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Explain classes of person who cannot join trade union?

A trade union is an organisation made up of members which is membership-based organisation and its membership must be made up mainly of workers. One of a trade union's main aims is to protect and advance the interests of its members in the workplace. Most trade unions are independent of any employer. However, trade unionised to develop close working relationships with employers. This can sometimes take the form of a partnership agreement between the employer and the trade union which identifies their common interests and objectives.

The Industrial Relations Act 1967 accords workmen as well as employers the right to form trade unions, the right to join trade unions, and the right to participate in the activities of trade unions. In order to buttress these rights, it also imposes various duties on employers, workmen, and their unions, some of which are fairly general in nature, while others are quite specific. However, this Act applies primarily to the Private Sector. None of the aforementioned rights is absolute: all are qualified by the Industrial Relations Act 1967 itself or by the Trade Unions Act 1959, which applies to both the Private and Public Sectors. Under the Trade Unions Act 1959, the following classes of persons can neither join nor be accepted as members by any trade union.

(i) (ii)

any person below the age of 16 years; any student of an educational institution established by or under a Written law, unless he is employed as an employee and is over the age of 18 years;

(iii)

any person employed or engaged in a trade or occupation or industry other than the one in respect of which the trade union is registered

(iv)

any "public officer" which is any person in the permanent or temporary employment of the Federal or a State Government. However, the King may exempt from this prohibition either wholly or conditionally any category

or class of public officers, other than:

(i) (ii) (iii)

the Armed Forces; the Police Force; the Education Service;

(iv) (v) (vi) (vii) (viii)

the Railway Service; the Judicial and Legal Service; the Federal Public Service; the State Public Services; and Joint Public Services

The public officers prohibited under any written law from being members of a trade union; public officers engaged in a confidential or security capacity and public officers holding any post in the managerial and professional group, except such public officers in this group as are excluded from this prohibition by a written direction issued by the Chief Secretary to the Federal Government.

An employee of a statutory authority can only join or be accepted as a member by a trade union whose membership is confined exclusively to employees of that particular statutory authority. And an employee of a local authority can only join or be accepted as a member by a trade union whose membership is confined exclusively to employees of one or more local authorities. Even then, an employee of a statutory or local authority who is engaged in a confidential or security capacity cannot join nor be accepted as a member by any trade union or holds any post in the managerial and professional group or the equivalent there of cannot join or be accepted as a member by any Wade union, except such of these persons as are excluded from this prohibition by a women direction issued by the Chief Secretary to the Federal Government.

A "Statutory Authority" means a body established, appointed or constituted by any written law, whether federal or state, including a local authority. It should be noted that the term "Public Sector" as used here does not include any public corporation or state enterprise engaged in agricultural, mining, commercial or industrial activities which is the so-called "public enterprise.

Even though those classes of workers are not have the legal rights under the Trade Union, they have their own organization to protect their rights and giving them benefits.