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HEALTH

HEALTH

HEALTH HEALTH Milk cuts bone fracture risks F our glasses of milk daily can significantly cut

Milk cuts bone fracture risks

F our glasses of milk daily can significantly cut the risk of bone fractures in adults, suggests a new study. The study has found that boosting calcium intake by drinking milk can significantly reduce healthy adults’ chances of a debilitating bone break. Researchers claim that healthy men and women supplemented with 1,200 mg of calcium per day, the amount in four glasses of milk, reduced their risk of bone fractures by 72 per - cent. The study involved healthy men and women be - tween the ages of 27 and 80 and were divided into two groups for a four-year intervention study. One group

was given a placebo, while the other took a daily cal - cium supplement containing 1,200 mg of calcium daily - the calcium recommendation for adults over the age of 51. The results showed that those receiving an addi - tional 1,200 mg of calcium were significantly less likely to have a bone fracture of any sort during the four- year period. The researchers suggest that adults are required to maintain their calcium intakes. Adult bones continue to grow in density and strength until about age 35. After that, preventing further bone loss is essential.

Eating fat = Less sleep

The amount of fat eaten during the day seems to negatively affect the sleep patterns of healthy adults, according to a new study. The study, focussed on 52 healthy volunteers between the ages of 20 and 45. Their food intake was analysed over a three-day period, while their sleep pattern was evaluated by polysomnographic recording. The results showed that total fat intake and dinner fat intake seem to influence the sleep pattern negatively.

fat intake seem to influence the sleep pattern negatively. Cell phone to help in cancer care

Cell phone to help in cancer care

Cell phones are being used to help young cancer patients manage the side-effects of chemotherapy at home, according to a new study. Under the study, teenagers and young adults were provided special cell phones that enabled them to record and forward details of symptoms to their doctors. The phones were capable of gauging the most common symptoms of chemotherapy-related side-effects. If they were found to be serious, the phone triggered an alert at the hospital. Spe- cially trained nurses would then ring the patient and, if necessary, ask him or her to come to the hospital. The new initiative was presented at the Teenage Cancer Trust’s Fifth In- ternational Conference on Teenage and Young Adult Cancer Medicine. The initiative, called the Advanced Symptom Management System for Young People (ASyMS-YG) seemed capable of transforming the way young people with cancer were cared for, said Faith Gibson of Institute of Child Health in London.

iPods leading to a new generation of deaf young adults
iPods leading to a new generation of
deaf young adults

You might love listening to your favourite music on your iPods, but a new survey has revealed that more than 70 percent of young adults are loosing their hearing power, thanks to the increasing use of headphones. The study suggests that this may be due to listening to music played at danger- ously loud levels through headphones. Experts say that although it is happening, definitely, it is occuring gradually and people just don not notice it. They suggest that safe headphone audio levels were 85 decibels, averaged over an eight-hour day and also advised workers exposed to loud machinery or industrial noise to wear earmuffs or plugs to protect their hearing.

Air in modern aircraft cabin healthier than in other crowded places

You need not worry about catching an infectious disease or bug next time you climb on board an aeroplane packed with people, for a study suggests that the quality of air filtered through a modern aircraft cabin is far better than in other crowded places. Many passengers might be con- cerned that the high recirculation rates of cabin air on modern aircraft pose a particular risk for infection. However, experts say that outside air entering an aircraft cabin at altitude is essentially sterile and air particle filtration systems installed cause minimal spread of infec- tion on board aircrafts. The evidence suggests that passen- gers’ health is not greatly at risk through air travel and widespread infections are unlikely.

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that passen- gers’ health is not greatly at risk through air travel and widespread infections are

July 08

that passen- gers’ health is not greatly at risk through air travel and widespread infections are
that passen- gers’ health is not greatly at risk through air travel and widespread infections are