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ARMED

SERVICES

PETROLEUM

Ii9fcruct«rs Reading this Document

Name

O

PETROLEUM

FAR

Date

SITUATION

EAST

December

1948

DOWNGRADED AT 3 YEflR INTERVALS-"

^ DECLASSIFIED AFTER 12 YEAhS DOD DIR 5200.10

BOARD

ARCHQffiS

ACCESSION NO

NATIONAL MILITARY ESTABLISH?^? Armed Services Petroleum Board Building T-4

ASPB Serial :

911-4

Washington

25,

D.

C.

Subject :

Petroleum Situation ,

6 of th e report

Fa r East .

Amendment t o Paragraph

place

1. The enclosure

(s ) i s fo r inclusion i n th e subject

report

of paragraph 3 , page 6 which should be deleted

entirely .

Distribution

List

i

C>

J. M, BOtD' Captain, USN

/

Executive Officer

5 , page

i n

th e

The Honorable, The Secretary of Defense The Honorable, The Secretary of the Army The Honorable, The Secretary of the Navy The Honorable, The Secretary of the Air Force The Honorable, The Undersecretary of the Army The Honorable, The Undersecretary of the Navy The Honorable, The Undersecretary of the Air Force Director, The Joint Staff Secretary, The Joint Chiefs of Staff Armed Forces Staff College MEMBERS, The Armed Services Petroleum Board Director, Central Intelligence Agency Chairman, Munitions Board Area Petroleum Office, - ComServPac Area Petroleum Office, - CinCFE The-Chief of Staff, US Army The Army Comptroller Director, Intelligence Division, General Staff, USA Director, Logistics Division, General Staff, USA Director, Plans and Operations Division, General Staff, USA Office of the Chief of Engineers Office of the Quartermaster General Chief, Fuels and Lubes Branch, Supply Division, OQNG Office of the Chief of Transportation. Commandant, National War College Commandant, Industrial College of the Armed Forces Commandant, Command and General Staff School Chief of Naval Operations, Op-00

FEB 1 5 1949

Distribution

List

(con't)

Deputy Chief

Acting Chief of Naval Operations (Transportation) Chief of Naval Intelligenc e

Chief, Bureau of Supplies and Accounts Chief, Bureau of Yards and Docks

Commandant, Naval War Colleg e Chief of Staff,, Headquarters, United States Air Force The Air Comptroller, Programs and Standards Division Deputy Chief of Staff, Materiel Directo r of Maintenance, Supply and Service s Deputy Chief of Staff, Operations Director of Intelligence, USAF Commanding General, Air Materiel Command Commanding General, Strategic Air Command

of

Naval Operations

(Logistics)

Commandir.g General,

Commanding General, Far East Air Force

Tactica l Air Command.

Commandant,

Technical & Logistics Division, Air ?fer College, Air University A,S,P.3, Distribution to Divisions

A.S.P.B, Distribution

Armed Services Petroleum

The Air

Universit y

to

A.S.P.P T A. Bo?>rd, Intelligenc e

Division FILES

(3)

ExisiSig &asx Indies balk storage total s approximately

8,850,000 barrel s and approximately 9,000,000 barrel s of additiona l bulk

storage is proposed.

SUFiATTtA

No,

Bbls.

No.

Tanks

Crude

Tanks

Pangkalan

Brandan

Pladj oe

20 4

920,000

63

1,920,000

41

1,420,000

Palembang

336,000

21

858,500

12

392,400

Tandjoejig; Oeban

 

10

765,000

8

589,000

 

1,256,000

3,541,500

2,211,400

 

Proposed Additional Storage

 

Pangkalan Brandan

 

590,000

20

470,000

21

350,000

Pangkalan Soesoe

130,000

17

450,000

13

355,000

Palembang

320,000

3

240,000

 

Tar&joeng Obean

160,000

1

80,000

 

160,000

 

1,200,000

1,240,000

865,000'

JAVA

Tj©poe

53,000

2

3,500

10,300

BORNEO

 

Balikpapan

5

260,000

6

183,000

8

224,000

Tarakan

9

230,000

-

Lutong

34

409,400

-

-

3

11,500

Seria

6

240,000

-

-

 

1,139,400'

183,000

 

235,500

 

Proposed Additional Storage

 

Balikpapan

18

1, 300,000

47

1,850

,000

51

2,150,

000

Lut ong

3

228,000

9

233

,800

18

653,

000

Seria

2

120,000

->

 

648,000

2,083,800

 

2,203, 000

N3W GUINEA

195,000

NATIONAL MILITARY ESTABLISHMENT Armed Services Petroleum Board Building T-4 Washington 25, D. C.

r

091-Far East

Study

(ASPB Seria l

911-7)

1

s­

FROM:

Armed Service s Petroleu m Board

TO:

Distributio n

Lis t

SUBJECT:

Petroleum Situation ,

Far

East

1.

Subject

enclosure

i s

forwarded

herewith

for

f > r

J. : r . EO:

Captain, USN Executive Officer

information

Distribution List

of Defense of the Army of the Navy

of the Air Force

The Honorable, The Undersecretary of the Army

The Honorable, The Secretary

The

The Honorable, The Secretary The Honorable, The Secretary

The Honorable, The Undersecretary of the Navy

The

Director, The Joint Staff

Secretary, The Joint Chiefs of Staff Armed Forces Staff College

MEMBERS, The Armed Services

Honorable, The Secretary

Honorable, The Undersecretary

of the Air Force

Petroleum Board

Director, Central Intelligence Agency Chairman, Munitions Board Area Petroleum Office, - ComServPac Area Petroleum Office, - CinCFE The Chief of Staff, US Army The Army Comptroller Director, Intelligence Division, General Staff, USA Director, Logistics Division, General Staff, USA Director, Plans and Operations Division, General Staff, USA

Office of the Chief of Engineers Office of the Quartermaster General Chief, Fuels and Lubes Branch, Supply Division, OQI/1G Office of the Chief of Transportation Commandant, National War College Commandant, Industrial Collage of the Armed Fo

Distribution

List

(cont)

Commandant, Command and General Staff School Chief of Naval Operations, Op-00 Deputy Chief of Naval Operations (Logistics) Acting Chief of Naval Operations (Transportation) Chief of N^val Intelligence Chief, Bureau of Supplies and Accounts Chief, Bureau of Yards and Docks Commandant, Naval War College

Chief of Staff, Headquarters, United States Air Force The Air Comptroller, Programs and Standards Division Deputy Chief of Staff, Faterie l Director of Maintenance, Supply and Services Deputy Chief of Staff, Operations Director of Intelligence, USAF Commanding General, Air Materiel Command Commanding General, Strategic Air Command Commanding General, Tactical Air Command. Commanding General, Far East Air Force Commandant, The Air Universit y

Technica l & Logistic s

A.S.P.B. Distribution

Division ,

Ai r War College ,

Ai r Universit y

t o

Divisions

A.S.P.B. Distribution to A.S.P.P.A. Armed Services Petroleum Board, Intelligence Division F1USS

PA?uA

1

Z

 

(a)

(b)

(c)

(d)

(e)

(g)

(h)

(i)

A.

Map of the Far East

TABLE OF CONTENTS

SUBJECT

Purpose

1

Summary

1

Proven Reserves

1

Crude Production

1

Refining Capacity

2

Domestic Consumption

3

Imports

4

Exports

4

Storage

4

Terminals

5

Transportation

8

Conclusions

11

APPENDICES

B. • Map of Northern Sumatra oil fields

C.

Map of Southern Sumatra oil fields

D.

Map of oil fields, riddle and East Java

S.

!."ap of Refineries, marine terminals and storage, Sumatra

F, Hap of transportation and petroleum facilities, North Borneo

G. Map of transportation and petroleum facilities, South Borneo

H, Map

I. Table of pipelines in prewar northern Sumatra

J f Table of pipelines in prewar Southern Sumatra

K. Table of pipelin3S in prewar Java

L. Table of pipelines in prewar Borneo

M. Basis of Study

of New Guinea and Ceram

IU\

REPORT ON THE

PETROLEUM SITUATION OF THE FAR EAST

ARMED SERVICES

BY

PETROLEUM BOARD

MfSS.M.

MUM

I

PETROLEUM SITUATION - FAR EAST

1. PURPOSE

To ascertain the availability of petroleum and petroleum facilities in the countries of the Far East.

2. SUMFARY

(a) Proven Reserves

(1) Chinese proven reserves, including Korea and Formosa are reported to be about 30,000,000 barrels. (2) Japanese proven reserves are reported to be 13,000,000 barrels. There were seventy-two producing fields in 1932 but only fifteen are now considered of much importance. (3) The East Indies, including Burma, has combined proven reserves of about 1,050,000,000 barrels. (4) The Philippine Islands presently have no proven reserves. The Far East Oil Compa'ny is exploring the Islands and there is incon­ clusive indication that oil does exist in commercial quantity.

(b) Crude Production

 

(l )

Chinese crude production ,

includin g

Korea and Formosa

averaged

about

1500 barrels

per day during the year 1947.

Sinkiang pro­

vince

i s

China's principa l petroleum producing area.

There ar3

thirtee n

field s

in

thi s

sraa ,

namely Sochi,

Sha-wan,

T'a-Chang'eng,

Sui-lai ,

Ti­

hua,

Wu-su,

K'u-ch'e,

Wen-su, Shu-na,

Ch'ing-Shui-ho,

Chin-Shui-ho,

Tou-San-Tzu,

Hui-hui-p^o ^nd Ku-yeh -

Yuan-hsing-kung.

The most impor­

tant

of

these n r e th e

Tu-Sh^n-Tze fiel d

n-anr

'm-su

(44N-85E) and lumen

fiel d

hear Yuuen (39N-97E).

The- Tu-Shan-tze field

Bussisns fror.: 1939 unti l thei r -.vith^rawal in

1943.

was

oper-ted

by the

All wells were

cemented

in .at. that-tim e

but

late, .reports

­

1

_

indicate t,

succeeded.in.re-cpenin g

si x wells .

The opening

-f

th e

a significnnt

wartime development.

I |8U|§

Yumen fiel d

§

I I %

There are three potentia l producing arr.sT n

unm^

*mowi^aV i70T>i"

Desert

Basin ,

Huangshui

Basin and th e

Lungtuan Basin ,

All of

th e

Chinese

production i s

located

in

remote

areas where littl e

or no transportation

is

available.

Seventy percent

of

Chinese

production i s

required

by the

Chinese

Array,

Manchuria

shal e

reserve s

locate d

a t

FUSHQN and estimated

a t

2,300,000,000 barrels

are

considered

to be a second potentia l

source of

petroleum.

(2)

Japanese production for

the year 1947 was reported

to

average

3560 barrels

per day.

This

i s

a decrease

of

about 4,5% compared

with

1946 production.

Efforts

wero made in 1937 toward

the

extensive

development

of

synthetic s

but

th e

lac k

of technica l knowledge and Japanese

inabilit y

to manufacture

the

necessary

equipment

or

inport

it ,

caused

the

plan to

fail .

(3)

Sumatra

hss produced the greatest

share

of

East

Indies

 

crude .

The southern

field s

consistin g

of

500 wells produced

about 45,000

barrel s

pe r day prio

r

t o World War II

.

These field s

were destroye d

i n

th e

earl y days of

th e i/mr and did

not ge t

back i n productio n unti l about

July 1947.

By 1949 these

field s

are expected

to

be producing

about

52,000

barrel s

per day .

The field s

of

North and

Centra l Sumatra ar e

stil l

held

by th e Indonesian

Republic and effort s

of th e prewar owners t o

re-ente r

have been denied.

Unsettled

politica l

conditions

in Java have so hampered

efforts

at

reconstruction

that

present

production

i s

only 1,000

barrels

per day.

On 31 October 1943 politica l

strif e

was reported

to have caused

th e

burning

of th e Tjepoe field s

and refinery .

The exten t

of th e damage

has not been reported. Production in Ceram was has not yet been attempted. Mew Guinea is the center of a push for new sources of crude oil in the East Indies. The Netherlands New Guinea Petroleum Company is reported to be spending £.15,000,000.00 for explora­ tion and exploitation. The Klamono, Mogoi and Wasian fields are known to •be productive but the lack of storage facilities and pipelines will hold up production at least until the middle of.1949. The oil fields of Borneo, Miri, Seria, Tarakan and Balikpapan had exceeded 50,000 barrels per day by the end of 1947.

(4) The Philippine Islands have no production of petroleum, (c) Refining Capacity

(1) Authoritative reports indicate only one refinery in opera­

tion in China at the end of 1947. This plant

is located near lumen

(39N-97E) in northern Kansu province and is reported to have a capacity of about 1400 barrels per day, Estimates raise refining capacity to 8000 barrels per day by 31 December 1948 as a result of new construction now under way at the two refineries located at Takao, Formosa. These plants were built by the Japanese to refine East Indies crude. They had a thermal capacity of 14,000 barrels per day and catalytic cracking capacity of 2000 barrels per day. As a result of wartime equipment removals the capacity has oeen "vary limited since World War II, The China Petroleum Corporation has assumed responsibility for rehabilitation and operation

of these plants. (2) The Japanese are reported to have refining capacity of

27,000 barrels per d*y average as of 31 December 1947. The actual through­

put was only 5,535 barrels par day, avaraged for the first five months of

1947. Japanese refining lories are very high, averaging 23^ of input.

The Reparations

Committee report

recommends tha t Japanese

rsfinin g

capa­

cit y

be limited

to

40,000 barrels

per day.

(3 )

Refinin g

capacit y

of th e East

Indie s

a t

th e

end of

th e yea r

1947

totalle d

about

39,500 barrels

per day,

Sumatra

has three

refineries ,

Soengei Gerong., Pladjo e

and Pangkalan Brendan,

The firs t

two ar e

i n

southern Sumatra

and th e

latte r

i n th e north .

Northern *r-3a

facilitie s

ar e

stil l

held

by th e Indonesian

Republic and al l

effort s

a t

re-entr y

by th e

owners have been denied .

The Soengai Gerong plan t

starte d

war operatio n i n

October 1947 and by

Jul y 1948 had

exceeded

46,000

post ­

barrels

per day.

politica l

strife .

Restoration

The thre e

of Java

refinerie s

has been held up by

plant s

Tjepoe,' Knpoean ~nd Wonokromo have

been

operating

on a limited

sc^le but

the tota l

output

has not

exceeded

1,000

barrel s

per day.

In October 1948 i t

was

reported

that

the

Tjepoe

refiner y

had been se t

-fire .

 

The extent

of

th e damage i s

not known.

There i s

presentl y no refinin g

i n New Guinea.

Borneo has two

refineries ,

Lutong i n

north

Borneo and

B?,likp n pan in

the

southeast.

Lutong

i s

being

modernized

and restore d

and

i s

scheduled

t o

be

on stream by mid

1949.

Balikpap-n

i s

presently a skimming plant

of

7,000 barrels per day capa­

city .

Ceram has no refineries .

The combined

refiner y

countries

from

India

to Japan has never been sufficient

needs

of the

Far

East.

capacity

of

al l

to

supply the

(d) Domestic Consumption

(1)

China's domestic consumption for

the year 1946 was about

24,000 barrels

but

authenti c

per d*y.

data

i s

not

Post war consumption has increased

presentl y available .

The extent

materially

of

Chinese

domestic

consumption in the

future

vai l depend

on the

outcome of the

pre ­

sen t

chaoti c politica l

and economic

situation. ­

(2) Japanese domestic consumption averaj per day for the year ending 1 July 1947. In 1938 Japanese domestic consumption averaged 79,452 barrels per day. The Control Law of 1934 w^s invoked in 1938 to create a quot? system .°nd establish rationing. (3) East Indies domestic consumption for the year 1947 is reported to be 9,627 barrels per day. Domestic consumption of this area is low because" of the lack of industry and other heavy consumers nnd its geographical location. (4) Domestic consumption in the Philippine Islands for the year 1948 is estimated to be about 18,000 barrels per day. Motor gasoline, fuel oil, diesel oil, snd kerosene, in order, p.re the principal products consumed.

(5) The average par capita consumption of petroleum products in the Far East is 4 gallons per ye^r which is the equivalent to the average per capita consumption of petroleum products in the United States every 48 hours. (e) Imports

barrels

(1)

Petroleum products

per day for

the year 1947.

imported

by China averaged

L'lajor products in

order

fue l

oil ,

^soline ,

kerosene and lubricatin g

oils .

about

39,000

of volume were

(2)

13,109 barrel s

Japanese imports for the year ending 1 July 1947 ivsraged

pe r day .

Navy Special ,

gasoline ,

diese l

oi l and

lubricat ­

ing oil s

head th e

list .

about

(3)

East

Indies

1,685,808 barrels .

imports for

the

firs t

10 months of

1947 were

(4)

Philippine Islands

imports

are

estimated

to

about

18,000 barrels

only slightly

higher,

per day for th e year 1947.

Estimates

have averaged

of

1948 are

(f) Exports

(1)

There were no Chinese exports

of petroleum products

re ­

ported

for

the year 1947,

 

(2)

There were no Japanese

exports

reported

for

the year 1947.

(3)

East

Indies

exports,

for the

year 1947 were

8,851,000

barrels ,

or 24,250 barrels

per

day,

 

(4)

Figures

are not

available

to determine the amount of

Philippin e

exports

but

i t

i s

known tha t

some kerosene and

lubricatin g

oils

are

exported

to

China.

(g)

Storage

 

(1)

Bulk storage

along

the

China

coast total s

5,373,000

 

barrel s

and i s widely scattered .

The thre e principa l

storage points

are

Shanghai

60$ or 3,553,000

barrels ,

Hong Kong 811,600 barrel s

and

Tientsi n

433,000

barrels .

(2)

The Japanese

"Strike "

report

of February 1948 indicate d

ther e was 7,293,000

barrel s

of

above

ground

and

11,381,650 barrel s

of un ­

derground

storag e

i n Japan .

Principa l militar y

storag e points and

quantitie s

in

order

are

lokahoma

387,410

barrels ,

Kainan 824,000

barrels ,

Sa'sebo 705,300 barrels ,

Kawasaki

502,000

barrels ,

Fukuoka 209,320

barrels

and

Kobe 180,800 barrels .

The

militar y i s

now occupying about

6,400,000

barrel s

and commercial storag e

approximates

2,000,000 barrels ,

leavin g

about

10,000,000 barrels

of

storage

or strategic purposes.

(3) N \In the East

Indies,

available

for

increased

operational

there

i s

iilvlprt i

approximately

!"!i*\

760,000

barrels

of

storageVas

follows:

110,000 barrels

at

Hollandia,

20,000

barrels

at

Noesi Podidojs^6,900

barrels

Balikpapan,

347,000

barrels

Batavia

and Soerabaja

has 246^9Q0 barrel s under constructio n and

scheduled

for

completion

in

late

(4)

The Philippin e Island s

have

659, 8

storag e

and 1,990,400 barrel s

of

commercial storage ,

Luzon Islan d

has

659,812

barrel s

of militar y

storage and 1,034,000 barrel s

of

commercial

storage,,

Cebu Island

has 246,700 barrels

of

(h)

Terminals

has

676,900 barrel s

commercial storage,

of

commercial storage.

Panay

 

(1)

Three Chinese ports

are

capable

of

accommodating

fully

loaded f- 2

tankers *

Shanghai has

32 '

of wate r

and line s

and

connection s

fo r

al l

products ,

Amoy has

32 '

of water

and

line s

and

connections

fo r

al l

products

and Hong Kong has

31 '

of water

and

line s

and

connections

fo r

al l

products.

Five

other ports ,

Chinkiang,

Foochow, Hankow (summer only)

Tsingta o and Swatow have varyin g wate r depth s

(20 '

t o

30' )

and some dis ­

charge facilities f

vessels

of

over 14 f

Tientsin

has insufficien t

water to accommodate

draf t

because

of

a sand

ba r i n

th e harbor

entrance and

vessels must use lighterag e

from the

outer anchorage to the

terminal,

loaded

(2)

Japan has three

ports

capable

of

accommodating

T-2 tankers

Sasebo Naval Base has water depth of

33 '

fully

and 36'

wit h

cranes ,

warehouses pnd railroa d

spurs a t

each

pier . • Shimotsu has

35 '

of w?»ter and two 10"discharge lines .

floatin g

discharge

lines ,

Yokahoma has

Nagasaki has 34'

of water and

only 29'

of water at

the

berth

but discharge

is. made t o

lighters .

Tsurumi

(Tokio Bay) has 29'

of water

and discharg e i s

made

t o

lighters .

Qonai and Itozak i

have 30'6 " of water

but

no information

accommodate full y

i s

available

about

discharge

facilities .

• Yokosuka can

loaded

T-2 tanker s but

th e water depth and method of

discharge

i s

not

presently

known.

(3)

I n

th e

East

Indies ,

Belawsn Island ,

Sumatra

and Lutong,

Britis h

Borneo can accommodate full y

loaded

line s

and

connections

for

al l

products .

T-2 tankers .

Each port

has

 

(4)

In the

Philippine

Island s

there

are TSWfee" "porTs" which can

take

fully

loaded T-2

tankers ,

Manila

has 35'

of water,

but

discharge

i s

made by lighterage .

Cebu has

31 ' of water ,

thre e

8" line s

and one 6"

line .

Iloilo ,

Poro and Tacloban each have 30'

of water and severa l 4" ,

6" and

8" lines .

Daval has 26 '

of wate r

and two 8" lines .

The draf t

of

th e

Bataan terminal at Quitang

Point

i s

equipped with thre e

8" and

one 6"

lines .

(i)

Transportation

(1)

Railroads

presently unknown but

the port

of

4'8^ "

(a) Chinese railroad s

are

reported

(standard

gauge) track ,

2,798 locomotives,

to have 13,349 miles

32,564 freight

cars

is

and

5,165 passenger

cars .

There ar e als o

749

miles

of meter gauge trac k

with

205 locomotives,

2,209 freight s

cars

and 221 passenger

cars ,

 

Japan

has a tota l

of

24,760 miles

of

railway trackage.

There

ar e 20,225 miles

of

3'6 "

gauge

owned by th e Government and

3,208

miles

of

3'6" gauge

owned

by private

interests .

There are also 821 miles

of

4'8j-"

(standard

gauge)

and

506 miles

of

2'6 " gauge owned by privat e

interests .

Japan has the following

equipment;

6,438

steam locomotives,

519

electri c

locomotives,

113,987 freight s

cars and 12,316 passenger

There i s

no breakdown of the

Sumatra

inventories

has

565 miles

by gauge or

ownership.

of

3'6 " gauge trackage ,

101

cars .

locomotives,

2,186 freigh t

cars

and 242 passenger

cars .

There are

als o

318

miles

of

2'6 "

gauge trackage ,

38 locomotives,

1,032

freigh t

cars

and

155 passenger

cars .

 

Java

has 3*018 mile s

of

3'6 "

gauge trackage ,

972

locomotives* 20,220 freigh t

162

miles

of

4'8j "

(standard

cars and

gauge)

3^000 passenger

cars *

There are

trackage*

57 locomotives,

1,758

als o

Ceram

has no railroads .

Dutch Borneo has no railroad s 7~ The

port^tio n

of

thi s

area

i s

by coasta l

steamers and inlan d waterways.

12 locomotives ,

Britis h

Borneo has 116 miles

of meter

gauge trackage ,

149

freigh t

car s nnd 34 passenge r

(b) Of th e Philippin e

Island s

only

cars .

Luzon, Panay and Cebu

Island s

have railroads .

The lin e

on Luzon has 538

miles

of

3'6 " gauge

trackag e

77 locomotives,

1,838

freigh t

cars ,

39 express,

mail and

caboose

cars ,

75 freigh t

car s

converted

t o passenger

use and 67 passenger

cars ,

panay

and

Cebu Island s

combined

have 131 miles

of

3'6 " gauge trackage .

Th^re

i s

no informatio n

on th e

equipment a t

thes e two points .

 
 

(2)

Highways

 

(a)

China has 79,000 miles

of highways but the

condition

i

s

ver y poor .

There

ar e ver y

few motor vehicle s

i n

China.

Presen t

road s

can be considered

as

satisfactor y

only for

continued

animal cart

traffic .

The

percentage

of

concrete

or asphalt

roads i s unknown.

 
 

(b)

Japan i s

reported

to

have 568,750 miles

of highways.

I t

i s

estimated

asphalt

and th e

tha t

les s

balance i s

than

one half

of

littl e

more than

one percent

trails ,

are

concrete

or

(c)

The East

Indie s

are

reported

highway of which Y7% i s

concrete

or

asphalt,

t o

have 43,700 milis of

Java

has 16,850 miles

of which 31% i s

concrete or

a

sphalt•

 

Sumatra

has 15,800 miles

of

highway of which 10% i s

concrete

or

asphalt.

 

Ceram,

because

of

it s

development

and topography has

no significan t

highways

-

9

­

Dutch Borneo i s

report ed^rcf JTa"<

road,, most of which i s

considered

to be trails .

highways-with

British

Borneo i s

9% concrete

and asphalt

reported

to have 771 miles of

About 176 miles ar e improved

earth

surface•

 

New Guinea i s

reported

t o have 669 miles

of

road

but the

largest

percentage are believed

to be littl e

better

than

trails .

(d)

The Philippin e

Island s

are reporte d

t o have 14,907

miles

of highway,

15% of which

are

concrete

or

asphalt,

(3)

Pipelines,

(a)

China

i s

reported

to have no pipelines ,

 

(b)

Japan has no pipelines

according to the

latest

reports.

(c)

Sumatra

 

(1) There wss an extensive network of gathering lines running throughout northern Sumatra, The lines vary in diameter from 3" to l\ n and from 4 to 47 miles long, However, there is n o information available regarding their condition, (Appendix I) Southern Sumatra has many gathering linas varying in diameter from 2J-" to 8" and from 5 miles to 165 miles in length. (Appendix J ) (2) Java. There is a network of gathering lines throughout Java varying in size from 3" to 4" in diameter. The main

pipeline runs a distance of 93 miles from the Tjepoe refinery to Bondar?n,

the loading point, on Madoera Strait

(Appendix K )

(3) Ceram. There are no pipelines. (4) Borneo. There are numerous gathering linos

from 4" to 9" in diameter and varying from 2 miles in length to 36 miles.

(Appendix l>)

( 5 ) New Guinea,.

- 10­

struction from the Klamona field'to Sele Straits. at a deep water port due east of Makmak Island^ Thore are also pipelines under construction from the Mogoi and Wpsian fields to a point in MacCluer Bay on the south coast of the Vogelkop. These lin3S ^re scheduled for completion in 1949 and 1950, respectively.

(4) The Philippine Islands have no pipelines. CONCLUSIONS

(a) As potential allies, all countriss of the Far East, except Java,

Sumatra,' Borneo and New Guinaa, would be petroleum liabilities to the United States.

(b) Terminal facilities, and water depth are insufficient at most

ports for the expeditious handling of T-£ or larger tankers. • (c) Railroad facilities, highways and pipelines are inadequate for the support of large scale military operations.

- 11 ­

20

Oil

Refineries

Shale

Fields

Oil Plants

CHINA

Shanghai

Hong

Kong

Tientsin

Hankow

Tsingtoo

JAPAN

Yokohama Ka in on

Sasibo

Kawasaki

N.B

OUTER

MONGOLIA

MONGOLI A

APPENDIX

PRINCIPAL

STORAGE

LOCATIONS

BBLS.

JAPAN

(Con't)

3,553,000

Fukuoka

812,000

Kobe

483,000

EAST

INDIES

126,000

Holland/a

108, 000

Batavia

Soerobaja

3, 875,

000

PHILIPPINES

824,

000

705, 000

502,000

>MANCHUKUO

BBLS.

209,000

181,000

110,000

347, 000

246, 000

2,660,000

677,

247. OOO

000

INDIA N

ITlDOnQ * JAVAvi^^^'^r""""*'

U

S T

R A

L

150°

15O #

SUMATRA

 

a

Newly dlseovirtd fl«ld t

.

not y«l dtvilopt d

 

i

Fields of minor Import!

RANTAU

APPENDIX B

FIELD

Q

2QO

«p o

 

LEGEND

)Important

Producing

Fields

,,^J _

Abandoned Wells -

Pr^bobly

Dry Holes

• Producing

Reids

of

Minor

Importance

 

) Practically

.Pipelines

Depleted

Oil Fields

Uti"^ y Swamps ^

>"

°

C 3

Tidal

Vllloges

Swamps

 
 

<SS2> Rice

Fields

Not*'

Thru

FitId t North of this or*a

art

shown on tht lns$t of

Sumofro,

98*12'

SUMATRA

NORTHERN

OIL

FIELDS

APPENDIX C

Prewar

SUMATRA

SOUTHERN OIL

FIELDS

*

ADondonM Oil

Oil

Abondomd

Will

Wall

<

L±J

Q

LL.

O

Q

LJ

i

APPENDIX D

f*

S

155

'

S

DJS

£

Is

?!

s

!^,

J

? Si ! S

APPENDIX E

Prewar

SUMATR A

REFINERIES, MARINE

AND

TERMINALS,

STORAGE

FACILITIES

O

PACKAGE STORAGE

POINT

 

•©•

BULKond PACKAGE STORAGE POINT

0

MARINE

TERMINAL

gkalon Soesoe

•0-

REFINERY

nqkalan Brondon­

"

ndjoengpoera

6iawon

bondicheO

^

.JOsaran

Pematangjyantar^r

"^O'Tondjoengbaloi

f^vGaloegoor aloego

V> \

n-.i«^" Boiige

OLaboehanbalik ­ \

Rantouparapat

•Sibolga

0 Podong Sidimpoeon

APPROXIMATE

SCALE

100

200

Mllff

100

200

300

Pajokoemboeh

Fort Padang Pondjang "*• OFort Van der Capellen OSawahloanto

Emma Haven

°Rengat

IndrapoeraQ

0 Soengeipenoeh

Djambi

Moearoroepit

MoearoklingiQ

Sekojoe ~

Tpla^gbeto«to^

^•Loekboeklinggou Opraboemoelih

Tebiggtinggi-©-

-©•Moeoroenim

Benkoeleny

Kepahiong

•©'Lohot

PogorolamO

Q Batoerodjg

 
 

•^Martapoea

 

Bintoehan'

Kotoboemi

 

Kroeb

^ .

°Soekadan'o

 

Tandjoengkarang

k

/

QTeloekbetoeng

APPENDIX

F

o

U J

LLJ

m

_j

if)

­

2

£E° 2

O

LJ-

QQ °

Q

d

°

1

Us

X

~

O

if) z>

5

^

- J

i=

g 2

<

APPENDIX G

APPENDIX H

APPENDIX I

, £i£ lines.- A system of pipe lines served the different oil fields rangkalanbrandan the refinery, and Pangkalansoesoe the marine terminal or ship­ ping-off point. Detail of main pipe line connections existing in prewar day3 follows Northern Sumatra. Prewar Main Pipe Line

.

Oil Lines from

 

to

Length of Approx. Diameter

 

Line in

Miles

in Inches

Km.

Djoeloerajeu

Perlak

 

32.8

22

3

Perlak

S. Lipoet

75.3

47

5

Rantau

S.

Lipoet

15.5

9.6

6

Rantau

S.

Lipoet

(14.7

9.1

4

 

(

0.8

.5

6

Serangdjaja

s.

Lipoet

(16.5

10.3

6

 

(

0.8

.5

4

S.

Llpoet

P.

Batoe

41.7

27

5

S.

Lipoet

P.

Batoe

41.7

27

6

P.

Batoe

P.

Brandan

6.2

3.85

6

P.

Batoe

P. Brandan

 

6.1

3.8

5

P.

Brandan

P. Soesoe

( 7.2

4.5

6

 

( 6.0

3.7

4

P.

Taboehan

P. Brandan

 

6.2

3.85

3

Darat

T. Said

7.8

4.85

4

T . Said

P. Brandan

9.1

5.7

3

Post II

S. Sidoer

( 0.6

.37

?i

 

(

0.7

.45

6

(

0.2

.14

5

Gas Lines from

to

Length of

Approx. Diameter

 

Line in

Miles

in Inches

Km.

Perlak

S. Lipoet

(30.2

18.8

5

 

(45.1

28.

4

Rantau

S. Lipoet

15.6

9.7

6

S.

Lipoet

P. Batoe

(31.9

19.8

5

 

( 9.8

6.2

6

P.

Batoe

P. Brandan

6.2

3.85

6

P.

Taboehan

P. Brandan

6.2

3.85

4

Gebang

Pelawie

12.2

7,6

4

Pelawie

P. Brandan

3.1

1.9

3

Water Lines from

to

Length of

Approx. Diameter

 

Line in

Miles

in Inches

Km.

Serangdjaja

S. Lipoet

16.4

10.2

6

P. Brandan

P. Soesoe

(

7.8

4.85

5

 

(

6.1

3.8

4

Gebang

Pelawie

12.2

7.6

3

P . Taboehan

P. Brandan

6.2

3.85

3

Pelawie

P . Brandan

3.1

1.9

24

Pelawie

P . Brandan

3.1

1.9

24

Pelawie

P . Brandan

3.1

1.9

24

Northern Sumatra. Prewar Main Pipe Line (Continued)

Products Pipe Lines

Length of

from

to

Product

Line in

Approx. Diameter

P.

Brandan

P.

Brandan

P.

Brandan

P.

Brandan

P.

Brandan

P.

Brandan

p . Brandan

P. Brandan

 

Km.

Miles

in Inches

P. Soesoe

Gasoline

14.0

8.7

5

P. So9soe

Gasoline

14.0

8.7

6

P. Soesoe

Gasoline

14.0

8.7

6

P. Soesoe

Gas Oil

(13.4

(8.3

(4

 

( 0.5

( .31

(5

P. Soesoe

Residue

14.0

8.7

5

P. Soesoe

Kerosine

14.0

8.7

4

P. Soesoe

White Spirit

14.0

8.7

4

P. Soesoe

Residue

3.1

1.9

2

APPENDI X

J

MAIN PREWAR CRUDE PIPE LINES. SOUTHERN SUMATRA

Oil Lines from

BPM

Kenaliassam Betoeng Badjoebang Tempino Kloeang Kloeang Mangoendjaja MangoendJaja spur Babat Babat Sumpal Pladjoe (loop) PladJoe Pladjoe Lembok Lembok Limau Soebandjerigi Kampong Minjak

IKPM

Benakat

Djirak

Talangakar

Talangakar

Pendopo

To

Length of

line in

Km,

M M

Tempino

22.5

Badjoeban g

12. 3

Tempino

27.5

Pladjoe

265

Pladjoe

135

Mangoendjaja

54

Babat

20

8.5

Soebanboeroeng

25

Sumpal

46

Selara Ladangpait

16

Pladjoe

107

Lembok

74

Lembok

74

Limau

36

Limau

36

Soebandjerigi

32

Tandjongloentar

36

Pladjoe (a)

160

Djira k

8

Talangakar

12

Soengaigerong

131

Soengaigerong

131

Soengaigerong

136

Approx.

Diameter

Miles

in inches

14.0

4"

7.6

4"

17.0

4"

165.0

8"

84.0

6"

33.5

4 & 3"

12.4

4"

5.3

15.5

4"

28.5

«*"

10.0

3"

65.5

6"

46.0

4 n

46.0

6"

22.4

4"

22.4

6"

19.8

4"

22.4

6"

100.0

4"

5.3

6"

7.5

8"

82.

8"

82.

6"

84.

8"

From Pladjoe BPM also