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NY PUBLIC LIBRARY THE BRANCH LIBRARIES

3 3333 08115 4086

7^34

THE CENTRAL CHILDREN* ! RQQB

'SR

53" STREET

iYORK, M 3 Yo

\

THE SCOTTISH CLANS

AND

THEIR TARTANS

WITH NOTES

"Nowhere beats the heart so kindly

As beneath the tartan plaid." AYTOUN.

LIBRARY EDITION

W. & A. K. JOHNSTON, LIMITED

EDINBURGH AND LONDON

THE NEW YO

PUBLIC LIBRA

7034

MD

TILDEN FOUNDATIONS.

1 1 . C < : : . ; . I . . c
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CONTENTS.

MAP OF SCOTLAND DIVIDED INTO

INTO

CLANS.

INTRODUCTORY NOTE.

LIST OF NATIVE DYES. BADGES OF THE CLANS.

WAR CRIES.

1. BRODIE OF BRODIE. 2. BRUCE, KING ROBERT.

3.

BUCHANAN.

4.

CAMERON, ERRACHT.

5.

CAMERON, LOCHEIL.

0.

CAMPBELL, ARGYLL, CHIEF.

7.

CAMPBELL, BREADALBANE.

8.

CAMPBELL, CAWDOR.

( .i.

CAMPBELL, LOUDOUN.

10.

CHISHOLM.

11.

CLERGY.

12.

COLQUHOUN.

13.

CUMIN.

14.

DAVIDSON.

15." DOUGLAS.

16.

DRUMMOND.

17.

DUNDAS.

18.

ELLIOT.

19.

ERSKINE.

20.

FARQUHARSON.

21.

FERGUSSON.

22.

FORBES.

23.

FORTY-SECOND. "BLACK

WATCH," AND CAMPBELL.

24.

25.

26.

27.

28.

29.

30.

31.

32.

33.

34.

35.

36.

37.

38.

FRASER.

GORDON.

GRAHAM.

GRANT.

GUNN.

JACOBITE.

JOHNSTON.

KERR.

LAMOND.

LESLIE.

LINDSAY.

LOGAN OR MACLENNAN.

MACALISTER.

MACALPINE.

MACARTHUR.

39. MACAULAY.

.

40.

41.

42.

43.

,

MACBEAN OR M^I^EAN.

MACBETH.

MACDONALD.

MACDONALD OF CLA^RA

44. MACDONELL OF GLENGARRY.

45. MACDONALD OF SL.EAI. "

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1. Maclfods of Harris. MacLeods of Lewis.

2.

3. ClanJ)onald(N.tKS.)Afacdonalds.

4. Ckm QuAeie or Skaws.

5. Clan Macian or Maedonalds of

Ardnamurchan and Sunnart.

6. Cian Qillean or MacUant,

i l i ^ CAtn liant.ld of Lo^hqbfr,

\ 'JSStemrts of^<ft,irl.

Ill M'Do-ugals.

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16. M'lntoshesofOlxntilt.

17. BarlofAtholl.

20.

SpoMmgs.

21. Stearf.

22.

23.

24.

25.

C(olt Lauren, Maclarens

Stewarts.

Macgregors.

Jfoc/artoTies.

27! OaUtruiths.

28.

29.

30.

31.

Macaulays.

CTati Donald (South). M'Altistirt.

Campbells.

56

INTRODUCTORY NOTE.

HE Scottish Highlanders are the remnant of the great Celtic

race which remained untouched by the Roman and Saxon

invasions on the south, and the Danes on the east and west

of the country, and they were the last to oppose with

perfect success the otherwise conquering arms of Rome. When, in the year 81 of the Christian era, Agricola

invaded North Britain, it was inhabited by twenty-one

aboriginal tribes or clans.

The introduction of clanship and tartans seems to be beyond the

reach of history, but Logan, in his Scottish Gael (vol. i., p. 230), gives

the following extract from the charge and discharge of John, Bishop

of Glasgow, Treasurer to King James III., 1471 :

"Ane elne and ane halve of Blue Tartane, to

lyne his gowiie of cloth of gold " Four elne and ane halve of Tartane, for a

.

.

sparwort aboun

elne 10s

his

credill, price ane

" Halve ane elne of doble Tartane, to lyne

ridin collars to her lady the Queen, price

1,

2,

10s.

5s.

(Scots)

8 shillins."

In the accounts of the Lord High Treasurer of Scotland, in August

1538, are entries regarding a Highland dress for King James V., on the

occasion of that monarch making a hunting excursion to the Highlands.

The dress was made of vari-coloured tartan.

In

1640, General Leslie states that the Highlanders under his command

were composed of men of the same name or clan ; as to the Tartan,

reference is made as to its price in the Acts of Parliament of Scotland

In more modern times the following references may be quoted.

in 1661.

In the ornamental title to Bleau's Map of Scotland, published

in 1654, two Highlanders are represented in striped clothes, one of them

wearing the

" Belted

Plaid," consisting of a large and long piece of

plaiding, which was so folded and confined by a belt round the waist

as to form a complete dress, plaid and kilt in one piece.

This is sup-

posed to be the origin of the now highly ornamental Highland dress.

INTRODUCTORY NOTE Continued.

Charles the Second, at his marriage in

tartan ribbons on his dress.

1662, wore Royal Stuart

Tartan is not a Gaelic word ; the striped or spotted cloth under this

name is called " Breacan," derived from breac, chequered.

Various

coloured cloths have, from a very early period, been worn by the several Highland Clans ; originally tartan was worn only by the natives

inhabiting the Highlands, which not only excluded the Lowlands or

Border counties on the south, but also the north-east of the country.

The line of demarcation is laid down on the accompanying map, showing

the districts inhabited by the various Clans.

In modern times many tartans have been invented and manufactured, named after the Border tribes of the Lowlands, such as Douglas, John-

ston, Lindsay, Dundas,

etc. ;

these, although not considered Clan

Tartans, are also shown in this work.

On the 1st day of August 1747 (O.S.), after the rising of 1745, an

Act was passed forbidding the wearing of tartan, as any part of a High-

land dress, under the penalty of six months' imprisonment for the first

offence, and transportation beyond seas for seven years for the second.

No Highlander could receive the benefit

of the Act of Indemnity

without first taking the following dreadful oath :

" I, A. B., do swear, and as I shall answer to God at the great day

of judgment,

I have not, nor shall have, in my possession any gun,

sword, pistol, or arm whatsoever, and never use tartan, plaid, or any

and if I do so, may I be cursed in my

undertakings, family, and property,

children, father, mother, or relations,

may I be killed in battle as a

may I never see my wife and

part of the Highland garb ;

coward, and lie without Christian burial, in a strange land, far from the

graves of my forefathers and kindred ; may all this come across me if I

break my oath." Dr James Browne's History of the Highland Clans

1859.

This severe and harsh Act, as might have been expected, was most

unpopular, and, in consequence of the

discontent created by it, it was

gallant

Duke of Montrose.

in 1782 repealed through the influence of the

When the last hope of the restoration of the Stewart dynasty was

extinguished at Culloden, "Culloden! which reeks with the blood of

the brave," the influence of the Clans was greatly weakened, and

by

the

making of military roads through the Highlands by General Wade, the

face of the country and the habits of the people have been completely

changed.

"Yet when time shall have drawn its veil over the past, as over the

INTRODUCTORY NOTE Continued.

present, when the last broadsword shall have been broken on the anvil,

and the shreds of the last plaid been tossed by the Avinds upon the cairn,

or bleached within the raven's nest, posterity may look back with regret

to a people who have so marked the history, the poetry, and the achieve-

ments of distant ages, and who, in the ranks of the British army, have stood foremost in the line of battle and given place to none."

Every now and then we hear an absurd story revived that the

Feileadh beag, the present Highland dress, Avas first introduced in 1728

by Rawlinson, or Parkinson, an Englishman, the superintendent of the

lead mines at Tyndrum, Avho, finding his Highland labourers encumbered

with their belted plaids, taught them to separate the plaid from the kilt

This opinion Avas first broached by an

anonymous Avriter in the Scots Magazine in the year 1798, or seventy

and sew it in its present form.

years after the event is said to have taken place.

It is very strange that

this individual Avas the only person Avho knew of such a thing, and that

he should be so long in making it public !

There are too many descriptions and portraits of gentlemen in the

dress long anterior to 1728 to render this absurd story of any

Highland

value.

It is introduced here from a very learned article by Mr J. G.

Mackay, of Portree, on " The Highland Garb," read by him before the Gaelic Society of Inverness in 1883.

It should be borne in mind that many Clans have from one to five

various tartans, such as the common Clan Tartan, the Chiefs Tartan,

worn only by himself and heir, the Dress Tartan, the Hunting Tartan, and Mourning Tartan. The ignorance of this fact leads to many

disputes as to the correctness of a particular tartan, it being generally

supposed that a clan had only one tartan.

The historical accounts of the various Clans are mostly extracted

from the large quarto work, The Tartans of the Clans of Scotland, by the

same publishers, edited by the late James Grant, author of The Romance

of War, and other popular works.

For others, the publishers have been indebted to Logan's Scottish

of Oban, for several

Gael, M'lan's

Clans, and

to

D. M'Isaac, Esq.,

original histories, and the list of dyos used in staining the tartans.

In the present edition several corrections have been received from

Chiefs of Clans and others, and a list of Badges and War Cries have

been introduced. In every case the tartans in the book have been taken thread by thread from the actual cloth, not from any previously printed

work.

NATIVE DYE5.

The items in the following list have been gleaned from various

sources.

Many of the dyes are still employed in the Highlands.

COLOUR.

GAELIC.

DYES.

Black

Do.

Do.

Blue

Do.

Brown (yellowish)

Do.

Do.

Do.

(dark)

Rusg-Fearna Bun na Copaig

Bun an t-Sheilisdeir

Dearcan-Fraoich, le Aim

Droman, le Aim

Crotal

Duileasg

Preas-dearc, le Aim

Dearcan-Fraoich, le Cnomh-

an-doniblaib

Alder-tree bark.

Dock root.

Water-flag root.

Blueberry, with Alum.

Elder, with Alum.

Lichen.

Dulse.

Currant, with Alum.

Blueberry, with Gall Nuts.

Crimson

Do.

Crotal Geal

\Yhite Lichen.

Crotal Dubh

Dark Lichen.

Cairt-Sheilich

Willow-bark.

Freumhaichean Sheilisdeir

Root of Yellow Water-flag.

Bealaidh

Broom.

Rusg-Conuisg

Whin-bark.

Teasel, or Fuller's Thistle.

Heather, with Alum. Dandelion.

Bramble.

Sundew.

Lichen, Cupmoss.

Rock Lichen.

White Lichen.

Rue root.

Tormentil.

Limestone Lichen.

Wild Cress.

Bog-Myrtle.

Ash-tree root.

Bracken root.

St. John's Wort.

Teasel.

Lichen.

Common Heather, with

(dark)

Flesh Colour

Grey

Green

Do.

Do.

Do.

 

Lus-an fhucadair

(dark)

Fraoch, le Aim

Bearnan-Bride

Preas-Smeur

Lus-na-fearnaich

Magenta

Orange (dark)

Purple

Do.

Crotal, Coinneach

Red

Crotal-nan-creag

Do.

Crotal Geal

Do.

Bun an Riiidh

Do.

Leanartach

Scarlet

Crotal Cloich-aoil

Violet

Biolaire

Yellow

Roid

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Freumh na Craoibh-Uinnsinn Bun na Rainich Lus Chaluim-Chille Lus-an-fhucadair

Crotal

Fraoch, le Aim

Alum.

Do. (bright)

Lus-na-fearnaich, le Sugh Chabar-feidh

Sundew, with Ammonia.

BADGES OF THE CLANS,

SUAICHEANTAS 1 NAN GAEL; OB, THE BADGES OF THE

CLANS, IN GAELIC AND ENGLISH. 2

CLANS.

Buchanan

Cameron

Campbell

Chisholm

Colquhoun

Cumin

Drummond

Fergusson, MacFarquhar, and Farquharson

Forbes

Fraser

Grant, MacAlpine, Mac-

Gregor, MacKinnon, and MacQuarrie

Gordon Graham and MacLaren

Gunn

Johnston

Lamond

MacArthur

MacAulay

MacDonald, MacDonell, Mac-

MacAlister,

Intyre, and MacNab

MacDougal

MacFarlane

GAELIC.

Dearc bhraoileag ; Darag

Darag ; Dearca fithich

Roid ; Garbhag an t-sleibhe

Fearna ; Raineach

Call-

Braoileag nan con ; tuinn

Lus Mine Cuimin

Lus an righ, or Lus mhic righ

Bhreatuinn ; Cuileann

Ros-greine; Lus-nam-ban-

sith

Bealaidh

lubhar

Giuthas

ladh-shlat, Eitheann

Buaidh chraobh, nalaibhreas

Aiteann ; Lus nan laoch

Machall monaidh ; Craobh

ubhal fiadhain

Roid ; Garbhag an t-sleibhe

A' Muileag ; Giuthas Fraoch

Fraoch dearg

A' Muileag; Oireag, foigh-

reag, or feireag

ENGLISH.

Bilberry ; Oak.

Oak ; Crowberry. Wild Myrtle ; Fir Club Moss.

Alder ; Fern.

Dogberry ; Hazel.

Cumin Plant.

Wild Thyme

Holly.

Little Sunflower ; Foxglove.

(the oldest);

Broom.

Yew.

Scotch Fir or Pine Tree.

Ivy.

Laurel.

Juniper ; Roseroot.

Red Hawthorn. Dryas ; Crab Apple Tree.

Wild Myrtle ; Fir Club Moss.

Cranberry ; Scotch Fir.

Common Heath.

Bell Heath.

Cranberry ; Cloudberry.

1 Ao.laoh-suaicheantais means the national costume or dress complete, with the badge, etc. 2 The Gaelic in the lists of " Badges" and " War Cries" have been revised by Duncan MacTsaac,

Esq., Oban, and some important items are now added to them.

BADGES OF THE CLANS Continued.

CLANS.

MacKay

MacKenzie, MacLean, Mac-

Millan, and Maclnnes MacLachlan MacLaine MacLennan, Logan

MacLeod and Ross MacNaughton

MacNeil

MacPherson, Macintosh,

MacDuff, MacBean,

MacGillivray, David-

son, MacQueen, and

many others,

longing

chattan

MacRac

Menzies

Munro

to

Murray

Ogilvie

Robertson

]lose

Sinclair

Stewart

Sutherland

Urquhart

as be-

Clan-

GAELIC. Luachair-bhog ; Bealaidh Cuileann

Faochag ; 1 Uinnsean

Cuileann ; Grainseag dliubh

Conasg

Aiteann

Lus Albanach

Machall monaidh

Bocsa ; Lus nan craimsheag,

braoileag

Garbhag an t-sleibhe

Fraoch nam Meinnearach

Garbhag nan Gleann

Calg-bhealaidh ; Aiteann Sgitheach geal

Dubh Fhraoch ; Raineach

Ros-Mairi Fiadhaich

Conasg

Darag ; Cluaran

Calg-bhealaidh ; Canach or

Canaicheaii

Lus Leth-an-t-Samhraidh

ENGLISH. Bulrush ; Broom.

Holly.

Little Periwinkle ; Ash Tree.

Holly ; Blackberry Heath.

Furze.

Juniper.

Trailing Azalea.

Dryas.

Boxwood (this is said to be Red

the oldest badge) ;

Whortleberry.

Club Moss.

The Menzies Heath.

Common Club Moss.

Butcher's Broom ; Juniper.

Whitethorn, Hawthorn.

Fine-leaved Heath ; Fern.

Wild Rosemary.

Whin or Gorse.

Oak;

also

the Thistle, the

present national badge. That of the Pictish kings

was Rudh (rue), which is

joined with the Thistle in

the Collar of the Order.

Butcher's

Sedge.

Broom ;

Cotton

Gillyflower, Wallflower.

1 According to Logan.

[Vincii Minor

suggested by Logan's Gaelic term.]

an evergreen plant; not the shell-fish periwinkle a

WAR CRIE5;

OR, RALLYING WORDS OF SOME OF THE CLANS.

CLAN.

Buchanan

Cameron

Campbell

Farquharson

Forbes

Fraser

Do.

(later)

Gordon

Grant

Mac Alpine

MacDonald

Do.

(Clanranald)

MacDonell

Do.

(Glen-

garry)

(Keppocli)

MacDougal

MacFarlane

MacGillivray

MacGregor

Macintosh

Maclntyre

MacKay

MacKenzic

MacKinnon

MacLaren

MacLennan, Logan

MacNaughton

MacNeil

MacPherson

MacQuarrie

Matheson

Menzies

Munro

Stewarts (Appin)

Sutherland

GAELIC.

ENGLISH.

'Clarlnnis" 'Chlanna nan con thigibh a so

"

's gheibh sibh feoil

"

' Cruachaii

'Cam na Cuimhne"

' LGnach "

' A Mlior-fhaiche " ' Caisteal Dunie "

' A Gordon ! A Gordon !

' Creag Elachaidh "

"

An island in Loch Lomond.

' ' Sons of the hounds come here

and get flesh."

A mountain near Loch Awe.

" Cairn of Remembrance."

A mountain in Strathdon.

"The Great Field."

"

Castle Downie."

"Stand Fast Craig Elachaidh,"

"The Rock of Alarm."

"Cuimhnich bas Ailpein"

"Fraoch Eilean"

"Dh' aindeoin co theireadh e "

"

Creagan-an-fhithich

"Remember the death of Alpin."

"The Heathery Isle."

"

Gainsay who dare."

" "The Raven's Rock."

"Dia's Naomh Aindrea "

' Buaidh ne Bas "

'LochShMdh"

'LochMoidh"

' Ard-Coille "

' Loch Moidheidh "

"Cruachan"

" Bratach bhan Chlann Aoidh " "Tulach Ard"

"Cuimhnich " bas Ailpein"

"

"

Creag an Tuirc

Druim nan deur "

"Fraoch-Eilean"

"God and St. Andrew."

"Victory or Death."

"The Loch of the Host."

Loch Moy.

"The

Woody Height."

" The Loch of

Threatening " (a lake

near the seat of the Chief tain).

A mountain near Loch Awe.

"

' ' The White Banner of MacKay.

A mountain in Kintail.

" Remember the death of Alpin."

"The Boar's Rock."

"The Ridge of Tears."

"Heather Island," Loch Awe,

" Buaidh no Bas "

"Creag

tain "

Dhubh Chloinn Cha-

Argyllshire.

"Victory or Death."

"The Black Craig of Clan

Chattan."

"An t-Arm Breac Dearg

" "The army of

red" [tartan].

the checkered

"Dail Achadh 'n da thear-

naidh " " Geal 'us

Dearg a suas "

"Caisteal Foulis 'n a theine"

"The field of

the two decliv-

ities. "(?)

"Up

with the White and Red."

"Castle Foulis ablaze " (referring

probably to beacon or signal

"

Creag-an-Sgairbb.

lights).

" "The Cormorant's Rock" (on

wmch is built Castle Stalker).

" Ceann na drochaide bige

" A bridge at Dunrobin.

BRODIE OF BRODIE.

fHIS name" (says Shaw

in his "History of Moray")

"is manifestly local, taken from

originally of the ancient

Malcolm IV. gave lands

rebels." The old writings of

the lands of Brodie.

Moravienses, and were one

about the year 1160, when he the family were mostly carried

I incline to think that they were

of those loyal tribes to

whom

transplanted the Moray

away or destroyed when Lord Lewis Gordon, after-

Malcolm,

Thane

wards (3rd) Marquis of Huntly, burnt Brodie House in 1645. From

of Brodie, living temp.

King

Alexander III., descended Alexander Brodie of Brodie,

College

of

Justice, born 25th July 1617, whose

September 1637, married in

Brodie,

brother of Lord Brodie

styled Lord Brodie as a senator of the

son and successor, James Brodie of Brodie, born 15th

son, and was succeeded by his

Brodie of Aslisk, and grandson of David Brodie of

1659 Lady Mary Ker, daughter of William, third Earl of Lothian. He left nine

cousin George Brodie, son of Joseph

daughters, but no

He married, in 1692, Emily, fifth daughter of his predecessor, and died in 1716. He left three sons

cousin James Brodie, son of James Brodie of

Spynie. This gentleman, Lord-Lieutenant of the

Lady Margaret Duff, youngest daughter

County of Nairn, was born 31st August 1744, and married

of William, first Earl of Fife.

This lady was burnt to deatli at Brodie House, 24th

he died 17th January 1824, leaving

1786 and

two sons and three daughters. Their son James was drowned

April

in his father s lifetime, leaving by Ann,

issue:

of Brodie.

his wife, daughter of Colonel Story of Ascot, two sons and

Brodie, Esq., of Brodie, in Morayshire Lieutenant of

grandfather, January 1824, married, November

Hugh Baillie, M.P.,

of Red Castle and had

live daughters. Their eldest son, William

Nairnshire, was born 2nd July 1799, succeeded his

27, 1838, Elizabeth, third daughter of the late Colonel

Hugh Fife Ashley, R.A., born 8th September 1840, and died 1S89, leaving Ian Ashley now

The other branches of the clan

Brodie was made a Baronet in 1834.

are Brodie of Lethen, and Brodie of Eastbourne, Sussex, and a

x^

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1. BRODIE.

^XXXXV^XXXXV^

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ROBERT BRUCE, KING OF SCOTLAND.

OBERT PE BRUS, the first on record of this race of

knight of Normandy, came into

heroes and patriots a noble

Conqueror. He was of

England with William the

by

such valour and so much confided in

William that after his victory over Harold

England.

Before the end of the

ninety-four lordships in York-

monastery at Gysburn

Northallerton, where

negotiate

to with-

1138. Robert died on llth

he sent him to subdue the northern parts of

Conqueror's reign, Brus was owner of no less than

shire. He left a son, Robert, who founded and endowed a

Soon after the accession of David I.

that monarch whom he had known at

him the lordship of Annandale. For this

David. That

monarch invading England in 1138, advanced to

princely

an army was drawn

to the throne of Scotland in 1124, he visited the Court of Henry I., and obtained from

donation Brus did homage to

up to oppose him. Bruce was sent by the English to

an

eloquent address to that monarch to induce him

August

with David,