung. 0 sei fiir die Flamme begeistert,
drin sich ein Ding dir entzieht, das mit Verwandlungen prunkt;
jener entwerfende Geist, welcher das Irdische meistert,
liebtin dem Schwung der Figur nichts wie den wendenden Punkt.
Was sich ins Bleiben verschliesst, schon ists das Erstarrte;
wahnt es sich sicher im Schutz des unscheinbaren Grau's?
Warte, ein Hartestes warnt aus der Ferne das Harte.
Wehe -: abwesender Hammer holt ausl
Wer sich als Quelle ergiesst, den erkennt die Erkennung;
und sie fuhrt ihn entziickt durch das he iter Geschaffne,
das mit Anfang oft schliesst und mit Ende beginnt.
Jeder gliickliche Raum ist Kind oder Enkel von Trennung,
den sie staunend durchgehn. Vnd die verwandelte Daphne
will, seit sie lorbeern fiihIt, dass du dich wandelst in Wind.
The Sonnets to Orpheus: Second Series· 161
12
Will transformation. Oh be crazed for the fire
in which something boasting with change is recalled
from you; that designing spirit, the earthly's master,
loves nothing as much as the turning point of the soaring symbol.
What wraps itself up in endurance is already the rigid;
does it feel safe in that unpretentious gray shelter?
Beware, from afar the hardest warns the hard.
And, oh - the upswing of an absent hammer!
Whoever pours himself out like a spring, he's known by Knowing;
and she guides him enthralled through the serene Creation
that often ends with beginning and begins with ending.
Every happy space they wander through, astounded,
is a child or a grandchild of Departure. And the transformed
Daphne, feeling herself laurel, wills that you change into wind.
162 • Die Sonette an Orpheus: Zweiter Teil
13
Sei aHem Abschied voran, als ware er hinter
dir, wie der Winter, der eben geht.
Denn unter Wintern ist einer so endlos Winter,
dass, iiberwinternd, dein Herz iiberhaupt iibersteht.
Sei immer tot in Eurydike -, singender steige,
preisender steige zuriick in den reinen Bezug.
Hier, unter Schwindenden, sei, im Reiche der Neige,
sei ein klingendes Glas, das sich im Klang schon zerschlug.
Sei - und wisse zugleich des Nicht-Seins Bedingung,
den unendlichen Grund deiner innigen Schwingung,
dass du sie vollig vollziehst dieses einzige Mal.
Zu dem gebrauchten sowohl, wie zum dump fen und stummen
Vorrat der vollen Natur, den unsaglichen Summen,
zahle dich jubelnd hinzu und vernichte die Zahl.
The Sonnets to Orpheus: Second Series· 163
13
Be ahead of aU Departure, as if it were
behind you like the winter that's just passed.
For among winters there's one so endlessly winter
that, wintering out, your heart will really last.
Be dead forever in Eurydice - rise again, singing
more, praising more, rise into the pure harmony.
Be here among the vanishing in the realm of entropy,
be a ringing glass that shatters as it rings.
Be - and at the same time know the implication
of non-being, the endless ground of your inner vibration,
so you can fulfill it fully just this once.
To nature's whole supply of speechless, dumb,
and also used up things, the unspeakable sums,
rejoicing, add yourself and nullify the count.
164 • Die Sonette an Orpheus: Zweiter Teil
14
Siehe die Blumen, diesc dem Irdischen treuen,
denen wir Schicksal vom Rande des Schicksals leihn, -
aber wer weiss es! Wenn sie ihr Welken bereuen,
ist es an uns, ihre Reue zu sein.
Alles will schweben. Da gehn wir umher wie Beschwerer,
legen auf alles uns sclbst, vom Gewichte entzuckt;
o was sind wir den Dingen fur zehrende Lehrer,
weil ihnen ewige Kindheit gluckt.
Nahme sie einer ins innige Schlafen und schliefe
tief mit den Dingen -: 0 wie kame er leicht,
anders zum anderen Tag, aus der gemeinsamen Tiefe.
Oder er bliebe vielleicht; und sie bliihten und priesen
ihn, den Bekehrten, der nun den Ihrigen glekht,
allen den stillen Geschwistern im Winde der Wiesen.
It
The Sonnets to Orpheus: Second Series • 165
14
Look at the flowers, true to earth's ways,
we lend them fate from the rim of fate -
but who knowsl If they deplore their decay,
it's up to us to be their regret.
All wants to float. But we trudge around like weights.
Ecstatic with gravity, we lay ourselves on everything.
Oh what tiresome teachers we are for things,
while they prosper in their ever childlike state.
If one took them into intimate sleep and slept
deeply with things - oh how light he'd come
back, changed with change of day, out of a mutual depth.
Or perhaps he'd stay; and they'd bloom and praise him,
the convert who's now like one of them,
all the calm sisters and brothers in the meadow's wind.
166 • Die Sonette an Orpheus: Zweiter Teil
15
o Brunnen-Mund, du gebender, du Mund,
der unerschopflich Eines, Reines, spricht, -
du, vor des Wassers fliessendem Gesicht,
marmorne Maske. Und im Hintergrund
der Aquadukte Herkunft. Weither an
Grabern vorbei, vom Hang des Apennins
tragen sie dir dein Sagen zu, das dann
am schwarzen Altern deines Kinns
voriiberflillt in das Gefass davor.
Dies ist das schlafend hingelegte Ohr,
das Marmor-Ohr, in das du immer sprkhst.
Ein Ohr der Erde. Nur mit sich allein
redet sie also. Schiebt ein Krug sich ein,
so scheint es ihr, dass du sie unterbrichst.
..
The Sonnets to Orpheus: Second Series • 167
15
Oh fountain-mouth, you mouth, you giver,
who speaks the inexhaustible, the Pure, the One -
you, marble mask in front of the water's
flowing face. And in the background
the origin of aqueducts. From far away,
past graves, from the slopes of the Apenines,
they bring you what you say,
what then, beyond your black and aging chin,
finally falls into the basin
before it. This is the ear laid down asleep,
the marble ear in which you always speak.
An ear of earth. She's only talking
with herself alone. Slip a pitcher in,
it seems to her you're interrupting.
168 • Die Sonette an Orpheus: Zweiter Teil
16
Immer wieder von uns aufgerissen,
ist der Gott die Stene, we1che heilt.
Wir sind Scharfe, denn wir wonen wissen,
aber er ist heiter und verteilt.
Selbst die reine, die geweihte Spende
nimmt er anders nicht in seine Welt,
als indem er sich dem freien Ende
unbewegt entgegenstellt.
Nur der Tote trinkt
aus der hier von uns geharten QueI1e,
wenn der Gott ihm schweigend winkt, dem Toten.
Uns wird nur das Llirmen angeboten.
Und das Lamm erbittet seine Schelle
aus dem shlleren Instinkt.
..
The Sonnets to Orpheus: Second Series • 169
16
Torn open by us over and over again,
the god is the place that heals.
We're sharp because we will
know; but he's scattered and serene.
Even the pure, the sacred offering
he accepts no other way into his world:
motionless, he stands confronting
it, the unconditional goal.
Out of the well
heard by us here, only the dead drinks
when the god signals silently to him, the dead.
To us only noise is offered.
And out of a more quiet instinct,
the lamb begs for its bell.
,.
170 • Die Sonette an Orpheus: Zweiter Teil
17
Wo, in we1chen immer selig bewasserten Garten, an we1chen
Baumen, aus we1chen zartlich entblatterten Bliiten-Ke1chen
reifen die fremdartigen Friichte der Trostung? Diese
kostlichen, deren du eine vielleicht in der zertretenen Wiese
deiner Armut findest. Von einem zum anderen Male
wunderst du dieh iiber die Grosse der Frucht,
liber ihr Heilsein, liber die Sanftheit der Schale,
und dass sie der Leiehtsinn des Vogels dir nieht vorwegnahm
und nicht die Eifersucht
unten des Wurms. Gibt es denn Baume, von Engeln beflogen,
und von verborgenen langsamen Gartnern so seltsam gezogen,
dass sie uns tragen, ohne uns zu gehoren?
Haben wir niemals vermocht, wir Schatten und Schemen,
durch unser voreilig reifes und wieder welkes Benehmen
jener gelassenen Sommer Gleiehmut zu stOren?
It
The Sonnets to Orpheus: Second Series· 171
17
Where, in what heavenly watered gardens, in what trees,
from what lovingly unsheathed flower-calyxes
do the strange fruits of consolation ripen? Those precious
fruits, one of which you find perhaps in the trampled field
of your poverty? Time after time you marvel
at the size of the fruit, its soundness,
over its tender peel, and that a thoughtless
bird or jealous worm below didn't steal
it before. Are there trees flocked by angels, then,
and so strangely bred by slow, clandestine garden
hands that they produce us without being ours?
Shadows and shades, because we ripen too soon
and wither again, have we never had the power
to disorder the composure of these serene summers?
..
172 • Die Sonette an Orpheus: Zweiter Teil
18
Tanzerin: 0 du Verlegung
alles Vergehcns in Gang: wie brachtest du's dar.
Vnd der Wirbel am Schluss, dieser Saum aus Bewegung,
nahm er nicht ganz in Besitz das erschwungene Jahr?
Bliihte nicht, dass ihn dein Schwingen von vorhin umschwarme
platzlich sein Wipfel von Stille? Vnd tiber ihr,
war sie nicht Sonne, war sie nicht Sommer, die Warme,
diese unzahlige Warme aus dir?
Aber er trug auch, er trug, dein Baum der Ekstase.
Sind sie nicht seine ruhigen Frtichte: der Krug,
reifend gestreift, und die gereiftere Vase?
Vnd in den Bildern: ist nicht die Zeichnung geblieben,
die deiner Braue dunk1er Zug
rasch an die Wandung der eigenen Wendung geschrieben?
..
The Sonnets to Orpheus: Second Series • 173
18
Dancing girl: oh you translation
of an vanishing into act: how you made it clear.
And that final flourish, that tree of motion,
didn't it wholly possess the hard-turned year?
Didn't it oloom so your swirl a moment ago might
swarm around it, suddenly a summit of stillness? Also,
wasn't it summer above, "asn't it sunlight,
the warmth, that immeasurable warmth out of you?
But also it bore, it bore, your tree of rapture.
Aren't these its tranquil fruits: the jug
streaked ripe, and the vase even riper?
And in the images: didn't the drawing
endure, that dark stroke your eyebrow
quickly scrawled on the wall of its own turning?
It
174 • Die Sonette an Orpheus: Zweiter Teil
19
Irgendwo wohnt das Gold in der verwohnenden Bank,
und mit Tausenden tut es vertraulich. Doch jcner
BUnde, der Bettler, ist selbst dem kupfernen Zehner
wic ein verlorener Ort, wic das staubige Eck untcrm Schrank.
In den Geschaften entlang ist das Geld wie zu Hause
und verkleidet sich schcinbar in Seide, Nelken und Pelz.
Er, der Schweigende, steht in der Atempause
aHes des wach oder schlafend atmenden Gelds.
o wie mag sie sich schliessen bei Nacht, diese immer offene Hand.
Morgen holt sie das Schicksal wieder, und taglich
halt es sie hin: hen, elend, unendlich zerstorbar.
Dass doch einer, ein Schauender, cndlich ihren langen Bestand
staunend begriffe und riihmte. Nur dem Aufsingenden saglich.
Nur dem Gottlichen horbar.
The Sonnets to Orpheus: Second Series' 175
19
Gold lives somewhere in an indulgent bank
and it's intimate with thousands. But even
to a copper penny, that b ~ g g a r , the blind one,
is like a lost place, a dusty corner under a trunk.
All along money feels at home in shops
and shows up decked in silk, carnations, furs.
He, the silent one, stands in the breath-stops
of all that breathing money as it sleeps or stirs.
Oh how does that always opened hand close at night?
Tomorrow fate will haul it out again and hold
it out every day: ever destructible, miserable, bright.
If only someone, a seer, stunned, finally understood
its lasting value and praised it. That's sung
only by the singer. Heard only by the god .
..
176 • Die Sonette an Orpheus: Zweiter reil
20
Zwischen den Sternen, wie weit; und doch, urn wievieles noch
weiter,
was man am Hiesigen lernt.
Einer, zum Beispiel, ein Kind ... und ein Nachster, einZweiter-,
o wie unfasslich entfernt.
Schicksal, es misst uns vielleicht mit des Seienden Spanne,
dass es uns fremd erscheint;
denk, wieviel Spannen allein yom Madchen zum Manne,
wenn es ihn meidet und meint.
Alles ist weit -, und nirgends schliesst sich der Kreis.
Sieh in der Schiissel, auf heiter bereitetem Tische,
seltsam der Fische Gesicht.
Fische sind stumm ... , meinte man einmal. Wer weiss?
Aber ist nicht am Ende ein Ort, wo man das, was der Fische
Sprache ware, ohne sie spricht?
It
The Sonnets to Orpheus: Second Series· 177
20
How far between the stars; and yet, how much farther
still what we learn from the present.
Someone, a child for example ... and another, a neighbor -
oh how inconceivably distant.
Perhaps fate measures us with the span
of being, so that to us it seems strange;
think, how many spans just from a man
to a woman, when she avoids him and longs . . .
All is far - and nowhere does the circle close.
See, on the table nicely set, in the dish,
how odd the faces of the fish.
Fish are dumb . . . one used to think. Who knows?
But isn't there a place at last where perhaps their speech
is spoken - without fish?
..
178 • Die Sonette an Orpheus: Zweiter reil
21
Singe die Garten, mein Herz, die du nicht kennst; wie in Glas
eingegossene Garten, klar, unerreichbar.
Wasser und Rosen von Ispahan oder Schiras,
singe sie selig, preise sie, keinem vergleichbar.
Zeige, mein Herz, dass du sie niemals entbehrst.
Dass sic dich meinen, ihre reifenden Feigen.
Dass du mit ihren, zwischen den bliihenden Zweigen
wie zum Gesicht gesteigerten Liiften verkehrst.
Meide den Irrtum, dass es Entbehrungen gebe
fUr den geschehnen Entschluss, diesen: zu sein!
Seidener Faden, karnst du hinein ins Gewebe.
Welchem der Bilder du auch im lnnern geeint bist
(sei es selbst ein Moment aus dern Leben der Pein),
fiihl, dass der ganze, der riihmliche Teppich gemeint ist.
The Sonnets to Orpheus: Second Series • 179
21
My heart, sing the gardens you haven't known,
like clear inaccessible gardens poured in glass.
Ecstatic, sing the incomparable roses
and fountains of Ispahan or Shiraz, praise them.
My heart, prove that you can do without them.
That it's you their ripening figs have in mind.
That your friendship with their breezes between
branches all in bloom rises to the pitch of vision.
Avoid the error of believing that you're being
deprived for that decision you once made: to be!
Silken thread, you became part of the weaving.
Whatever pattern you're part of most intrinsically
(even just for a moment in the life of pain),
feel that the whole is meant, the glorious tapestry.
It
180 • Die Sonette an Orpheus: Zweiter Teil
22
o trotz Schicksal: die herrlichen Uberfliisse
unseres Daseins, in Parken iibergeschaumt, -
oder als steinerne Manner neben die Schliisse
hoher Portale, unter Balkone gebaumt!
Odie eherne Glocke, die ihre Keule
taglich wider den stumpfen Alltag hebt.
Oder die eine, in Karnak, die SauIe, die Saule,
die fast ewige Tempel iiberlebt.
Heute stiirzen die Oberschiisse, dieselben,
nur noch als Eile vorbei, aus dem waagrechten gelben
Tag in die blendend mit Licht iibertriebene Nacht.
Aber das Ra.sen zergeht und lasst keine Spuren.
Kurven des Flugs durch die Luft und die, die sie fuhren
keine vielleicht ist umsonst. Doch nur wie gedacht.
The Sonnets to Orpheus: Second Series • 181
22
Oh in spite of fate: the glorious surplus
of our existence foaming over in the parks-
or like stone men braced under bakonies
crowding the cornerstones of high arches I
Oh the brassy ben lifting its bludgeon
daily against the dally dull.
Or the one, in Karnak, the column, the column
that outlives the almost eternal temples.
Today abundances, the same ones, race
by, but only as a rush from the horizontal
yenow day into the more magnified dazzling night.
But the frenzy passes and leaves no trace.
Arcs of flight across the air, and those who controlled
them: maybe none is meaningless. But only as thought.
It
182 • Die Sonette an Orpheus: Zweiter Teil
23
Rufe mich zu jener deiner Stunden,
die dir unaufhorlich widersteht:
flehend nah wie das Gesicht von Hunden,
aber immer wieder weggedreht,
wenn du meinst, sie endlich zu erfassen.
So Entzognes ist am meisten dein.
Wir sind frei. Wir wurden dort entlassen,
wo wir meinten, erst begriisst zu sein.
Bang verlangen wir nach einem Halte,
wir zu Jungen manchmal fUr das Alte
und zu alt fiir das, was niemals war.
Wir, gerecht nur, wo wir dennoch preisen,
well wir, ach, der Ast sind und das Eisen
und das Siisse reifender Gefahr.
It
The SDnnets to Orpheus: Second Series • 183
23
Can me to that one of your hours
which is incessantly resisting
you: close as a dog's begging
face, but turned away as ever,
when you think it's finally caught.
What's taken like this is most yours.
We're free. Where we'd thought
we were welcomed - we were sent from there.
Afraid, we claw only for a hold,
we, sometimes too young for what's old
and too old for what never was.
We're just only where we praise nonetheless.
For, oh, we're the bough and the axe
and the sweetness of ripening risk.
Of
184 • Die Sonette an Orpheus: Zweiter Teil
24
o diese Lust, immer neu, aus gelockertem Lehm!
Niemand beinah hat den fruhesten Wagem geholfen.
Stiidte entstanden trotzdem an beseligten Golfen,
Wasser und 01 fiillten die Kruge trotzdem.
Gotter, wir planen sie erst in erkuhnten Entwurfen,
die uns das murrische Schicksal wieder zerstort.
Aber sie sind die UnsterbIichen. Sehet, wir durfen
jenen erhorchen, der uns am Ende erhort.
Wir, ein Geschlecht durch Jahrtausende: Mutter und Vater
immer erfiillter von dem kunftigen Kind,
dass es uns einst, iibersteigend, erschuttere, spater.
Wir, wir unendlich Gewagten, was haben wir Zeitl
Und nur der schweigsame Tod, der weiss, was wir sind
und was er immer gewinnt, wenn er uns leiht.
The Sonnets to Orpheus: Second Series • 185
24
Oh the ever-fresh pleasure from loosened day!
Virtually no one helped the earliest darers.
Nevertheless, cities rose out of happy bays,
water and oil, nonetheless, filled the pitchers.
Gods: we plot them out in daring models first
which disgruntled fate destroys for us again.
But they're the immortals. Listen, we must
hear him out who'll hear us in the end.
We, one generation through millennia: mother and father
always more full of the child of the future
who later, when he has outgrown us, will shatter
us. We, the endlessly risked, how much time we own!
And only closed-mouth death knows what we are
and, when he lends us, what he always gains.
186 • Die Sonette an Orpheus: Zweiter Teil
25
Schon, horch, horst du der ersten Harken
Arbeit; wieder den menschlichen Takt
in der verhaltenen Stille der starken
Vorfruhlingserde. Unabgeschmackt
scheint dir das Kommende. Jenes so oft
dir schon Gekommene scheint dir zu kommen
wieder wie Neues. bruner erhofft,
nahmst du es niemals. Es hat dich genommen.
Selbst die Blatter durchwinterter Eichen
scheinen im Abend ein kunftiges Braun.
Manchmal geben sich Lufte ein Zeichen.
Schwarz sind die Striiucher. Doch Haufen von Dunger
lagern als satteres Schwarz in den Au'n.
Jede Stunde, die hingeht, wird junger.
The Sannets to Orpheus: Second Series • 187
25
Listen: already you can hear the working
of the first hoes; again the human rhythm
in the early hard spring earth's unyielding
stillness. Whatever's coming doesn't seem
stale to you. What's already come toward
you so often seems to be approaching you
like something new. You always expected
but never seized it. It captured you.
Even the leaves of wintering oaks
in the evening radiate a future brown.
Sometimes breezes exchange signs.
Black are the bushes. Yet piles of manure
lie on the fields, an even richer black.
Each passing hour grows younger.
188 • Die Sonette an Orpheus: Zweiter Teil
26
Wie ergreift uns der Vogelschrei ...
Irgendein einmal erschaffenes Schreien.
Aber die Kinder schon, spielend im Freien,
schreien an wirklichen Schreien vorbei.
Schreien den Zufall. In Zwischenraume
dieses, des Weltraums, (in welchen der heile
Vogelschrei eingeht, wie Menschen in Traume-)
treiben sie ihre, des Kreischens, Keile.
Wehe, wo sind wir? Immer noch freier,
wie die losgerissenen Drachen
jagen wir halbhoch, mit Riindern von Lachen,
windig zerfetzten. - Ordne die Schreier,
singender Gott! dass sie rauschend erwachen,
tragend als Stromung das Haupt und die Leier .
..
The Sonnets to Orpheus: Second Series • 189
26
How a bird's cry can move us ...
Any once-created crying.
But even children playing
in the open cry beyond real cries. . . . ,
Cry accident. They drive their screams'
wedges into those interstices
of cosmic space (in which bird-cries
go unharmed, as men go into dreams).
Oh where are we? Freer and freer,
like kites torn loose, tattered by wind,
we race in midair, edged with laughter.
Singing god, order the criers,
so they awake resounding like a current
carrying the head and the lyre.
It
190 • Die Sonette an Orpheus: Zweiter Teil
27
Gibt es wirklich die Zeit, die zcrstorende?
Wann, auf dem ruhcnden Berg, 7..erbricht sie die Burg?
Dieses Herz, das unendlich den Gottern gehorende,
wann vergewaltigts der Demiurg?
Sind wir wirklich so angstlich Zerbrechliche,
wie das Schicksal uns wahrmachen will?
1st die Kindheit, die tie fe, versprechliche,
in den Wurzeln - spater - still?
Ach, das Gespenst des Verganglichen,
durch den arglos Empfiinglichen
geht es, als war es ein Rauch.
Als die, die wir sind, als die Treibenden,
getten wir doch bei bleibenden
Kraften als gottlicher Brauch.
The Sonnets to Orpheus: Second Series • 191
27
Does time the destroyer really exist?
When will it shatter the peaceful mountain's tower?
When will the demiurge overpower
this heart that always belongs to the gods?
Are we really as anxiously brittle
as fate wants to prove us?
Is childhood, so deep, so full of promise
in its roots - later - made still?
Ah, the apparition of impennanence;
it slides through the innocent
receiver as if it were steam.
As these which we are, the drivers,
among the lasting powers
we still matter as a divine means .
..
192 • Die Sonette an Orpheus: Zweiter Teil
28
o komm und geh. Du, fast noch Kind, erganze
fUr einen Augcnblick die Tanzfigur
zum reinen Sternbild eines jener Tam.:e,
darin wir die dumpf ordnende Natur
verganglich ubertreffen. Denn sie regte
sich vollig horend nur, da Orpheus sang.
Du warst noch die von damals her Bewegte
und leicht befremdet, wenn ein Baum sich lang
besann, mit dir nach dem Gehor zu gehn.
Du wusstest noch die Stelle, wo die Leier
sich tOnend hob -; die unerhorte Mitte.
Fur sie versuchtest du die schonen Schritte
und hofftest, einrnal zu der heilen Feier
des Freundes Gang und Antlitz hinzudrehn.
It
The Sonnets to Orpheus: Second Series· 193
28
Oh come and go. You, still barely a child,
for an eye-wink perfect the symbol of dance
into a sheer constellation of dance,
one of them in which we momentarily excel
Nature's primitive ordering. For she reached
fun hearing only when Orpheus sang.
You were the one from the past still excited
and slightly surprised when a tree took so long
deciding whether it would go into your ear.
You still knew that place where the resounding
lyre arose - that unheard-of center.
So you tried out your lovely steps, hoping
to tum your friend's look and direction
someday toward that restoring celebration.
194 • Die Stmette an Orpheus: Zweiter Teil
29
Stiller Freund der vielen Fernen, fiihle,
wie dein Atem noch den Raum vermehrt.
1m Gebalk der finstern Glockenstiihle
lass dich lauten. Das, was an dir 7..ehrt,
wird ein Starkes tiber dieser Nahrung.
Geh in der Verwandlung aus und ein.
Was ist deine leidendste Erfahrung?
1st dir Trinken bitter, werde Wein.
Sei in dieser Nacht aus Ubermass
Zauberkraft am Kreuzweg deiner Sinne,
ihrer seltsamen Begegnung Sinn.
Und wenn dich das Irdische vergass,
zu der stillen Erde sag: Ich rinne.
Zu dem raschen Wasser sprich: Ich bin.
The Sonnets to Orpheus: Second Series· 195
29
Silent friend of many distances,
feel how your breath is still expanding space.
Let yourself peal among the beams
of dark belfries. Whatever preys
on you will grow strong from this nourishment.
Know transformation through and through.
What experience has been most painful to you?
If the drinking's Ditter, turn to wine.
In this vast night, be the magic power
at your senses' intersection,
the meaning of their strange encounter.
And if the earthly has forgotten
you, say to the still earth: I flow.
To the rushing water speak: I am.
NOTES
..
NOTES
N.B.: The line-numbers in these notes refer primarily
to the translation .
..
THE DUINO ELEGIES
Dedication
Princess Marie von Thurn und Taxis-Hohenlohe was a friend of Rilke
who offered him the use of her at Duino near Trieste where he
the first and second elegies and wrote fragments that later
became the third, sixth, ninth, and tenth elegies.
The FIrSt Elegy
ll. 1-2: angelic orders
Although he used terminology and incidents associated with tra-
ditional ideas of angels, Rilke asserted in his letter of 1925 to his
Polish translator that the angel in the Elegies "has nothing to do with
the angel of the Christian heaven." He went on to explain: "The
angel of the Elegies is that creature in whom the transformation of the
visible into the invisible, which we are accomplishing, appears al-
ready consummated ... "
1. 46: Gaspara Stamp"
A sixteenth-century Italian noblewoman who fell desperately in love
with Count Collatino of Colla to when she was twenty-six years old.
After he deserted her, she found consolation in religion and wrote a
series of 200 sonnets recording the story of their love. She died in
1554 at the age of thirty-one.
I. 65: Santa Maria Formosa
A church in Venice, which Rilke visited in 19l1. Romano Guardini,
the noted theologian, has suggested that Rilke is referring to a plaque
in that chuTch that bears the following inscription: "While life lasted
I lived for others; now, after death, I have not perished, but in cold
marble live for myself. I was Hermann Wilhelm. Flanders mourns
200 • Notes
for me, Adria sighs for me, poverty calls for me. He died on the 16th
of October, 1593."
1.91: LinGs
An ancient Greek deity whose legend assumed a variety of forms
linking him with Adonis, Apollo, and Orpheus and who was as-
sociated with nature-worship and the origin of music. According to
one account, when Linus died the void caused by his death was so
startled that its trembling amazement was called musk. In another
account the lament or dirge for Linus is related to music's origin be-
cause those who were numbed by his death were reawakened by the
song of Orpheus.
The Second Eh!gy
l. 3: Tobias
A biblical figure who was sent by his dying father to retrieve a sub-
stantial amount of money that had been left in another man's care.
Tobias didn't know the way, and when he went looking for someone
to guide him, he met Raphael whom he didn't recognize as one of the
archangels because Raphael appeared to him disguised as a hand-
some young man.
The Fifth Elegy
Dedication
In 1915 Rilke spent several months in the home of Frau Hertha von
Koenig who, at the time, was the owner of Picasso's painting Les SaJ-
timbal1ques, which influenced this Elegy.
11. 14-15: ... the essence of standing there: the large initial of Debut (Jf"
Done . ..
This passage is generally accepted as a direct reference to Picasso's
Les Saltimbanques in which Rilke sees the acrobats as being arranged
on the canvas in the shape of the letter "D" and which he describes
ClS the large initial for the German word "Dastehn," whose literal
translation is "Standing-thereness." Since there is no one-word
equivalent to "Dastehn" in English, a literal translation would oblit-
erate the link that Rilke intended between the poem and Picasso's
painting.
In his commentary on this Elegy and Les Saltimbanques, J. B.
Notes·201
Leishman astutely observes that in Picasso's painting it is rather
difficult to determine whether the acrobats are "arriving or depart-
ing, beginning or ending their performance." Moreover, in one of
his notebooks from 1907, Rilke wrote at length about a troupe of real
acrobats that he'd seen in the Luxembourg Gardens in Paris and
spent considerable time describing how the acrobats kept starting
and stopping. At this moment in the Elegy it also seems that the ac-
robats are standing in some kind of momentary pause between one
act and another. These are some of the considerations that contrib-
uted to the manner in which I attempted to resolve this linguistic
challenge.
1. 18: Augllstus the Strong
King of Poland and Elector of Saxony from 1697 to 1733. According
to a mixture of history and legend, he was known to be a powerful
athlete who was matched in physical strength only by Peter of Rus-
sia.
I. 63: "Subrisio SaUat"
An abbreviation of "subrisio saltatoris," i.e., "acrobat's smile."
The Sixth Elegy
I. 20: Karnak
The site of the splendid temple to the god Amon Re on the Nile in
Southern Egypt that Rilke visited in January of 1911. The temple is
especially noted for the Hypostle Hall erected by Seti I and his son
Ramses II during the 19th Dynasty. The Hall includes 134 huge pil-
lars on which are carved various scenes depicting the kings and the
god.
Most translators have rendered this line as "the chiseled reliefs of
Karnak the conquering king." However, there is no historical evi-
dence that there ever was a king by this name, a fact that Rilke un-
doubtedly knew since he had visited Karnak.
The Eighth Elegy
Dedication
Rudolf Kassner was an Austrian philosopher and writer to whom
Rilke was introduced by Princess Marie von Thurn und Taxis-
Hohenlohe and with whom Rilke spent some time at Duino. De-
202 • Notes
spite their friendship, Rilke profoundly disagreed with Kassner's be-
lief that the limitations and contradictions lamented in this Elegy are
necessary conditions of life; and Kassner viewed Rilke's longing for
"the open" as atavistic.
I. 58: Etruscan souls
The Etruscans painted birds on the walls of their tombs to represent
the souls of the dead. They also often placed a life-size figure of the
dead person on top of the sarcophagus.
The Tenth Elegy
1. 75: brother to the one on the Nile
Most probably a reference to the mastaba, a building in front of the
great pyramid.
I. 80: the scale of stars
The constellation Libra, whose sign is a scale.
I. 83: the double crown
The pschent (or double crown) worn by the Sphinx and by Egyptian
kings after the unification of Upper and Lower Egypt.
(Perhaps it is worth noting that in his letter to his Polish translator,
Rilkc stated that while the Land of Lamentation is a kind of reflection
of the Nile country "in the desert clarity of the consciousness of the
dead," he insisted that it "is not to be identified with Egypt . . .")
11. 91-93: Rider, Staff, Garland of Fruit, et al.
Most of these are Rilke's own symbolic constellations. However, the
middle star of the Great Dipper and the little star immediately above
it were known to the Arabs as "The Horse and the Rider." The Latin
name for this combination of stars was Eques stelluia, "Little Starry
Horseman."
THE SONNETS TO ORPHEUS
Dedication
Born in Moscow in 1900, Wera Ow::kama Knoop was a young girl
especially talented in music and dancing. Although Rilke had seen
her daru:e only once, her untimely death at the age of twenty moved
Notes • 203
him deeply and served as the emotional occasion for the writing of
these sonnets. In a letter to Countess Sizzo, Rilke described Vera as
"that beautiful child, who had just begun to dance and attracted the
attention of everyone who saw her in those days through the art of
motion and transformation innate in her body and spirit."
First Series
;; 6, ll. 3-4:
In The Golden Bough, Frazer notes that Orpheus carried a willow
branch as a talisman when he went down to Hades to rescue
Eurydice. Moreover, in the frescoes on the walls of the loggia at Del-
phi, Orpheus was portrayed as sitting under a willow, holding his
lyre with one hand and a branch of the willow with the other.
I. 10:
Rue and earthsmoke (the herb, fumitory) were plants used to make
medicine. C. F. MacIntyre also states that these are "typical
graveyard flora."
I. 14:
The clasp, ring, and gourd (or jug) were everyday objects buried with
the dead by some andent peoples.
'*' 10:
In the first stanza Rilkc is clearly speaking of the andent sarcophagi
in Rome, while in the second stanza, according to a note he wrote in
a friend's copy of the Sonnets, he is referring to the open sarcophagi
among the Roman ruins at Les Alyscamps near Aries in Southeastern
France.
;; 11:
See note on lines 91-93 of "The Tenth Elegy" for a discussion of the
constellation "Rider."
;; 13 and 14:
C. F. Macintyre has suggested rather convincingly that these two
sonnets are indebted to Valery's poem, "Le Cimetiere marin."
;; 16:
In a letter to his wife, Rilke stated that perhaps the reader should
know that this poem is addressed to a dog.
204 • Notes
The last line is somewhat enigmatic, for it suggests that Rilke has
either dramatically telescoped or confused the biblical account of
Esau and his twin-brother Jacob. In Genesis it is Ja{:ob whose skin is
smooth and hairless and who attaches the pelts of goats to his arms
and neck in order to deceive his aged father, Isaac, into believing that
he Oacob) is Esau and thereby rob his brother of his rightful inheri-
tance.
As it appears in the poem, the line could be spoken by Jacob at that
moment when he is impersonating his brother, or Esau could be
speaking metaphorically. However, in a letter to Countess Sizzo
Oune, 1923) Rilke's own explanation of the line makes it all the more
enigmatic. He told the Countess that the dog in the poem is like
Esau who has "put on his pelt in order to share in ... a heritage of
everything human that was not coming to him."
Second Series
#3, l. 7:
A "sixteen-pointer" is a stag with sixteen points to its antlers. Gener-
ally an eight- or ten-point stag is considered very large.
#4:
This sonnet is based on The Lady with the Unicorn tapestries at the
Musee de Cluny in Paris.
#5:
Though Rilke ascribes certain morphological characteristics of ani-
mals to this flower, it should not be confused with the sea anemone.
In her memoir of RiTke, Lou Andreas-Salome quotes him as once
writing: "I am like the little anemone I once saw in the garden in
Rome, which had opened so far during the day that it could no
longer close at night!"
#8:
Egon von Rilke was Rilke's cousin and one of his childhood play-
mates. He died when he was still a child. Most probably he is "the
boy with the squinting brown eyes" in line 35 of "The Fourth Elegy."
# 11:
The caverns of Karst (or Carso) are at Trieste, near Duino, which
Notes·205
Rilke visited. Rilke's description of the manner in which doves were
hunted is based on fact.
# 21, 1.4:
Ispahan and Shiraz were cities in ancient Persia, now Iran. Ispahan
is also a kind of Persian rug.
# 22, 1.7:
No doubt Rilke is referring to the Column of Taharka at Karnak,
which he described in some detail in a letter to his wife dated
January, 1911. Also see note on line 20 of "The Sixth Elegy" regard-
ing Karnak.
#23:
According to one of Rilke's notes, this poem is addressed "To the
Reader."
#29:
Rilke's note for this poem was "To a friend of Wera's"; critics gen-
erally agree that most probably he is referring to himself .
..

buiNO eleGies
and

Tb'e SONNeTS TOORpbeus

AL SO BY A. POULIN,

JR..

The American Folk Scene: Dimensions of the Folksong Revival (ed. with David A. DeTurk) In Advent: Poems Contemporary American Poetry (ed.) Catawba: Omens, Prayers and Chants

Rainer Maria Rilke

tJUiNO ELEljiES and Th'E SONNETS TO ORphEUS
Translated by

A. Poulin, Jr.

HOUGHTON MIFFLIN COMPANY BOSTON

-i-

Houghton Mifflin Company.165D821977 831'. Poulin. Jr. I. write to Permissions. Duino Elegies and The Sonnets to Orpheus. Grateful acknowledgment is made to the Editors of these journals. Volume 1. Title: Duino Elegies. All rights reserved For information about permission to reproduce selections from this book. Libmry ofCongress ClltIlloging-in.9'12 76-47553 ISBN 0-395-2. 1976.) Printed in the United States of America QUM 151413 . Rilke. Massachusetts 02108. Boston. Some of The Sonnets to Orpheus originally appeared in The American Poetry Review and in The Ohio Revkw. Rainer Maria. PT2635. English and German. II. Includes bibliographical references. Jr. 1875-1926.'s translation of Duirw Elegies was originally published as"A Special APR Supplement" by The American Poetry Review. An earlier version of A.The German text for this book is taken from Rilke's 5tlemtliche Werke. 1971 by A. Frankfurt am Main.5015-3 ISBN 0-395-25058-7 (pbk. 1875-1926. Poulin. 2 Park Street. Rilke. Copyright © 1975. All rights reserved. Rainer Maria. DieSonnettean Orpheus. copyright e1955 by Insel Verlag. 1977. Translation of Duineser E1egien and Die Sonette an Orpheus.Pubiictltion DIIt. English&tGerman.

all of which he is. he offered me advice and encouragement with editiorial acumen and with that fine sensibility that marks his own poems and translations. and blood brother . Grateful acknowledgment is due to Mr. I also want to thank Kirsten Michalski. Kurt Bernheim. Insel Verlag's representative in the United States. Jonathan Galassi suggested that I translate The Sonnets to Or- . as did Professor Jack Stein (Harvard University). generously agreed to read various parts and stages of my manuscript for the sake of accuracy. poet. gave me the kind of help and encouragement that can come only from a long-time friend. Galen Williams. for his gracious assistance in securing the reprint and translations rights to Rilke's poems for this book. Their expertise and sensitivity elucidated difficult passages and afforded me insights that were invaluable in my attempt to make these translations as faithful to the original as I beJieved possible. and Leonard Randolph personally for kindness that far exceeded professional courtesy. Rimbaud's brilliant translator. my colleagues at the State University of New York at Brockport.E. Irma Pylyshenko and Christoph Kaiser. scholar. Bertrand Mathieu. Ines Delgado de Torres. My friend Stephen Berg initially suggested that I translate the Duino Elegies. From my first faltering attempts to the version that appeared in The American Poetry Review. as well as the P. and Paul Hopper (Pennsylvania State University).PERSONAL ACKNOWLEDGMENTS I WANT TO THANK The National Endowment for the Arts and The Research Foundation of the State University of New York for grants I received while working on these translations.N. Stephen Conway (Boston University). American Center for assistance in time of need.

.vi • Personal Acknowledgments pheus in order that this book include both of Rilke's last major sequences.. And you. his sustained loyalty. P. Jr. and by the personal interest he devoted to these translations. Love. for wintering out a hard-turned year. A. His professional vigor as my editor was surpassed only by his friendship.

by February 9 he had completed 7 elegies. . his Polish translator. I've attempted to make the Elegies and Sonnets as fully accessible as translations can be to individuals who can't read German. and by February 20. on February 11 he had completed 10 elegies. artistry. and to make them successful poems in English. This book marks the first time that English translations of these two major works are being published together as the larger interdependent whole they've always been. Rilke stated that the Duino Elegies and Sonnets to Orpheus "are. between February 2 and 5 of 1922 he wrote the first sequence of sonnets." Since he wrote all of the Sonnets and completed most of the Elegies in an astoundingly short period of time (almost entirely within the month of February. as could not be otherwise. and vision that distinguishes them as Rilke's greatest achievement and one of the most fully realized artistic statements of twentieth-century poetry. not only had he written stll! another elegy (now the Fifth) but also the second sequence of sonnets. 19Z?t). For a number of reasons. Rilke's claim that these two sequences of poems "support each other constantly" is entirely plausible. readers of German will note that my attempt to be faithful to the original can't be equated with an intention to IN HIS NOTED LETTER • Rilke started writing the Elegies in 1912 and worked on them intermittently untlll914. Moreover. to remain as faithful as possible to the original. of the same 'birth'" and "filled with the same essence. According to several of his letters.PREFACE of 1925 to Witold von Hulewicz. he did not and could not return to them again until 1922. critics and scholars generally agree that an attentive reading of the Elegies and Sonnets reveals that they do support and reaffirm each other and are clearly filled with the same essential sensibility. Since these are a poet's work and not a scholar's.

Robert Bly. Snodgrass have also published translations of . Such distinguished contemporary American poets as Randall Jarrell. Later I read C. even as he oversteps the bounds. B. and one of the poet-translator'S responsibilities is to try to submerge his personal sensibility into that of the poet whose work he is translating.viii • Preface be literal. MacIntyre's translations of the Elegies and Sonnets and. nevertheless. Stephen Canney and Jay Wilson's Elegies. Leishman and Stephen Spender's translation of the Duino Elegies and M. D. Herter Norton's versions of The Sonnets to Orpheus. The translation that results from such an encounter thus becomes a fusion oflanguages. the translator is entrusted with a kind of dictation. Like so many others of my generation. No less important to this kind of alchemical process and its results is the fact that. and aesthetic personalities. and W. one can't ignore the work of others or avoid indebtedness. Such words may no longer be part of the idiom of contemporary poetry. Rilke spoke of the Elegies and especially of the Sonnets as "dictations" that were "entrusted" to him." In his letters. when dealing with poems like the Elegies and Sonnets. more recently. historical moments. as well as by his occasional idiosyncratic use of Gennan. I was introduced to these poems through J. But he can't annihilate his own inner poetic sense entirely. cultures. I've taken such liberties as I felt were necessitated by the differences between the two languages and by Rilke's unique logic and imagery. At times I've taken even greater liberties because a more literal translation didn't seem to convey the full aesthetic sense of given passages. D. F. as well as David Young's courageous rendition of them. On such occasions I invoked RiIke's own articulation of the poet's (and the translator's) responsibility and risk: "And he obeys. it becomes a third poem.

I've read all of them." A. Emerson's dictum that each age must write its own books takes on a new meaning. and now and then I've stolen a word. Poulin. Each age. New York February.. 1976 . like Rilke. I hope someone else will find a word or ph1C!se to steal from these versions. Brockport. and to come to a fuller realization that there have been a few among us. This stood among men. Jr. I've learned from all of them. who haven't failed to use our "generous spaces" and who still assert: "That's us . a phrase. . a line from one or more of them. each generation needs many versions of great works in translation in order to know them as variously and acutely as possible. When the work at hand is as monumental and awesome as the Duma Elegies and Sonnets to Orpheus. It's simply foolhardy to try to improve on what is obviously a mot juste.Preface· ix some of the Sonnets.

CONTENTS

Personal Acknowledgments Preface DUINO ELEGIES The First Elegy The Second Elegy The Third Elegy The Fourth Elegy The Fifth Elegy The Sixth Elegy The Seventh Elegy The Eighth Elegy The Ninth Elegy The Tenth Elegy

v
vii

5
13 19 27 33
43

47

55
61
69

THE SONNETS TO ORPHEUS
First Series

83

Second Series

137 199

Notes

tJUiNO ELEGiES
for Basilike dieses ist unser, uns so zu beriihren

DUINESER ELEGIEN

Aus dem Besitz der Fiirstin Marie von Thurn und Taxis-Hohenlohe

DUINO ELEGIES

The Property of Princess Marie von Thurn und Taxis-Hohenlohe

1st sie den Liebenden leichter? Ach. und die findigen Tiere merken es schon.4 • Duineser Elegien: Die Erste Elegie DIE ERSTE ELEGIE [5] [10] [15J [20] Wer. welche dem einzelnen Herzen miihsam bevorsteht. sie verdecken sich nur mit einander fur Los. und so blieb sie und ging nicht. uns zu zerstOren. Em jeder Engel ist schrecklich. daB wir nicht sehr verlaSlich zu Haus sind in der gedeuteten Welt. es nahme einer mich plOtzlich ans Herz: ich verginge von seinem starkeren Dasein. wem bliebe sie nicht. wenn ich schriee. Und so verhalt ich mich denn und verschlucke den Lockruf dunkelen Schluchzens. es bleibt uns die Stra1Se von gestem und das verzogene Treusein einer Gewohnheit. o und die Nacht. Denn das Schone ist nichts als des Schrecklichen Anfang. und wir bewundem es so. weil es gelassen verschmaht. wen vermOgen wir denn zu brauchen? Engel nicht. Menschen nicht. der es bei uns gefiel. WeiSt du's noch nicht? Wirf aus den Armen die Leere zu den Raumen hinzu. daB wir ihn taglich wiedersahen. wenn der Wind voller Weltraum uns am Angesicht zehrt . Ach.. Es bleibt uns vielleicht irgend ein Baum an dem Abhang. die wir atmen. herle mich denn aus der Engel Ordnungen? und gesetzt selbst. den wir noch grade extragen. die Nacht. vielleicht daB die Vogel . die ersehnte sanft enttauschende.

who'd listen to me in those angelic orders? Even if one of them suddenly held me to his heart. gentle. Maybe what's left for us is some tree on a hillside we can look at day after day. Is she easier on lovers? But they use each other to hide their fate. deceptive one waiting painfully for the lonely heart . Because beauty's nothing but the start of terror we can hardly bear. I'd vanish in his overwhelming presence. Every angel's terrifying. and the perverse affection of a habit that liked us so much it never let go. and the animals already know by instinct we're not comfortably at home in our translated world.she'd stay on for anyone. one of yesterday's streets. oh the night when the wind full of outer space gnaws at our faces. maybe birds [5] [10] [15] [201 .Duino Elegies: The First Elegy • 5 THE FIRST ELEGY And if I cried. You still don't understand? Throw the emptiness in your arms out into that space we breathe. And the night. then? Neither angels nor men. that wished for. Ah. and we adore it because of the serene scom it could kill us with. who can we tum to. So I control myself and choke back the lure of my dark cry.

daB irgend ein Madchen. die du so vie1 liebender fandst als die Gestillten.6 • Duineser Elegien: Die Erst Elegie 125J die erweiterte Luft fuhlen mit innigerm Flug. so singe die Liebenden. Aber die Liebenden nimmt die erschopfte Natur in sich zuruck. am gesteigerten Beispiel dieser Liebenden ffihlt: daB ich wurde wie sie? Sollen nicht endlich uns diese iiltesten Schmerzen fruchtbarer werden? 1st es nicht Zeit. dieses zu leisten. lange noch nicht unsterblich genug ist ihr beruhmtes Geffihl. daB du sie spurtest. als waren nicht zweimal die Kriifte. Das alles war Auftrag. als kundigte alles eine Geliebte dir an? (Wo willst du sie bergen. oder da du voriiberkamst am geOffneten Fenster. Es hob sich eine Woge heran im Vergangenen.) Sehnt es dich aber. Aber bewiiltigtest du's? Warst du nicht immer noch von Erwartung zerstreut. Es muteten manche Sterne dir zu. dem der Geliebte entging. denk: es erhiilt sich der Held. Jene. die Fruhlinge brauchten dich wohl. selbst der Untergang war ihm nur ein Vorwand. Hast du der Gaspara Stampa denn genugend gedacht. du neidest sie fast. da doch die groBen fremden Gedanken bei dir aus und ein gehn und ofters bleiben bei Nacht. daB wir liebend uns vom Geliebten befrein und es bebend bestehn: wie der Pfeil die 5ehne besteht. Ja. Beginn immer von neuem die nie zu erreichende Preisung. gab eine Geige sich hin. zu sein: seine letzte Geburt. Verlassenen. urn gesammelt im Absprung [301 [35] [40J [45J [50] .

as if there weren't the energy to create them twice. A wave that had broken long ago swelled toward you. as if all this promised you a lover? (Where would you have hidden her. Tryout your impotent praise again. Have you remembered Gaspara Stampa well enough? From that greater love's example. Yes. But exhausted nature draws all lovers back into herself. Begin again. All that was your charge. their famous passions still aren't immortal enough. Springs needed you. Many stars waited for you to see them. trembling. often staying overnight?) When longing overcomes you. sing about great lovers. a violin gave itself. any girl descrted by her lover can believe: "If only I could be like her!" Shouldn't our ancient suffering be more fruitful by now? Isn't it time our loving freed us from the one we love and we. You found that the deserted. with all those strange and heavy thoughts flowing in and out of you. those you almost envied. a final birth. and in that gathering momentum [25] [30] [35] [40] [45] [50] . But could you live up to it? Weren't you always distracted by hope. could love you so much more than those you loved. endured: as the arrow endures the string. think about the hero who lives on: even his fall was only an excuse for another Hfe.Duino Elegies: The First Elegy • 7 will feel the air thinning as they fly deeper into themselves. or when you walked by an open window.

Aber Lebendige machen [55J [60] [65] [70] [75J [SO] . wie neulich die Tafel in Santa Maria Formosa. Denn Bleiben ist nirgends. so lose im Raume flattern zu sehen. Stimmcn. Seltsam. . wie sonst nur Heilige horten: daIS sie der riesige Ruf aufhob vom Boden. daB man allmiihlich ein wenig Ewigkeit spurt. Rosen. was man war in unendlich angstlichen Handen. Seltsam. weiter und achtetens nkht So waren sic horend. Es rauscht jetzt von jenen jungen Toten zu dir. Und das Totsein ist miihsam und voller Nachholn. Hore. und andern eigens versprechenden Dingen nicht die Bedeutung menschlicher Zukunft zu gebcn. kaurn erlernte Gebrauche nicht mehr zu iiben. Freilich ist es seltsam. daIS du Cottes ertriigest die Stimme. der ihrer Geister reine Bewegung manchmaI ein wenig behindert. Stimmen. Was sie mir wollen? leise solI kh des Unrechts Anschein abtun. nicht mehr zu sein.8 • Duineser Elegien: Die Erste Elegie mehr zu sein als er selbst. sie aber knieten. die Erde nicht mehr zu bewohnen. und selbst den eigenen Namen wegzulassen wie ein zerbrochenes Spielzeug. die ununterbrochene Nachricht. mein Herz. alles. Aber das Wehende hore. Nkht. Wo immer du eintratst. redete nicht in Kirchen zu Rom und Neapel ruhig ihr Schkksal dkh an? Oder es trug eine Inschrift sich erhaben dir auf. Unmoglkhe. die Wiinsche nkht weiterzuwunchen. bei weitem. die aus Stille skh bildet. was sich bezog. das.

Whenever you entered a church in Rome or Naples. voices. the endless news growing out of silence. It's true. It's strange not to wish your wishes anymore. yet. impossible creatures.Duino Elegies: The First Elegy • 9 becomes more than itself. throwing out even your own name like a broken toy. didn't their fate always softly speak to you? Or an inscription raised itself to reach you. they kept on kneeling. My heart. like that tablet in Santa Maria Formosa recently. listen as only saints have listened: until some colossal sound lifted them right off the ground. it's strange not living on earth anymore. Because to stay is to be nowhere. What do they want from me? That I gently wipe away the look of suffered injustice sometimes hindering the pure motion of spirits a little. not using customs you hardly learned. rustling toward you from those who died young. they listened so intently that. no longer being what you used to be in hands that were always anxious. Voices. Strange to see the old relationships now loosely fluttering in space. Not that you could endure the voice of God! But listen to the breathing. But the living are wrong [55] [60] [65] [70] [75] [SO] . not giving the meaning of a human future to roses and other things that promise so much. And it's hard being dead and straining to make up for it until you can begin to feel a trace of eternity.

Die ewige Stromung reiBt durch beide Bereiche alle Alter immer mit sich und ubertont sie in beiden. daIS einst in der Klage urn Linos wagende erste Musik diirre Erstarrung durchdrang. dem ein beinah gottlicher Jiingling plOtzlich fiir immer enttrat. SchlielSlich brauchen sie uns nicht mehr.: konnten wir sein ohne sie? 1st die Sage umsonst. daB erst im erschrockenen Raum. ob sie unter Lebenden gehn oder Toten. man entwohnt sich des Irdischen sanft. denen aus Trauer so oft seliger Fortschritt entspring . daB sie zu stark unterscheiden.10 • Duineser Elegien: Die Erste Elegie alle den Fehler. das Leere in jene Schwingung geriet. Engel (sagt man) wuSten oft nicht. [85] [90] [95] . die Fruheentriickten. die so groBe Geheimnisse brauchen. die uns jetzt hinreilSt und trostet und hilft. Aber wir. wie man den Briisten milde der Mutter entwachst.

how once during the lament for Linos. whose source of blessed progress so often is our sadness . and in that stunned space. Angels (they say) often can't tell whether they move among the living or the dead. At last.Duino Elegies: The First Elegy • 11 to make distinctions that are too absolute. who need such great mysteries. we're weaned from the things of this earth as gently as we outgrow our mother's breast. suddenly abandoned by an almost godlike youth. the Void first felt that vibration which charms and comforts and helps us now? [85] [90] [95] . those who left too soon don't need us anymore. The eternal torrent hurls all ages through both realms forever and drowns out their voices in both. But we. the first daring music pierced the barren numbness.could we exist without them? Is the story meaningless.

die schon sind. Vnd dennoch. wir schwinden in ihm und um ihn. Raume aus Wesen. Wer seid ihr? Friihe Gegliickte. weh mir. ower halt sie zuriick? Vnaufhorlich steht Anschein [10] [15] [20] . Was hilfts. wo wir fiihlen. Hohenziige. . fast tOdliche Vogel der Seele. da der Strahlendsten erner stand an der einfachen Haustiir. du gehst mir ins Blut. hinter den Stemen eines Schrittes nur nieder und herwarts: hochaufschlagend erschliig uns das eigene Herz. Denn wir. der gefahrliche. Oungling dem Jungling. einzeln. Treppen. Gange. Spiegel: die die entstromte eigene Schonheit wiederschopfen zuriick in das eigene Antlitz. wissend urn euch. von Holzglut zu Holzglut geben wir schwachern Geruch.12 • Duineser Elegien: Die Zweite Elegie DIE ZWEITE ELEGIE [5] Jeder Engel ist schrecklich. dieses Zimmer. Tumulte stiirmisch entziickten GefUhls und plOtzlich. Trate der Erzengel jetzt.Pollen der bliihenden Gottheit. ach wir atmen uns aus und dahin. ihr Verwohnten der Schopfung. der Friihling fUllt sich mit dir . Throne. er kann uns nicht halten. ansing ich euch. V nd jene. verfliichtigen. Da sagt uns wohl einer: ja. Wohin sind die Tage Tobiae. Schilde aus Wonne.. wie er neugierig hinaussah). morgenrotliche Grate aller Erschaffung. . zur Reise ein wenig verkleidet und schon nicht mehr furchtbar. Gelenke des Lichtes.

and out. But we: we vanish in our feelings.Duino Elegies: The Second Elegy • 13 THE SECOND ELEGY Every angers terrifying. and suddenly. the dangerous one behind the stars. oh. who can hold them back? Some look is always rising [5] [10] [15] [20] . " What good is it? He can't hold us. Almost deadly birds of my soul.seed of a blossoming god. hallways. If the archangel. I still sing to you! What happened to the days of Tobias when one of you stood in a simple doorway. It's true. no longer appalling.. mirrors: each drawing its own widespread streaming beauty back into its face. ranges. thrones. stairways. separate. force fields of ecstasy. I know what you are. And the beautiful. We vanish in him and around him. creation's pampered darlings. mountain tops. hinges of light. but. this room. Spring floods with you . radiant. took just one step down toward us today: the quicker pounding of our heart would kill us. Oh. oh. partly disguised for the trip. someone may tell us: "You're in my blood. our smell dissolves from ember to ember. (a young man to the young man as he looked out amazed). storms of unchecked rapture. we breathe ourselves out.. spaces of being. morning-red ridges of all Beginning . Who are you? Fortunate first ones.

weh mir: wir sinds doch. die Hauser. ihnen Entstromtes. Schmeckt denn der Weltraum. in den wir uns iosen. ihr in einander Geniigten. die ihr unter den Handen [30] [35] [40] [45] [SO] . oder ist manchmal. euch. mir geschiehts. bestehn noch. Doch wer wagte darum schon zu seill? Ihr aber.14 • Duineser Elegien: Die Zweite Elegie [25] aufin ihrem Gesicht und geht fort. Habt ihr Beweise? Seht. nach uns? Fangen die Engel wirklich nur Ihrigcs auf. Liebende. (Wie sollten sie's merken. wohin? 0 Aufschaun: neue. Denn es scheint. die ihr im Entziicken des andcrcn zunehmt. ein wenig unseres Wesens dabei? Sind wir in ihre Ziige soviel nur gemischt wie das Vage in die Gesichter schwangerer Frauen? Sie merken es nicht in dem Wirbei ihrer Riickkehr zu sich. Ihr greift euch.) Liebende konnten. in der Nachtluft wunderlich reden. wie die Hitze von einem heigen Gericht. daB meine Hande einander inne werden oder daB mein gebrauchtes Gesicht in ihnen sich schont. Das giebt mir ein wenig Empfindung. warme. uns zu verschweigen. Und al1es ist einig. Wie Tau von dem Friihgras hebt sich das Unsre von uns.. frag ich nach uns. wie aus Versehen. verstiinden sie's.. entgehende Welle des Herzcns . die Baume sind. bis er euch iiberwaltigt anfleht nicht mehr . 0 Uicheln. die wir bewohnen. halb als Schande vielleicht und halb als unsagliche Hoffnung. Siehe. daB uns alles verheimlicht. Wir nur ziehen aHem vorbei wie ein luftiger Austausch.

everything we are rises away from us. then? Do angels really absorb only what poured out of them. (Why should they notice. or sometimes. half out of some speechless hope. Because it seems everything wants to camouflage us. [25] [30] [35] [40] Lovers. and falling. Then I feel a slight sensation. but that's what we are. But who'd dare to exist just for that? Yet you. half out of shame.Duino Elegies: The Second Elegy • 15 in their faces. Like dew on new grass. Does the cosmic space we dissolve into taste of us. satisfied with each other. where are you going? o upturned look: new. wann.) If they were understood. But we pass by all of it like an exchange of breath. perhaps. is there a trace of us. like heat from a steaming dish. Everything conspires to ignore us. lovers might say marvelous things in the night air. too? Do the contours of their features bear as much of us as that vague look on a pregnant woman's face? Unnoticed by them in their whirling back into themselves. Look. What's your proof? Look. who grow in the other's ecstasy until he's overcome and begs: "No more!". who in one another's hands grow [45] [50] . or my worn out face seeks shelter in them. you. the houses we live in still hold up. as if by mistake. the heart's receding waveit hurts me. trees exist. I'm asking you about us. 0 smile. You hold each other. sometimes it happens my hands become aware of each other.

Und wir konnen ihm nicht mehr nachschaun in Bilder. die ihr manchmal vergeht. dieses ist unser. zudeckt. schmales Menschliches. starker stemmen die Gotter uns an. Fanden auch wir ein reines. Und doch. obwohlin den Torsen die Kraft steht. So versprecht ihr euch Ewigkeit fast von der Umarmung. seid ihrs dann noch? Wenn ihr einer dem andern euch an den Mund hebt und ansetzt . Ich weig. wenn ihr der ersten Blicke Schrecken besteht und die Sehnsucht am Fenster. Zartliche. noch in gottliche Korper.16 • Duineser Elegien: Die Zweite Elegie euch reichlicher werdet wie Traubenjahre. [55] [60] [65] [70] [75] [79] . in denen es groBer sich magigt. Diese Beherrschten wugten damit: so weit sind wirs. Erstaunte euch nicht auf attischen Stelen die Vorsicht menschlicher Geste? war nicht Liebe und Abschied so leicht auf die SchuItern gelegt. die es besanftigen. und den ersten gemeinsamen Gang. ein Mal durch den Garten: Liebende. weil ihr darunter das reine Dauern verspiirt. als war es aus anderm Stoffe gemacht als bei uns? Gedenkt euch der Hande. Doch dies ist Sache der Gotter.: Getrank an Getrank: 0 wie entgeht dann der Trinkende seltsam der Handlung. einen unseren Streifen Fruchtlands zwischen Strom und Gestein. uns 50 zu beriihren. weil die Liebkosung verhalt. die ihr. nur weil der andre ganz iiberhand nimmt: euch frag ich nach uns. verhaltenes. weil die Stelle nicht schwindet. wie sie drucklos beruhen. Denn das eigene Herz iibersteigt uns noch immer wie jene. ihr beriihrt euch so selig.

and that first walk in the garden. For our heart rises out of us as it did out of the others. but that's the gods' affair. they lie weightless. [55] [60] [65] [70] [75] [79J . or into godlike bodies where it finds a greater mastery. And we can't follow it any longer into figures that tame it. because you feel a pure duration there.our own small strip of orchard between river and rock. once: lovers. Didn't the caution of human gestures on Attic steles amaze you? Weren't love and separation placed on those shoulders so lightly they seemed made of other stuff than we are? Remember the hands: despite the power in the torso. are you still the same? When you lift yourselves up to each other's lips and begin. And yet. but only when the other takes over completely. All we can do is touch one another like this. drink for drink oh how strangely the drinker then slips from the role. when you've survived the fear of that first look. who sometimes disappear. In your embrace you almost find the promise of eternity. contained. you. I'm asking you about us.Duino Elegies: The Second Elegy· 17 more abundant like grapes in a vintage year. the longing at the window. If only we could find something pure. human . The gods can press down harder on us. I know why you touch each other so ecstatically: that touch lasts. That place you cover with such tenderness doesn't vanish. The self-controlled knew this: we can only go this far. narrow.

er will. du. du warsts. oft auch als ware sie nicht. die wandelt wie Friihwind? Zwar du erschrakst ihm das Herz. du machtest ihn klein. du rufst ihn nkht ganz aus dunkelem Umgang. aufrufend die Nacht zu unendlichem Aufruhr. die Geliebte zu singen. von welchem Unkenntlichen triefend. wehe. Horch. we he. Aber begann er sich je? Mutter. Odes Blutes Neptun. 0 sein furchtbarer Dreizack. erleichtert gewohnt er sich in de in heirnliches Herz und nimmt und beginntsich. jenen verborgenen schuldigen Flug-Gott des Bluts. was we~ er selbst von dem Herren der Lust. Freilich. stammt nicht von euch des Liebenden Lust zu dem Antlitz seiner Geliebten? Hat er die innige Einsicht in ihr reines Gesicht nicht aus dem remen Gestirn? Du nicht hast ihm. ehe das Madchen noch linderte. ihn hatte dein leichter Auftritt also erschuttert. das Gotthaupt aufhob. nicht seine Mutter hat ihm die Bogen der Braun so zur Erwartung gespannt. die ihn anfing. Ihr Sterne. Meinst du wirklich.. wie die Nacht sich muldet und hohlt. ihren Jiingling. [15] [20] [25] . ach. Ein anderes. an dir nicht bog seine Lippe sich zum fruchtbarern Ausdruck. ihn fiihlendes Madchen. Nicht an dir.18 • Duineser Elegien: Die Dritte Elegie DIE DRITTE ELEGIE [5] [10] Emes ist. doch altere Schrecken stiirzten in ihn bei dem beriihrenden AnstoS. Ruf ihn . er entspringt. o der dunkele Wind seiner Brust aus gewundener Muschel. der aus dem Einsamen oft.. Den sie von weitem erkennt.

You stars. raised his godhead.. but more ancient terrors rushed into him with your shocking touch. what can her lover. not for your lips did his thicken with passion. and incited the night to riot. how the night carves itself out and grows hollow. even. often as if she didn't exist.Duino Elegies: The Third Elegy • 19 THE THIRD ELEGY To sing about someone you love is one thing. doesn't a lover's longing for his loved one's face come from you? Doesn't his most intimate insight into her purest face come from your own purest constellation? No. relieved. Known to her only from a distance. nor was it his mother who arched his brow with so much expectation. [5] [10] [15] [20] [25] . who knows from what depths. do you really think your gentle coming could convulse him so? True. You who wander like the morning breeze. not for yours. but. you started him once. he starts to feel at home in your comfortable heart and takes and begins himself. Girl who's holding him now.. he docs escape. it really wasn't you. who often out of loneliness. came streaming. you can't quite call him back from that dark circle. you scared his heart. before she could comfort him. But did he ever begin himself? Mother. the blood's hidden guilty river-god is something else. he tries. Oh that Neptune of the blood and his terrible trident! Oh the dark wind of his chest from that twisted conch! Listen. Yes. oh. Call him . oh. you made him small. say about the lord of passion.

hin sind die Jahre. der Erleichterte. nein. unter schllifemden Lidem deiner leichten Gestaltung SiiBe 16send in den gekosteten Vorschlaf . So vieles vermochte zartlich dein Aufstehn. wann sich die Diele benirnmt ... Aber innen: wer wehrte. da war keine Vorsicht im Schlafenden. in dein naheres Dasein hast du das Nachtlicht gestellt. ach. Scheuende. Er. der Neue. Nirgends ein Knistern. das nachtlkh-verdachtige Zimmer machtest du harmlos.20 • Duineser Elegien: Die Dritte Elegie [30] [35] [40] dir war er neu. hinter den Schrank trat hoch im Mantel sein Schicksal. mit des innern Geschehns weiterschlagenden Ranken schon zu Mustern verschlungen. aus deinem Herzen voll Zuflucht mischtest du menschlichern Raum seinem Nacht-Raum hinzu.. das du nicht lachelnd erklartest. Und er selbst. zu tierhaft [45] [50] . aber traumend. da du ihm einfach mit der schlanken Gestalt wallendes Chaos vertratst? Vicles verbargst du ihm so. hinderte innen in ihm die Fluten der Herkunft? Ach.: schien ein Gehuteter . Nicht in die Finsternis. du beugtest liber die neuen Augen die freundliche Welt und wehrtest der fremden. und in die Falten des Vorhangs paBte. Wo. die leicht sich verschob. und es schien wie aus Freundschaft. aber in Fiebern: wie er sich ein-lieB. seine unruhige Zukunft. zu wurgendem Wachstum. so als wliBtest du langst. wie er verstrickt war. Und er horchte und linderte sich. schlafend. wie er lag. .

. he seemed protected .. cloaked destiny stepped behind the wardrobe. but feverish and dreaming: what he dared! So young and shy. sleeping. his tall.. your heart's sanctuary mingling a more human space with his own night-space. you didn't put the night-light in that darkness but in your own nearer presence. But inside: who could stop or turn the floods of Origin in him? Oh. Coming to him quietly. strangling tendrils. where are the years when you simply stood between him and the surging chaos with your slender body? You hid so much from him then.Duino Elegies: The Third Elegy • 21 he was new to you. and his restless future that got out of hand so easily molded itself to the curtains' folds. mingling the sweetness of your slight body with the first taste of approaching sleep under his heavy lids. friendly. you could do so much. No. and it glowed. how he entangled himself in the spreading roots of events inside him. over those new eyes you arched the friendly world and shut the strange one out. there was no caution in that sleeper. as if you'd always known just when the floor would do that . And he listened and was comforted. Oh. shapes [30] [35] [40] [45] [50] . at night you made the threatening room harmless. There wasn't a creak you couldn't explain with a smile. And lying there. twisted patterns.. relieved.

du locktest Vorzeit empor in dem Liebenden. sondern das zahllos Brauende. VerlieB cs. blinzelte. dies: daB wir liebten in uns. Welche [55] [60] [65] [70] [75] . da du ihn trugst schon. wo das Furchtbare lag. wir lieben nicht. unvordenklicher Saft in die Arrne. Mutter. auf dessen stummem Gestiirztsein lkhtgriin sein Herz stand. denn.. Vnd jcdes Schreekliche kannte ihn. was weiBt du . ging die eigenen Wurzeln hinaus in gewaltigen Ursprung. zuvor. aus einem einzigen Jahr. VOT rur hat ers geliebt. sondern die Vater. war wie verstandigt. noeh satt von den Vatern. Sclten hast du so zartlich gellichelt. ein Kiinftiges.. Liebend stieg er hinab in das altere Blut. Liebte.. wo seine kleine Geburt schon iiberlebt war. nicht ein einzelnes Kind. in die Schluehten. uns steigt. Ja. war es im Wasser gelOst. seines Inneren Wildnis. wie die Blumen.22 • Duineser Elegien: Die DTitte Elegie jagenden Formen. Wie er sich hingab . sondem die ganze lautlose Landschaft unter dem wolkigen oder reinen Verhangnis . Und du seiber.. nicht Eines. Liebte sein Inneres. Wie soUte er es nicht Heben.: dies kam dir. Liebte.. Madehen. das Entsetzliche Hichelte . Siehe. diesen Vrwald in ihm. das den Keimenden leicht macht. sondern das trockene FluBbett einstiger Miitter . wo wir Heben. Wclche Gefiihle wiihlten herauf aus entwandelten Wesen. 0 Madchen. die wie Triimmer Gebirgs uns im Grunde beruhn. da es ihm lachelte.

we don't love like flowers with only one season behind us. and all that soundless landscape under its clouded or clear destiny . winked. how could you know . How he surrendered. And every horror knew him.Duino Elegies: The Third Elegy • 23 of preying animals. the dry riverbed of former mothers. Then left it.Loved. cradled inside us like ruins of mountains. Loving. Loved. a sap older than memory rises in our arms. not just one child.girl. . it was already dissolved in the water that makes the seed light. but fathers. into the canyons where terror lurked. still gorged with fathers. Loved his interior world. How could he help but love whatever smiled at him? He'd loved it before you. yes. it's like this: inside us we haven't loved just some one in the future. you hardly ever smiled at him so tenderly. Yes. And you yourself. 0 mother. going out from his own roots into violent Beginning where his own tiny birth was already outlived. the hideous smiled at him . What feelings welled up from beings no longer here. that primal inner forest where his pale green heart stood among the fallen and mute ruins. when we love. 0 girl. he stepped down into the older blood.you've stirred up prehistoric time in your lover. the jungle in him.. but a fermenting tribe. and seemed to understand. all this came before you. [55] [60] [65] [70] [75] . Look. even while you carried him..

0 leise. tu ein liebes vor ihm.24 • Duineser Elegien: Die Dritte Elegie [80] [85] Frauen haSten dich da..fiihr ihn nah an den Garten heran. Verhalt ihn . Wasrur finstere Manner regtest du auf im Geider des Jiinglings? Tote Kinder woilten zu dir ... . ein verUifsliches Tagwerk. gieb ihm der Niichte Obergewkht .. .. leise..

.. . with love. . give him those compensating nights . Dead children reached for you . Gently... . [SO] [85] .. What sinister men you incited in his young veins. lead him toward the garden. gently do a good day's work for him each day. Hold him back.Duino Elegies: The Third Elegy· 25 What women hated you. oh.

die sich versprachen Weite.26 • Duineser Elegien: Die Vierte Elegie DIE VIERTE ELEGIE o Baume Lebens. ganz. Wer sag nicht bang vor seines Herzens Vorhang? Der schlug sich auf: die Szenerie war Abschied. . so drangen wir uns plotzlich Winden auf und fallen ein auf teilnahmslosen Teich. Ich will nicht diese halbgefiillten Masken. [5} 0 wann winterlich? Wir sind nicht cinig. eins im andcrn. Und irgendwo gehn LOwen noch und wissen. von keiner Ohnmacht. [10} [15] [20] [25] Uns aber. ist schon des andem Aufwand fiihlbar. Feindschaft ist uns das Nachste. daS wir sie sahcn. Bliihn und verdorrn ist uns zugleich bewugt. Sind nicht wie die Zugvogel verstiindigt. Nicht der. muhsam. Uberholt und spat. Jagd und Heimat. Oa wird fUr eines Augenblickes Zeichnung ein Grund von Gegenteil bereitet. Oer bekannte Garten. Treten Liebende nicht immerfort an Rander. er ist verkleidet und er wird ein Burger und gcht durch seine Kiiche in die Wohnung. und schwankte leisc: dann erst kam der Tanzer. was ihn formt von auf5en. wo wir Eines meinen. Genug! Und wenn er auch so lekht tut. Leicht zu verstehen. Wir kennen den Kontur des Flihlens nicht: nur. denn man ist sehr deutlkh mit uns. solang sie herrlich sind.

We don't have the instinct of migrant birds. but only what shapes it from without. and home. turns into a suburbanite. don't lovers always cross each other's boundaries? Then for the sketchwork of an eye-wink. Easy to understand. Who hasn't sat anxious in front of his heart's curtain? It would go up: another parting scene. a contrasting background's painfully prepared to make us see it. Havipg promised one another distance. And somewhere lions still roam: so magnificent they can't understand weakness. Because it's very dear we don't know the contours of our feeling. Not him. I don't want these half-filled masks. we suddenly throw ourselves to the wind and fall into indifferent ponds. Even when fully intent on one thing. We understand flowering and fading at once. hunting. then came the dancer. The familiar garden swaying slightly. [5] [10] [15] [20] [25] . we feel another's costly tug. Hostility is second nature to us.Duino Elegies: The Fourth Elegy • 27 THE FOURTH ELEGY o trees of life. he's disguised. Late and out of season. when is your winter? Our nature's not the same. Enough! However graceful he may be. and walks into his house through the kitchen.

hab ich nicht recht? Und ihr. und Gleichmut. Wenn auch die Lampen ausgehn. Es giebt immer Zuschaun. den ersten trliben AufguB meines Mlissens.. seit du tot bist. von dem ich immer abkam. sogar der Knabe nicht mehr mit dem braunen Schielaug: Ich bleibe dennoch. der du. wie ihn Tote haben. mit dem Nachgeschmack so fremder Zukunft beschaftigt.. keine Frau. immer wieder kostend und. wei! mir der Raum in eurem Angesicht. in dem ihr nicht mehr wart . Hier. um me in Schauen am Ende aufzuwiegen. wenn auch von meinen stillen Vorfahm keiner mehr mit mir dasitzt. Vater. Ich will den Balg aushalten und den Draht und ihr Gesicht aus Aussehn. innen in mir. dort als Spieler [40] [45J [50] [55J . die ihr mich liebtet fUr den kleinen Anfang Liebe zu euch. Reiche von Gleichmut. bab ich nicht recht. pruftest mein beschlagnes Aufschaun. wenn auch von der Blihne das Leere herkommt mit dem grauen Luftzug. Ich bin davor. meines kostend. liberging in WeI traum. Die ist vol!. wenn mir auch gesagt wird: Nichts mehr . Angst hast. da ich ihn liebte. so vollig hinzuschaun.28 • Duineser Elegjen: Die VieTte Elegie [3OJ [35] Heber die Puppe. Hab ich nicht recht? Du. aufgiebst fUr mein biBchen Schicksal. da ich heranwuchs.. wenn mir zumut ist. daB. oft in meiner Hoffnung. nein. mein Vater. zu warten vor der Puppenbiihne. der urn mich so bitter das Leben schmeckte.

who in my deepest hope so often since your death have been afraid for me and. Even if the lights go out. That's whole. just for my bit of fate aren't I right? And aren't I right. Here. even if I'm told. I'm waiting. Aren't I right? Father. fascinated by the aftertaste of such a strange future. you kept on tasting and. "That's all". I'll put up with the empty body. the first opaque infusion of my must. my father. an actor to counteract [30] [35] [40] [45] [SO] [55] . tried my clouded gaze you.Duino Elegies: The Fourth Elegy • 29 I'd rather have a doll. surrendered the kingdoms of serenity the dead own.. and the face that's only surface. even if emptiness drifts toward me in gray drafts from the stage. you who loved me for that first small impulse of love for you I always turned from. not a woman. the wire. when I'm in the mood to wait in front of the puppet stage .No. even while I loved it.. you who found life so bitter after tasting mine. changed into outer space where you no longer were . to stare into it so intensely that finally an angel must appear. because the space in your faces. not even the boy with the squinting brown eyesI'll stay here. as I kept growing. even if none of my silent ancestors will sit next to me anymore. One can always watch. serene.

da hinter den Figuren mehr als nur Vergangnes war und vor uns nicht die Zukunft. Wer zeigt ein Kind. die andres nicht mehr hatten.eug. Dann kommt zusammen. denen halb zuIieb. Und waren doch. Ober uns hiniiber spielt dann der Engel. was wir immerfort entzwein. sollten sie nicht vermuten. Alles ist nicht es selbst. die seit Anbeginn gegriindet war fUr einen reinen Vorgang. Morder sind leicht einzusehen.oder Iagt ihn drin im runden Mund. der die Balge hochreifSt. . was wir hier leisten. in unserem Alleingehn. die Sterbenden. Dann entsteht aus unsern Jahreszeiten erst der Umkreis des gan7. das hart wird. Sieh. wie voll Vorwand das alles ist. an einer Stelle.30 • Duineser Elegien: Die Vierte Elegie [60] [65J [70] [75] ein Engel hinmufS. den ganzen Tod. . so wie es steht? Wer stellt es ins Gestirn und giebt das Mag des Abstands ihm in die Hand? Wer macht den Kindertod aus grauem Brot. noch vor dem Leben so sanft zu enthalten und nicht bos zu sein. Engel und Puppe: dann ist endlich SchauspieI. mit Dauerndem vergniigt und standen da im Zwischenraume zwischen Welt und Spie17. ist unbeschreiblich. 0 Stunden in der Kindheit.. bald groB zu werden. [80] [85] . Aber dies: den Tod. Wir wuchsen freilich und wir drangten manchmal. so wie den Grops von einem schonen Apfel? . indem wir da sind. als das GrofSsein.en Wandelns.

We were growing. Angel and doll: a real play at last. Then what we continually divide by our being here unites there. in a place which. from the very start. But this: to hold death. . had been established for a pure event. the whole of death. . Yet when we were alone. even before life's begun and not be mad . sometimes we hurried to grow up too soon.or leave it there in his round mouth like the core of a sweet apple .that's beyond description! [60] [65] [70] [75] [80] [85] . half for the sake of those who had nothing more than being grown-up. surely they suspect how everything we do is full of sham. so gently. ? Murderers are easily understood. we still amused ourselves with the everlasting and stood there in that gap between world and toy. Who'll show a child just as he is? Who'fl set him in his constellation and put the measure of distance in his hand? Who'll make the death of a child out of gray bread growing hard . when more than the mere past was behind each shape and the future wasn't stretched out before us. 0 hours of childhood. Then the angel plays over and above us. Then the cycle of all change can finally rise out of our seasons. here where nothing is really itself.Duino Elegies: The Fourth Elegy • 31 my stare and pull up the empty skins. Look at the dying.

die starksten Manner. den von dem eignen bliihenden Staub getroffnen.. Um diesen Stampfer. schon auch. aufrecht. den Stempel.gUinzend mit dunnster [20] [25] . dicse ein wenig Fliichtigern noch als wir selbst. Und kaum dort. wirft sie und fangt sie zuruck. . von ihrem ewigen Aufsprung dunneren Teppich. biegt sie. die Fahrenden. roilt sie wieder.32 • Duineser Elegien: Die Fiinfte Elegie DIE FONFTE ELEGIE Frau Hertha Koenig zugeeignet [5] [10] [15] Wer aber sind sie. wic August der Starke bei Tisch einen zinnenen Teller. als hatte der VorstadtHimmel der Erde dort wehe getan. sag mir. da und gezeigt des Dastehns grDGer Anfangsbuchstab . Aufgelegt wie ein Pflaster. diesem verlorcnen Teppich im Weltall. glatterer Luft kommen sie nieder auf dem verzehrten.. zum Scherz. wie aus geOlter. wem zu Liebe niemals zufriedener Wille? Sondern er wringt sie. . schlingt sie und schwingt sie. die dringend von fruh an wringt ein wem. die Rose des Zuschauns: bluht und entblattert. der immer kommendc Griff. Ach und um diese Mitte. ihrer niemals bewu1lten. zur Scheinfrucht wieder der Unlust befruchteten.

on the threadbare carpet worn thin by their endless leaping. like a pewter platter Augustus the Strong once played with at his table. as if through oiled and polished air.Duino Elegies: The Fifth Elegy • 33 THE FIFTH ELEGY Dedicated to Frau Hertha von Koenig But tell me. as if the suburban sky had bruised the earth. this carpet lost in space. erect. the rose of audience blooms and sheds around this center. whose sake? . this pistil pregnant with its own pollen. oh. fertilized again into the false fruit of their own unconscious boredom. who are they. tosses and catches them. and they fall. these troupers. Around this pestle. obsessed since childhood.for whose. the essence of standing-there: the large initial of Debut or Done . even more transient than us. And barely there. bends them.wrung by an insatiable will? But it wrings them. and .but even the strongest men are tossed up again in play by that always returning grip. And. swings and twists them. gleaming with a synthetic smile. Stretched like a plaster. the flimsy [5J [10J [15] [20] [25] .

rascher als Wasser... der mit dem Aufschlag. einst als Spielzeug bekam.34 • Duineser Elegien: Die Fiinfte Elegie OberfUiche leicht scheinHichelnden Unlust. Du. der alte. tiiglich hundertmal abfallt vom Baum der gemeinsam erbauten Bewegung (der. der nur noch trommelt. Oh ihr. unreif. der Mann. in halber Pause. wie nur Friichte ihn kennen. das noch klein war. in der verwitweten Haut. Sommer und Herbst hat)abfiHlt und anpraUt ans Grab: manchrnal. in wenig Minuten Lenz. die ein Leid. faltige Stemmer. doch an deinen Korper verliert sieh. [30] [35] [40] [45] . Aber der junge. Da: der welke. und einer lage nun schon auf dem Kirchhof. in einer seiner langen Genesungen . taub und manchmal ein wenig wirr. will dir ein liebes Antlitz entstehn hiniiber zu deiner selten zartlichen Mutter. als hatte sic friiher zwei Manner enthalten. als war er der Sohn eines Nackens und einer Nonne: prall und strammig errullt mit Muskeln und Einfalt. eingegangen in seiner gewaltigen Haut. und er iiberlebte den andern.

[30] [35] o you. . out of that tree rising from a cooperation of motion (rushing faster than water through autumn. shriveled up in his powerful skin that looks as if it held two men once. a still small pain received as a plaything once during one of its long convalescences. deaf and a little weird in his widowed skin.Duino Elegies: The Fifth Elegy • 35 patina of their boredom. old and merely drumming now. half pausing. you feel a look of love for your seldom tender mother surge up to your face. and now one's already lying in the churchyard. But the young one. wrinkled weightlifter. with the thud only green fruit know. then it loses itself (40] [45] . filled with muscle and simplicity. and summer in minutes) you fall and bounce on the grave: sometimes. the man. spring. and he's outlived the other. You. There the withered. . like the offspring of a neck and nun: taut and tense. who fall a hundred times a day.

Schaff eine Vase.36 • Duineser Elegien: Die Fiifl/te Elegie [SO] [55J der es fUichig verbraucht.. Liebliche. das schiichtern kaum versuchte Gesicht . . Und wieder klatscht der Mann in die Hand zu dem Ansprung.ich trag ihn im Herzen . Du. Wo. offentlich unter den Schultern. und eh dir jemals ein Schmerz deutlkher wird in der Nahe des immer trabenden Herzens. Engel! 0 nimms. von den reizendsten Freuden stumm Ubersprungne... seinem Ursprung. kommt das Brennen der FulSsohln ihm. zuvor mit ein paar dir rasch in die Augen gejagten leiblichen Tronen. pfiiicks. Und dennoch. du. blindlings. . in lieblicher Ume riihms mit blumiger schwungiger Aufschrift: [60] »5ubrisio Saltat. Vielleicht sind deine Fransen gliicklich fUr dich . oder iiber den jungen prallen Briisten die grune metallene Seide Whit sich unendlich verwohnt und entbehrt nichts. verwahrs! Stells unter jene. das kleinbliitige Heilkraut. 0 [75] wo ist der Ort . immerfort anders auf alle des Gleichgewichts schwankende Waagen hingelegte Marktfrucht des Gleichmuts. das Lacheln .. «. [65] [70] Du dann. uns noch nicht offenen Freuden. .

praise it with a high-flown. preserve it! Set it among those joys not open to us yet. oh take it! Pluck that small-flowered healing herb! Make a vase. " Then you. And again the man's hands are clapping for that leaping. and before a pain has gotten near your ever galloping heart. silently leapt over by the most exciting joys. where is that place . You. barely tried expression. Angel. Where. always on the swaying scales of balance like stacked fruit of serenity publicly displayed between shoulders.Duino Elegies: The Fifth Elegy • 37 in your body whose surface quickly absorbs that rippling. In a lovely urn. flowery inscription: [SO] [55] [60] "Subrisio Saltat. . the burning in the soles of your feet arrives ahead of its own spring.. your blind smile . shy. darling. chasing a few live tears into your eyes.I carry it in my heart - [65] [70] [75] . And yet. Maybe your hems are happy for you or over your finn young breasts the green metallic silk feels always indulged and lacking nothing. you. . .

wie sich bespringende. Madame Lamarl. zeigten die Liebenden. Ruschen. auf unsaglichem Teppich. Platze. unendlicher Schau platz.38 • Duineser Elegien: Die Fiinfte Elegie wo sie noch lange nicht konnten.. nicht recht paarige Tiere. . den wir nicht wissen. noch von einander abfieln.. wo noch von ihren vergeblkh wirbelnden SUiben die Teller torkeln . Kokarden. . Blumen. [80] [85J [90] [95] Engel!: Es ware ein Platz. Wo die vielstellige Rechnung zahlenlos aufgeht. alle unwahr gemrbt. und dorten.. ihre kiihnen hohen Figuren des Herzschwungs. kiinstliche Fruchte .rur die bi11igen Winterhiite des Schicksals. wo die Modistin. wo sich das reine Zuwenig unbegreiflkh verwandelt . umspringt in jenes leerc Zuviel. die's hier his zum Konnen nie bringen. endlose Bander. schlingt und windet und neue aus ihnen Schleifen erfindet. Und plotzlich in diesem mtlhsamen Nirgends. die ruhlosen Wege der Erde. wo die Gewichte noch schwer sind.. 0 Platz in Paris. plOtzlich die unsagliche Stelle.

where their hoops still totter away from their futile twirling sticks . flowers. if there were a place we know nothing about.. ? And suddenly. 0 square in Paris. lovers revealed everything that's impossible here: the daring patterns of their high-flying hearts. artificial fruit .all cheaply dyed . and there. where weights are still heavy. Squares. endless showplace. cockades. in this tiresome nowhere.springs around into an empty Too-Much. those endless ribbons.for the paltry winter hats of fate. and from them designs new bows. twists and winds the restless ways of the world. suddenly in this indescribable place where the pure Too-Little mysteriously changes . . where the modiste. on some ineffable carpet. Madame Lamort. frills.Duino Elegies: The Fifth Elegy • 39 where they still never could. where they still fell apart like mating animals poorly paired. Where the staggering bill adds up to zero. [80] [85] [90] [95] Angel..

. immer ersparten. . be bend. ihre langst. unzahligen lautlosen Toten: Wiirfen die dann ihre letzten. ewig giiltigen Miinzen des Gliicks vor das endlich wahrhaft lachelnde Paar auf gestilltem [108] Teppich? . die wir nkht kennen. nur an einander lehnenden Leitem. [105] immer verborgenen.40 • Dui1U!ser Elegien: Die Funfte Elegie [1001 ihre Tiirme aus Lust.. wo Boden nie war. vor den Zuschauem rings.und konntens.

their ladders leaning long. trembling .and if they could. always hidden. where there was never any ground. forever valid coins of happiness for that couple whose smile was genuine at last. unknown to us.Duino Elegies: The Fifth Elegy· 41 their pyramids of passion. always hoarded. out there on that calmed carpet? [100] [105] [108] . the countless silent dead: Would they throw their last. in front of those rings of spectators. only on each other.

Sein Aufgang ist Dasein. . . ins GlUck seiner suBesten Leistung. Wenigen steigt so stark der Andrang des Handelns. und ins verspiitete Innre unserer endlkhen Frucht gehn wir verraten hinein. Wie der Fontane Rohr treibt dein gebognes Gezweig abwarts den Saft und hinan: und er springt aus dem Schlaf. wie du die BUite beinah ganz iiberschlagst und hinein in die zeitig entschlossene Frucht. das uns finster verschweigt. Sich: wie der Gott in den Schwan . ihnen die Lider beriihrt: HeIden vielleicht und den friihe Hinuberbestimmten. bestandig nimmt er sich fort und tritt ins veranderte Sternbild seiner steten Gefahr. fast nkht erwachend. wenn die Verfiihrung zum Bliihn wie gelinderte Nachtluft ihnen die Jugend des Munds. Dort fanden ihn wenige. Wir aber verweilen. Dauern ficht ihn nicht an. das plotzlich begeisterte Schicksal [25] . Diese stiirzen dahin: dem eigenen Uicheln sind sie voran. drangst dein reines Geheimnis. ach. wie das Rossegcspann in den milden muldigen Bildem von Karnak dem siegenden Konig. seit wie lange schon ists mir bedeutend. Aber. daB sie schon anstehn und gHihn in der Fiille des Hcrzens. Wunderlich nah ist der Held doch den jugendlich Toten. uns nlhmt es zu bliihn. . denen der gartnernde Tod anders die Adern verbiegt. ungeruhmt.42 • Duineser Elegien: Die Sechste Elegie DIE SECHSTE ELEGIE [5] [10] [15] [20J Feigenbaum.

Duino Elegies: The Sixth Elegy • 43 THE SIXTH ELEGY Fig tree. like the god into the swan . those in whom death the gardener has twisted the veins differently. pour your purest secret into the season's determined fruit. Time and again he takes off and charges into the changed constellation of his constant danger. it leaps out of sleep into the ecstasy of its sweetest accomplishment. and so we come to the retarded core of our last fruit already betrayed. they're already standing and glowing with full hearts. In a few the surge of action rises so strongly that. and in those destined to die young. you've been so meaningful to me so long the way you almost completely neglect to bloom and then. like gentle night air. They plunge ahead of their own laughter like the team of horses in front of the lovingly chiseled reliefs of the conquering King at Karnak. we glory in our flowering. Sec. Survival doesn't concern him. [5] [10] [15] [20] [25] . perhaps. without fanfare. Only a few find him there.. suddenly infatuated. The hero strangely resembles those who die young. But hiding the rest of us in darkness. of their eyelids. hardly awake. oh. But we linger. when the temptation to bloom touches the youth of their mouths.. Your arched branches drive the sap up and down like a fountain's pipe. His rising is his Being. only in heroes.

Denn hinstiirmte der Held durch Aufenthalte der Liebe. abgewendet schon. wo er weiter wilhIte und konnte. jeder ihn meinende HerzschIag. da er ausbrach aus der Welt deines Leibs in die engere Welt. in die sich hoch von dem Herzrand. 0 Mutter der HeIden. [30] [35] [40J [45] • . 0 Mutter. wie verbarg ich mich gem vor der Sehnsucht: o war ich. 0 Ursprung reiBender Strome! Ihr SchJuchten. War er nicht Held schon in dir. in dir.. klagend. Auf einmal durchgeht mich mit der stromenden Luft sein verdunkelter Ton. war ich ein Knabe und durft es noch werden und siifse in die kunftigen Arme gestiitzt und lase von Simson. anders . seine herrische Auswahl? Tausende brauten im SchoolS und wollten er sein. schon die Madchen gestiirzt. wie seine Mutter erst nichts und dann alles gchar. Und wenn er Saulen zerstieB. so wars. wilhIte und konnte. stand er am Ende der Lacheln. aber sieh: er ergriff und lieB aus . jeder hob ihn hinaus. Hor kh doch keinen wie ihn. Dann. begann nicht dort schon.44 • Duineser Elegien: Die Sechste Elegje singt ihn hinein in den Stunn seiner aufrauschenden Welt. kiinftig die Opfer dem Sohn.

he stood at the end of smiles. and I was a boy sitting propped up on my future arms. For whenever the hero stormed through love's stops. then everything. Oh I wish. Then how I'd like to hide from this longing. future sacrifices to the son. I wish it were still to come. didn't his powerful choice begin there inside you? Thousands fermented in that womb and wanted to be him. 0 mothers of heroes. All of a sudden. wac.Duino Elegies: The Sixth Elegy • 45 fate sings him into the storm of its roaring world. how at first his mother bore nothing.n't he already a hero inside you. I don't hear anyone like him. [30] o mother. it was when he tore out of your belly's world into this more constricted world where he went on choosing and doing. someone else. 0 sources of raging rivers! Gorges where wailing virgins have already leapt from the heart's high rim. his dark song rushes through me. Already turning around. chose and could. carried by the streaming air. reading about Samson. And if he demolished columns. [35] [40] [45] . each heartbeat meant for him carried him farther. But see: he seized and rejected.

Ruf-Stufen hinan.. Wie er. daB. nicht minder . weithin umschweigt ein reiner bejahender Tag. . beinah vergessend.. Dann die Stufen hi nan. die zart sind urn Blumen.46 • Duineser Elegien: Die Siebente Elegie DIE SIEBENTE ELEGIE [5] Werbung nieitt mehr. Nicht nur die Morgen allc des Sommers . das sie ins Heitere wirft. in die innigen Himmel.. die stille. wenn ihn die Jahreszeit aufhebt. nicht nur wie sie sich wandeln in Tag und strahlen vor Angang. noch unsiehtbar. Und vor sieh. deinem erkiihnten GefiihI die ergliihte Gefiihlin. Erst jenen kIeinen fragenden Aufiaut. FonHine. den Sommer. so wiirbest du wohl.. nicht Werbung. dann den TriIler. die steigende. dieh die Freundin erfiihr.. die nicht triige den Ton der Verkiindigung. in der eine Antwort langsam erwacht und iiber dem horen sich anwarmt. stark und gewaltig. die zu dem drangenden Strahl schon das Fallen zuvornimmt im versprechlichen Spiel . da ist keine Stelle. entwachscne Stimme. zum getraumten Tempel der Zukunft . zwar schriccst du rein wie der Vogel. den. 0 und der Friihling begriffe - [10] [151 [20] . mit steigernder Stille. um die gestalteten Baume. sei deines Schreies Natur. Nicht nur die Tage. daB er ein kiimmerndes Tier und nieht nur cin einzelnes Herz sei. und oben.

into the intimate blue. you'd be courting some still invisible.Duino Elegies: The Seventh Elegy • 47 THE SEVENTH ELEGY No more wooing! Voice. you've outgrown wooing. it won't be the reason for your cry anymore. not only the way they tum into day and shine before beginning. the fountain whose rising jet's already lured into falling by the promise of play . around the molded trees. And ahead of it. Spring would understand . summer. Not only the days.the glowing reflection of your own fired feeling.. almost forgetting he's an anxious creature. then the trill. oh. Then the calling-intervals. Just like him. Not only all of summer's dawns. so delicate around flowers. a mate whose reply was slowly waking and warming itself while she listened . And. still silent lover. above. [5] [10] [15] [20] .the music of your annunciation would echo everywhere. the rising steps up to the future's dreamed-of temple.. and not just a single heart she's tossing toward brightness. First that tiny swell of questioning surrounded by the purely affirmative day's magnifying stillness. so heavy and strong. even if you cried dear as a bird when the soaring season lifts him.

Nachte. nicht nur der nahende xhlaf und ein Ahnen. nicht nur die Wege.48 • Duineser Elegien: Die Siebente Elegie [25] Nicht nur die Andacht dieser entfalteten Krafte. Madchen. vielleicht nicht ganz eine Stunde. das ahnende Klarsein. in den argsten Gassen der Stadte.. nicht nur. . abends . da rief ich die Liebende. ein hiesig einmal ergriffenes Ding galte fur viele. die ihr scheinbar entbehrtet. ein mit den Magen der Zeit kaum MeSliches zwischen zwei Weilen . wie sie vergessen! Siehe. . Schicksal sei mehr. Denn. atmend. Sichtbar [30] [35J [40] [45] . Nur. ins Freie. des Sommers. was der lachende Nachbar uns nicht bestlitigt oder beneidet. nicht nur die Wiesen im Abend.. die Sterne der Erde. da sie ein Dasein hatte. ihr auch.. nach spatem Gewitter. Alles. wie beschrlink ich. ihr. Hiersein ist herrlich. den gerufenen Ruf? Die Versunkenen suchen immer noch Erde. oder dem AbfaH Offene. sondern die Nachte! Sondern die hohen.. Es kamen aus schwachlichen Grabern Madchen und standen .. wir vergessen so leicht. wie. atmend nach seligem Lauf. o einst tot sein und sie wissen unendlich. Schwarende. sondern die Sterne. Denn eine Stunde war je<ier. auf nichts zu. wie. als das Dichte der Kindheit... versankt . Ihr wugtet es. Die Adem voll Dasein. Glaubt nicht.Ihr Kinder. Aber nicht sit nur kame . alle die Sterne: denn wie. wie iiberholtet ihr oft den Geliebten.

Duino Elegies: The Seventh Elegy· 49 Not only the reverence of these unleashed forces.but also the nights! the high summer nights. Oh. not only the coming of sleep and a premonition at night .. But we forget so easily what our laughing neighbor neither confirms nor envies. Life is glorious here. not only the breathing freshness after late thunder. just one thing of this world suddenly understood is valid for many. panting. Your veins swelled with existence.. forever. not only the evening meadows. But she wouldn't come alone . how. the nights and the stars. not only the paths. the stars of the earth. .Children. to be dead at last and know all the stars. . forever! Then how. For there was one hour for each of you. how often you'd catch up with a lover. Other girls would rise out of those crumbling graves and stand .you who sank under in the cities' vilest streets festering like open sewers. when you possessed Being. All. We want to make it [25] [30] [35] [40] [45] . some span between two whiles that can hardly be measured. even you who seem to have gone without it . maybe less than an hour. . How could I limit the call I'd made? The lost are always searching for the earth again. panting from the happy chase. how could you forget them! Look. I've been calling a lover. You girls knew it. into the open. Never think destiny's more than the substrate of childhood.

gestaltlos wie der spannende Orang. und bog Sterne zu sich aus gesicherten Himmeln. schon ins Unsichtbare hin. als stand es noch ganz im Gehirne. halt es sieh. Unser Leben geht hin mit Verwandlung. den er aus aHem gewinnt.50 • Duineser Elegien: Die Siebente Elegie wollen wirs heben. so wie cs ist. schlagt sich erdachtes Gebild vor. Geliebte. [55] [60] [65J [70] . mit pfeHern und Statuen. daB sie's nun innerlich baun. Uns soli dies nicht verwirren. ein einst gebetetes Ding. Viele gewahrens nicht mehr. des Herzens. [SO] Nirgends. . Weite Speicher der Kraft schafft sich dec Zeitgeist. quer. mitten im Nichtwissen-Wohin stand es. zu Erdenklichem vollig gehorig. geknietes . als innen. wo doch das sichtbarste GlUck uns erst zu erkennen sich giebt.Dies stand einmal unter Menschen. Engel. es starke in uns die Bewahrung der noch erkannten Gestalt. wo noch eins ubersteht. denen das Friihere nicht und noch nicht das Nachste gehort. mitten im Schicksal stands. groBer! Jede dumpfe Umkehr der Welt hat solche Enterbte. Ja.. doch ohne den VorteH. Tempel kennt er nicht mehr. Diese. im vernichtenden. wic seiend. wenn wir es innen verwandeln. Verschwend ung sparen wir heimlicher ein. wird Welt sein. Denn auch das Nachste ist weit fur die Menschen. ein gedientes. Und immer geringer schwindet das AuBen. Wo einmal ein dauerndes Haus war.

the World exists nowhere but within. Each slow turn of the world carries such disinherited ones to whom neither the past nor the future belongs. it should commit us to preserve the fonn we still can recognize. Our life is lived in transformation. the annihilator. stood in the middle of fate. Where a sturdy house once stood. complete with pillars and statues. a fantastic structure rises into view. even though the most visible joy reveals itself to us only when we've transformed it. Many don't see it anymore and miss the chance to build it again. as much at ease among concepts as if it still stood in the brain. Love. survives. formless as the straining urge from which it draws all else. within. This stood among men. within. diminishing. and knelt to once. it endures just as it is. served. Temples it can't recognize anymore. [50] [55] [60] [65] [70] . as if it existed. This shouldn't confuse us. in the invisible. Yes. stood in the middle of Not-Knowing-Where-To. even where one single thing that was prayed to. The Zeitgeist builds huge warehouses of power. once. and it pulled down stars from the safe heaven toward it.Duino Elegies: The Seventh Elegy • 51 visible. For even the immediate future is far from mankind. Now we're saving these extravagances of the heart secretly. the outer world vanishes. And. greater than ever. no.

I [SO] [85] [90] [93] ..groB. des Doms. Engel. denn wir sinds. (Was miissen sie fiirchterlich groB sein. Und seine zum Greifen oben offene Hand bleibt vor dir offen. daB wir solches vermochten. reichte sie dir nicht ans Knie . .) Aber ein Turm war groB. und Musik rekhte noch weiter hinan und iiberstieg uns. diese unseren Riiumc. SauIen. wie Abwehr und Warnung. wir. weitauf. grau aus vergchender Stadt oder aus fremder. 0 du GroBer. diese gewiihrenden. Doch selbst nur eine Liebende oh.. nicht wahr? 0 Engel. erzahls. und wiirb ich dich auch! Du kommst nicht. wider so starke Stromung kannst du nicht schreiren.. So haben wir dennoch nicht die Riiume versaumt. mein Atem reicht rur die Riihmung nicht aus.52 • Duineser Elegien: Die Siebente Elegie dir noch zeig ich es.? Glaub nicht. Engel.. er war es. der Sphinx. das strebende Stemmen. da sie Jahrtausende nicht unseres Fiihlns iiberfiilln. da! in deinem Anschaun steh es gcrettet zuletzt. Pylonc. UnfaBlicher. nun endlich aufrecht. [75J War es nicht Wunder? 0 staune. Denn mein Anruf ist immer voU Hinweg. Wie cin gestreckter Arm ist mein Rufen. daB ich werbe. auch noch ncben dir? Chartres war groB . allein am nachtlichen Fenster .

finally redeemed in your eyes. a defense and a warning. But. My breath's too short for its praise. Wasn't it a miracle? Oh. That's us. pylons.Duino Elegies: The Seventh Elegy • 53 Angel. soared far beyond us. the cathedral's striving gray thrust out of its crumbling or alien city. then. up there. (How frighteningly huge they must be. still not overpopulated with our feelings after thousands of years.. our spaces. even when compared with you. alone at the window at night . [75] [SO] [85] [90] [93] . is always in front of you. Angel. 111 show it to you yet. Pillars. us. doesn't she reach your knee? Don't think I'm wooing you! And. even a lover. oh. marvel. it was great. There! At last it shall stand straight.) But one tower was great. incomprehensible. So. Because my call is always full of "Get away!" You can't advance against such a powerful current. you wouldn't come. My call is like an outstretched arm. even if 1 were.. upturned open hand. Angel. And its clutching. 0 great one. wasn't it? 0 Angel. we haven't failed to use these generous spaces. Tell them that's what we could do. the Sphinx. Chartres was greatand music soared even higher.

ware nicht der andre. Als Kind verliert sich eins im Stilln an dies und wird geriittell Oder jener stirbt und ists. das man ahnet und unendlich weiS und nicht begehrt. Liebende.. daS es riickwarts Gestaltung sehe. in den die Blumen unendlich aufgehn. Immer ist es Welt und niemals Nirgends ohne Nicht: das Reine. denn schon das friihe Kind wenden wir urn und zwingens. den reinen Raum vor uns. so wie die Brunnen gehen. Uniiberwachte. so gehts in Ewigkeit.. Was drauBen ist. Denn nah am Tod sieht man den Tod nkht mehr und starrt hinaus. nicht das Offne. Ihn sehen wir allein. das im Tiergesicht so ticf ist. WiT haben nie. vielleicht mit groBem Tierblick. Wie aus Versehn ist ihnen aufgetan . der die Sieht verstellt. Frei von Tod. rings urn ihren freien Ausgang.54 • Duineser Elegien: Die Achte Elegie DIE ACHTE ELEG IE Rudolf Kassner zugeeigllet [5J [10J [15J [20J [25] Mit allen Augen sieht die Kreatur das Offene. und wenn es geht. das freie Tier hat seinen Untergang stets hinter sich und vor sich Gott. sind nah daran und staunen . Nur unsre Augen sind wie wngekehrt und ganz urn sie gestellt als Fallen. wir wissens aus des Tiers Antlitz allein. nicht einen einzigen Tag.

Not for a single day. But our eyes. and never crave. one may lose himself in silence and be shaken out of it. no. We know what's out there only from the animal's face. tum him around and force him to look at the past as formation. trapping its way out to freedom. . . lovers come close to it and are amazed. in which flowers endlessly open. we only see it. the free animal always has its destruction behind and god ahead. never have we had that pure space ahead of us. for we take even the youngest child. Once near death. and when it moves. Or one dies and is it. If the other weren't there blocking the view. It opens up behind the other. unguarded space we breathe. it moves toward eternity like running springs. maybe with the wide eyes of animals. As a child. almost [5] [10] [15] [20] [25] . always know.Dumo Elegies: The Eighth Elegy • 55 THE EIGHTH ELEGY Dedicated to Rudolf Kassner AIl other creatures look into the Open with their whole eyes. Free from death. It is always World and never Nowhere without No: that pure. are set all around it like snares. turned inward. one can't see death anymore and stares out. not that openness so deep within an animal's face.

. o Seligkeit der kleinen Kreatur. und wieder wird ihm Welt. Aber uber ihn kommt keiner fort. . [35] [40] [45] [50] . Der Schopfung immer zugewendet. rein. treuer und sein AnschluG unendlich zartlich. Nach der ersten Heimat ist ihm die zweite zwitterig und windig. Denn ihm auch haftet immer an. Hier ist alles Abstand. die noch innen hupft. . Doch sein Sein ist ihm unendlich. ruhig durch uns durch.die Erinnerung. riB es uns herum mit seinem Wandel. o Gluck der Mucke. naher gewesen. der sie austrug. was uns oft iiberwaltigt. als sei schon einmal das. von uns verdunkelt. Oder daB ein Tier.. so wie sein Ausblick. aufschaut. die immer bleibt im SchooBe. dort sieht es Alles und sich in AHem und geheilt fiir immer. Und wo wir Zukunft sehn. Und doch ist in dem wachsam warmen Tier Gewicht und Sorge einer groBen Schwermut. sehn wir nur auf ihr die Spiegelung des Frein. und dort wars Atem. ein stummes. Ware BewuBtheit unsrer Art in dem sicheren Tier.56 • Duineser Elegien: Die Achte Elegie [30] hinter dem andern . ungefaBt und ohne Blick auf seinen Zustand. wonach man drangt. das uns entgegenzieht in anderer Richtung . Dieses heiBt Schicksal: gegeniiber sein und nichts als das und immer gegeniiber.

the second seems drafty and a hybrid. pure. and whole forever. and blind to his condition. But to the animal. Because what often overwhelms us also dings to him . and through us. This is destiny: to be opposites. Always facing creation. blessed are the tiny creatures who stay in the womb that bore them forever. Oh. And where we see the future. oh the joy of the gnat that can still leap within. incomprehensible. always. [30] [35] [40] And yet the weight and care of one great sadness lies on this warm and watching creature. and its attachment to us infinitely tender. he'd drag us around in his wake. all we see is the reflection of the frcc and open that we've darkened. like his outward gaze. and nothing else but opposites.. truer. After that first home. his being is infinite. or some mute animal raising its calm eyes and seeing through us. and the world returns again. he sees all. [45] [50] .the memory that what we so strive for now may have been nearer. If this sure animal approaching us from a different direction had our kind of consciousness..Duino Elegies: The Eighth Elegy • 57 an oversight . Here all is distance. there it was breath. but no one gets past the other. himself in all. once.

dem allen zugewandt und nie hinaus! Uns uberfiillts. der beinah beides weiS aus seinem Ursprung. anhalt. immer. Und sieh die halbe Sicherheit des Vogels. Wir ordnens. [60] [65] [75] . den ein Raum empfing. so leben wir und nehmen immer Abschied. wie wenn ein Sprung durch eine Tasse geht. Es zerfalll Wir ordnens wieder und zerfallen selbst. So reiBt die Spur der Fledermaus durchs Porzellan des Abends. Und wir: Zuschauer. welcher fortgeht? Wie er auf dem letzten Hugel. das fliegen mulS und stammt aus einem SchooK Wie vor sich selbst erschreckt. doch mit der ruhenden Figur als Deckel. was wir auch tun. der ihm ganz sein Tal noch einmal zeigt.. durchzuckts die Luft. aus einem Toten. als war er eine Seele der Etrusker.58 • Duineser Elegie11: Die Achte Elegie [55] selbst wenn sie Hochzeit hat: denn SchooB ist Alles. in jener Haltung sind von einem. Und wie bestiirzt ist eins. uberall. weilt . sich wendet. daB wir. [70] Wer hat uns also umgedreht.

and stops.1W Elegies: The Eighth Elegy • 59 even on its wedding day. We arrange it It decays. the way a wing of a bat crazes the porcelain of night. And how confused is anything that comes from a womb and has to fly. always. everywhere. Who's turned us around like this. so that whatever we do. we always have the look of someone going away? Just as a man on the last hill showing him his whole valley one last time. We arrange it again. turns. And we: spectators.Du. for the womb is all! And look at the half-certainty of the bird almost aware of both from birth. and lingers so we live. it darts through the air like a crack through a cup. [70] [55] [60] [65] [75] . like one of the Etruscan souls rising from the dead man enclosed inside the space for which his reclining figure forms a lid. and we decay. As if afraid of itself. and are forever leaving. looking at everything and never from! It floods us.

Nie wieder. Uns..Wem es geben? Am liebsten alles behaIten fUr immer . Schicksal vermeidend. nicht.: warum dann Menschliches mussen . Wollen es werden. mit kleinen Wellen an jedem Blattrand (wie eines Windes Lacheln) . sich sehnen nach Schicksal? . Nicht aus Neugier. Ein Mal jedes. das hier [10J [15] [20] . Aber dieses ein Mal gewesen zu sem. . dieser voreilige Vortell eines nahen Vedusts. in den andem Bezug. als Lorbeer. . well Gluck ist. das seltsam uns angeht. Ein Mal und nichtmehr.60 • Duineser Elegitn: Die Neunte Elegit DIE NEUNTE ELEGIE [5] Warum.. Und so drangen wir uns und wollen es leisten. dieses Schwindende. was nimmt man hinuber? Nicht das Anschaun. scheint nieht widerrufbar. wenn es angeht. das auch im Lorbeer UJiire . ein wenig dunkler als alles andere Gnln. nur ein Mal. Und wir auch tin Mal. wenn auch nur ein Mal: irdisch gewesen zu sein. Oh. und wei! uns scheinbar alles das Hiesige braucht. oder zur Ubung des Herzens. die Schwindendsten... also die Frist des Daseins hinzubringen. wehe. Aber weil Hiersein viel ist.und.. wollens enthalten in unsern einfachen Handen. Ach. im uberfiillteren Blick und im sprachlosen Herzen.

really exists. and because all that's here. not because happiness.that could be in the laurel. that quick profit of impending loss.cc . not just to exercise the heart . . long for fate? Oh. the edge of each leaf fluted with small waves (like the wind's smile) . to have been on earth just on. even if only once. ..why. Once and no more. But to have been once. too . vanishing so quickly. Us. in our overcrowded eyes. but what can we take across into that other realm? Not the power to see we've learned [5] [10] [15] [20] . when this short span of being could be spent like the laurel.. do we have to be human and. and in our speechless heart. But because being here means so much. Never again. And so we keep on going and try to realize it. once. seems to need us and strangely concerns us. only once.that's irrevocable. to the first to vanish.Duino Elegies: The Ninth Elegy • 61 THE NINTH ELEGY Why. then. avoiding fate. Try to become it. Ah. a little darker than all the other green. try to hold it in our simple hands. And us too. Not out of curiosity. Once each. To give it to whom? We'd rather keep all of it forever .

Keins.also lauter Unsagliches. wie die Zunge [SO] . Turm . . daB sie die eigne altere Schwelle der Tiir ein wenig verbrauchen. was sie verdrangend ersetzt. Brunnen. Obstbaurn. Krug. Aber spater.. auch sie. leicht. die erlebbaren. die Allen unsagliche. was soIls: die sind besser unsaglich.. urn zu sagen: Haus. Bringt doch der Wanderer auch yom Hange des Bergrands nicht eine Hand voll Erde ins Tal. die willig zerspringen. hier seine Heimat.. Tor. unter den Stemen. nach den vielen vorher und vor den kiinftigen . denn. sondern ein erworbenes Wort.62 • Duineser Elegien: Die Neunte Elegie [25J [30J [35] [40] langsam erlernte. Also die Schmerzen. [45] Sprich und bekenn. oh zu sagen so. aber zu sagen. Zwischen den Hammern besteht unser Herz. also der Liebe lange Erfahrung. Hier ist des Siiglichen Zeit. Tun unter Krusten. verstehs. Mehr als je fallen die Dinge dahin. daB sich in ihrem Gefiihl jedes und jedes entziickt? Schwelle: was ists fur zwei Liebende. ist ein Tun ohne BUd. . Fenster. reines. den gelben und blaun Enzian. 1st nicht die heimliche List dieser verschwiegenen Erde. wie seIber die Dinge niemals innig meinten zu sein. sobald innen das Handeln entwachst und sich anders begrenzt. wenn sie die Liebenden drangt.. Sind wir viel1eicht hier. und kern hier Ereignetes. Brucke. Also vor aHem das Schwersein. h6chstens: Sauie.

Maybe we're here only to say: house.. above all. the long experience of love those purely unspeakable things. after so many before them. Our heart survives between [45] [50] . a pure word.. Speak and testify. replaced by an act without symbol. but to say them. to say them in a way that the things themselves never dreamed of existing so intensely. jug. them too. but only some word he's earned. olive tree. tower . But later. the hard work of living. Nothing. remember. under the stars. Here is its country. and nothing that's happened here. pillar. When this silent earth urges lovers on. well. The things we can live with are falling away more than ever. and before all those to come . the pain. what then? That's better left unsaid. gently. [25] [30] [35] [40] This is the time for what can be said. gate. oh.Duino Elegies: The Ninth Elegy • 63 so slowly here. isn't it her secret reason to make everything shudder with ecstasy in them? Doorsill: how much it means to a pair of lovers to wear down the sill of their own door a little more.. And so. the yellow and blue gentian. window at most.. For the wanderer doesn't bring a handful of that unutterable earth from the mountainside down to the valley. An act under crusts that will easily rip as soon as the energy inside outgrows them and seeks new limits. bridge.

64 • Duineser Elegien: Die Neunte Elegie

zwischen den Zahnen, die doch, dennoch, die preisende bleibt. Preise dem Engel die Welt, nicht die unsagliche, ihm kannst du nicht groBtun mit herrlich Erfiihltem; im Wcltall, wo cr fiihlender fiihlt, bist du ein Neuling. Drum zeig ihm das Einfache, das, von Geschlecht zu Geschlechtern gestaltet, als ein Unsriges lebt, neben der Hand und im Blick. Sag ihm die Dinge. Er wird staunender stehn; wic du standcst bei dem Seiler in Rom, oder beim Topfer am Nil. Zeig ihm, wie gliicklich ein Ding sein kann, wic schuldlos und unser, wie selbst das klagende Leid rein zur Gestalt sich entschlieBt, dient als em Ding, oder stirbt in ein Ding -, und jenseits selig der Geige entgeht. - Und diese, von Hingang lebenden Dinge verstehn, daIS du sie riihmst; verganglich, traun sie ein Rettendes uns, den Verganglichsten, zu. Wollen, wir sollen sie ganz im unsichtbarn Herzen verwandeln in - 0 unendlich - in uns! Wer wir am Ende auch seien. Erde, ist cs nicht dies, was du willst unsichtbar in uns erstehn? - 1st cs dein Traum nicht, einmal unsichtbar zu sein? - Erde! unsichtbar! Was, wenn Verwandlung nicht, ist dein drangender Auftrag? Erde, du liebe, ich will. Oh glaub, es bediirfte

[55]

[60J

[65]

[70]

Duino Elegies: The Ninth Elegy • 65
hammers, just as the tongue between the teeth is still able to praise. Praise the world to the angel, not what can't be talked about. You can't impress him with your grand emotions. In the cosmos where he so intensely feels, you're just a novice. So show him some simple thing shaped for generation after generation until it lives in our hands and in our eyes, and it's ours. TeU him about things. He'll stand amazed, just as you did beside the ropemaker in Rome or the potter on the Nile. Show him how happy a thing can be, how innocent and ours; how even grief's lament purely determines its own shape, serves as a thing, or dies in a thing - and escapes in ecstasy beyond the violin. And these things, whose lives are lived in leaving - they understand when you praise them. Perishing, they tum to us, the most perishable, for help. They want us to change them completely in our invisible hearts, oh - forever - into us! Whoever we finally may be. Earth, isn't this what you want: to resurrect in us invisibly? Isn't it your dream to be invisible one day? Earth! Invisible! What's your urgent charge, if not transformation? Earth, my love, I will. Oh, believe me, you don't

[55]

[60]

[65]

[70]

66 • Duineser Elegien: Die Neunte Elegie

[75]

nicht deiner Friihlinge mehr, mich dir zu gewinnen -, einer, ach, ein einziger ist schon dem Blute zu viel. Namenlos bin ich zu dir entschlossen, von weit her. lmmer warst du im Recht, und dein heiliger Einfall ist der vertrauliche Tod. Siehe, ich lebe. Woraus? Weder Kindheit noch Zukunft werden weniger . .. Oberzahliges Dasein entspringt mir im Herzen.

[SOJ

Duino Elegies: The Ninth Elegy • 67

need your Springs to win me anymore - one, oh, one's already too much for my blood. I'm silently determined to be YOUTS, from now on. You were always right, and your most sacred idea is death, that intimate friend. Look, I'm alive. On what? Neither childhood nor the future grows less . .. More being than I'll ever need springs up in my heart.

[75]

[80]

wo in der falschen. ihre fertig gekaufte: reinlich und zu und enttauscht wie ein Postamt am Sonntag. Vergeuder der Schmerzen. unser dunkeles Sinngriin. wehe. an dem Ausgang der grimmigen Einsicht. das platzende Denkma!. nicht in euer gelOstes Haar mich geIOster ergab. eine der Zeiten des heimlichen Jahres -. sind Stelle. Wohnort. JubeI und Ruhm aufsinge zustimmenden Engeln. aus der GuBform des Leeren der AusguB prahlt: der vergoldete Uinn. Nachte. Wie wir sie absehn voraus.68 • Duineser Elegien: Die Zeh"te Elegie DIE ZEHNTE ELEGIE [5] [10] [15J Dass kh dereinst. zweifelnden oder rciBenden Saiten. geharmte. 0 wie werdet ihr dann. wie fremd sind die Gassen der Leid-Stadt. nicht nur Zeit -. Wir. Boden. (2OJ . wie spurios zertrate ein Engel ihnen den Trostmarkt. stark. hinnahm. ob sie nicht enden vieI1eicht. Lager. daB das unscheinbare Weinen blUhe. Drau1Sen aber krauseln sich immer die Rander von Jahrmarkt. 0. untrostliche Schwestem. aus Obertonung gemachten Stille. DaB von den klar geschlagenen Hammem des Herzens keiner versage an weichen. Sie aber sind ja unser winterwahriges Laub. OafS mich mein stromendes Antlitz gllinzender mac he. den die Kirche begrenzt. Freilich. mir lieb sein. in die traurige Dauer. DaB ich euch knieender nicht. Siedelung.

and disappointed as a post office on Sunday. clean. the glittering confusion. our dark evergreen. a home. my tiny tears bloom. a camp. Oh. surrender myself more loosely into your flowing hair. let me sing ecstatic praise to angels saying yes! Let my heart's clear-struck keys ring and not one fail because of a doubting. why didn't I kneel lower to receive you. oh. And then how dear you'll be to me. you nights of anguish. violent. shut. bought ready-made. slack. the collapsing monument swaggers. a settlement. But. But on the outskirts there's always the fair's spinning rim. soil. [5] [10] [15] [20] . with the church nearby. We waste our sufferings. when this terrifying vision's vanished. But they're nothing more than our winter trees. how strange the streets of the City of Pain really are. or breaking string.not just a season. Sisters of despair. how an angel could stamp out their market of comforts. Let my streaming face make me more radiant.Duino Elegies: The Tenth Elegy • 69 THE TENTH ELEGY One day. like something cast from a mold of the Void. but a place. We stare into that boring endurance beyond them looking for their end. one of the seasons in our secret years . In the seeming silence of noise against noise.

. ernst.70 • Duineser Elegien: Die Zehnte Elegie [25J [30J [35] Schaukeln der Freiheit! Taucher und Gaukler des Eifers! Und des behiibschten GlUcks figiirliche SchieBstatt. der Vorgang . hinter der letzten Planke. und Liebende halten einander.. We iter noch zieht es den Jiingling. . das unterrichtet und macht fruchtbar . daf5 er eine junge Klage liebt . Wir wohnen dort drauBen . gleich dahinter. alles. wenn ein Geschkkterer trifft. . Ihn riihrt ihre Haltung. jenes bitteren Biers. nicht zur Belustigung nur: der Geschlechtsteil des Gelds. Hinter ihr her kommt er in Wiesen... und Hunde haben Natur. Wo? Und der Jiingling folgt. wo es zap pelt von Ziel und sich blechem benimmt. der Hals -. trommeln und pliirrn. wenn sie immer dazu frische Zerstreuungen kaun . [40J [45] Kinder spielen. Fur Erwachsene aber ist noch besonders zu sehn.. Oh aber gleich dariiber hinaus. im armlichen Gras. das Ganze. gleich im Riicken der Planke. Von Beifall zu Zufall taumelt er weiter. vielleicht.. .abseits. ists wirklich.Weit. Die Schulter.. kehrt um . . wie das Geld sich vermehrt. anatomisch. das den Trinkenden siiS scheint.. vielleicht ist sie von herrlicher Herkunft. Aber er laSt sie. . denn Buden jeglicher Neugier werben. . Sie sagt: . beklebt mit Plakaten des » Todlos«.

. Maybe he's in love with a young Lament. but actually. but just outside. every thing. Oh. to one side lovers are holding each other. [25] [30] [35] [40] [45] ." Where? And the young man follows. . The young man walks farther on. the real. their gold genitals. right behind them. But he leaves her. For adults only there's something special to see: coins copulating. He follows her into the fields. the whole operation . . We Jive out there." the bitter beer so sweet to those who drink it while chewing on plenty of fresh distractionsjust behind the billboards. not just acting. Children are playing. behind the last billboards plastered with posters of "Deathless.Dui110 Elegies: The Tenth Elegy • 71 Swings of freedom! High-divers and jugglers of excitement! And the lifelike shooting galleries of garish luck: targets tumbling off the rack to the ring of tin when a good-shot hits one. earnest in the thinning grass. and dogs are doing nature's bidding. He reels through applause toward more lock. He's moved by her ways: her shoulders. her neck maybe she comes from a noble family. . booths that can tempt the queerest tastes are drumming and barking. turns back.educational and guaranteed to arouse you . She says: "It's far.

dem der Entwohnung. Ja. Madchen wartet sie ab und befreundet sie. der Alteren eine. einrnal.. im ersten Zustand zeitlosen Gleichmuts. Zeigt ihnen leise. Perlen des Leids und die feinen Schleier der Duldung.Mit Jiinglingen geht sie schweigend. der Klagen. schlackig versteinerten Zorn. Zeigt mm die hohen Tranenbaume und Felder bliihender Wehmut. das stamrnte von dort. weidend. aus altern Vuikan. zeigt ihm die Saulen der Tempel oder die Triimmer jener Burgen. em GroBes Geschlecht. bei Menschen findest du manchmal ein Stiick geschliffenes Ur-Leid oder. Nur die jungen Toten. Die Vater trieben den Bergbau dort in dem groBen Gebirg. . wo sie wohnen. im Tal. . wir Klagen. sagt sie. folgen ihr liebend. winkt . Aber dort. Einst waren wir reich. von wo Klage-Fiirsten das Land emstens weise beherrscht. zeigt ihm die Tiere der Trauer.. Was so11s? Sie ist eine Klage. nimmt sich des Jiinglinges an. was sie an sich hat. (Lebendige kennen sie nur als sanftes 8Iattwerk).72 • Duineser Elegien: Die Zehnte Eiegie wendet sich. Und sie leitet ihn leicht durch die weite Landschaft der Klagen.und manchmal [SO] [55] [60J [65] .Wir waren. wenn er fragt: .

Our fathers worked the mines in that mountain range. She says: "We were a great clan. the flowering fields of sadness (the living know them only as tender leaves). Sometimes you'll find a polished lump of ancient sorrow among men. one of the older Laments listens to the young man's questions. once. in the valley where they live. We used to be rich. Yes. Gently she shows them what she's wearing: pearls of pain and the fine-spun veils of patience. those in their first moments of timeless serenity. she shows him herds of pasturing grief. With young men she walks silently. showing him columns of temples or ruins of the castles where the Lords of Lament wisely ruled the country long ago. just being weaned. and sometimes [50] [55] [60] [65] ." And she gently guides him through the immense Land of Lamentation. But there. She shows him the tall trees of tears. that came from there. Only those who die young.Duino Elegies: The Tenth Elegy • 73 looks around. What's the use? She's only a Lament. or petrified rage from the slag of some old volcano. we Laments. She waits for girls and befriends them. waves . follow her lovingly...

Wiege. so wandeln sie leiser. Neue. Briiderlich jenem am Nil. Das Brennende Buch. Langsam nennt sie die Klage: siehe: den Reiter. Und sie. [75] [80] [85] [90] . dem Pol zu. und nennen sic: Fruchtkranz.74 • Duineser Elegitm: Die Zehnte Elegie schreckt ein Vogel und zieht. Und hoher. jene der reifesten Rundung. Die Sterne des Leidlancls. im Frlihtod schwindelnd. flach ihnen fliegend durchs Aufschaun. den unbeschreiblichen UmriB. streifend im langsamen Abstrich die Wange entlang. Und sie staunen dem kronlichen Haupt. Nicht erfaSt es sein Blick. [70] weithin das schriftliche Bild seines vereinsamten Schreis. scheucht es die Eule. Abends flihrt sie ihn hin zu den Grabern der Alten aus dem Klagc-Gesch1echt. den Sibyllen und Warn-Herrn. zeichnet weich in das neue Totengehor. Puppe. der erhabene Sphinx . das liber Alles wachende Grab-Mal. unci bald mondets empor. Weg.: der verschwiegenen Kammer Antlitz. Naht aber Nacht. Fenster. hinter dem Pschent-Rand hervor. liber ein doppelt aufgeschlagenes Blatt. Aber ihr Schaun. die Sterne. den Stab. schweigend. Dann. der Menschen Gesicht auf die Waage der Sterne gelegt. das vollere Sternbild we iter. das rur immer. Hier.

as on facing pages of an opened book. and soon the tomb that watches over all rises bright as moonlight.Duino Elegies: The Tenth Elegy • 75 a frightened bird flying across their line of vision scrawls the huge glyph of its desolate cry. Stars of the Land of Grief. The Burning Book. his look can't take it in. In the evening she leads him to the grave of the elders. he faintly traces the indescribable outline. Window. And they're stunned by the crowned head that has silently poised the features of man on the scale of stars forever. Road. Doll. and on the dead's newborn hearing. and they call that bigger constellation Garland of Fruit. skimming strokes. they walk more slowly. And with slow. But hers frightens an owl from behind the double crown's rim. [70] [75J [80J [85] [90] . the bird brushes the cheek. the one with the fullest curve. New ones. The Lament slowly names them: "Look. Still dizzy from just having died. brother to the one on the Nile. there: the Rider. the sybils and prophets of the House of Lamentation. the stupendous Sphinx: the secret chamber's face. the Staff. Then farther toward the Pole: Cradle. But as night comes on. the stars. And higher.

oder [110] meinten den Regen. rein wie Un Innern einer gesegneten Hand. Und da umarmt sie ihn. siehe. der fallt auf dunkles Erdreich Un Friihjahr.. - [95] Doch der Tote mug fort. sie zeigten vielleicht auf die Katzchen der leeren Hasel. und schweigend bringt ihn die altere Klage bis an die Talschlucht. wo es schimmert im Mondschein: [100] die QueUe der Freude.Bei den Menschen ist sie ein tragender Strom. die uns beinah besturzt. die hangenden.. empfanden die RUhrung. sagt: . Stehn am Fug des Gebirgs. Und wir. ein Glekhnis. weinend. [105] Einsam steigt er dahin. [114] wenn ein Glucklkhes fiillt. die an steigendes GlUck denken.76 • Duineser Elegien: Die Zehnte Elegie Aber im sudlkhen Himmel. In Ehrfurcht nennt sie sic. . in die Berge des Ur-Leids. Und nkht emmal sein Schritt klingt aus dem tonlosen Los. das die Mutter bedeutet . das klar ergHinzende »M «. Aber erweckten sie uns. die unendlich Toten.

. (95] (100] [105] [110] [114] . . weeping. Yet. And not once does his step ring from that mute fate.Duino Elegies: The Tenth Elegy • 77 But in the southern sky. where it shines in moonlight: the source of joy. she says: "It is an enduring stream among men. look. the bright shining M that stands for Mothers ." But the dead must go on. pure as the palm of a consecrated hand. Naming it reverently. if those forever dead were waking an image in us." They stand at the foot of the mountains. . and silently the old Lament brings him as far as the gorge. And we. He climbs the mountains of primal pain alone. or maybe mean the rain falling on the dark earth in early spring. who have always thought of joy as rising. would feel the emotion that almost amazes us when a happy thing fulls. they might point to the catkins hanging from the empty hazels. And there she embraces him.

.TbesONNETS TOORpbEUS for Daphne Und wenn dich das Irdische vergass. zu der stillen Erde sag: Ich rinne. Zu dem raschen Wasser sprich: Ich bin.

DIE SONETTE AN ORPHEUS Geschrieben als ein Grab-mal {iir Wera Ouckama Knoop .

THE SONNETS TO ORPHEUS Written as a monument for Wera Ouckama Knoop .

FIRST SERIES .

dessen Pfosten beben. und da ergab sieh. * .84 • Die Sonette an Orpheus: Erster Teil 1 Da stieg ein Baum. 0 reine Obersteigung! 0 hoher Baum im Ohr! Und alles schwieg. ein Unterschlupf aus dunkelstem Verlangen mit einem Zugang. dass sie nicht aus List und nicht aus Angst in sich so leise waren. o Orpheus singt! Tiere aus Stille drangen aus dem klaren gelOsten Wald von Lager und Genist. sondern aus Horen. Und wo eben kaum eine Hiitte war. da schufst du ihnen Tempel im Gehor. Gerohr schien klein in ihren Herzen. Doch selbst in der Verschweigung ging neuer Anfang. Briillen. dies zu empfangen. Schrei. Wink und Wandlung vor.

shriek. • . 0 sheer transcendence! o Orpheus sings! 0 tall tree in the ear! And all was still. Creatures of silence crowded out of the clear freed forest. and change appeared. But even in that silence a new beginning. but out of listening. a dugout carved from their darkest desire with a lintel of trembling timber you erected temples for them in their inner ear .The Sonnets to Orpheus: First Series • 85 1 A tree sprang up. Growl. and roar shrank in their hearts. out of their dens and lairs. any fear. hint. And where there'd been hardly a hut before to take this in. and it was clear that inner silence of theirs wasn't out of any cunning.

sie erstand und schlief. die ich je bewundert. dass sie nicht begehrte. Ein Madchen fast.. . wie hast du sie vollendet. Die Baume. Und schlief in mir. Singender Gott. wirst du dies Motiv erfinden noch.86 • Die Sonette an Orpheus: Erster Teil 2 Und fast ein Madchen wars und ging hervor aus diesem einigen Gluck von Sang und Leier und gUinzte klar durch ihre Fruhlingsschleier und machte skh ein Bett in meinem Ohr. . erst wach zu sein? Sieh. eh sich dein Lied verzehrte?Wo sinkt sie hin aus mir? . Wo ist ihr Tod? 0. die gefiihlte Wiese und jedes Staunen. diese fiihlbare Ferne. das mich selbst betraf. Sie schlief die Welt. Vnd alles war ihr Schlaf.

.. Where is her death? Oh. How did you perfect her. ? barely a girl yet . and leaping out of this happy harmony of song and lyre. so that she didn't crave to be awake first? See. will you invent the leit motif before your song sings its own grave? Where does she shrink to from me .. She slept the world. and made herself a bed inside my ear.. those palpable distances. she arose and slept. • .The Sannets to Orpheus: First Series • 87 2 And yet barely a girl. singing god. and every mystery that filled me with awe. and shining clearly through her veils of Spring. the felt meadows. The trees I always marveled at. And her sleep was all. And slept in me.

ist nicht Begehr. Wie aber. soIl ein Mann ihm tolgen durch die schmale Leier? Sein Sinn ist Zwiespalt. Fur den Gott ein Leichtes. Dass verrinnt. sag mir. Ein Wehn im Gott. ist ein andrer Hauch. dass du liebst. Ein Hauch urn nichts.88 • Die Sonette an Orpheus: Erster Ted 3 Ein Gott vetmags. wenn auch die Stimme dann den Mund dir aufstosst. wie du ihn lehrst. Gesang. nicht Werbung urn ein endlich noch Erreichtes. -Ierne vergessen dass du aufsangst. Gesang ist Dasein. Ein Wind. In Wahrheit singen. Wann aber sind wir? Und wann wendet er an unser Sein die Erde und die Sterne? Dies ists nicht. Jungling. An der Kreuzung zweier Herzwege steht kein Tempel fur Apoll. .

The Sonnets to Orpheus: First Series • 89 3 A god can do it.learn to forget your impulsive song. It . A breath about nothing. how a man can trail him through the narrow lyre? His mind is forked. it's almost nothing. True singing is a different kind of breath. will you. your loving isn't it. But when do we exist? And when does he spend the earth and stars on our being? Young man. even if your mouth is pried open by your voice . For a god. Singing is Being. as you teach us. isn't desiring. A wind. Singing. nor luring something conquered in the end. Where two heart's arteries intersect. But tell me. A gust in the god. Soon it will end. there stands no temple for Apollo.

90 • Die Sonette an Orpheus: Erster Teil

4

o ihr Zartlichen,

tretet zuweilen in den Atem, der euch nicht meint, lasst ihn an eueren Wangen sich teilen, hinter euch zittert er, wieder vereint.

o ihr Seligen, 0

ihr Heilen, die ihr der Anfang der Herzen scheint. Bogen der PfeHe und Ziele von Pfeilen, ewiger gHinzt euer Uicheln verweint.

Fiirchtet euch nicht zu leiden, die Schwere, gebt sic zuriick an der Erde Gewicht; schwer sind die Berge, schwer sind die Mcere. Selbst die als Kinder ihr pflanztet, die Baume, wurden zu schwer Hingst; ihr triiget sie nicht. Aber die Liifte ... aber die Raume ...

..

The Sonnets to Orpheus: First Series • 91

4

o you tender ones, every now and then
step into breath that doesn't notice you; let it touch your cheeks, divide in two; behind you it will tremble together again.

o you who are blessed, you who are whole,
you who seem to be the beginning of hearts, bows for the arrows and the arrows' targets, only tear-glazed will your smile forever glow.

Don't be afraid to suffer; replace the heaviness back on the earth's own weight: the mountains are heavy, so are the seas. You couldn't support even the trees you planted as children, they've grown so great. Ah, but the breezes . . . ah, but the spaces ...

92 • Die Sonette an Orpheus: Erster Teil

5

Errichtet keinen Denkstein. Lasst die Rose nur jedes Jahr zu seinen Gunsten bliihn. Denn Orpheus ists. Seine Metamorphose in clem und dem. Wir sollen uns nicht miihn urn andre Namen. Ein fUr aile Male ists Orpheus, wenn es singt. Er kommt und geht. Ists nicht schon vie!, wenn er die Rosenschale urn ein paar rage manchmal iibersteht?

o wie er schwindcn muss, dass ihrs begrifft!
Und wenn ihm selbst auch bangte, dass er schwande Indem sein Wort das Hierscin iibertrifft, ist er schon dort, wohin ihrs nicht beg1eitet. Der Leier Gitter zwangt ihm nicht die Hande. Und er gehorcht, indem er iiberschreitet.

..

The Sonnets to Orpheus: First Series • 93

5

Erect no memorial stone. Let the rose bloom every year to remind us of him. Because it's Orpheus. His metamorphosis is in this, and this. No other name should trouble us. Once and for all, when there's song, it's Orpheus. He comes and goes. Isn't it enough that now and then he's able to outlive the bowl of roses a few days? Oh how he has to vanish so you'll know! Though he too were afraid of vanishing. Even while his word's transcending being here, he's already there, where you don't follow. The lyre's lattice doesn't snare his hands. And he obeys, even as he oversteps the bounds.

die Toten ziehts-. sei es aus Zimmern.94 • Die Sonette an Orpheus: Erster Teil 6 1st er ein Hiesiger? Nein. Aber er. Kundiger boge die Zweige der Weiden. . mische unter der Milde des Augenlids ihre Erscheinung in alles Geschaute. Nichts kann das giiltige BUd ihm verschlimmern. und der Zauber von Erdrauch und Raute sei ihm so wahr wie der klarste Bezug. riihme er Fingerring. sei es aus Gdibern. Geht ihr zu Bette. aus beiden Reichen crwuchs seine weite Natur. der Beschworende. Spange und Krug. wer die Wurreln der Weiden erfuhr. so lasst auf dem Tische Brot nicht und Milch nicht.

the gourd. the magician. and let the spell of earth smoke and of rue be as true to him as the clearest chord. But under the mildness of the eyelid let him. whether from graves or rooms. the ring. his wide nature grew out of both realms.The Sonnets to Orpheus: First Series • 95 6 Is he one of us? No. let him praise the clasp. Nothing can ruin the genuine sign for him. let him mingle their look with all that can be seen. Don't leave bread or milk on the table when you go to bed: it attracts the dead. Whoever's known the roots of the willow is better trained to bend the willow's limbs. .

oder dass von den Gottern ein Schatten fallt.96 • Die SoneUe an Orpheus: Erster Teil 7 Riihmen. in seinem fiihlenden Siiden gereift. Alles wird Weinberg. ging er hervor wie das Erz aus des Steins 5chweigen. das ists! Ein zum Riihmen Bestellter. der noch weit in die Tiiren der Toten Schalen mit riihmlichen Friichten hall . Nicht in den Griiften der Konige Moder straft ihm die Riihmung Liigen. aIles wird Traube. Er ist einer der bleibenden Boten. . Nie versagt ihm die Stimme am Staube. Sein Herz. wenn ihn das gottliche Beispiel ergreift. 0 vergangliche Kelter eines den Menschen unendlichen Weins..

When he's in a godlike example's grip. he came like ore out of the silence of stone. his heart's a perishable press of a wine that's eternal for men.The Sonnets to Orpheus: First Series • 97 7 To praise. All turns vineyard. Oh. ripened in his sensitive South. . still extending bowls of glorious fruit deep inside the doors of the dead. He's one of the messengers who stays. that's it! Called to praise. . his voice isn't graveled by drought. all turns grape. Neither mould in the vaults of kings nor a shadow that falls from the gods makes a lie out of his praise.

98 • Die Simette an Orpheus: Erster Teil

8

Nur im Raum der Riihmung darf die Klage gehn, die Nymphe des geweinten Quells, wachend fiber unserm Niederschlage, dass er klar sei an demselben Fels, der die Tore tragt und die Altare. Sieh, urn ihre stillen Schultern friiht das Gefiihl, dass sie die jiingste ware unter den Geschwistern im Gemiit. Jubel weiss, und Sehnsucht ist gestandig, nur die Klage !ernt noch; madchenhandig z1ihlt sie nachtelang das alte Schlimme. Aber plotzlich, schrag und ungeiibt, halt sie doch ein Sternbild unsrer Stimme in den Himmel, den ihr Hauch nicht triibt.

The Sonnets to Orpheus: First Series • 99

8

Only in the sphere of praise may Lamentation walk, water-spirit of the weeping spring who watches closely over our cascading so it will be clear even on the rock that supports the gates and altars. See, around her quiet shoulders dawns the hovering feeling she's the youngest one among the spirit's mood-sisters. Jubilation knows and Longing grants only Lament still learns; with girlish hands she counts the ancient evil through the nights. But suddenly, unpracticed and askant, she lifts one of our voice's constellations into the sky unclouded by her breath.

100 • Die Sonette an Orpheus: Erster Teil

9

Nur wer die Leier schon hob auch unter Schatten, dad das unendliche Lob ahnend erstatten. Nur wer mit Toten vom Mohn ass, von dem ihren, wird nicht den leisesten Ton wieder verlieren. Mag auch die Spieglung im Teich oft uns verschwimmen:

Wisse das Bild.
Erst in dem Doppelbereich werden die Stimmen ewig und mild.

The Sonnets to Orpheus; First Series • 101

9

Only one who's also raised the lyre among shades may return unending praise with warning. Only one who's tasted the poppy of the dead with them won't forget the tone so delicate. Although the pool's reflection blurs before us often: know the image. Only in the double-world do voices become eternal and mild.

It

die man dem Zweifel entreisst. Wissen wirs. die ihr nie mein Gefiihl verliesst. was schweigen heisst. wissen wirs nicht? Beides bildet die zogernde Stunde in dem menschlichen Angesicht . die das frohliche Wasser romischer Tage als ein wandelndes Lied durchfliesst.. Freunde. aile. die wiedergeOffneten Munde. . . Oder jene so offenen. wie das Aug eines frohen erwachenden Hirten. die schon wussten. antikische Sarkophage. gruss ich. gross ich.102 • Die Sonette an Orpheus: Erster Teil 10 Euch. .innen voll Stille und Bienensaug denen entziickte Falter entschwirrten.

you who conduct the glad old Roman water like a wandering song. the mouths opened again after having known what silence means. . all that a person wrenches from doubt I greet. do we or not? These two mold the hesitating span of time into features of the human. Or those so open like the pupils of a happy waking shepherd . I greet you. friends.full of silence and honeysuckle from which charmed butterflies fluttered.The Sonnets to Orpheus: First Series • 103 10 You ancient limestone tombs who never vanished from my feelings. Do we know.

Heisst kein Sternbild "Reiter"? Denn dies ist uns seltsam eingepragt: dieser Stolz aus Erde. gejagt und dann gebandigt. Und die zwei sind eins. Doch uns £reue eine Welle nun. Neue Weite. der ihn treibt und halt und den er tragt. Auch die stemische Verbindung triigt. der Figur zu glauben. Aber sind sie's? Oder meinen beide nicht den Weg. diese sehnige Natur des Seins? Weg und Wendung. den sie zusammen tun? Namenlos schon trennt sie Tisch und Weide. Das genugt. It . 1st nicht so. Doch ein Druck verstandigt.104 • Die Sonette an Orpheus: Erster Teil 11 Sieh den Himmel. Und ein zweiter.

. Isn't this like our sinewy way of being. And the two are one. Is no constellation called "Rider"? Because this is strangely branded in us: this earthly pride. But one touch: understanding. to be whipped on. And another who drives and holds it and whom it carries. But for a while now let's be happy to believe the symbol. . then reined in? Track and turning. Even the linking of stars is a lie.The Sonnets to Orpheus: First Series • 105 11 Look at the sky. But are they? Or don't both signify the road they take together? They're already unspeakably divided by table and trough.. That's enough . New distances.

wo die Saat in Sommer sich verwandelt. reicht er niemals hin. Die Erde schenkt. Die Antennen fiihlen die Antennen. handeln wir aus wirklichem Bezug. Reine 5pannung. denn wir leben wahrhaft in Figuren.. . der uns verbinden mag. Vnd mit kleinen Schritten gehn die Vhren neben unserm eigentlichen Tag. 0 Musik der Krafte! 1st nicht durch die Hisslichen Geschafte jede Srorung von dir abgelenkt? Selbst wenn sich der Bauer sorgt und handelt. Ohne unsern wahren Platz zu kennen.106 • Die Sonette an Orpheus: Erster Teil 12 Heil dem Geist.. und die leere Ferne trug .

.. Without knowing our real place. The earth grants . . . the farmer never reaches down to where the seed turns into summer.The Sonnets to Orpheus: First Series • 107 12 Hail to the spirit who can link us: because we live in symbols. 0 music of the powers! Don't our trivial transactions deflect all your interruptions? Though he works and worries. And with tiny steps the clocks walk beside our primal day. Antennas feel antennas. really.. Pure tension. and the empty spaces carried . we act as if we actually interacted.

aus dern Fruchtfleisch iiberrascht befreit. doppeldeutig. Wird euch langsarn narnenlos irn Munde? Wo sonst Worte waren. Alles dieses spricht Tod und Leben in den Mund . Freude . erdig.. . Bime und Banane. hiesig-: o Erfahrung. riesigl It . was ihr Apfel nennt.. . wenn es sie erschrneckt. . Fiihlung.108 • Die Sonette an Orpheus: Erster Teil 13 Voller Apfel. Dies kornrnt von weit. Ich ahne .. Wagt zu sagen. fliessen Funde. sonnig. Lest es einern Kind vorn Angesicht.. urn. wach und transparent. Diese Siis5e. klar zu werden. die sich erst verdichtet. im Schrnecken leise aufgerichtet. Stachelbeere .

. I feel . This comes from far. Is the unspeakable slowly growing in your mouth? Released from the fruit's pulp. earthy.. astonished. joy . Read it in the features of a child who's tasting them.. plump apple. Dare to say what you call apple. ourso knowledge. double meaning. gooseberry . bright.The Sonnets to Orpheus: First Series • 109 13 Banana and pear.immense! . feeling. . clear. This sweetness that condenses first so in the taste that's tenderly intense it may become awake. transparent. All these reveal life and death inside the mouth. discoveries flow where words usually were.

Aus Dunkel steigt ein buntes Offenbares und hat vielleicht den Glanz der Eifersueht der Toten an sieh. Was wissen wir von ihrem Teil an dem? Es ist seit lange ihre Art. die bei den Wurzeln schlafen. den Lehm mit ihrem freien Marke zu durchmarken. Drangt diese Frueht. und gonnen uns aus ihren Oberflussen dies Zwischending aus stummer Kraft und Kiissen? . Nun fragt sieh nur: tun sie es gern? . Sie spreehen nieht die Spraehe nur des Jahres.110 • Die Sonette an Orpheus: Erster Teil 14 Wir gehen urn mit Blume. Frueht. ein Werk von schweren Sklaven.. Weinblatt. die die Erde starken. gebaUt zu uns empor.. zu ihren Herrn? Sind sie die Herm.

toward us. and one perhaps that has the jealous shine of the dead.The Sonnets to Orpheus: First Series • 111 14 We're involved with flower. What do we know of the part they assume? It's long been their habit to marrow the loam with their own free marrow through and through. They speak more than the language of the year. Now the one question: Is it done gladly? The work of sullen slaves. granting us only out of their surplus this hybrid made of mute strength and kisses . those who strengthen the earth. Out of the darkness a blaze of colors appears. clenched. its masters? Sleeping with roots.. fruit.are they the masters? . . does this fruit thrust up. grapevine.

112 • Die Sonette an Orpheus: Erster Teil 15 Wartet . Wer kann sie vergessen. ein Stampfen. ihr warmen. Madchen. enthiillt Diifte urn Diifte! Schafft die Verwandtschaft mit dec reinen.. ein Summen . sieh weigernden Schale. Sie hat sich kOstlich zu euch bekehrt. tanzt den Geschmack der erfahrenen Frucht! Tanzt die Orange. sieh wehrt wider ihr SiiBsein. Schon ists auf der Flucht . werft sie aus euch.. Wenig Musik nur. Ihr habt sie besessen. Tanzt die Orange.....: Madchen. der die gliickliche fii1lt! . ihr stummen. dass die reife erstrahle in Liiften der Heimat! Ergliihte. . ertrinkend in sieh.. das schmeckt . mit dem Saft. wie sie. . Die warmere Landschaft.

.. drowning in itself.The Sonnets to Orpheus: First Series • 113 15 Wait . dance the taste of the fruit you've been tasting. Who can forget it. a tapping. Dance the orange. the juice that fills the happy fruit! It . Just a little music. how. Dance the orange. Discharge the warmer landscape out of you so the ripe will glisten in their native breezes! Glowing. .. .. Exquisite. that tastes good . You've possessed it. it's already bolting . resistant rind. a hum Girls.. it refuses its own sweetness. it's been transmuted into you. Become sisters with the pure. strip perfume from perfume. you girls who are silent and warm.

filhlst du viele ... . . gefahrlichsten Teil. nun heisst es zusammen ertragen Stiickwerk und Teile. Dir helfen.. als sei es das Ganze. vielleicht ihren schwachsten.114 • Die Sonette an Orpheus: Erster Teil 16 Du. wird schwer sein. Sieh. . Wer zeigt mit Fingern auf einen Geruch?Doch von den Kraften. die uns bedrohten. . Vor aHem: pflanze mich nicht in dein Herz. und du erschrickst vor dem Zauberspruch. lch wiichse zu schnell. mein Freund. bist einsam. Doch meines Herm Hand will ich filhren und sagen Hier. Du kennst die Toten. Wir machen mit Worten und Fingerzeigen uns allmahlich die Welt zu eigen. weil . Das ist Esau in seinem Fell .

don't plant me in your heart. Above all. Who points a finger at a smell? But you feel many of the powers that threaten us . .. Helping you win be hard. With pointing words and fingers we slowly make the world our own. I'd grow too fast. See.. most precarious part. as if they were the whole.. my friend. . now we must bear the pieces and parts together. are lonely because .. and you cower from the magic spell. But I shall guide my master's hand and say: Here. You know the dead.The Sonnets to Orpheus: First Series • 115 16 You. . perhaps its weakest. This is Esau in his pelt.

0 steig . Manner im Bruderzorn. Drangender Zweig an Zweig. . Spruch von Ergrauten. . . nirgends ein freier . Aber sie brechen noch. Frauen wie Lauten . .116 • Die Sonette an Orpheus: Erster Tei. all der Erbauten Wurzel.l 17 Zu unterst der AIte. It . verborgener Born.. . Dieser erst oben doch biegt sich zur Leier. verworrn. . Einer! 0 steig .. den sie nie schauten. Sturmhelm und Jagerhorn.

But this top one finally bends into a lyre. . not one of them free . . higher ... . . Yet they still break. . One! oh. Branch pushing branch. old men's truths. wrath of brothers.The Sonnets to Orpheus: First Series • 117 17 Deep down... the secret source they've never seen. Helmet and horn of hunters. women like lutes . climb higher . the oldest tangled root of ail that's grown.

die es erheben. Hat sie aus uns auch Kraft. die Maschine: wie sie sich walzt und racht und uns entstellt und schwlkht. Sieh.118 • Die Sonette an Orpheus: Erster Teil 18 Horst du das Neue. doch der Maschinenteil will jetzt gelobt sein. Herr. . sie. Zwar ist kein Horen heil in dem Durchtobtsein. . ohne Leidenschaft. treibe und diene . drohnen und beben? Kommen Verkiindiger..

droning and throbbing? Its prophesying promoters are advancing. now each machine part wills its praise. the Machine: how it spins and wreaks revenge. See. serene . • . Master. let it do its work and serve.The Sonnets to Orpheus: First Series • 119 18 Do you hear the New. No hearing's truly keen in all this noise. deforms and demeans us. Since its power comes from us. still.

Nicht sind die Leiden erkannt. Gott mit der Leier. It . alles Vollendete fallt heim zum Uralten. nicht ist die Liebe gelemt. wahrt noch dein Vor-Gesang.120 • Die Sonette an Orpheus: Erster Teil 19 Wandelt sich rasch auch die Welt wie Wolkengestalten. und was im Tod uns entfernt. ist nicht entschleiert. Einzig das Lied iiberm Land heiligt und feiert. weiter und freier. Uber dem Wandel und Gang.

all perfected things at last fall back to the very old. your overture is lasting. and whatever eliminates us in death is still secret. freer and wider. love hasn't been learned. Only the Song above the land blesses and celebrates. . Pain's beyond our grasp.The Sonnets to Orpheus: First Series • 121 19 Even if the world changes as fast as the shapes of clouds. Over what's passing and changing. god with the lyre.

in Russland . Sein Bild: ich weih's. an der vorderen Fessel den Pflock. .122 • Die Sonette an Orpheus: Erster Teil 20 Dir aber. ein Pferd . der das Ohr den Geschopfen gelehrt? Mein Erinnern an einen Friihlingstag... Heriiber vom Dod kam der Schimmel allein. seinen Abend. dein Sagenkreis war in ihm geschlossen . 0 was weih ich dir.. und ob! der sang und der horte . wie schlug seiner Ml!hne Gelock an den Hals im Takte des Obermuts. . Herr. um die Nacht auf den Wiesen allein zu sein. Wie sprangen die Quellen des Rosseblutsl Der fiihlte die Weiten.. sag. bei dem grob gehemmten Galopp.

to be alone all night in the meadows. His image: I dedicate it. its evening. tell me what to dedicate to you. you who taught creatures their ear My memory of one spring day. ? Across from the village the white horse came. in Russia .. how the shock of his mane on his neck beat in time with his high spirits in that clumsy-shackled gallop.The Stmnets to Orpheus: First Series • 123 20 But. . say it.a horse there . Master. How the springs of stallion-blood leapt! How he sang and listened! He felt the distances . a rope on one front fetlock..your cycle of myths was sealed in him. .

die !rei hat. viele. Die Erde ist wie ein Kind. wie das Griine. was der Lehrer sie lehrte. du gluckliche. frOhliche Erde. 0 viele. das Viele. das Blaue heisse. das Gedichte weiss. sie singts! . und was gedruckt steht in Wurzeln und langen schwierigen Stammen: sie singts. Wir wollen dich langen. Oem Frohsten gelingts.. Fur die Beschwerde langen Lemens bekommt sie den Preis. durfen wir !ragen: sie kanns. Nun.124 • Die Sonette an Orpheus: Erster Teil 21 Fruhling ist wiedergekommen. sie kanns! Erde. Wir mochten das Weisse an dem Barte des alten Manns. 0. spiele nun mit den Kindem. . Streng war ihr Lehrer.

. so many. many.. all those things. happy earth. lucky earth on vacation. The earth is like a child who's memorized poems. We liked the white in the old man's whiskers. Now when we ask what green or blue is. she has the answer! Earth. The happiest will win. she sings! . play with the children now. We long to catch you. Oh what her teacher taught her. Her teacher was strict. right away she knows.. It was worth the long painful lesson: she wins the prize. and what's imprinted on the roots and long complicated stems: she sings it.The Sonnets to Orpheus: First Series • 125 21 Spring has returned again. .

126 • Die Sonette an Orpheus: Erster Teil 22 Wir sind die Treibenden. denn das Verweilende erst weiht uns ein. . Aber den Schritt der Zeit. Alles das Eilende wird schon voriiber sein. nicht in den Flugversuch. 0 werft den Mut nicht in die Schnelligkeit. Blume und Buch. nehmt ihn als Kleinigkeit im immer Bleibenden. Alles ist ausgeruht: Dunkel und Helligkeit. Knaben.

oh don't waste your courage on being fast or on risking flight.. . Everything hurrying will already be over. But take time's stride as trivial beside what remains forever.The Sonnets to Orpheus: First Series • 127 22 We're the drivers. Boys. All these are at rest: darkness and light. . for only the lasting is our initiator. flower and text .

. wird. erst wenn ein reines Wohin wachsender Apparate Knabenstolz iiberwiegt. iiberstiirzt von Gewinn. urn in lichten Profilen. sich seIber genug.128 • Die Sonette an Orpheus: Erster Tefl 23 wenn der Flug nicht rnehr urn seinetwillen wird in die HirnrneIsstillen steigen. das gelang. Liebling der Winde zu spielen. was er einsam erfliegt. sicher schwenkend und schlank. jener den Fernen Genahte sein. als das Gerat. o erst dann.

so that in shining profiles. closing on the distances be his lonely flight's own end. will one. slim. hellbent to win. like a successful tool. it may play the wind's darling. • . self-sufficient. confidently swaying only when a pure destination means more than adolescent pride in swelling machines.The Sonnets to Orpheus: First Series • 129 23 Oh only then. when flight will no longer rise into the sky's silences for its own sake.

ohne einander zu kennen. Einsamer nun aufeinander ganz angewiesen. Nur noch in Dampfkesseln brennen die einstigen Feuer und heben die Hammer. und ihre uns lang schon zu langsamen Boten iiberholen wir irnmer.. Wir aber nehmen an Kraft ab.. verstossen oder sie plotzlich such en auf einer Karte? Diese gewaltigen Freunde. den wir streng erzogen. unsere Bader. die uns die Toten nehmen. die grassen niemals werbenden Gotter. . fortgeriickt.130 • Die Sonette an Orpheus: Erster Teil 24 Sollen wir unsere uralte Freundschaft. sondern als Grade. . riihren nirgends an unsere Rader. weil sie der harte Stahl. wie Schwimmer . nicht kennt. die immer grossern. Unsere Gastmahler haben wir weit . fiihren wir nicht mehr die Pfade als schone Maander.

The Sonnets to Orpheus: First Series • 131 24 Shall we reject our oldest friendship. But we. we always outrun their messengers. for years too slow for us. If . We've moved our baths and banquets far away. wholly dependent on ea(:h other. like swimmers. More lonely now. these powerful friends never brush against our wheels. because the tough steel we trained so hard does not know them. the great undemanding gods. but straight. heaving hammers always growing bigger. or suddenly seek them on a map? Although they take the dead from us. not knowing each other. no longer do we build those lovely paths rambling. Now only in boilers do former fires burn. and. we grow weaker.

die ich kannte wie eine Blume. . wie fluchtig verdachtigt. Schon von den Schatten bemachtigt. die plotzlich. dich. Bis es nach schrecklichem Pochen trat in das trestles offene Tor. schOne Gespielin des unuberwindlichen Schreis. . anhielt. den Korper voll Zogern. drangte verdunkelt das Blut. gllinzte es irdisch. Entwandte. trieb es in seinen natiirHchen Friihling hervor. trauernd und lauschend-. Tanzerin erst.132 • Die Sonette an Orpheus: Erster Teil 25 Dich aber will ich nun. von Dunkel und Sturz unterbrochen. Wieder und wieder. von der ich den Namen nicht weiss. Nah war die Krankheit. doch. von den hohen Vermogern fie! ihr Musik in das veranderte Herz. Da. als gOss man ihr Jungsein in Erz. noch ein Mal erinnern und ihnen zeigen.

you . the unquellable cry's beautiful playmate. mourning and listening. her blood pulsed darker. clotted by dark and collapse. . Once more I'll remember and describe you to them. it gleamed earth. as if her youth were being cast in bronze. Until after terrible throbs it trod through that hopelessly open door. Dancer first. paused suddenly.The Sonnets to Orpheus: First Series • 133 25 But you. you who evaporated. from the great creators music fell into her transformed heart. now.I knew you like a flower whose name I don't know. it leapt out into its natural spring. whose body. full of hesitation. Then. Already mastered by darkening. but as if suspicious for a moment. Sickness was near. Again and again.

Du unendliche Spur! Nur weil dich reissend zuletzt die Feindschaft verteilte. von der Rache gehetzt. hast ihr Geschrei iibertont mit Ordnung. und aIle die schaden Steine. du Schoner. wahrend dein Klang noch in Lowen und Felsen verweilte und in den Baumen und Vogeln. aus den ZerstOrenden stieg dein erbauendes Spiel. die sie nach deinem Herzen warfen. Gottlicher. da ihn der Schwann der vcrschmahten Manaden befiel. wie sie auch rangen und rasten.134 • Die Sonette an Orpheus: Erster Teil 26 Du aber. dass sie Haupt dir und Leier zerstOr'. o du verlorener Gatt! . Dart singst du noch jetzt. wurden zu Sanftem an dir und begabt mit Gehor. Schliesslich zerschlugen sie dich. Keine war da. sind wir die Horenden jetzt und ein Mund der Natur. bis zuletzt noch ErtOner. du.

the architecture of your song rose from the destroyers. trees and birds. gifted with hearing. and touching you. . Not one of them could crush your head or lyre. divine one. Oh you lost god! You everlasting clue! Because hate finally dismembered. You still sing there. at last they broke and tore you. gorgeous god. scattered you. But the echo of your music lingered in rocks and lions. now we're merely nature's mouth and ears. you drowned out their shrieks with order. all the sharp rocks they fired at your heart turned tender. you resounding to the end. When attacked by the swarm of rejected maenads.The Sonnets to Orpheus: First Series • 135 26 But you. despite their wrestling and raging. Ravaged by vengeance.

SECOND SERIES .

voU noch einst meiniger Orte? Du. Luft. Raumgewinn. in dem ich mich rhythmisch ereigne. du unsichtbares Gedicht! Immerfort um das eigne Sein rein eingetauschter Weltraum. Gegengewicht. sparsamstes du von allen moglichen Meeren. Einzige Welle. du. Erkennst du mich. Rundung und Blatt meiner Worte.138 • Die Sonette an Orpheus: Zweiter Tefl 1 Atmen. Manche Winde sind wie mein Sohn. Wie viele von diesen Stellen der Rliume waren schon innen in mir. einmal glatte Rinde. . deren allmahliches Meer ich bin.

. still full of places once mine. Counterpoise in which I rhythmically become.. . Single wave whose gradual sea I ami sparest of all possible seas winning the universe. air. You. and smooth rind . once my words' sphere. Many winds are like my son. How many regions in space have been inside me already.The Sonnets tD Orpheus: Second Series • 139 1 Breath. you invisible poem! Steady sheer exchange between the cosmos and our being. leaf. do you know me? You.

.140 • Die Sonette an Orpheus: Zweiter Teil 2 So wie dem Meister manchmal das eilig nahere Blatt den wirklichen Strich abnimmt: so nehmen oft Spiegel das heilig einzige Uicheln der Madchen in sieh. . allein. wer kennt die Verluste? Nur. fUr immer verlorne. Was haben Augen einst ins umrusste lange Vergliihn der Kamine geschaut: Blicke des Lebens. das ins Ganze gebome .. fallt nur ein Widerschein. wer mit dennoch preisenciem Laut sange das Herz. Ach. Und in das Ahnen der echten Gesiehter. oder im Glanze der dienenden Lichter. wenn sie den Morgen erproben. spater. der Erde.

would sing the he. what have eyes stared at once: glimpses of a life forever lost. Ah the earth. who knows her losses? Only one who.The $(}nnets to Orpheus: Second Series • 141 2 Just as at times the nearest sheet of paper quickly catches the master's genuine stroke. Into the slow-waning glow of coals in charred fireplaces. .or in the glow of helpful tapers. so mirrors often capture the unique sacred smile of girls in them. when they appraise the morning all alone ..art bom into the whole . And later only a reflection falls into that breath of their real features. still praising them out loud. .

. wie Walder weit . Aber die Schonste wird bleiben. Und der Luster geht wie ein Sechzehn-Ender durch eure Unbetretbarkeit. Manchmal seid ihr voll Malerei. wenn es diimmert. . andere schicktet ihr scheu vorbei. was ihr in euerem Wesen seid. Einige scheinen in euch gegangen-. . lhr. bis druben in ihre enthaltenen Wangen eindrang der klare geloste Narziss. noch des leeren Saales Verschwender-.142 • Die Sonette an Orpheus: Zweiter Teil 3 Spiegel: noch nie hat man wissend beschrieben. wie mit lauter LOchern von Sieben erfiillten Zwischenraume der Zeit. Ihr.

you seem filled with nothing but the holes of filters. You. A few seem to have seeped into youothers you shyly sent away. . knowing what you really are. vaults where nothing can set foot. wide as woods . .The Sonnets to Orpheus: Second Series' 143 3 Mirrors: no one's ever yet described you.. And the chandelier. still the squanderers of the empty hallwhen twilight comes. At times you're full of painting. Time'~ interstices. like a sixteen-pointer. . But the most beautiful will stay until the clear freed Narcissus penetrates there to her chaste kisses . .

Zu einer Jungfrau kam es weiss herbei und war im Silber-Spiegel und in ihr .geliebt. Sie wusstens nicht und habens jeden Falls .144 • Die Sonette an Orpheus: Zweiter Teil 4 o dieses ist das Tier.sein Wandeln. Sie nahrten es mit keinem Kom. das es nicht gibt. dass es aus sich ein Stirnhorn trieb.. Doch wei! sie's liebten. Ein Horn. . nur immer mit der Moglichkeit. Zwar war es nicht. Sie Hessen immer Raum. seine Haltung. es seL Und sie gab sokhe Starke an das Tier. ward ein reines Tier. seinen Hals. klar und ausgespart. . bis in des stillen Blickes Licht . Und in dem Raume. erhob es leicht sein Haupt und brauchte kaum zu sein.

But since they loved it. but always with the chance that it might be. And this gave the creature such power. a pure beast came to be. besides . In fact. They didn't feed it with corn. it never was. clear and unlocked. They didn't know that. it grew one hom out of its brow. its bearing.its neck. and its stride.they loved it. One hom. It came here to a virgin. And in that room. even to the light of its calm gaze . all white and was in the mirror-silver and in her. It . They always allowed room. it freely raised its head and barely needed to be.The Sonnets to Orpheus: Second Series • 145 4 Oh this is the creature that doesn't exist.

Entschluss und Kraft von wieviel Welten! Wir Gewaltsamen. in den stillen Bliitenstern gespannter Muske! des unendlichen Empfangs. sind wir endIich offen und Empfanger? It . wir wahren langer. der der Anemone Wiesenmorgen nach und nach erschliesst. Aber wann. in welchem aller Leben.146 • Die Sonette an Orpheus: Zweiter Teil 5 Blumenmuskel. dass der Ruhewink des Untergangs kaum vermag die weitzuriickgeschnellten Blatterrander dir zuriickzugeben: du. bis in ihren Schooss das polyphone Licht der lauten Himmel sich ergiesst. manchmal so von Fiille iibermannter.

muscle of endless reception tensed in the still star of the bloom. in which of all possible lives. But when. slowly stretching open to her meadow's dawn until the loud skies' polyphony of light pours down into her womb. .. we can last longer. are we at last open and receivers? .The Sonnets to Orpheus: Second Series • 147 5 Flowermuscle of the anemone. will and power of how many worlds! We are the violent. at times so fully ovennanned that the sinking's call to calm is barely able to recontract the widesprung edges of your petals: you. slowly.

Seit Jahrhunderten mft uns dein Duft seine siissesten Namen heriiber. Und Erinnerung geht zu ihm iiber. . du thronende.148 • Die Sonette an Orpheus: Zweiter Teil 6 Rose. denen im Altertume warst du ein Kelch mit einfachem Rand. die wir von rufbaren Stunden erbaten . wir raten . In deinem Reichtum scheinst du wie Kleidung urn Kleidung urn einen Leib aus nichts als Glanz. . der unerschopfliche Gegenstand. Dennoch. aber dein einzelnes Blatt ist zugleich die Vermeidung und die Verleugnung jedes Gewands.. wir wissen ihn nicht zu nennen.. Uns aber bist du die volle zahIlose Blume. plotzlich liegt er wie Ruhm in der Luft..

..The Sonnets to Orpheus: Second Series • 149 6 Enthroned rose. For centuries your perfume has been calling its sweetest names across to us. • . Still. And over to it memory carries what we have begged from hours filled with names . suddenly. the countless bloom. we don't know what to can it. the inexhaustible thing. we're guessing . it lies on the air like fame. to them in ancient times you were a calyx with a simple ring. In your wealth you shimmer like drape over drape on a body of nothing but splendor. For us you are the full. yet your single petal is both the escape from and the denial of any attire.

die auf dem Gartentisch oft von Kante zu Kante lagen. langsam erkiihlend und Warrnes von Madchen. als ihr ahntet. und nun wieder erhobene zwischen die stromenden Pole fiihlender Finger. von euch gebend. das sie noch einmal erhole aus dem begonnenen Tod . die wohlzu tun mehr noch vermogen. ermattet und sanft verletzt. wenn ihr euch wiederfandet im Krug.. ihr leichten. die das Gepfliicktsein beging. als Bezug wieder zu ihnen. die sich euch bliihend verbiinden. ihr schliesslich den ordnenden minden verwandte. (Handen der Madchen von einst und jetzt). wie Beichten. It .150 • Die Sonette an Orpheus: Zweiter Teil 7 Blumen. wie triibe ermiidende Siinden. wartend des Wassers.

and now held up again between the streaming poles of sympathetic fingers that can do even more good than you guessed. like dreary and exhausting sins committed by your being plucked. cooling slowly. your allies in blooming. ultimately sisters of arranging hands (those hands of girls from now and then) who often lay from end to end across the garden table. waiting for water that would rescue you once more from that beginning death.The Sonnets to Orpheus: Second Series • 151 7 Flowers. drooping and gently wounded. light ones. but as a bond again with them. • . exuding warmth of girls like confessions from yourselves. when you found each other again in the vase.

Aber manchmal trat eines. ach ein vergehendes.. Auch nicht die Kinder . vorubergezogen. aber unwahr. unter den fallenden Ball. Wagen umroUten uns fremd..152 • Die Sonette an Orpheus: Zweiter Teil 8 Wenige ihr. Wessen wars? Und wie zergings unter allen den gehenden Leuten und im Bangen des langen Jahrs. sprachen als schweigende. Hauser umstanden uns stark. Nur die Balle. wie das Lamm mit dem redenden Blatt.. . keinem gehorte es.und keines kannte uns je. Was war wirklich im All? Nichts. In memoriam Egon von Rilke . Wenn wir uns einmal freuten. . der einstigen Kindheit Gespielen in den zerstreuten Garten der Stadt: wie wir uns fanden und uns zogernd gefielen und. Ihre herrlichen Bogen.

Whose was it? And how it melted in that crushing crowd and in the long year's anxiety. like the lamb with the speaking scroll. oh a dying one. What was real in that All? and none Nothing. stepped under the falling ball. alien. Their glorious arcs. Only the balls. playmates of a childhood long ago in the scattered gardens of the city how we found and liked each other timidly and. solid but unreal ever knew us.. Carriages rolled around us. spoke silently. But sometimes one. . it was no one's. When all of us were happy. In memory of Egon von Rilke • . Not even the children .The Sonnets to Orpheus: Second Series· 153 8 You few. stark houses stood around us.

als die heimliche leise Gewahrung. Er kame gewaltig und griffe strahlender urn sich. nicht der entbehrlichen Folter und dass das Eisen nicht Hinger an mUsen sperrt. Mehr als ein Wind fUr die grossen gesicherten Schiffe.der Gott wirklicher MHde. ins torig offene Herz trate er anders.. Weniger nicht. das schenkt das Schafott wieder zuriick. kein Herz . . Ins reine. . Keins ist gestcigert. weil ein gewollter Krampf der Milde euch zarter verzerrt. wie Cottliche sind.154 • Die Sonette an Orpheus: Zweiter Teil 9 Riihmt euch. die uns im Innern schweigend gcwinnt wie ein still spielendes Kind aus unendlicher Paarung. ihr Richtenden. ins hohe. wie Kinder ihr Spielzeug vom vorig alten Geburtstag. Was es durch Zeiten bekam.

The Sonnets to Orpheus: Second Series • 155 9 Judges. and open like a gate. More than a wind for the great confident ships. as children give their last year's birthday toys. . not one. Into the heart that's high. The scaffold will give back what it's received for ages. don't boast because you've abolished torture and the neck's no longer shackled by iron. Not less than the subtle secret understanding that conquers us silently within like a quiet playing child of a cosmic coupling .no heart's elated. Because a planned spasm of mercy twists you more tenderly . .. the god of true mercy would enter differently. He'd come gripped with power as gods are. pure. and as radiant.

Worte gehen noch zart am Unsaglichen aus . Aber noch ist uns das Dasein verzaubert... dass wir ihr ein Mal entronnen und sie in stiller Fabrik olend sich seIber gehort. Dass nicht der herrlichen Hand schoneres Zogern mehr prange. die keiner beriihrt. .156 • Die Sonette an Orpheus: Zweiter Teil 10 Alles Erworbnc bedroht die Maschine. . solange sie sich erdreistct. baut im unbrauchbaren Raum ihr vergottlichtes Haus . Und die Musik. immer neu. . die mit dem gleichen Entschluss ordnet und schafft und zerstort. statt im Gehorchen. Nirgends bleibt sie zuriick.sie meint es am besten zu konnen. aus den bebendsten Steinen. zu dem entschlossenern Bau schneidet sie steifer den Stein. Sie ist das Leben.. im Geist. an hundert Stellen ist es noch Ursprung. zu sein. der nicht kniet und bewundert. Ein Spielen von reinen Kraften.

become its own thing.. Nowhere does it stand aside so we might once escape it. It is life . and with the same mind makes and orders and destructs. But for us existence is still enchanted. the machine threatens everything we've gained. And ever new. A playing of pure powers no one can touch and not kneel to and marvel. words still disintegrate .it believes it's all-knowing. out of the most quivering stones. . It's still Beginning in a hundred places. Faced with the unutterable. It hacks the stone starker for more determined building so we won't be drawn by the lovelier lingering of the master-hand.The Sonnets to Orpheus: Second Series • 157 10 As long as it dares to exist as spirit instead of obeying.. and. music builds her divine house in useless space. oiling itself in a silent factory.

Rein ist im heiteren Geist. Leise liess man dich ein.. wachsam und handelnd vollzieht.158 • Die Sonette an Orpheus: Zweiter Teil 11 Manche. Doch dann: rang dich am Rande der Knecht. Aber auch das ist im Recht. der. entstand ruhig geordnete Regel. Fern von dem Schauenden sei jeglicher Hauch des Bedauerns. weiterbezwingender Mensch. dieN achtwarfeineHandvoll von bleichen taumelnden Tauben ins Licht . . was an uns seIber geschieht . . -und.. . seit du im Jagen beharrst. Streifen von Segel. weiss ich dich. Frieden zu feiern. was sich zeitig erweist. den man hinuntergehangt in den hohligen Karst. Toten ist eine Gestalt unseres wandernden Trauerns . ausdenHohlen.. als warst du ein Zeichen. . nicht nur vom Jager allein. mehr doch als Faile und Netz. des Todes.

whatever happens to us is right. ads and accomplishes his business. strip of sail they used to hang down into the caverns of Karst.The SDnnets to Orpheus: Second Series • 159 11 Insatiable conquering man. I know you better than a trap or net.and out of the caves the night threw a handful of tumbling pale doves into the light . . But then a boy gave your edge a twist .. They lowered you softly. . at the right time. For the spirit that's serene. . Let every breath of pity be far from witnesses. not only from the hunter who. as if you were a signal celebrating peace. . Killing's one shape of our restless affliction . But even that's right. many of death's peaceful rules have been established from the time you first insisted on hunting. alert.

den erkennt die Erkennung. das mit Verwandlungen prunkt. und sie fuhrt ihn entziickt durch das he iter Geschaffne.: abwesender Hammer holt ausl Wer sich als Quelle ergiesst. jener entwerfende Geist. Jeder gliickliche Raum ist Kind oder Enkel von Trennung. dass du dich wandelst in Wind. drin sich ein Ding dir entzieht. Was sich ins Bleiben verschliesst. das mit Anfang oft schliesst und mit Ende beginnt. liebtin dem Schwung der Figur nichts wie den wendenden Punkt. . Wehe .160 • Die Sonette an Orpheus: Zweiter Teil 12 Wolle die Wandlung. ein Hartestes warnt aus der Ferne das Harte. den sie staunend durchgehn. wahnt es sich sicher im Schutz des unscheinbaren Grau's? Warte. 0 sei fiir die Flamme begeistert. welcher das Irdische meistert. seit sie lorbeern fiihIt. schon ists das Erstarrte. Vnd die verwandelte Daphne will.

wills that you change into wind. And the transformed Daphne. the earthly's master. and she guides him enthralled through the serene Creation that often ends with beginning and begins with ending. What wraps itself up in endurance is already the rigid. And. that designing spirit. loves nothing as much as the turning point of the soaring symbol. astounded. is a child or a grandchild of Departure. . feeling herself laurel. from afar the hardest warns the hard.The Sonnets to Orpheus: Second Series· 161 12 Will transformation. does it feel safe in that unpretentious gray shelter? Beware.the upswing of an absent hammer! Whoever pours himself out like a spring. oh . he's known by Knowing. Every happy space they wander through. Oh be crazed for the fire in which something boasting with change is recalled from you.

im Reiche der Neige. das sich im Klang schon zerschlug. Sei .. zahle dich jubelnd hinzu und vernichte die Zahl. Hier. wie der Winter. dein Herz iiberhaupt iibersteht. als ware er hinter dir. den unendlichen Grund deiner innigen Schwingung. . Zu dem gebrauchten sowohl. dass du sie vollig vollziehst dieses einzige Mal.und wisse zugleich des Nicht-Seins Bedingung. sei ein klingendes Glas. singender steige. unter Schwindenden. Denn unter Wintern ist einer so endlos Winter. den unsaglichen Summen. dass. preisender steige zuriick in den reinen Bezug. wie zum dump fen und stummen Vorrat der vollen Natur. iiberwinternd.162 • Die Sonette an Orpheus: Zweiter Teil 13 Sei aHem Abschied voran. der eben geht. sei. Sei immer tot in Eurydike .

Be . praising more.and at the same time know the implication of non-being. as if it were behind you like the winter that's just passed. . the endless ground of your inner vibration. To nature's whole supply of speechless. Be here among the vanishing in the realm of entropy. and also used up things.rise again. your heart will really last. rejoicing. the unspeakable sums. Be dead forever in Eurydice . add yourself and nullify the count. so you can fulfill it fully just this once. singing more. dumb. For among winters there's one so endlessly winter that. be a ringing glass that shatters as it rings. wintering out. rise into the pure harmony.The Sonnets to Orpheus: Second Series· 163 13 Be ahead of aU Departure.

anders zum anderen Tag. Oder er bliebe vielleicht. ist es an uns. denen wir Schicksal vom Rande des Schicksals leihn. aus der gemeinsamen Tiefe. vom Gewichte entzuckt. o was sind wir den Dingen fur zehrende Lehrer. ihre Reue zu sein. der nun den Ihrigen glekht. legen auf alles uns sclbst. und sie bliihten und priesen ihn.: 0 wie kame er leicht. weil ihnen ewige Kindheit gluckt. diesc dem Irdischen treuen. It . aber wer weiss es! Wenn sie ihr Welken bereuen. allen den stillen Geschwistern im Winde der Wiesen. den Bekehrten.164 • Die Sonette an Orpheus: Zweiter Teil 14 Siehe die Blumen. Nahme sie einer ins innige Schlafen und schliefe tief mit den Dingen . Alles will schweben. Da gehn wir umher wie Beschwerer.

true to earth's ways.oh how light he'd come back. Oh what tiresome teachers we are for things. it's up to us to be their regret. we lend them fate from the rim of fate but who knowsl If they deplore their decay. Or perhaps he'd stay.The Sonnets to Orpheus: Second Series • 165 14 Look at the flowers. changed with change of day. If one took them into intimate sleep and slept deeply with things . But we trudge around like weights. All wants to float. . out of a mutual depth. we lay ourselves on everything. the convert who's now like one of them. all the calm sisters and brothers in the meadow's wind. while they prosper in their ever childlike state. Ecstatic with gravity. and they'd bloom and praise him.

in das du immer sprkhst. . das dann am schwarzen Altern deines Kinns voriiberflillt in das Gefass davor.. vom Hang des Apennins tragen sie dir dein Sagen zu. du gebender. Und im Hintergrund der Aquadukte Herkunft. spricht. Reines. dass du sie unterbrichst. Schiebt ein Krug sich ein. . der unerschopflich Eines. Ein Ohr der Erde. das Marmor-Ohr. vor des Wassers fliessendem Gesicht.166 • Die Sonette an Orpheus: Zweiter Teil 15 o Brunnen-Mund. du. marmorne Maske. so scheint es ihr. Dies ist das schlafend hingelegte Ohr. Weither an Grabern vorbei. Nur mit sich allein redet sie also. du Mund.

Slip a pitcher in. you giver. From far away. from the slopes of the Apenines. An ear of earth. the Pure.The Sonnets to Orpheus: Second Series • 167 15 Oh fountain-mouth. it seems to her you're interrupting. marble mask in front of the water's flowing face. And in the background the origin of aqueducts. beyond your black and aging chin. you mouth. they bring you what you say. who speaks the inexhaustible. the marble ear in which you always speak. what then. finally falls into the basin before it. past graves. . This is the ear laid down asleep. the One you. She's only talking with herself alone.

die geweihte Spende nimmt er anders nicht in seine Welt. dem Toten. aber er ist heiter und verteilt. Wir sind Scharfe. .168 • Die Sonette an Orpheus: Zweiter Teil 16 Immer wieder von uns aufgerissen. ist der Gott die Stene. Und das Lamm erbittet seine Schelle aus dem shlleren Instinkt. Uns wird nur das Llirmen angeboten. denn wir wonen wissen. . als indem er sich dem freien Ende unbewegt entgegenstellt. Selbst die reine. wenn der Gott ihm schweigend winkt.. we1che heilt. Nur der Tote trinkt aus der hier von uns geharten QueI1e.

And out of a more quiet instinct.. . the god is the place that heals. but he's scattered and serene. only the dead drinks when the god signals silently to him.The Sonnets to Orpheus: Second Series • 169 16 Torn open by us over and over again. We're sharp because we will know. the unconditional goal. To us only noise is offered. Out of the well heard by us here. . the sacred offering he accepts no other way into his world: motionless. the dead. Even the pure. he stands confronting it. the lamb begs for its bell.

aus we1chen zartlich entblatterten Bliiten-Ke1chen reifen die fremdartigen Friichte der Trostung? Diese kostlichen. ohne uns zu gehoren? Haben wir niemals vermocht. an we1chen Baumen. durch unser voreilig reifes und wieder welkes Benehmen jener gelassenen Sommer Gleiehmut zu stOren? It . Von einem zum anderen Male wunderst du dieh iiber die Grosse der Frucht. liber die Sanftheit der Schale. deren du eine vielleicht in der zertretenen Wiese deiner Armut findest. Gibt es denn Baume. in we1chen immer selig bewasserten Garten. und dass sie der Leiehtsinn des Vogels dir nieht vorwegnahm und nicht die Eifersucht unten des Wurms.170 • Die Sonette an Orpheus: Zweiter Teil 17 Wo. liber ihr Heilsein. dass sie uns tragen. von Engeln beflogen. wir Schatten und Schemen. und von verborgenen langsamen Gartnern so seltsam gezogen.

clandestine garden hands that they produce us without being ours? Shadows and shades. its soundness. and so strangely bred by slow. have we never had the power to disorder the composure of these serene summers? .The Sonnets to Orpheus: Second Series· 171 17 Where. over its tender peel. in what heavenly watered gardens. and that a thoughtless bird or jealous worm below didn't steal it before. because we ripen too soon and wither again. one of which you find perhaps in the trampled field of your poverty? Time after time you marvel at the size of the fruit. . Are there trees flocked by angels. from what lovingly unsheathed flower-calyxes do the strange fruits of consolation ripen? Those precious fruits. then. in what trees..

. Sind sie nicht seine ruhigen Frtichte: der Krug. dieser Saum aus Bewegung. und die gereiftere Vase? Vnd in den Bildern: ist nicht die Zeichnung geblieben. Vnd der Wirbel am Schluss. er trug. . die Warme. die deiner Braue dunk1er Zug rasch an die Wandung der eigenen Wendung geschrieben? . dass ihn dein Schwingen von vorhin umschwarme platzlich sein Wipfel von Stille? Vnd tiber ihr. diese unzahlige Warme aus dir? Aber er trug auch. reifend gestreift. dein Baum der Ekstase.172 • Die Sonette an Orpheus: Zweiter Teil 18 Tanzerin: 0 du Verlegung alles Vergehcns in Gang: wie brachtest du's dar. war sie nicht Sommer. war sie nicht Sonne. nahm er nicht ganz in Besitz das erschwungene Jahr? Bliihte nicht.

and the vase even riper? And in the images: didn't the drawing endure. that dark stroke your eyebrow quickly scrawled on the wall of its own turning? It . suddenly a summit of stillness? Also.The Sonnets to Orpheus: Second Series • 173 18 Dancing girl: oh you translation of an vanishing into act: how you made it clear. it bore. wasn't it summer above. "asn't it sunlight. the warmth. Aren't these its tranquil fruits: the jug streaked ripe. didn't it wholly possess the hard-turned year? Didn't it oloom so your swirl a moment ago might swarm around it. that immeasurable warmth out of you? But also it bore. your tree of rapture. that tree of motion. And that final flourish.

Nur dem Gottlichen horbar. o wie mag sie sich schliessen bei Nacht. diese immer offene Hand. Dass doch einer.174 • Die Sonette an Orpheus: Zweiter Teil 19 Irgendwo wohnt das Gold in der verwohnenden Bank. Doch jcner BUnde. elend. Er. steht in der Atempause aHes des wach oder schlafend atmenden Gelds. Nelken und Pelz. der Schweigende. und taglich halt es sie hin: hen. unendlich zerstorbar. ein Schauender. Morgen holt sie das Schicksal wieder. . cndlich ihren langen Bestand staunend begriffe und riihmte. Nur dem Aufsingenden saglich. ist selbst dem kupfernen Zehner wic ein verlorener Ort. der Bettler. In den Geschaften entlang ist das Geld wie zu Hause und verkleidet sich schcinbar in Seide. wic das staubige Eck untcrm Schrank. und mit Tausenden tut es vertraulich.

The Sonnets to Orpheus: Second Series' 175 19 Gold lives somewhere in an indulgent bank and it's intimate with thousands. a dusty corner under a trunk. All along money feels at home in shops and shows up decked in silk. He. . miserable. But even to a copper penny. Oh how does that always opened hand close at night? Tomorrow fate will haul it out again and hold it out every day: ever destructible. carnations. finally understood its lasting value and praised it. If only someone. that b~ggar. That's sung only by the singer. Heard only by the god . a seer. is like a lost place. stunned. bright. the blind one. stands in the breath-stops of all that breathing money as it sleeps or stirs. the silent one. furs. .

wie weit. wenn es ihn meidet und meint. zum Beispiel. seltsam der Fische Gesicht. Fische sind stumm .. was man am Hiesigen lernt. und ein Nachster. Sieh in der Schiissel. wieviel Spannen allein yom Madchen zum Manne.. Alles ist weit . ein Kind .. o wie unfasslich entfernt. denk. und doch. urn wievieles noch weiter. Schicksal. dass es uns fremd erscheint. .. Wer weiss? Aber ist nicht am Ende ein Ort. meinte man einmal. ohne sie spricht? It . Einer.. einZweiter-.176 • Die Sonette an Orpheus: Zweiter reil 20 Zwischen den Sternen. und nirgends schliesst sich der Kreis. auf heiter bereitetem Tische. es misst uns vielleicht mit des Seienden Spanne. was der Fische Sprache ware. wo man das.

without fish? . on the table nicely set. so that to us it seems strange. Perhaps fate measures us with the span of being. and yet.The Sonnets to Orpheus: Second Series· 177 20 How far between the stars. . . a neighbor oh how inconceivably distant. . All is far . think. in the dish. . Who knows? But isn't there a place at last where perhaps their speech is spoken . one used to think. when she avoids him and longs . Fish are dumb . a child for example . how much farther still what we learn from the present.. and another. . how many spans just from a man to a woman. Someone... See. how odd the faces of the fish.and nowhere does the circle close.

Zeige. Welchem der Bilder du auch im lnnern geeint bist (sei es selbst ein Moment aus dern Leben der Pein). preise sie. keinem vergleichbar. karnst du hinein ins Gewebe. zwischen den bliihenden Zweigen wie zum Gesicht gesteigerten Liiften verkehrst. Meide den Irrtum. klar. der riihmliche Teppich gemeint ist. ihre reifenden Feigen. wie in Glas eingegossene Garten. diesen: zu sein! Seidener Faden. dass der ganze. Wasser und Rosen von Ispahan oder Schiras. die du nicht kennst. fiihl. Dass sic dich meinen. dass es Entbehrungen gebe fUr den geschehnen Entschluss. mein Herz. . unerreichbar. mein Herz. singe sie selig.178 • Die Sonette an Orpheus: Zweiter reil 21 Singe die Garten. dass du sie niemals entbehrst. Dass du mit ihren.

sing the incomparable roses and fountains of Ispahan or Shiraz. you became part of the weaving. Ecstatic. sing the gardens you haven't known. the glorious tapestry. praise them. It . Whatever pattern you're part of most intrinsically (even just for a moment in the life of pain). feel that the whole is meant. Avoid the error of believing that you're being deprived for that decision you once made: to be! Silken thread. That it's you their ripening figs have in mind. That your friendship with their breezes between branches all in bloom rises to the pitch of vision. prove that you can do without them.The Sonnets to Orpheus: Second Series • 179 21 My heart. My heart. like clear inaccessible gardens poured in glass.

Kurven des Flugs durch die Luft und die. Heute stiirzen die Oberschiisse. dieselben. unter Balkone gebaumt! Odie eherne Glocke. die fast ewige Tempel iiberlebt. Oder die eine. die Saule. Aber das Ra. in Parken iibergeschaumt. aus dem waagrechten gelben Tag in die blendend mit Licht iibertriebene Nacht. nur noch als Eile vorbei. die SauIe. die sie fuhren keine vielleicht ist umsonst.180 • Die Sonette an Orpheus: Zweiter Teil 22 o trotz Schicksal: die herrlichen Uberfliisse unseres Daseins. in Karnak. Doch nur wie gedacht. oder als steinerne Manner neben die Schliisse hoher Portale. die ihre Keule taglich wider den stumpfen Alltag hebt. .sen zergeht und lasst keine Spuren.

in Karnak. Today abundances.The Sonnets to Orpheus: Second Series • 181 22 Oh in spite of fate: the glorious surplus of our existence foaming over in the parksor like stone men braced under bakonies crowding the cornerstones of high arches I Oh the brassy ben lifting its bludgeon daily against the dally dull. But the frenzy passes and leaves no trace. but only as a rush from the horizontal yenow day into the more magnified dazzling night. Arcs of flight across the air. But only as thought. the column that outlives the almost eternal temples. the same ones. Or the one. the column. and those who controlled them: maybe none is meaningless. race by. It .

was niemals war. It . Bang verlangen wir nach einem Halte. So Entzognes ist am meisten dein. die dir unaufhorlich widersteht: flehend nah wie das Gesicht von Hunden. wir zu Jungen manchmal fUr das Alte und zu alt fiir das. wo wir meinten. well wir. der Ast sind und das Eisen und das Siisse reifender Gefahr. ach. erst begriisst zu sein. Wir sind frei. gerecht nur. wenn du meinst. Wir.182 • Die Sonette an Orpheus: Zweiter Teil 23 Rufe mich zu jener deiner Stunden. aber immer wieder weggedreht. Wir wurden dort entlassen. sie endlich zu erfassen. wo wir dennoch preisen.

What's taken like this is most yours.The SDnnets to Orpheus: Second Series • 183 23 Can me to that one of your hours which is incessantly resisting you: close as a dog's begging face. Of . when you think it's finally caught. For. we're the bough and the axe and the sweetness of ripening risk. Where we'd thought we were welcomed . oh. We're just only where we praise nonetheless. Afraid. but turned away as ever. we claw only for a hold.we were sent from there. we. sometimes too young for what's old and too old for what never was. We're free.

iibersteigend. immer neu. spater. . Wasser und 01 fiillten die Kruge trotzdem. der uns am Ende erhort. dass es uns einst. wenn er uns leiht. Aber sie sind die UnsterbIichen. erschuttere.184 • Die Sonette an Orpheus: Zweiter Teil 24 o diese Lust. Wir. wir unendlich Gewagten. die uns das murrische Schicksal wieder zerstort. Sehet. aus gelockertem Lehm! Niemand beinah hat den fruhesten Wagem geholfen. ein Geschlecht durch Jahrtausende: Mutter und Vater immer erfiillter von dem kunftigen Kind. was wir sind und was er immer gewinnt. Wir. wir durfen jenen erhorchen. der weiss. was haben wir Zeitl Und nur der schweigsame Tod. Gotter. Stiidte entstanden trotzdem an beseligten Golfen. wir planen sie erst in erkuhnten Entwurfen.

when he has outgrown us. But they're the immortals. Listen. will shatter us. what he always gains. water and oil. Nevertheless. the endlessly risked. We. cities rose out of happy bays. when he lends us. we must hear him out who'll hear us in the end.The Sonnets to Orpheus: Second Series • 185 24 Oh the ever-fresh pleasure from loosened day! Virtually no one helped the earliest darers. filled the pitchers. how much time we own! And only closed-mouth death knows what we are and. . one generation through millennia: mother and father always more full of the child of the future who later. nonetheless. Gods: we plot them out in daring models first which disgruntled fate destroys for us again. We.

186 • Die Sonette an Orpheus: Zweiter Teil 25 Schon. Doch Haufen von Dunger lagern als satteres Schwarz in den Au'n. wird junger. wieder den menschlichen Takt in der verhaltenen Stille der starken Vorfruhlingserde. Es hat dich genommen. nahmst du es niemals. Jenes so oft dir schon Gekommene scheint dir zu kommen wieder wie Neues. die hingeht. Unabgeschmackt scheint dir das Kommende. Selbst die Blatter durchwinterter Eichen scheinen im Abend ein kunftiges Braun. horst du der ersten Harken Arbeit. Schwarz sind die Striiucher. . Manchmal geben sich Lufte ein Zeichen. horch. bruner erhofft. Jede Stunde.

Even the leaves of wintering oaks in the evening radiate a future brown.The Sannets to Orpheus: Second Series • 187 25 Listen: already you can hear the working of the first hoes. Yet piles of manure lie on the fields. an even richer black. Each passing hour grows younger. Whatever's coming doesn't seem stale to you. again the human rhythm in the early hard spring earth's unyielding stillness. . It captured you. Black are the bushes. Sometimes breezes exchange signs. You always expected but never seized it. What's already come toward you so often seems to be approaching you like something new.

..188 • Die Sonette an Orpheus: Zweiter Teil 26 Wie ergreift uns der Vogelschrei . Irgendein einmal erschaffenes Schreien. schreien an wirklichen Schreien vorbei. mit Riindern von Lachen. spielend im Freien.Ordne die Schreier. Schreien den Zufall. Keile. wo sind wir? Immer noch freier. des Kreischens. wie die losgerissenen Drachen jagen wir halbhoch. In Zwischenraume dieses. . Aber die Kinder schon.. tragend als Stromung das Haupt und die Leier .. . singender Gott! dass sie rauschend erwachen. Wehe. des Weltraums. windig zerfetzten. wie Menschen in Traume-) treiben sie ihre. (in welchen der heile Vogelschrei eingeht.

The Sonnets to Orpheus: Second Series • 189 26 How a bird's cry can move us . . edged with laughter. like kites torn loose. But even children playing in the open cry beyond real cries. Any once-created crying. . They drive their screams' wedges into those interstices of cosmic space (in which bird-cries go unharmed.. as men go into dreams). Oh where are we? Freer and freer. Singing god. we race in midair. It . . Cry accident. so they awake resounding like a current carrying the head and the lyre.. tattered by wind. order the criers. .

die tie fe. als die Treibenden.spater .erbricht sie die Burg? Dieses Herz. das unendlich den Gottern gehorende. wie das Schicksal uns wahrmachen will? 1st die Kindheit. in den Wurzeln . Als die. . das Gespenst des Verganglichen.. versprechliche. die wir sind. durch den arglos Empfiinglichen geht es.still? Ach.190 • Die Sonette an Orpheus: Zweiter Teil 27 Gibt es wirklich die Zeit. die zcrstorende? Wann. wann vergewaltigts der Demiurg? Sind wir wirklich so angstlich Zerbrechliche. auf dem ruhcnden Berg. 7. als war es ein Rauch. getten wir doch bei bleibenden Kraften als gottlicher Brauch.

so full of promise in its roots . the apparition of impennanence.later .made still? Ah. . ..The Sonnets to Orpheus: Second Series • 191 27 Does time the destroyer really exist? When will it shatter the peaceful mountain's tower? When will the demiurge overpower this heart that always belongs to the gods? Are we really as anxiously brittle as fate wants to prove us? Is childhood. it slides through the innocent receiver as if it were steam. As these which we are. among the lasting powers we still matter as a divine means . so deep. the drivers.

fast noch Kind. wo die Leier sich tOnend hob ..:e. Du warst noch die von damals her Bewegte und leicht befremdet. mit dir nach dem Gehor zu gehn. erganze fUr einen Augcnblick die Tanzfigur zum reinen Sternbild eines jener Tam. o komm und geh. die unerhorte Mitte. Du wusstest noch die Stelle. It . einrnal zu der heilen Feier des Freundes Gang und Antlitz hinzudrehn.192 • Die Sonette an Orpheus: Zweiter Teil 28 Du. da Orpheus sang. darin wir die dumpf ordnende Natur verganglich ubertreffen. wenn ein Baum sich lang besann. Fur sie versuchtest du die schonen Schritte und hofftest. Denn sie regte sich vollig horend nur.

still barely a child. You still knew that place where the resounding lyre arose . So you tried out your lovely steps. For she reached fun hearing only when Orpheus sang. for an eye-wink perfect the symbol of dance into a sheer constellation of dance.The Sonnets to Orpheus: Second Series· 193 28 Oh come and go. one of them in which we momentarily excel Nature's primitive ordering.that unheard-of center. You were the one from the past still excited and slightly surprised when a tree took so long deciding whether it would go into your ear. hoping to tum your friend's look and direction someday toward that restoring celebration. You. .

was an dir 7. wird ein Starkes tiber dieser Nahrung. Und wenn dich das Irdische vergass.ehrt. Zu dem raschen Wasser sprich: Ich bin. Was ist deine leidendste Erfahrung? 1st dir Trinken bitter. fiihle. Sei in dieser Nacht aus Ubermass Zauberkraft am Kreuzweg deiner Sinne..194 • Die Stmette an Orpheus: Zweiter Teil 29 Stiller Freund der vielen Fernen. wie dein Atem noch den Raum vermehrt. Das. 1m Gebalk der finstern Glockenstiihle lass dich lauten. . werde Wein. ihrer seltsamen Begegnung Sinn. zu der stillen Erde sag: Ich rinne. Geh in der Verwandlung aus und ein.

To the rushing water speak: I am. And if the earthly has forgotten you. In this vast night. Know transformation through and through. Whatever preys on you will grow strong from this nourishment. say to the still earth: I flow. . Let yourself peal among the beams of dark belfries. turn to wine. feel how your breath is still expanding space. the meaning of their strange encounter. What experience has been most painful to you? If the drinking's Ditter.The Sonnets to Orpheus: Second Series· 195 29 Silent friend of many distances. be the magic power at your senses' intersection.

NOTES .. .

65: Santa Maria Formosa A church in Venice. 1-2: angelic orders Although he used terminology and incidents associated with traditional ideas of angels. I. which Rilke visited in 19l1.. the noted theologian. appears already consummated .: The line-numbers in these notes refer primarily to the translation . Romano Guardini. .. which we are accomplishing.B. and tenth elegies. ninth.. but in cold marble live for myself. has suggested that Rilke is referring to a plaque in that chuTch that bears the following inscription: "While life lasted I lived for others. Rilke asserted in his letter of 1925 to his Polish translator that the angel in the Elegies "has nothing to do with the angel of the Christian heaven." He went on to explain: "The angel of the Elegies is that creature in whom the transformation of the visible into the invisible. After he deserted her.NOTES N. sixth. Flanders mourns . She died in 1554 at the age of thirty-one. The FIrSt Elegy ll. " 1. 46: Gaspara Stamp" A sixteenth-century Italian noblewoman who fell desperately in love with Count Collatino of Colla to when she was twenty-six years old. after death. I was Hermann Wilhelm. THE DUINO ELEGIES Dedication Princess Marie von Thurn und Taxis-Hohenlohe was a friend of Rilke who offered him the use of her cast~ at Duino near Trieste where he comp~ted the first and second elegies and wrote fragments that later became the third. she found consolation in religion and wrote a series of 200 sonnets recording the story of their love. I have not perished. now.

. he met Raphael whom he didn't recognize as one of the archangels because Raphael appeared to him disguised as a handsome young man. poverty calls for me. He died on the 16th of October. 14-15: . J.200 • Notes for me. 11." Since there is no one-word equivalent to "Dastehn" in English. B. and Orpheus and who was associated with nature-worship and the origin of music. . which influenced this Elegy." 1. Apollo. was the owner of Picasso's painting Les SaJtimbal1ques.. This passage is generally accepted as a direct reference to Picasso's Les Saltimbanques in which Rilke sees the acrobats as being arranged on the canvas in the shape of the letter "D" and which he describes ClS the large initial for the German word "Dastehn. the essence of standing there: the large initial of Debut (Jf" Done . . According to one account. In another account the lament or dirge for Linus is related to music's origin because those who were numbed by his death were reawakened by the song of Orpheus." whose literal translation is "Standing-thereness. a literal translation would obliterate the link that Rilke intended between the poem and Picasso's painting. and when he went looking for someone to guide him. when Linus died the void caused by his death was so startled that its trembling amazement was called musk. 3: Tobias A biblical figure who was sent by his dying father to retrieve a substantial amount of money that had been left in another man's care.91: LinGs An ancient Greek deity whose legend assumed a variety of forms linking him with Adonis. at the time. 1593. In his commentary on this Elegy and Les Saltimbanques. The Second Eh!gy l. Tobias didn't know the way. The Fifth Elegy Dedication In 1915 Rilke spent several months in the home of Frau Hertha von Koenig who. Adria sighs for me. .

he was known to be a powerful athlete who was matched in physical strength only by Peter of Russia. The Hall includes 134 huge pillars on which are carved various scenes depicting the kings and the god. Rilke wrote at length about a troupe of real acrobats that he'd seen in the Luxembourg Gardens in Paris and spent considerable time describing how the acrobats kept starting and stopping. 1. The Eighth Elegy Dedication Rudolf Kassner was an Austrian philosopher and writer to whom Rilke was introduced by Princess Marie von Thurn und TaxisHohenlohe and with whom Rilke spent some time at Duino.e. De- . 18: Augllstus the Strong King of Poland and Elector of Saxony from 1697 to 1733." Moreover. Most translators have rendered this line as "the chiseled reliefs of Karnak the conquering king." The Sixth Elegy I. These are some of the considerations that contributed to the manner in which I attempted to resolve this linguistic challenge. 63: "Subrisio SaUat" An abbreviation of "subrisio saltatoris. I.. The temple is especially noted for the Hypostle Hall erected by Seti I and his son Ramses II during the 19th Dynasty. a fact that Rilke undoubtedly knew since he had visited Karnak. 20: Karnak The site of the splendid temple to the god Amon Re on the Nile in Southern Egypt that Rilke visited in January of 1911. According to a mixture of history and legend.Notes·201 Leishman astutely observes that in Picasso's painting it is rather difficult to determine whether the acrobats are "arriving or departing. there is no historical evidence that there ever was a king by this name. At this moment in the Elegy it also seems that the acrobats are standing in some kind of momentary pause between one act and another." i. "acrobat's smile." However. beginning or ending their performance. in one of his notebooks from 1907.

et al. Although Rilke had seen her daru:e only once. a building in front of the great pyramid. the middle star of the Great Dipper and the little star immediately above it were known to the Arabs as "The Horse and the Rider. Garland of Fruit." he insisted that it "is not to be identified with Egypt . 58: Etruscan souls The Etruscans painted birds on the walls of their tombs to represent the souls of the dead. Staff. 80: the scale of stars The constellation Libra." The Latin name for this combination of stars was Eques stelluia. I. I. 83: the double crown The pschent (or double crown) worn by the Sphinx and by Egyptian kings after the unification of Upper and Lower Egypt. "Little Starry Horseman. Wera Ow::kama Knoop was a young girl especially talented in music and dancing. and Kassner viewed Rilke's longing for "the open" as atavistic. Most of these are Rilke's own symbolic constellations. (Perhaps it is worth noting that in his letter to his Polish translator. They also often placed a life-size figure of the dead person on top of the sarcophagus. .202 • Notes spite their friendship. I. However. The Tenth Elegy 1.") 11. her untimely death at the age of twenty moved . 75: brother to the one on the Nile Most probably a reference to the mastaba. . 91-93: Rider. Rilke profoundly disagreed with Kassner's belief that the limitations and contradictions lamented in this Elegy are necessary conditions of life. whose sign is a scale. Rilkc stated that while the Land of Lamentation is a kind of reflection of the Nile country "in the desert clarity of the consciousness of the dead." THE SONNETS TO ORPHEUS Dedication Born in Moscow in 1900.

" . 3-4: In The Golden Bough. 11: See note on lines 91-93 of "The Tenth Elegy" for a discussion of the constellation "Rider. C. "Le Cimetiere marin. 16: In a letter to his wife. in the frescoes on the walls of the loggia at Delphi. and gourd (or jug) were everyday objects buried with the dead by some andent peoples." I." . MacIntyre also states that these are "typical graveyard flora. ll. In a letter to Countess Sizzo. according to a note he wrote in a friend's copy of the Sonnets. Moreover. 6. F.. F. .. Rilke described Vera as "that beautiful child. Macintyre has suggested rather convincingly that these two sonnets are indebted to Valery's poem. I. 14: The clasp.Notes • 203 him deeply and served as the emotional occasion for the writing of these sonnets.. 10: Rue and earthsmoke (the herb. . Orpheus was portrayed as sitting under a willow. '*' In the first stanza Rilkc is clearly speaking of the andent sarcophagi 10: in Rome. ring. Frazer notes that Orpheus carried a willow branch as a talisman when he went down to Hades to rescue Eurydice. while in the second stanza. 13 and 14: C. Rilke stated that perhaps the reader should know that this poem is addressed to a dog." First Series . fumitory) were plants used to make medicine.. who had just begun to dance and attracted the attention of everyone who saw her in those days through the art of motion and transformation innate in her body and spirit. holding his lyre with one hand and a branch of the willow with the other. he is referring to the open sarcophagi among the Roman ruins at Les Alyscamps near Aries in Southeastern France.

near Duino. Isaac.204 • Notes The last line is somewhat enigmatic. which . or Esau could be speaking metaphorically. However. He told the Countess that the dog in the poem is like Esau who has "put on his pelt in order to share in . for it suggests that Rilke has either dramatically telescoped or confused the biblical account of Esau and his twin-brother Jacob. l. In Genesis it is Ja{:ob whose skin is smooth and hairless and who attaches the pelts of goats to his arms and neck in order to deceive his aged father. Lou Andreas-Salome quotes him as once writing: "I am like the little anemone I once saw in the garden in Rome. #4: This sonnet is based on The Lady with the Unicorn tapestries at the Musee de Cluny in Paris. into believing that he Oacob) is Esau and thereby rob his brother of his rightful inheritance. in a letter to Countess Sizzo Oune.or ten-point stag is considered very large. As it appears in the poem. the line could be spoken by Jacob at that moment when he is impersonating his brother. 1923) Rilke's own explanation of the line makes it all the more enigmatic.." # 11: The caverns of Karst (or Carso) are at Trieste. it should not be confused with the sea anemone. Generally an eight. a heritage of everything human that was not coming to him.. Most probably he is "the boy with the squinting brown eyes" in line 35 of "The Fourth Elegy. which had opened so far during the day that it could no longer close at night!" #8: Egon von Rilke was Rilke's cousin and one of his childhood playmates. 7: A "sixteen-pointer" is a stag with sixteen points to its antlers. He died when he was still a child. #5: Though Rilke ascribes certain morphological characteristics of animals to this flower. In her memoir of RiTke." Second Series #3.

this poem is addressed "To the Reader. 1911. # 21. Also see note on line 20 of "The Sixth Elegy" regarding Karnak. which he described in some detail in a letter to his wife dated January." #29: Rilke's note for this poem was "To a friend of Wera's".4: Ispahan and Shiraz were cities in ancient Persia. 1.Notes·205 Rilke visited.7: No doubt Rilke is referring to the Column of Taharka at Karnak. Rilke's description of the manner in which doves were hunted is based on fact. #23: According to one of Rilke's notes.. . now Iran. Ispahan is also a kind of Persian rug. critics generally agree that most probably he is referring to himself . . 1. # 22.

You're Reading a Free Preview

Herunterladen
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->