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MOREHOUSE COLLEGE - DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY SPRING 2012: HIST 112G/7 or WORLD HISTORY TOPICAL APPROACH CLASS DETAILS CLASS TIME: 8:00-9.15 Am CLASS PLACE: 314 Wheeler Hall INSTRUCTORS DETAILS NAME: Haile M. Larebo OFFICE #: 202J Brawley Hall Telephone: 404 681 7587 Email: hlarebo@morehouse.edu

OFFICE HOURS Tuesday & Thursday: 11:00-12:00 Thursday: 4:00-5:00 PM ANY OTHER TIME: By Appointment Only 1. THE COURSE

1.1. Course Description. History 112 discusses some of the major periods, movements, events, ideas and personalities that helped to shape the modern world. Understandably, the course will not provide details of all the global events that took place in each corner of the world across several centuries, but shall instead, among other things, focus on the following areas and themes: 1. Early American history and the African Diaspora. 2. The history of modern Europe, including the Enlightenment, the Age of Revolutions and the various ideologies and movements spawned by it. 3. African and African-American history since 1800. The course is organized thematically, though chronology is also important. 1.2. Course Objective The course is designed to: 1. Assist students in improving their skills in reading, critical thinking, logical reasoning, clarifying, articulating, summarizing, and listening; 2. Improve their expertise in critical thinking and use of historical sources; 3. Stimulate dialogue and enhance knowledge of bibliographical sources; 4. Acquaint students with tools for analyzing personalities and events and their functioning of society; 5. Help students understand continuity and change in historical development; 6. Teach students to articulate the interrelatedness of historical themes to other disciplines especially in the social sciences and humanities; 7. Highlight the significant contributions of Africa, Europe, and Americas to the history of human civilization.
2. WEEKLY READING SCHEDULE The course reading and discussion assignments listed overleaf are meant to allow you to keep up with the pace of the course. The lectures will not follow the textbook too closely and yet the indicated assignments are the best matches of the subject of that weeks lectures. You are expected to have done these readings before each weeks lectures and discussions. If you dont, you may only find yourself confused. If so, you dont have to blame anybody else but yourself. Please note that each lectures outline and notes are posted on the WebCT and so there is no need for you to take notes during the class.

WEEKLY READING AND DISCUSSION TOPICS


WEEK OF: ACTIVITIES TOPIC AND READING

PART I: EUROPE AND THE AMERICAS 1. 2. 3. Introduction: AA, Preface, Lecture Reentry Assessment and Group Selection The Making of North America [AA: Chs. 2-3; Rd. Chs. 1-3; pp. 154-155] PART II: THE AGE OF REVOLUTIONS The Making of North America 4. 154]; 14 & 16 5. 159] 6. 7. Intellectual and Cultural Revolution: THE ENLIGHTENMENT [Rd.: Ch.4; pp. 151World Upside Down: Political Revolutions: France and Haiti. [Rd. Chs. 5-6; pp. 156Economic Revolution: Britain and Industrial Revolution [Rd. chs. 7; pp. 159-161] Group II Presentation Ideologies and Upheavals: The Various -isms [Rd. pp. 161-169; Ch.9] PART III: THE AFRICAN DIASPORA 8. Rd. Chs. 10-12] 9. 22] Plantation Economy and Slavery in North America: Struggle for Freedom:. [AA. 6-13; Group III Presentation Civil War and Jim Crows: Struggle for Equality. [AA. Chs. 14-26; Rd. Chs. 17PART IV: AFRICA: COLONIALISM, NATIONALISM AND INDEPENDENCE 10. 11. 12. 13. Three Cs: European Scramble for Africa [Rd. Ch. 7, pp. 143-158; Chs. 11 & 13] Paternalism and Dictatorship: Colonial Rule and Resistance [Rd. Ch. 16] Nationalism and Independence [Rd. Chs. 14-15] Group IV Presentation Colored People Unite: Pan-Africanism. [Chs. 11 & 21; Film]

3 GROUP PRESENTATIONS GUIDELINES A. GENERAL GUIDELINES Each Group will work as a team under a leader. He will ensure that each member of the Group participates actively and presents his/her topic without repeating the information that other Group members present. On the day of the presentation, the leader will: 1. introduce his Group and the topics of each member. 2. ensure that the Group and its members give a copy of their topic outline to each student in the class. 3. allocate fairly to each presenter adequate time. 4. grade the Group as a team, and the presenters individually. B. PRESENTATION OUTLINE. Any GROUP or a member of the Group who, on the day of the presentation, fails to provide a copy of the presentation outline to the class will AUTOMATICALLY receive a grade of F for Presentation. Therefore, everyone (the Group and its members) should come with sufficient copies of their presentation outlines and distribute them to each student in the classroom. The presentation outlines should: (a) be submitted prior to the presentation; (b) must be typed; (c) have the name of the Group and that of the presenting member, all written on the top part of the page. C. ASSESSMENT and CRITERIA: The assessors will be the Group leaders and one independent member chosen by the class or the instructor. The instructor will make his own independent assessment. The assessment will be based on the following criteria: 1. ANALYSIS 2. Thoroughness of the CONTENT 3. CLARITY 4. DELIVERY 5. ORGANIZATION 6. TEAM-WORK AND EFFORT 7. PRESENTABILITY & DEMEANOUR 8. USE OF MEDIA (board, computer, overhead, projector). D. RATING. The presentation will be given the following grade: 10 = Excellent 9 = Very Good 8 = Good 7 = Fair 6 = Satisfactory 5-1 = Poor Nota Bene: To earn the top grade (Excellent), the presenter/s should satisfy all the above criteria. For example, it will be inappropriate to give excellent grade even to an outstanding presentation when there is no use of any media (board or IT).