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Past Examination Papers

June 2006 (0150)

UNIVERSITY of CAMB RIDGE


ESOL Examinations
English for Speakers of Other Languages

GAE June 2006

(050)

Contents

Paper 1, Reading, Question Paper and Answer Sheet Paper 2, Writing, Question PaPer Paper 3, Use of English, Question Paper and Answer Sheet Paper 4, Listening, Question Paper and Answer Sheet, Tapescript Paper 5, Speaking, Sample Test Materials

Papers 1, 3 and 4, Answer KeYs


Paper 2, Notes on Assessment and Sample Scripts Paper 5, Assessment Criteria

law' All rights Copyright. The contents of this publication are covered by international copyright stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted ,""rbi-'ro; no part of this document may be reproduced, otheruvise, without in any form oi by any means, electroni, mechanical, photocopying, recording or the prior written conent of University of Cambridge ESOL Examinations'

be liable to lndividuals and institutions who do not observe these copyright restrictions will
prosecution

O UCLES 2006

UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE ESOL EXAMINATIONS

English for Speakers of Other Languages

CERTIFICATE IN ADVANCED ENGLISH


PAPER

015011
t
hour 15 minutes

1 Reading
14 JUNE

Wednesday
Additional materials:

2006

Morning

Multiple Choice answer sheet Sof clean eraser Soft pencil (type B or HB is recommended)

TIME t hourlS minutes


INSTRUCTIONS TO CANDIDATES

Do not open this booklet untilyou are told to do so. Write your name, Centre number and candidate number on the answer sheet in the spaces provided unless this has already been done for you. This paper requires you to read four texts and answer the accompanying questions.
For each question indicate in pencil on the separate answer sheet one answer from the appropriate list of choices. Read and follow carefully the instructions given on the separate answer sheet. You may write on the question paper if you wish, but you must transfer your answers to the separate answer sheet within the time limit. At the end of the examination, you should hand in both the question paper and the answer sheet. INFORMATION FOR CANDIDATES

Questions in Parts 1 and 4 carry one mark. Questions in Parts 2 and 3 carry two marks.

This question paper consists of 10 printed pages and 4 blank pages.


sP (SLM/KS)
O UCLES

399418/3 2006

'l0o/2033i0
Level 2 Certificate in English

(ESOL)

[TUfn OVef

Part

Answer questions 1-13 by referring to the magazine article on page 3 about people who have converted old houses. lndicate your answers on the separate answer sheet.
For questions 1-13, answer by choosing from the people in the article (A-D). Some of the choices

may be required more than once.

ln which section are the following mentioned?


incorporating a particular originalfeature in a new design using materials to allow more light throughout the house previous alterations to the house being unimaginative

the limited space initially appearing to be a drawback the house being bought on impulse
the alterations following a steady schedule over a period of time

the restrictions of the site requiring an unusual design the layout inside the house being more modern than the external appearance
a feeling of relief after a lengthy search for a house

being unaffected by the disruption of major building work being reluctant to make drastic changes to an old house
an efficient approach when searching for a house

10
11

12 13

fulfilment of an earlier ambition

0150/1 Jun06

BUILDTI{G A DREAM
Mel Bridge talks
to

in an attempt to create heir dream home' four people who have renovated an old house

A-

you see she has used her skills to Helena is a successful interior designer and on visiting her watm village home, house, but the golden-walled exterior belies a spare, good advantage, on first sight, thii is a typical traditional for a house, Helena made a list of Jool and .pu.Lu, interior, of contemporary design. when she stafted looking that she expected her search to be personal requirements for her new home. Such methodical foresight shows she came across the house' prolonged. However, it was when visiting her mother in a neighbouring village that iwt t saw it I jumped at it, it just felt right,' explains Helena. Having lived there for over a yeat, Helena says, ,I "n life in the country although the problem of finding like-mincled people is much harder here. I had a lot

Helena HolroYd

enjoy of good friends in London'' respect for tradition and allowed the As she talks about the recent renovations, it is clear that Helena has a healthy six months of living here I building to dictate its own design. 'At first I thought I'd leave it untouched. But aftcr eight months later, the house and realised I had to make some alterations.' So she .nlirt.d the help of an architect plus the addition of a third floor in the converted attic and, what's more, it had been boasted a new extension extensive refurbishment, but totally redecorated, Helena appears to have been amazingly pragmatic about such and the hospitality of her family living nearby' her relaxed attitude *uy rruu. "en helped by a generous budget, B

is why architect Sara Faramaz settled The perfect location for a house in London is very hard to come by. That architects wouldn't even touch. 'I spent a for a house on a slim wedge of space on a busy street, a site which other prices were hotting up' When lot of time looking for a bigger hour. in the same area, but it was difficult because up with an I came back a few months later and it was still unsold, I starled thinking what I could do.' Sara came but to avoid creating an unlovely innovative plan for the narrow home, which made best use of the existing space, and extend her house around it' To benefit war.ren of small dark rooms, she decided to create a paved courtyard the house while bedrooms nestle from the best available natural light, Sara placed theliving rooms at the top of open area' set on two levels' 'I always below. The combined kitchen, dining room and living room is in one large and the views, but I have a lot of people envisaged the main living space beiig at the top becuse of the sunlight I'm very happy with the end result'' want the kit.h"n to be separaie from the sitting room,
round, so I didn't
C - Jo Palmieri Jo had been looking for a propefty Desperate to move back to her native Leeds, to work as an interior designer, she saw the country bungalow' 'As for some six months. So she was becoming exasperated, when at long last Even better, the location was ideal, soon as I went inside I could immediately see the potential space available. into a three-bedroom only 20 minutes away from my office.; The stoire-built house had been transformed with her designing skills, Jo planned her own conversion bungalow 30 years ago with a decided lack of flair. the ceiling from the in stages. ,The basic idea was to open up the whole place as mnch as possible. I removed fine days the sunshine that on living area, and replaced the windows with a wall of glass, divided into squares, so of the rooms has a door - indeed, all the doors were removed to open brigitens up the whole of the house .'None up the internal space.

Sara Fnramaz

D -LizEazan job, she saw that her childhood dream when Lizbeganher search for a bolthole in the country after giving up her across a single-storey cottage, built of a place away from it all could now be realised. When she eventually came dilapidated state. Neveftheless, on by an amateur builder to a very strange design, she was daunted by its rather quality of the house. The eccentricity of the crossing the threshold, she was immediately*attracted by the magical vely high quality materials, such as solid original design had been more than compensated for by an insistence on
wooden beams and handmade bricks'

retain the existing Liz enlisted the help of a local architect, Philip warner. 'Philip understood my desire to the confines of the existing cottage,' she ambience, and I instructed him to create u .o-fortuble interior within to include a large open-plan sitting room' said. But after much deliberation, it was agreed to extend the house in the main bedroom' making it spacious and airy, Another major alteration was the ..-ouul- of the ceiling home could never be yet retaining unusual diamond-shaped windows overlooking the garden, Liz's country
described as ordinary!
0150/1 Jun06

[Turn over

Parl2
For questions 14-19, choose which of the paragraphs A-G on page 5 fit into the numbered gaps in the following magazine article. There is one extra paragraph, which does not fit in any of the gaps. lndicate your answers on the separate answer sheet.

Big Band
Peler Datis rcports on fhe creaion of a veryt unusual epe of orchestra. Craig Hilton says it was a glimpse of a toy in a store window. Peter Keane remernbers the cover of a chilclren's book. Either way, sorne form of unlikely inspiration was involved when the two of them got ogether over dinner one evening in New York and dreamed up the Thai Elephant Orchestra. Wrat they didn't imagine was how successful their project would eventually become.

i.tl;,,T,,

What you can do is to starl with one elephant, mor.e

into a duet, and then bring in the drums. 'But,' says Hilton, 'it never goes quite like that. Often the
elephants either don't staft on time or they refuse to stop playing or a mallet gets dropped. I think that's one of the reasons why people like thc music. It's initially unsettling because you're used to centring in on one instrument and using that as a means of filtering out the other sounds. The elephant music is so random that you can't do that - anything can happen.'

It was still capturing their imagination in the cold light of morning. After all, elephants were already making their names in the art world as painters - elephant canvases can sell for thousands of dollars in the right galleries. If art, why not music? Keane booked a ticket to Thailand, and got out his sketch book to start designing the instruments. But what would work for the biggest ofbands?

Keane duly anived in Thailand and the two band leaders set to work. To their initial despair, some of the instruments were disastrous. 'If you put a flute in an elephant's mouth, it'll bite it in half,'says Keane. The drum pedals were a non-starter too, since elephants, it turns out, like to keep all four feet on the ground. And they didn't particularly take to the huge electronic
keyboard either.

The elephants do, nonetheless, need ways to make a living. Their numbers are plummeting norv that the logging work has dried up and their natural habitat is disappearing. As recently as 150 years ago, there were 100,000 elephants in Thailand; now there are just a few thousand. 'The possibility of returning them to the wild is nil,'says Keane. oThere's sirnply not enough wild there.'
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The orchestra plays several times a day for visitors to the centre. And now the elephants even have a CD to ttreir name. Their first recording is an arty affair, with no overdubs or studio effects to leaven the sounds. But Hilton and Keane are also producing an easy-listening version for a wider audience. oI don't listen to it every

And the music sounded ... good. Surprisingly good, in fact. 'I was annazed,' says Keane. 'Personally speaking, as an unusual composer, I don't mind if there's cacophony in the music. If it's wild and woolly that's fine by me, but obviously *y preferences have made no difference to them. The elephants really do seem to like "pretty" llusic.'

night now, as I did at first,' says Hilton. 'But turn it on and it's just gorgeous.'

still

0150/1 Jun06

Strange as it may seem, it really is like that, in a weird soft of way. And it really is more

Hilton reluctantly agrees with this. 'They


shouldn't be kept in captivity. They're wild animals and they belong in the forest. But if they've got to be in captivity, what better than
to be in our band?'

than, say, sea lions trained to honk car horns. Although the elephants are told when to start and stop, the rest is up to them. Actually, when to stop is also very much up to them, since it's hard to dictate such things to some elephants.

There is something uncomfortable, howeveE about getting elephants to do something so obviously hurnan. Hilton and Keane both feel it. 'It's not like they would be doing it spontaneously,' Keane admits. 'We ask them to do it. If people want to get offended fbr that reason, then I acrually agree with them. You don't want to have elephants mimicking human activities.'

But when Keane and Hilton tried out creations the elephants could blow into with their trunks or bash with a stick, the orchestra was bom. Lining up in a solemn row, the centre's elephants played metal 'thunder sheets' and harmonicas, xylophones and elephant sitars. They even managed an Asian wind instrument called a khaen, although they had trouble holding it.

In retrospect, the outcome of such an alliance


was inevitable. Hilton had always been obsessed with Asian elephants. Indeed, he's been working

Anything delicate could be ruled out. They would have to survive being pounded by 4-tonne rnusicians. Perfotmances would be out of doors and they would have to cope with sweltering humid summers, monsoonal
downpours and winter temperatures that could fall to just above fi'eezing. They would also need to sound good to the Thai ear - human as well as elephant. And above all, the elephants would have to want to play them.

at the Thai Elephant Conservation Centre in nofthem Thailand for 20 years now. Keane, on the other hand, didn't know much about
elephants, but he does know music; the unusual is his forte and he's always up for a challenge.
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It becarne apparent that it would take more than


mere imagination to turn the idea into a reality.

The finance to employ the local craftsmen needed to help out with the instruments was in short supply. At this point it looked as if the
project was doomed.

0150/1 Jun06

[Turn over

Part 3 Read the following newspaper article and then answer questions 20-24 on page 7. On your answer sheet indicate the letter A, B, C, or D against the number of each question 20-24. Give only one answer to each question.

Lights, camera, action man


Traveliournalist Richard Madden reports on his first trip with a camera crew. It was books that first captured my imagination about faraway places. TV travelogues always seemed the poor relation to the classic written accounts, although of course the pictures were rather better. And then there was the issue of authenticity. All those pretentious theatrical types dying of thirst in the desert, as if we didn't realise there was a camera crew on hand to cater for their every need. These days programme-makers know that the audience is more sophisticated and the presence of the camera is acknowledged. But can a journey with filming equipment ever be anything other than a
cleverly constructed fiction? I recently got the chance to find out, when I was asked to present two one-hour programmes for an adventure travel series. The project was the brainchild of the production company, Trans-Atlantic Films, which wanted the series presented by writers and adventurers, as well as TV professionals. My sole qualification was as a journalist specialising in 'adventure'travel. However, was thought to have 'on-screen' potential. The first programme was filmed in Costa Rica. Within 24 hours of my arrival, I realised that this was going to be very different from my usual 'one man and his laptop'expeditions. For a start, there were five of us director, cameraman, sound recordist, producer and presenter. And then there was the small matter of t100,000 worth of equipment. I soon realised that the director, Peter Macpherson, was a vastly experienced adventure film-maker. ln his case, the term'adventure' meant precisely that. Part of the brief for the series was to put the presenter in unusual situations and see how he or she coped. One such sequence was the night we spent in the rainforest canopy near the Rincn de la Vieja National Park in Guanacaste

province. I don't have a head for heights and would make a poor rock-climber, so my distress

is real enough as the camera catches

me

dangling on a rope some 30m up, well short of the canopy platform. lronically, was the presence of the camera, looking down on me from above, that gave me the impetus for the final push to the top. By this time, I'd learnt how'sequences'were cut together and realised that one last effort was required. I had to struggle to stay coherent while the camera swooped within a few millimetres of my face for my reaction. ln the end, it was a magical experience, heightened all the more by the sounds of the forest. Learning how to establish a rapport with the camera is vital and it took me a while to think of it as a friend rather than a judge and jury. The most intimidating moments were when Peter strolled up to me, saying that the light would only be right for another 10 minutes, and that he needed a 'link' from one sequence to another. The brief was simple.lt needed to be 30 seconds long, sum up my feelings, be informative, wellstructured and, most important of all, riveting to watch.'Ready to go in about 5 minutes?'he would say breezily. I soon discovered that the effect of the camera on what was gong on around us was far less intrusive than I had imagined. After a first flurry of curiosity, people usually lost interest and let us get on with our job. We were also flexible enough to be spontaneous. Our trip coincided with an 80 per cent solar eclipse, a rare event anywhere in the world. We were in a village called Santa Elena and captured the whole event on camera. The carnival atmosphere was infectious and made a welcome addition to our shooting schedule.

it

0150/1 JunO6

20 One thing the writer used to dislike about travel programmes

on TV was

A B C D

the repetitive nature of many of them. the dull images that they frequently contained. their lack of respect for the intelligence of the viewers. their tendency to copy the style of famous written accounts.

21 What reason is given for the writer becoming involved in making TV travel programmes?

A B C D
22

other people's belief that he might be suited to appearing on them his own desire to discover whether it was possible to make good ones his own belief that it was natural for him to move from journalism to TV a shortage of writers and adventurers willing to take part in them

The writer uses the sequence filmed in the National Park as an example of

A B C D
23

something he had been worried about before any filming started. the sort of challenge that presenters were intended to face in the series. something he was expected to be unable to deal with. the technical difficulties involved in making films in certain places.

ln paragraph six the writer says that he found it particularly difficult to

A B C D
24

understand what was required of him for a'link'. change things he was going to do at very short notice. accept certain advice given to him about presenting a film. meet certain demands the director made on him.

What does the writer use the experience in Santa Elena as an example of?

A B C D

something they filmed although they had not planned to the friendly way in which they were treated by the local people something they did purely for their own enjoyment the kind of thing that viewers like to see in travel films

01

50/1 Jun06

[Turn over

Answer questions 25-45 by referring to an extract from a book on coral reefs on pages your answers on the separate answer sheet.

f10. lndicate

For questions 25-45, answer by choosing from the sections of the extract (A-E). Some of the choices may be required more than once_

ln which section are the following mentioned?


the places where human involvement in the restoration of coral reefs is likely to be warranted surprise that reefs flourish in a part of the sea that should be incapable of sustaining
life

25 26 27 28 29 30
31

circumstances in which polluters have been made to contribute towards the repair of coral reefs the relative ignorance that exists about damage to the sea as compared to awareness of other environmental issues
a factor that makes extensive human repair to coral reefs problematic

problems in proving to people that certain activities cause environmental damage


the fact that the range of species supported by coral reefs is comparable to another habitat

the importance of limiting damage to coral reefs in order to allow self-repair to occur
the fact that people living near coral reefs have always taken advantage of their resources

32 33 34 35 36

the uncertainty that exists about a common practice for the disposal of chemicals the relative difficulty of evaluating different reefs according to how they are exploited the cost of constructing sea barriers to perform the same function as coral reefs
the fact that the size of coral reefs cannot protect them aganst the pollution and damage caused by people

37
38 39
4A
41

the precautionary measure that must be taken because of the poor survival rate of coral the reason why the capacity of coral reefs for self-repair is being diminished
the considerable progress that has been made in improving public awareness of the threat to coral reefs growing acceptance of the view that polluters should be made accountable for environmental damage a comparison between coral reefs and buildings found on land the fact that as the threat to coral reefs has increased so has awareness of the benefits they offer the view that the small number of unspoilt coral reefs left is a factor to consider when estimating their importance the two aspects of the modern world that have altered the impact local communities have on coastal areas

42 43 44 45

Coral Reefs
Over the ages coral reefs have proved exraordinarily resilient, yet sadly their health and, in some cases, their vuy survival is notv being threatened. Sue Wells and Nick Hanna explain.

A thriving coral reef is one of the most glorious


natural phenomena on our planet. For sheer colour and exuberance, reefs can arguably outdo any other natural habitat, and in the huge diversity and number of plants and animals they support, they are second only to rainforests. And yet, paradoxically, these 'rainforests of the ocean' are found only in shallow tropical seas where the nutrients essential to growth are practically non-existent.

Reefs have always been at risk from natural

Coral reefs have existed for 450 million


years, making them probably the oldest ecosystems

catastrophes, notably, ferocious hurricanes. In normal circumstances, they are remarkably good at regeneration, but the continuous onslaught from human interference is now affecting their ability to recover from natural impacts. And although we can only speculate at present, it is possible that humanity has unleashed the greatest threat to reefs yet, in the form of increased sea temperatures caused by global warming.

on the planet. Coral animals, the remarkable little creatures that build reefs, are responsible for creating the largest structures made by life on earth - big enough, in some cases, to dwarf even the most ambitious edifices constructed by humankind. But this extraordinary ability is
no defence against the assaults suffered by reefs as a direct result of human activities. Sewage and toxic chemicals are pumped over them, silt from construction sites chokes them, soil run-off smothers them, and boat and cruise ship anchors smash into them.
B

Ironically, as reefs have become even more


stressed, their value to people has been thrown into

sharp focus. Since the dawn of humanity, the biological abundance of coral reefs has provided sustenance for coastal communities in the tropics, yielding a bountiful harvest of food as well as many other products as diverse as building materials, medicines and jewellery. breakwaters, protecting the land and coastol settlements from the violence of the ocean and providing natural harbours. They are an essential defence against rising sea levels, and if they disappear, artifcial replacements would mean spending billions of dollars. The very existence of coral islands and many of the sandy beaches so beloved by tourists in the tropics is heavily dependent on healthy reefs, which are, of course, an irnportant attraction in their own right.

Reefs are also invaluable as

natural

01

50/1 Jun06

10

C People have always been drawn to coastlines, as coastal plains provided fertile agricultural land, and the shallow waters above the continental shelf offered abundant fisheries. The pattems of settlement that developed posed few problems in pre-industrial times, but a combination of industrial Active reef restoration is perhaps most useful and cost-effective where there is a need to increase populations ofvery rare coral species, or to repair reefs in marne parks or in locations where a great deal of money is earned from tourism. E

development and fast-growing populations is now putting enormous pressures on shoreline


ecosystems.

All

centres

of

population and industry

nowadays, even agricultural land, produce a range of waste products and efTuents. In coastal areas,

pollutants are habitually discharged into the sea and in many cases the impact on tropical coastlines is still largely unknown. Studies that have so far been carried out have often produced conflicting results, which can make it difficult to use the data to convince people that potentially harmful practices should be changed. The seriousness of the effect of a pollution incident depends on many variables, such as weather, and not just on, say, the size of a toxic discharge. For example, in open water and on well-flushed coastlines, pollutants are dispersed far more easily than in enclosed bays and lagoons. The world community is now well aware of plight of the rainforests and the threats posed the by deforestation and global warming, but the dangers that face marine ecosystems are not so well known. Over the last decade, though, enofinous advances have been made in our understanding of the problems facing reefs and in seeking solutions to safeguard their future. D

One principle increasingly being recognised in the battle to protect the world's natural resources, is that whoever is engaged in activities that could harm the environment, pays the cost. This is the case whether it involves installing equipment or technology to prevent pollution and other degradation, or to repair any damage that occurs. Ship owners, for example, are now often liable for cleaning up oil spills and paying compensation for
any damage caused.

Reefs used for tourism are most obviously of high economic worth, but it may be harder to calculate the worth of reefs used primarily for fishing (particularly subsistence fishing), unless detailed catch statistics are available, which they It is perhaps even harder to put prices on scientific or aesthetic value - solne remote and pristine reefs might be considered especially valuable now for their rarity value. Clearly this process is complex and the results present are variable and highly dependent on the at site in question, and the amount of information available. But it can provide an indicator of the conservation value of the reef and underlines the importance of preventing damaging activities.
are often not.

in reef management is to remove or at least minimise human causes of reef destruction, and to improve conditions so that natural regeneration of the reefs takes place as quickly as possible. It is most unlikely that a reef could be restored to its original state in anything other than a timescale of decades, but it may be possible for it to be helped towards a stage where normal processes can start to function. Large-scale replanting of corals has proved difficult to carry out successfully, largely because of the amount of diving labour required. When a reef is damaged by a hurricane, much of the regrowth takes place by regeneration of the broken coral fragments, but large numbers also die. Similarly, when a reef is being replanted manually, numerous fragments of coral have to be planted if a significant number are to flourish.
The highest priority
0150/1 Jun06

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UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE ESOL EXAMINATIONS

English for Speakers of Other Languages

CERTIFICATE IN ADVANCED ENGLISH


PAPER

0150t2
Morning

Writing
14 JUNE 2006
2 hours

Wednesday

Candidates answer on the question paper. No additional materials are required.

TIME

2 hours

INSTRUCTIONS TO CANDIDATES

Do not open this booklet untilyou are told to do so. Write your name, Centre number and candidate number in the spaces at the top of this page. This paper requires you to complete two tasks, each of approximately 250 words in length.
Answer the Part 1 task and one task from Parl2. Read the task instructions and consider the information carefully both for Part 1 and the task which you select 'for Part 2. Write your answers in the spaces provided on the question paper.

Write clearly in pen, not pencil. You may make alterations but make sure that your work is easy to read.
INFORMATION FOR CANDIDATES All tasks in this paper carry equal marks.

This question paper consists of 4 printed pages,4 lined pages and 4 blank pages.
sP (sLM)T0142916 O UCLES 2006
100/2033/0 Level 2 Certificate in English (ESOL)

[Turn over

Part

You have been asked to write a report about the club's first year for the members of the college social committee.

You are the President of the Film Club which was started at your international college a year ago.

Read the notice below, which publicises the Film Club, and, on page 3, a note you have received from Felipe, the Secretary of the Film Club, together with comments that some members have made. Then, using the information appropriately, write a report for the committee members explaining how successful the club has been so far, suggesting ways in which it could be improved and saying how new members could be encouraged to join.

COLLEGE FILM CLUB

An entertaining way to continue your


English language studies outside the classroom.

Films from Britain and USA Every Thursday at 6.30 pm

Membership 10 per year


Entrance

Fee

[1.50

0150/2 Jun06

the inlormalion I lhink you'll nee or Lhe repor\. We have 3O membere an ueually beLween 20 an 25 lurn uV each week. We've ehown len ilms each f,erm, 5o far we have manaqe No cover caole, bu only jueL. The club could o wilh more membere - whal abou offerin4 a free lrial Verio or oinq eome exlra publicil'y?
Here'6
FelVe

Comments from students 6.30 is a bad time - we con't eot in the cofeteria ond get therefor the stort. l've enjoyed the films but haven't made many friends.

/'

I've learnt a lot about Britain and the USA but we are an international college!

I know people who would

like to come occasionally, What about a discussion after each film? It's not much of a club really.

but not every week,

Now write your report for the committee members as outlined on page 2 (approximately 250 words). You should use your own words as far as possible.

[Turn over

Part2
Choose one of the following writing tasks. Your answer should follow exacly the instructions given. Write approximately 250 words.

You have seen this announcement in an international magazine.

Decisions
The decisions we make every day can have an important effect on our lives. What's the best decision you have ever made? We would like you, our readers, to rvrite an article telling us: . why it rvas your best decision . what other options you had . what could have happened if you had made a different decision. We

will publish

the best arricle.

Write your article.

Your friend has just applied for


environmental advice to companies.

a new job with an international

organisation that offers

The organisation has asked you to wrte a character reference for your friend:

. ' ' 4

describing his or her personal strengths and skills summarising his or her experience with environmental issues expressing your opinion about his or her suitability for the job.

Write your reference.


You see this announcement in a TV magazine.
Reality shows, where people are filmed going about their real lives or in a competitive situation, are becoming increasingly popular on television, But what do viewers really think of them? Please write a review of a reality TV show you have watched, You should:

. . .

give your opinion about the show suggest why you think the participants agreed to take part say why you think people watch this programme.

Write your review.

Your manager has identified a company in Britain which may be interested in importing your company's products. You have been asked to write a letter to the manager of the British co,ip"ny. Your letter should:

' ' .

describe your company's products including their qualities and special features outline the advantages for the British company of importing your products suggest a follow-up meeting.

Write your letter.You do not need to include postal addresses.


01

50/2 Jun06

Centre Candidate Name

Number

Candidate Number

UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE ESOL EXAMINATIONS

English for Speakers of Other Languages

CERTIFICATE IN ADVANCED ENGLISH

0150/3
t
hour 30 minutes

3 English in Use Wednesday 14 JUNE 2006


PAPER
Additional materials: Answer sheet

Afternoon

TIME t hour 30 minutes


INSTRUCTIONS TO CANDIDATES

Do not open this booklet untilyou are told to do so. Write your name, Centre number and candidate number in the spaces at the top of this page and on the answer sheet unless this has already been done for you. There are six parts to this paper, containing a total of 80 questions.You are required to complete all six parts. For each question write your answer on the separate answer sheet. Write clearly in pencil in the numbered spaces provided.
You may write on the question paper if you wish, but you must transfer your answers to the separate answer sheet within the time limit.

At the end of the examination, you should hand in both the question paper and the answer sheet. INFORMATION FOR CANDIDATES Each question carries one mark.

This question paper consists of 9 printed pages and 3 blank pages.


sP (sLM/CGW) T01150/3 O UCLES 2006
1 00/2033/0 Level 2 Certificate in English (ESOL)

[Turn over

Part I
For questions 1-15, read the text below and then decide which answer on page 3 best fits each space. lndicate your answers on the separate answer sheet. The exercise begins with an example (0).
)
:.."' :'C:

Example:

"':a:t::!:.','.'., B 'f::::t...J:.t:i:

Dinosaur

discoveries f
\\

\*'--

/-fr

-)r.ri, ___(!iJ_))_

,',-

q--

ln the late 1930s, a group of (0)..... American scientists seeking dinosaur fossils made

some (1)..... finds, Although one of their expeditions discovered no bones at all, it
nonetheless (2) .....to be important in terms of the information about dinosaurs it provided.

During that historic expedition, which took place along the (3)..... of the Paluxy river in
Texas, something extraordinary was revealed: a dinosaur track, clearly {41 ..... in the rock.

These dinosaur footprints (5)..... their preservation to the salts and mud that covered
them and then hardened into rock, before (6) ..... to light 100 million years later. Tracks like

these are (71..... to experts. There have been great gaps in scientists' understanding of
dinosaur (8) ..... , and so such footprints are useful since they provide direct (9) .....of how dinosaurs actually moved. Scientists have been able to use these footprints, and others like them, to (f 0)..... how quickly different species walked, and to conclude that many
kinds of dinosaur must have travelled in (11) ......

{12')

..... , the tracks of four-legged dinosaurs seem to (13)..... that in spite of being

reptiles, these creatures must have moved in a very similar way to living mammals, such

as elephants

- a pattern of movement (14)..... from that of most contemporary reptiles,

such as crocodiles. This leads to an intrlguing question. Might existing mammals have
more to teach us about the (15) ..... reptiles that once walked the earth?

015013

Jun06

0 A

primary

B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B

dominant

leading

D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D

principal

1 A noteworthy 2 A turned 3 A verges 4 A blatant 5Aowe 6 A coming 7 A unique 8 A action I A basis 10 A make up 11 A sets 12 A Accordingly 13 A point 14 A separate 15 A abolished

C C arose C borders C substantial C derive C bringing C invaluable C manners C support C determine C herds Characteristically C C specify C unconnected C departed
noticeable

notifiable proved coasts distinguishable result appearing costly behaviour source

notional occurred banks ostensible thank surfacing


rare

customs evidence reflect bunches Alternatively indicate distinct extinguished

weigh up
masses lnterestingly express detached extinct

01

50/3 Jun06

[Turn over

Parl2
For questions 16-30, complete the following article by writing each missing word in the correct box on your answer sheet. Use only one word for each space. The exercise begins with an example (0).

Example:

O lour

t0 Ir--rfl
The best books

Are there one thousand books that all of us should read sometime in (0) ..... lives? Throughout this year, we will be recommending a collection of books that, when taken (16) .....a whole, will form a library of 1,000 titles that will inspire and satisfy (17) ..... kind of reader imaginable. Book
lists appear from tme to time, often arousng controversy (18) ..... being too elitist or too populist. But our list is the result of consultations with bookbuyers and booksellers, people (1g) ..... know

and love books.

Currently, there are well (20) ..... a million books in print. Add (21) ..... these yet another 100,000

books published each year and the choice for readers becomes bewildering, (22)..... certain books, both classics and contemporary works, stand out. While our list doesn't identify classics (23) .....the traditional sense, many of the works included (241 .....considered to be classic books.

The list aims to make the reader aware of (25)..... is available that is stimulating, rewarding

and inspiring. (26) ..... else does one learn about a good read other {271 .....by enthusiastlc
recommendation?

This month we are highlighting fifty books from the area of business and reference. These fifty titles represent the perfect busness and reference library for your needs, (28)..... personal or
professional. Our selection will help you to expand and enhance (29) ..... understanding of today's fast-changing world of business.

Look out for next month's fifty choices, (30) ..... will take you a step nearer completion of your
1,000-book library.

0150/3 Jun06

Part 3 ln most lines of the following text, there is either a spelling or a punctuation error. For each numbered line 3f-46, write the correctly spelt word or show the correct punctuation in the box on your answer sheet. Some lines are correct. lndicate these lines with a tick (/) in the box. The exercise begins with three examples (0), (00) and (000).

Example:

0 00

several
valcnOeS;,,wth

.1,1..;,,,

f--l

{l

r ,.:.r1

,,f---*1

:t..., ,,

00

f_-_l

,,,,

000 ,/.

,r..,.,

-tr ,009...,,,, f-_], f--l

The volcanoes of Hawaii

0 00 000 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46

The Hawaiian island chain in the centre of the Pacific consists of severel
volcanoes with the active ones at the south-eastern tip of the archipelago.

The largest island is Hawaii itself, which is the site of two major active
volcanoes. The volcanoes, protected as a national state park are crucial for several types of agricultur. When volcanic ash cools and is exposed to weathering, it is converted into exceptionaly fertile soil. The Hawaiians utilise it for one of their main agricultural exports pineapples. The island

of Lanai comprises a single plateau, containing the worlds largest


pineapple plantation. The continual volcanic activity is also a major atraction for the hordes of tourists flocking to the area to see Hawaii's various spectacular geological marvels. But isn't it rather dangerous for them to do this Actually, a daily rumble is the least of the problems assosciated with volcanoes.
Far more worrying are thick clouds of volcanic ash or flows of lava, like those

that smothered the ancient roman city of Herculaneum, pouring down from

the mountainside in the night with a distructive, and totally unexpected, force.
Fortunately, Hawaii rarely witnesses such frightning occurrences. Jill Brooke, a leading expert in volcanoes, recently said, Hawaii experiences

thousands'of eruptions each year, but most are so small that they can only be
detected by sensitive instruments. There will eventually be a huge one, but it is almost impossible to predict when it will happenJ

O1

50/3 JunO6

[Turn over

Parl4
For questions 47-61, read the two texts on pages 6 and 7. Use the words in the boxes to the right of the texts to form one word that fits in the same numbered space in the text. Write the new word in the correct box on your answer sheet. The exercise begins with an example (0).

Example:

0::l ifrCshmnt

. $' "' . r-=.f-_l


.11'

MAGAZINE ARTICLE

Tea
Tea is a favourite hot drink, especially on chilly winter

(0)
(47) (48)

REFRESH

days, but you can also enjoy it in the summer served ice-cold with lemon. However, it is possible a daily cup of tea has more to EXTEND offer than instant (0) ..... . ln fact, scientists are only just beginning to understand its (47) ..... . This is because COMPLEX

(4e) (50)

HARM

(48) .....scientific research has proved that tea contains


RELTEF

naturally occurring substances called flavenoids, which help to limit the (49) .....chemicals produced in our bodies. lt has also long been believed that tea can

(51) ALERT (52) ABSENT

(50) .....pain and improve mental (51) ..... . ln addition,


the (52) ..... of any additives makes tea 100% natural. lt is also a great (53) .....of fluid for people of all ages.

(53)

PROVTDE

01

50/3 Jun06

NEWSPAPER ARTICLE

Two great drivers


Michael Schumacher's opponents are usually pounded into

(54) .....by the merciless pace which is at the heart of his talent. lf he ever loses ground, it's invariably because he's pushed

(54)

SUBMTT

(55) COMMENT
himself too hard. Most sports (55) ..... reckon that the key to his

success is his superb level of fitness, an asset which (56) .....


him to operate at the outer extremes of physical possibility.

(56) ABLE

(57)
ln contrast, many of Juan Pablo Montoya's moves are (57) .....

DRAMA

(58) (59)

PHENOMENON

daring, and only possible for someone with perfect judgement.


MENTAL He has a (58) ..... feel for the car, and also a good racing

(59) ..... . He's known to be a winner and looks confident, which gives the impression that he is totally (60) ......Yet this

(60) (61)

BEAT

TNTUTTTON

characteristic has a downside. lt's an (61) .....trait which can let


him down.

O1

5O/3 Jun06

[Turn over

I
Part 5

For questions 62-74, read the leaflet about a campsite. Use the information in it to complete the numbered gaps in the email to a friend. The words you need do not occur in the leaflet. Use no more than two words for each gap. The exercise begins with an example (0). Example: 0',I.,'pit.of
1:;:;'.,.'..$ .'.,:.'

r r-r

LEAFLET

Wellington Campsite
The campsite, set in the grounds of a former country estate, is located on the fringes of woodland, with a picturesque lake only a bicycle ride away. The campsite was first opened in
1950, and has expanded snce then to double its initial size.

Outdoor activities, laid on by a team of enthusiastic young instructors, are always in high demand. By reserving a place on two activities, you can enjoy a third at 50o/o discount. Essential equipment may be rented but please note that campers use it at their own risk. The open-air heated swimming pool is open daily, but children taking advantage of this facility must
be supervised at all times. Dogs are allowed on the campsite, but they must be exercised off the campsite area. Cycling is

permitted on the pathways, but not on the lawned area or in the vicinity of the tents.
Every effort is made to meet requests for neighbouring ptches for families travelling together;

but there is no guarantee that this will be possible.

EMAIL
Hi, Janet!

I've just found a great campsite. lt used to be (0) ..... an estate on the (62) ..... of some woods and

we can easily cycle to a lake from there. Apparently, the campsite was started in 1950 and now
it's (63) ..... big as it was originally. Your children will love the outdoor activities (64) ..... staff at the
campsite. These activities are very (65) .....so we need to put our names down for them in advance.

lf we (66) ..... two activities, the third is (67) ..... . We (68) .....any equipment we need, but it's our
responsibility if we (69) ..... ourselves. There's also a swimming pool - but we mustn't let the children

out of (70) .....there. And your dog can come too


outside the campsite.

as long as you don't mind taking him (71) .....

We're taking our bikes

if we don't go on the grass and we (72) ..... from other tents, we can use

them. Another good thing is that they promise they will (73) .....get us pitches (741 ..... each other.

0150/3 Jun06

I
Part 6
For questions 75-80, read the following text and then choose from the list A-l given below the best phrase to fill each of the spaces. lndicate your answers on the separate answer sheet. Each correct phrase may only be used once. Some of the suggested answers do not fit at all.

Counting penguins!
Scientists in the South Atlantic have developed an alternative way to track penguins:they now
count the birds by giving them supermarket-style electronic tags. The aim of their work there is

to examine the factors (75) .....and how numbers relate to environmental change.

At present, there are about 2.5 million breeding pairs of Macaroni penguins on Bird lsland

in South Georgia, but long{erm monitoring studies show the numbers may have halved
since 1978. Researchers from the British Antarctic Survey have been studying the penguins
throughout this time, (76) ..... . Weighing the birds has been an important part of the research,

giving data on how regularly and effectively they feed. However, the traditional method of
weighing penguins, by picking them up, putting them in a bag and using a hand-held balance,

is now seen as

(771

.....in what is a harsh environment. lt can also be disturbing for the

penguins. So the team has worked with a consultant design engineer on (78) ..... . The birds

are given an individual supermarket-style electronic tag, attached to a plastic ankle ring. A
special weighbridge has also been constructed

painted with the intention of (79) .....

- and it

has been placed on the birds'route to and from ther colony. Every time a tagged bird crosses the weighbridge, the tag is electronically read, (80) ..... . This weighbridge has proved to be of
great assistance to the scientists.

A B C D E F G H I

leading them to the steady decline helping it to blend in with its surroundings using up too much time and labour having a certain negative influence on all those allowing specified information to be recorded analysing the results in anY waY affecting penguin populations developing a different, less intimidating technique attempting to discover why their numbers are declining

0150/3 Jun06

UNIVERSITY o/ CAMB RIDGE


ESO[, Examinations

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Centre Candidate Name

Number

Candidate Number

UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE ESOL EXAMINATIONS

English for Speakers of Other Languages

CERTIFICATE IN ADVANCED ENGLISH


PAPER t

015014, 01 5114
Test A
Approx.45 minutes

Listening

JUNE 2006
Additional materials: Answer sheet

TIME

Approx.45 minutes

INSTRUCTIONS TO CANDIDATES Do not open this booklet until you are told to do so.

Write your name, Centre number and candidate number in the spaces at the top of this page and on the answer sheet unless this has already been done for you. Answer all questions.
You should write your answers in the spaces provided on the question paper.You will have ten minutes

at the end to transfer them to the separate answer sheet. At the end of the examination, you should hand in both the question paper and the answer sheet. INFORMATION FOR CANDIDAES

This paper requires you to listen to a selection of recorded material and answer the accompanying
questions.

There are four parts to the test. You will hear Part 2 once only. All the other parts of the test will be heard twice. There will be a pause before each part to allow you to look through the questions, and other pauses to let you think about your answers.

This question paper consists of 6 printed pages and 2 blank pages.


sP (cw)T02369/1
@ UCLES 2006
1 00/2033/0 Level 2 Certificate in English (ESOL)

[Turn over

Part

You will hear part of a radio programme about the fashion designer Nik Hojin. For questions 1-g, complete the sentences.
You will hear the recording twice.

FASHION DESIGNER

On the walls of Nik's studio there are photos,


1

and samples of material.

Nik was first employed as a designer of

and

clothing.

Nik now designs menswear for a company internationally known for the 3

clothes it produces.

Nik's first destination on his trip is


4
,

where he will visit textile mills.

Nik's job is to check both standards of

in the mills and the quality of products.

Nik found out that his company had placed an order for 6

metres of cotton.

The mills use what's known as a


v,

to check for faults in the shirt material.

Nik's company sees his visits to garment factories as a good form of

0'l 5o/4 TA Juno6

Parl2
You will hear a guide talking to tourists about a prehistoric site called Santara. For questions g-16, complete the sentences.

Listen very carefully as you will hear the recording ONCE only.

THE PREHISTORIC SITE OF SANTARA

The settlement of Santara is situated on a

I
10

, near a nver.

There is a total of

types of tree in the gardens.

The wetland area supplied a herb which

rl1

find useful.

An expert in

12

usually accompanies groups of visitors around the Exhibition Pavilion.

The guide recommends what he calls the


13

section to the tourists.

The site is described as being in an excellent

14

position.

The artefacts found locally belonged to


15 , who inhabited the area for many years.

There are experts available to demonstrate methods of


16

and weaving cloth.

01

50/4 TA Jun06

[Turn over

Part 3
You will hear a radio interview in which two people, Frank Johnson and Anna Pritchard, are discussing education in Britain. For questions 17-22, choose the correct answer A, B, C or D. You will hear the recording twice.
i'']:T tt

t?

What does Frank Johnson suggest about current teaching methods?

A B C D |-!1_l

They help teachers get their message across in an amusing way' They result in teachers losing sight of their main professional tasks.
They allow students a necessary break from serious study.

They encourage parental involvement in the educational process.

According to Frank, what is the key to a good education?

A B C D

promoting traditional skills through creativity developing general knowledge through linguistic ability ensuring the accuracy of what is taught enabling students to acquire reasoning powers

El

Anna Pritchard thinks that, in the average school today,

A B C D
tt

most teachers adopt satisfactory teaching methods.

there is an insufficient variety of classroom activities.


most teachers adapt their methods to suit different learners. there are too many students per class for teachers to deal with.

I tl

eO

How does Anna think schools should change their approach?

A B C D

by helping students to investigate the ways in which they learn by allowing students to choose precisely what they want to learn by letting students play music in the background during class by encouraging students to talk through their ideas in class

01

50/4 TA Jun06

r- -*l

El

Anna thinks that activties suctr as iugtgling can be beneficial because they

A B C D
It12

can impro'e students'pttfsi{al balance. make

stL#tts

more receptive to what they study.

help students rdax after concentrating hard. promote awareness of physical fitness.

Anna thinks that note-taking activities should be

A B C D

varied according to topic. replaced by other activities. adjusted to suit each student. checked carefully for inaccuracies.

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CAE June 2006 (0150) CAE PAPER 4 LISTENING TEST A

Part

Fashion Designer
When I visited the designer Nik Hojin, he was in his studio at the top of a building in central Tokyo. He was surrounded by racks of clothes, and cutting and sewing machines; but the piece of equipment that dominated the room was a huge drawing table. The walls were covered from floor to ceiling with sketches, fabric samples and photographs of collections. There was no room to sit so we stood drinking coffee while he talked about his work. After an early career in Europe designing sports clothing and beach clothing, Nik was recruited by a company in Tokyo that made casual clothing for young people. However, within a few months of arriving in Japan, he left that job and joined the design team of Japan's most popular store group, who have a world reputation for outdoor clothing. But when they appointed him chief desgner of their formal menswear department, he wasn't sure whether he was going to like this change of direction; and though it has its compensations, he's still getting used to a completely different type of working life because there's a lot of travel involved. Nik is shortly off to do a tour of some specialist textile mills in Canada, followed by a visit to the USA to his company's main supplier of leather for coats and jackets. His job in the mills is to order cloth, and check its quality; but also to look at other aspects of the manufacturing process. His company is very strict about safety standards. He has to make sure no dangerous chemicals are used in the manufacture of the fabrics, and that the shirt cotton is given a flame-proof finish. On his first trip to the suppliers, Nik was impressed to discover that his company had ordered 7 million metres of cotton - an increase of 2.5 million over the previous year. An inspection team checks every metre of cloth for faults as soon as it leaves the weaving machines, by passing it over the brilliantly lit glass of a piece of equipment called a 'light box'. Though it's not strictly his area of responsibility, Nik also visits the factories that manufacture the garments. The company likes everybody who's in the region to do this as an exercise in public relations. lt's pleasant for both suppliers and clients to get to know each other socially. Nik described his first visit to the factory, and the satisfaction it gave him to see his clothes being made.

workshop with a new picture of a fashion designer, as someone who's extremely practical and down to earth, as well as creative. Later 1...
Part Two

I left Nik's

Prehistoric Site
ls everybody here? Right. Good morning to you all. Today we're going to be visiting the settlement of Santara. And here we are on the hillside, looking down the slope to a beautiful river which flows through the valley, past the ancient site. ln fact, it was this river, once called Santara, that gave the site its name. On our journey, we'll be travelling back to prehistoric times in these mysterious, unspoilt surroundings. And we'll be finding out just how significant this site was. First of all, we'll walk through the gardens, where we'll find over 300 species of rare flower and 112 species of tree from Europe and elsewhere. Seventeen of these trees are of particular interest for one reason or another, and I'll point these out as we go.

CAE June 2006 (0150) Our next stop is an outstanding area for observing wild flora and fauna. lt's an area of wetland, which was originally used as a source of a certain herb, which fishermen collected to keep their fish fresh until they were ready to cook them. Actually, this herb is still being used for this purpose today. At the foot of the hill over there, we'll find the Exhibition Pavilion, which houses ten major exhibits showing the development of human habitation in the area. Visitors in groups are generally taken round these exhibits by a social history expert. Of course, anyone who prefers to explore the pavilion individually can do so, but they should remember to follow the chronological sequence of the displays: in other words, follow the thread of history down through the ages. Now my favourite part of Santara is the reconstruction section. There, we'll find three dwellings from different periods of the past. They haven't been reconstructed on the actual sites where they were found - but they are based on the findings of excavation in the vicinity. I particularly like this section because it brings the past to life in a very dramatic, realistic way. Anyway, after that, we're going to go on a trail which takes us round the entire site. What made this site so desirable to people in the past was its perfect defensive position. The trail shows quite clearly the important defensive ditch which was dug out to protect the site further.

The artefacts discovered on the site, and nearby, prove that the area was occupied by Roman settlers over two thousand years ago, soon after their conquest of the country.
Our final visit will be to the demonstration area, where you can see expert technicians at work people who have studied the methods that the ancient people used for building boats and weaving cloth, for example. ln the school terms, children come to the riverside workshops to learn some of these ancient crafts; and, as you can imagine, it's a very popular activity. Now if you have any questions ... Part Three

Education lssues

lnterviewer: Today our thoughts turn to education. Schools have come a long way since our great-grandparents' time, but have they come far enough? Or is the British
education system still essentially rooted in the nineteenth century? To discuss this,

we have Dr Anna Pritchard from the Association for Progressive Learning, and Frank Johnson from the Society for the Promotion of Authentic Education. Frank, may we start with you? What does your organisation promote?
Frank:

Well, basically we press for higher standards and more parental choice in state education. We're not against experimentation, but we think that if you look at the research, it shows that the traditional methods work best. Whilst all the approaches that are in fashion now may seem great fun, we suspect that they're just another distraction and not what teachers should be doing or what parents and employers
want them to do.

lnterviewer: And how would you define what teachers should be doing?
Frank:

ln our view, traditional subjects such as Maths, Classical History and Latin and Ancient Greek have always promoted thinking skills, and that's what education should be concerned with developing. A good teacher gives his or her pupils a foundation of knowledge, and by using that knowledge the pupil automatically learns how to think rationally and precisely. lt's essential to have that solid foundation before you can indulge in higher order thinking skills.

CAE June 2006 (0150)


lnterviewer:

So, good teachers have always inspired learning skills in their pupils and there's no need to find new learning methods. Anna, would you like to respond to that?

Anna:

Well, I believe that good teachers have always known that in a class of say 30 students there will be a variety of different learning styles. We organised a survey
of young people themselves in January of this year and found that 56% said that the activity they spend most time doing in the classroom is copying from the board or a book. So clearly not all teachers are gearing their teaching to different learning styles...

Frank:

I wouldn't agree with you on that. (interrupting)

Anna:

Well, coming to our main project 'Learning to Learn', what new research from the States tells us is that there are at least eight different types of intelligence, from the 'people person' who needs to talk in order to take things in, to the 'musical person' who needs sound and rhythm as a backdrop to thinking.

lnterviewer:

So we shouldn't stop teenagers from having music on full blast while they're
supposedly doing their homework?

Anna:

It's not quite as simple as that. Music will help some but not all students. What we're advocating is that schools encourage students to explore for themselves the ways in which their brains work most effectively, and build up a classroom culture where they get a chance to choose their own style of learning.
Can you give us some examples of how teachers would do that?

lnterviewer: Anna:

One interesting way which I saw demonstrated earlier this week is to hold juggling workshops.

Frank:

Juggling! we're surely not teaching students to be circus performers, are we?
Believe me, there's a very serious side to this. when you're juggling, in order to keep three balls in the air, you have to use both the left and right sides of the brain, the logical and artistic sides. ln the schools I visited, the juggling workshop was integrated into a day of revision skills of all types. For those with a physical intelligence, juggling can prove helpful, as can physical workout sessions. You see, gymnastics can be useful for all students, as it alleviates stress and improves concentration. Afterwards, most students say they feel different, more awake and more likely to take in what they learn.

Anna:

Frank:

lf I can come in briefly here. The idea of turning education into a set of skills is very dangerous because it undermines the knowledge and content which are inherent in the traditional school subjects.
I take your point but I used to sit in lessons and look around and everybody's head

lnterviewer:

was down writing notes. That's not good education practice surely? Anna:

Note-taking is still important. There are lots of different ways from mind mapping to drawing cartoons. I saw a student the other day who was writing his history notes inside a large drawing of a chicken. A chicken! He was having you on!

Frank:

GAE June 2006 {0150) Anna:

I don't think so. ln fact, he'd completely replaced traditional note-taking with this way of recording for all his subjects. He said that by giving his notes an unusual framework, it helped him to remember the content for that topic. We need to be helping students find their best way to keep records, according to ther intelligence and learning style. This particular student obviously had a visual intelligence.

Frank:

I really can't believe training here.

that.

But anyway, I think we're confusing education with

Anna:

We're building up a theoretical understanding of how people learn and it's our duty as educationalists to try and put that theory into practice.

lnterviewer: There we'll have to leave it, I'm afraid ...


Pa Four

Gruise Ship Experiences


SPEAKER
1

I'd always wanted to go, and with the discount they were offering it seemed silly to miss the opportunity, although money was no object at the time. I suppose it was cheaper at that time of year. But we thought that was an advantage because it meant there would be fewer noisy children around. Anyway, the real bonus was the numerous stopovers - a bit like having several holidays together. I knew I couldn't resist that! Actually, everything turned out to be comfortable enough, but I have to say that the meals got a bit repetitive and rather tasteless. That was the real let down. I'd try a different company next tme because of that.
SPEAKER 2

Well, it was marvellous really. Exactly what we'd been wanting. I mean, we didn't pay much attention to the night-life, just took things easy. lt was worth every penny it cost, just to be able to sit around in our cabin, especially on the little balcony we had, very nicely arranged it was, as good as a smart hotel room. I'd always liked the idea of a trip with everything laid on for you, so you could enjoy doing nothing in particular. There were quite a few families there, which I hadn't expected, but I suppose it's great fun for them.
SPEAKER 3

Mm, even better than we'd hoped! lt really is the best kind of holiday. All that fresh air! Well, it's true there isn't a great deal going on during the day, but then I was quite content to sunbathe the hours away or just relax in my cabin. The great thing was that, whenever you thought you might rather like a drink or whatever, there always seemed to be a waiter on hand, perfect, as if they could read your mind! We went hoping just to have as good a time as we had when we went before, but this one was even better... you almost didn't want to get to the ports and go ashore!

SPEAKER 4

Yes, I'm pleased we went. lt wasn't something that we'd ever planned to do really ... maybe just imagined we might go if we came into any money, or whatever, some day! But my colleague Nick and his wife went, and they said how sociable the atmosphere was, and that clinched it. And, it turned out to be just that. One thing we all had in common was complaning about the way dnner was served at exactly the same time every evening, which seemed strange. lt was far too early for

CAE June 2006 (0150)

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Good morning (afternoon/evening). My name is ...... and this is my colleague, ...... And your names are?

Can I have your mark sheets, please?


Thank you.

First of all, we'd like to know a little about you.


(select one or two questions and ask candidaes in turn, as appropriate.)

Where do you live? What do you do here/there? How long have you been studying English? What other languages have you studied?

Now I'd like you to ask each other something about


(Select one or two prompts in any order, as appropriate.)

your interests and leisure activities. what makes this country different from other countries.
places you have visited in this country. things you hope to achieve in the future.

(Ask candidates one or more

further questions in any order, as appropriate.)

o . . r .

What have you enjoyed most about studying English? What interesting things have you done recenfly?
How would you feel about going to live abroad permanenily?

What important events have happened in your life recenfly? What are your earliest memories of school?

Thank you.

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Test Material 3

lnterlocutor

ln this part of the test, l'm going to give each of you the chance to talk for about a minute, and to comment briefly after your partner has spoken. First, you will each have the same set of pictures to look at. They show meetings in different situations. Hond over the some set of pictures to each candidate.
(Candidate A), rt's your turn first. I'd like you to compare and contrast these pictures, saying why the people might be in these situations, and what the results of the meetings might be.

Don't forget, you have about one minute for this.

All right? So, (Candidate A),would you start now, please? Gandidate

A S ApproximatelTt s11s minute. lnterlocutor Thank you.


Now, (Candidate B), can you tell us which situation you think is the most unusua?

Candidate

Approximately tweny seconds.

Retrieve pictures.

lnterlocutor
4.

Thank you.

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lnterlocutor

Now, l'm going to give each of you another set of pictures to look at. They show natural materials being used in artistic ways. Hand over the same set of pictttres to each candidate. Now, (Canddate B), it's your turn. l'd like you to compare and contrast these pictures, saying how difficult it might be to use natural materials in this way, and how effective you think the results are. Don't forget, you have about one mnute for this.

All right? So, (Canddate B),would you start now, please?

Candidate

B ffi Approximately lnterlocutor Thank you.

one minute.

Now, (Candidate A), can you tell us which picture you think shows the most effective use of natural materials?

Candidate

ffi

Approximately tu,enty seconds.

Retrieve pictures.

lnterlocutor

Thank you.

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PARTS 3',nd
24. Life in the 21st centur!

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(Discuss, evaluate and select)

TSt Matrial,24

lnterlocutor

Now, I'd like you to discuss something between/among yourselves, but please speak so that we can hear you. Here are some pictures which have been chosen to appear in an exhibition entitled 'Life in the 21st Century'.
Place picture sheet 24

infront of the candidates.

Talk to each other about what positive and negative aspects of life in the 21st century these pictures show, and then decide which two pictures should be used to advertise the exhibition.

You have about four minutes for this. (Six minutes for groups of three.)

Candidates ffi Approximatelyfour

minutes.

(Six minutesfor groups of three.)

lnterlocutor

Thankyou.
So, which two pictures have you chosen?
Retrieve picture sheet 24.

lnterlocutor

Select any of the following questions as appropriate:

What do you consider to be one of the most exciting things about living in the 21st century? (Why?)
Do you feel that we rely too much on technology nowadays? (Why (not)?)

Some people say that we have lost a sense of what is really important in life. What's your opinion?
lf you could live in a different period of history, which would you choose? (Why?)

Some people say that we have gone too far in trying to control the world we live in. What's your view?

Thank you. That is the end of the test.


Check that

oll test materials have been replaced in the file.

L--

CAE June 2006 (0150)


MARK SCHEMES and ASSESSMENT CRITERIA Paper
Pa
1

l:

Reading
Part 4: Coral Reefs

l: Building a Dream
D

25D
26 27 28 29
30
31

2 3 4

c c
B

A
E

c
D

5A 6C 7B 8A
9 10
11

c
A
D
B

32

c
A A

33 34 35 36 37
3B

c
E B

12

A
D

13

A
D B

Part2: Big Band


14

39 40
41

c
E

15 16
17
1B

c
F

42
43

A
B

A
B E

44

19

45

Part

3: Lights, camera, action man

20c 21 A 228 23D 244

One mark is given for each conect answer to the multiple-matching tasks; two marks are given for each correct answer to the multiple-choice and the gapped-text tasks. The total score is then weighted to 40 marks for the whole of the Reading Paper.

CAE June 2006 (0150)


MARK SCHEMES and ASSESSMENT CRITERIA Paper 1: Reading
Pa
1

: Building a Dream
D

Pa 4: Coral Reefs

25D
26 27
2B

2 3 4 5 6 7

c c
B

A
E

c
D

29
30
31

c
B

A
D B

BA 9C 104 1',1 A 124 13D


Part2: Big Band

32

33 34 35 36 37 38 39

c
E B

A
D
B

14G 15C 16F 174 188 19E


Part

40
41

c
E

42
43

A
B

44

45

3: Lights,

camera, action man

2AC 21 A 228 23D 244

One mark is given for each correct answer to the multiple-matching tasks; two marks are given for each correct answer to the multiple-choice and the gapped-text tasks. The total score is then weighted to 40 marks for the whole of the Reading Paper.

GAE June 2006 (0150) Paper 3: English in Use


(One mark for each correct answer)

Part

1A 2C 3D 4C 5A 6A 7B BC 9D 108 11 12C 13D 14D 15C


Part 2
16 17
1B

Part 4
47 48 49
50
51

52 53 54 55 56 57
5B

59
60
61

complexity/com plexities extensive harmful relieve alertness absence provider submission commentators enables dramatically phenomenal mentality unbeatable intuitive

Part 5
AS

62
63 64 65 66

19

20
21

22

every/any for/by who/that over to yeVbut/although/thou gh


in

67
68 69 70
71

23
24

25 26 27 28
29 30

are what How/how than whether your which

72 73 74

edge twice as run by/organised by popular book half price can hire hurVharm/injure (our)sight for walks/walking/on walks keep away/stay away try to/attempt to/try and next to/close to/near (to)

Part 3

Part 6
park, are agriculture

3't 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46/

exceptionally exports, pineapples world's attraction

./

75G 76 77C 78H 798 80E

this? associated

./

Roman destructive frightening 'Hawaii thousands

N.B. The mark scheme for Part 5 may be expanded with other appropriate answers.

CAE June 2006 (0150)


Paper 4: Listening

TEST A

(One mark for each correct answer)

Pa 1: Fashion Designer
1

2 3

sketches sport(s) / beach

4 5 6 7

outdoor Canada safety 7 (seven) million / 7,000,000 light (-) box public relations / PR

Paft2: Santara
9
10
11

slope
112

I one hundred and twelve

12 13 14 15

16

fishermen history reconstruction defensive Romans building boats

Pa 3: Education lssues
17
1B

19

B D B

20
21

A
B

22

Pa 4: Cruise Ship Experiences

30c 3't E
32H
The total mark for the paper is adjusted to 40 to give the required weighting in the examination as a whole.

23D 248 25F 26E 274 288 29G

CAE June 2006 (0150)


Paper 2: Writing An impression mark out of 5 is awarded to each answer; examiners work within and across the bands assessing language and task achievement.

The general impression mark scheme is used in conjunction with a task-specific mark scheme, which focuses on criteria specific to each particular task, including relevance, length, omissions, specific language/vocabulary, and layout (following the conventions of writing letters, reports, etc. is
part of the task achievement). The criteria for assessment with reference to the general mpression mark scheme are summarised as follows:

GENERAL IMPRESSION MARK SCHEME

Very positive effect on target reader, minimal errors: resourceful, controlled and natural use of
language, showing good range of vocabulary and structure. Task fully completed, with good use of cohesive devices; consistently appropriate register. No relevant omissions. N.B. Not necessarily a flawless performancel

Sufficiently natural, errors only when more complex language attempted. Some evidence of range of

vocabulary and structure. Good realisation

of task, only minor omissions. Attention paid

to

organisation and cohesion; register usually appropriate. Positive effect on target reader achieved.

Either (a) task reasonably achieved, accuracy of language satisfactory and adequate range of vocabulary and range of structures or (b) an ambitious attempt at the task, causing a number of nonimpeding errors, but a good range of vocabulary and structure demonstrated. There may be minor omissions, but content clearly organised. Would achieve the required effect on the target reader.
Some attempt at task but lack of expansion and/or notable omissions/irrelevancies. Noticeable lifting of language from the input, often inappropriately. Errors sometimes obscure communication and/or language is too elementary for this level. Content not clearly organised. Would have a negative effect on target reader.

Serious lack of control and/or frequent basic errors. Narrow range of language. lnadequate attempt at
1

task. Very negative effect on target reader.

Either

a) Fewer than 50 words per question b) Totally illegible work c) Total irrelevance (often a previously prepared answer to a different question)

lrrelevance
and Omissions: These will vary from question to question: consult task-specific markscheme. American spelling acceptable but there should be consistency. Poor spelling penalised by a one-band reduction if it interferes with communication.

Spelling: Handwriting: Length:

Work which is difficult to read is penalised by


depending on degree of illegibility.

a one- or

possibly two-band reduction

Specific number of words used is not taken into account (except as above under Band 0). Length is an integral part of task achievement. Significantly fewer words are likely to mean that the task has not been completed. Over-long pieces of writing may involve irrelevance or have a negative effect on the target reader. lf this is the case, over-length will be penalised.

Layout:

Following the conventions of writing letters, reports and instructions is part of task achievement. Any acceptable modern layout for a formal letter may be used. Paragraphs
should be clearly laid out, either by indenting or by leaving a space between each paragraph.

CAE June 2006 (0150)


ln Part 2, candidates have more scope to display ther linguistic competence and there is more latitude in the interpretation of the task. Ihe assessment focus is mainly on content, range, and style/register, with attention paid to how successfully the candidate has produced the text type required.

Question 2 Content: (points covered)

Decisions
For Band 3 or above, the candidate's

Question 3 Content: (points covered)

Environmental Reference
For Band 3 or above, the candidate's

aicle must:

reference must:

. . .

explain why decision was good outline other options describe what might have happened if decision had been different.

. . .

describe personal skills summariseenvironmental


experiences express opinion on suitability.

Organisation
and

Clearly organised in paragraphs.

Organisation
and

Clearly organised.

Cohesion:
Range:
Language of explanation and hypothesis. May mix registers if appropriate to approach taken by candidate.

Cohesion:
Range:
Language of description and opinion.

Register: Target Reader: Question 4 Content: (points covered)

Register: Target Reader: Question 5 Content: (points covered)

Unmarked to formal.

Would be informed.

Would be informed. New Trade Offer


For Band 3 or above, the candidate's

Reality TV Shows
For Band 3 or above, the candidate's

review must:

letter must:

r . .

give opinion of the show suggest a reason for participants' agreement to take part say why people watch the programme.

. . .

describe company's products, including their qualities and specal features outline the advantages to the British company of importing your products suggest a meeting.

NB 1"t and 2"d bullets likely to be


embedded.

Organisation
and

Clearly organised in paragraphs. Letter format acceptable.

Organisation
and

Cohesion:

Letter format with appropriate opening and closing formulae" Clear organisation with appropriate paragraphing. Early reference to reason for writing. Language of description, explanation,

Range:

Language of describing and giving

opinion. Vocabulary related to TV


entertainment.

comparison and persuasion. Vocabulary related to the description of a product.

Register: Target Reader:

Any as long as consistent. Would be informed.

Register: Target Reader:

Unmarked to formal.

Would be informed.

CAE June 2006 (0r50) Question


1

Script A

College Film Club

Introduction The aim of this report is to: 1) explain how successful the club has been so far 2) suggest ways in which the club could be improved 3) say how new members can be encouraged to join
The Fitm Club contains 30 members, of whom between 20 and 25 show up each week. It has helped those people to improve their English and give a lot of acknowledge on Britain and the USA. Also, the Club has managed to cover the costs, the first year. Despite the fact that the CIub has managed to cover all the costs, it needs more members. a'rr suggesting perhaps to organise the evenings less often, for example twice a month instead of every week, so that more people show up each time. Because the starting time is at 6:30 pm, usually dinner time, so a bad time for a lot of students, the Club could provide food. This in addition with a discussion at the end of the

evenings, can give the pupils the oppertunity to socialise with each other. Like this, members wilt feel more attached to the club and will consider themselves as a real member of a club.

To encourage the students to join the club, I suggest offering a free trial period for who wants, so that peopte can try the Club out before really joining it. Some more publcity can encourage students to make this first step.
Conclusion

As the President of the Film CIub


years. Question
CONTENT

I hope these suggestions will improve our CIub next


ScriPt A

All points covered, with some expansion.


ORGANISATION AND COHESION Content clearly organised, with appropriate linking. ACCURACY A number of non-impeding errors (e.g. "give a lot of acknowledge ... , "... for who wants ..."). RANGE A good range of vocabulary.
REGISTER

Generally appropriate. TARGET READER Would achieve the required effect on target reader.

Band 3

CAE June 2006 (0150) Question


1

Script A

College Film Club

Introduction The aim of this report is to: 7) explain how successful the club has been so far 2) suggest ways in which the club could be improved 3) say how new members can be encouraged to join
The Film Club contains 30 members, of whom between 20 and 25 shaw up each week. It has hetped thase people to improve their English and give a lot of acknowledge on Britain and the IJSA. Also, the Club has managed to cover the costs, the first year. Despite the fact that the Club has managed to cover all the costs, it needs more members. am

suggesting perhaps to organise the evenings less often, for example twice a month instead of every week, so that more people show up each time. Because the starting tme is at 6:30 pm, usually dinner time, so a bad time for a lot of students, the Club could provide food. This in addition with a discussion at the end of the evenings, can give the pupils the oppertunity to socialise with each other. Like this, members will feel more attached to the club and will consider themselves as a real member of a club.
To encourage the students to join the club, I suggest offering a free trial pprod for who wants, so that people can try the Club out before really joining it. Some more publicity can encourage students to make this first step.

As the President of the Film Club


years. Question
CONTENT

Conclusion

I hope ffrese suggestions will improve our CIub next


Script A

All points covered, with some expansion.


ORGANISATION AND COHESION Content clearly organised, with appropriate linking. ACCURACY A number of non-impeding errors (e.g. "give a lot of acknowledge ... , "... for who wants ...").
RANGE A good range of vocabulary. REGISTER

Generally appropriate. TARGET READER Would achieve the required effect on target reader.

Band 3

GAE June 2006 (0150)

Question 2 Script B The power of decisions - or which path to take next Do you often worry about what to wear? All of us have to make decisions every singte day of our lifes. Some of them are easy to be answered such as what earrings to put on. Nevertheless, we have to make up our minds.

In contrast, a few decisions are so vital that once taken, they can turn our lifes upsidedown, for example the profession you choose, I started to study law straight after school. Nevertheless, it was the best decision I have ever made to give it up.

When I started my studies, I was full of illusions which soon got destroyed. I realised year by year that I was not made to be a judge or a lawyer. Despite that fact, it was only when I failed to pass my finalsfafe exam that I finally found the strength to do something else. Snce then, I am a completely different person. I feel good again and futt of energy. My health problems simply disappeared. My self-esteem is rising day by day and I realised that although not good at doing law, I have many other strengths.

Of course,

why

happyness were at risk. Now,

I could have carried on by making a second try to pass the exam. The reason I did not do it was that the cost would have been too high as my heatth and
I
feel alive again!

Question
CONTENT

gcript B

Good realisation of task. ORGANISATION AND COHESION Attention paid to organisation and cohesion. ACCURACY Generally accurate with a few non-impeding errors (e.9. "some of them are easy to be answered")
RANGE

Evidence of a good range of language (e.9. "so vital that once taken ...").
REGISTER Appropriate.

TARGET READER Positive effect on target reader achieved. Band 4

GAE June 2006 (0150)

Question

Script

Dear Sir / Madam

I am writing with reference to Mark Owen's job appliance, I have been queried to write a character reference for him. It has been more than 6 years since I first met him. We have
been together at University as we had studied the same subject.

Firstly, Mark Owen has always been an exceptional student. He was between the best five. Actually, I met him when I decided to join an environmental organisation at school. He leaded it with a lot of energy. All his success come from his extraordinary power of persuation. That gift had helped him along his life. Moreover, he has supported more than 2 enviromental organisations which were, respectivelly, against the deforestation and pollution. His confidence in what was doing and his strength to follow no matter the consequences, show me his value. For example, once he has been to Brasil to visit the Amazon and he spend 3 months helping people to stop the cut of the trees. Furthermore, the fact that he really believes in what he is doing and all the enthusiasm he put on it, makes him a very suitable candidate for the job. Truthly, I must admit that he has something that involves you in his believes which is a very good quality to advice companies how not to damage the environment. Also, he works really good in teams.

I hope, that will clarify any doubt about his ability


Yours faithfully, Question

and suitability for the job.

Script C

CONTENT

All points covered.


ORGANISATION AND COHESION Clearly organised into paragraphs with some attention paid to cohesion. ACCURACY Numerous errors, some of which are basic (e.9. "he leaded it with a lot of energy", "appliance", "the enthusiasm he put on it").
RANGE Some evidence of range. REGISTER Appropriate and consistent.

TARGET READER Negative effect on target reader. Band 2

CAE June 2006 (0150) Question 4 Big Brother

Script

ridiculous.

have watched many reality W shows during fose last few yearst some of them more interesting than others, but I have to say that Big Brother struck me as being the most

In this show you have about ten people stuck in a flat for a couple of months without any contact with the outside world. They have to learn to live with each other; they cook, sleep, eat, bath in the place every day. And it goes without saying that all of this is fitmed
twenty-four seven. They have no privacy at all as people can watch and hear everything they say.

Why would people take part in something like this? Maybe because they tike the idea of making new friends, maybe it's a kind of personnal experience? They all leave the show saying they have learned a lot and saying they don't regret anything! It could also be because they want to enjoy celebrity for a while. Who wouldn't want to be famous?

In my opinion, people watch this programme for several reasons. For some of them, it can be a kind of social study. They want to see how people react in different situations, how they confront problems and realise that humans are still animals after all. For others, it is probably just relaxing. They like to watch it either because they |ike to critise or because they like one person in the programme and feel they ought to defend them against
accusations and support them.

As far as I am concerned, this programme is just repetitive and boring but I encourage people to watch to judge for themselves. The important thing is to stay critical.
Question

Script

CONTENT All points covered and fully developed. ORGANISATION AND COHESION Clearly paragraphed with natural linking. ACCURACY Controlled, natural use of language with minimal errors.
RANGE

Wde range of vocabulary and structure.


REGISTER

Consistently appropriate.
TARGET READER Very positive effect.

Band 5

CAE June 2006 (01s0)

We would like ta inform you about a product, which is not yet avalable n England. A praduct, which could offer you a significant increase in the number of customers.
You may think, we already supply the whole market? But there is one software salution that is not yet inctuded in your amazing wide range of products. We are deligttted to affer you The Ontine Banking. This product enables you to provide a perfect software program for banks.

Question Dear Sir or Madam,

Script E

Moreover, The Online Banking has already gone through intensive fesf sessions and is therefore suitable for all banks around the world.

Our product includes different outstanding advantages: namely online-balance, onlinetrading and online-payment, In addition to that, it is protected by the \atest security programq which makes it impossible for a third part to read or change the program. Our company is the market leader in Switzerland and we would like to extend our current position with a fruitful partnership. We suggesf fo organise a presentation about our product, that offers you an ideal opportunity to enquire further details about The Online Banking.
We look forward to hearing from you at your earliest convenience.

Yours faithfully,

Question
CONTENT

ScriPt E

All points covered.


ORGANISATION AND COHESION Clearly organised into paragraphs. ACCURACY Mainly accurate with a few non-impeding errors (e.9. "to enquire further details", "third part").
RANGE

Good range of appropriate vocabulary.


REGISTER Appropriate.

TARGET READER Would be informed.

Band 3

GAE June 2006 (0150)


Certificate in Advanced English Assessment Criteria for the Speaking Test
CAE is at Council of Europe Level C1, an advanced level where candidates are expected to have a 'good operational command of the spoken
language'.

The GAE Speaking test has five assessment criteria, four analytical and one global, which are applied in relation to lhe level of the examination and to the prescribed tasks: Grammar and Vocabulary Discourse Management

Pronunciation lnteractive Gommunication


Global Achievement
Candidates are assessed on their own individual performance according lo the established criteria and are not assessed in relation to each other.

The assessor awards marks for each of the analytcal criteria. The interlocutor gives one global mark for the candidate's performance across all
parts of the test.

Grammar and Vocabulary (Range, Accuracy, Appropriacy) This refers


1o the

accurale use of grammar and the appropriale use and range of vocabulary.

The CAE tasks require the candidates to know enough grammar and vocabulary to produce accurate and appropriate language, withoul
continual pauses to search for words or structures. This criterion covers the candidate's awareness of lexical relationships, and the ability to use a range of words rather than a reliance on a few well-rehearsed forms.

such;s

oilocation,

It should also be noted that different varieties of standard, educated English, e.g. British, American, Australian, etc., and registers, e.g. formal, colloquial, etc. are acceptable, provided they are appropriate for the contexl.

Discourse Management (Coherence, Extent, Relevance)


This refers to the candidate's ability to use an appropriate range of linguistic resources to organise sentences. The CAE tasks require candidates to construct sentences and produce utterances (extended as appropriate) in order to convey informalion and to express or justify opinions. Sometimes the contribulion will be short and at other times a more lengthy utterance will bs required. ln this criterion, the candidale's ability to maintain a coherent flow of language over several utterances is assesse-d.

Pronunciation (Stress and Rhythm, lntonation, lndividual Sounds)


ln general this refers to the candidate's ability to produce comprehensible ulterances to fulfil the task requirements. More specifically, this refers to the production of individual sounds, appropriate linking of words, word stress, stress timing, highlighting of words to indicate information or to enforce a message, and the use of contrasting pitch levels to convey the intended meaning.

It is recognised that, at CAE level, even in the top assessment band, candidates' pronunciation may be influenced by features of their first language. This is acceptable, provided communication is not impeded.
lnteractive Communication (lnitiating and Responding, Hesitation, Turnlaking)
This refers to the candidate's ability to interact in the discourse by initiating and responding appropriately, at the required speed and rhythm. lt includes the ability to use functional language and strategies to maintain or repair interaction. The ability of the candidate to display sensitivity to the norms of turn-taking is also assessed here. Candidates should efend their contributions without dominating or excluding their partner. A willingness and an ability to develop the task and move it towards a conclusion, rather than supplying minimal responses, is also rewarded here. Candidates are not penalised for asking for repetition from the interlocutor or clarification from the other candidate (as long as this is not excessive)' However, if the interaction breaks down and the candidate has to be supported by the interlocutor or the other bandidte, this is taken as evidence of weak interactive ability and is penalised accordingly. Global Achievement

tasks in the four separate parts of the test.

ln addition lo the analylical scales, there is the Global Achievement scale. This refers to the candidate's overall effectiveness in tackling the

CAE Typical Minimum Adequate Performance


Develops the interaction with contributions which are mostly coherent and extended when dealing with the CAE level tasks. Grammar is mosfly accurate and vocabulary appropriate. Utterances are understood with very little strain on the listeer.

The certificate in Advanced English is at Level c1 of the common European Framework of Reference for Languages: Learning, teaching, assessmenf published by the Council of Europe. lt has also been accredited by the Oualifications and Curriculum Authority in the UK as a Level 2 ESOL certificate in the National Oua lifications Fra mework.

niversity of Cambridge

ESOL Examinations 1 Hills Road

Cambridge
CB1 2EU

United Kingdom

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