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What Employers Need

Workforce Challenges Among Fabricated Metal Manufacturers in Marion, Polk, and Yamhill Counties
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What Employers Need

July 2012

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
We would like to sincerely thank the employers who responded to the survey. Without the information you provided, this report would not be possible. We would also like to thank the many people who contributed to this report: Gary Gipson, Charles Johnson, Martin

Brooke Jackson, Occupational Skills Analyst (503) 947-1263 or Brooke.D.Jackson@state.or.us

WorkSource Oregon is an equal opportunity program/employer. The following services are available free of cost upon request: Auxiliaryaids or services and alternate formats to individuals with disabilities and language assistance to individuals with limited English proficiency. To request these services contact your local WorkSource Oregon Center for assistance. WorkSource Oregon es un programa/empleador que respeta la igualdad de oportunidades. Disponemos de los siguientes servicios a pedido y sin costo: Servicios o ayudas auxiliares, y formatos alternos para personas con discapacidades y asistencia de idiomas para personas con conocimiento limitado del ingls. Para solicitar dichos servicios, contctese con el Centro WorkSource Oregon ms cercano a su rea. This workforce solution was funded by a grant awarded by the U.S. Department of Labors Employment and Training Administration. The solution was created by the grantee and does not necessarily reflect the official position of the U.S. Department of Labor. The Department of Labor makes no guarantees, warranties, or assurances of any kind, express or implied, with respect to such information, including any information on linked sites and including, but not limited to, accuracy of the information or its completeness, timeliness, usefulness, adequacy, continued availability, or ownership. This solution is copyrighted by the institution that created it. Internal use by an organization and/or person use by an individual for non-commercial purposes is permissible. All other uses require the prior authorization of the copyright owner.

Kraal, Tom Lancefield, Jim Lee, John Miller, Mark Miller, Jessica Nelson, Pat OConnor, Kathi Riddell, Graham Slater, Kim Thompson, Brenda Turner, and Dave Yamaka.

Table of Contents
I. Introduction: Is There a Skills Gap in the Workforce?.......... 4 II. Hard-to-Fill Occupations: Welders Top the List.......... 6 III. Hard-to-Fill Occupations: Employers Cite Skills and Related Shortages as Barriers.......................................... 8 IV. Technical Skills: Machine Use Most Important and Hardest to Find....................................... 10 V. Soft Skills: Good Work Ethic Needed .......... 12 VI. Looking Ahead: Employer Expectations Vary ...........14 VII. Final Observations and Conclusions ................................16

Appendices
A: Methodology and Notes ..........................................18 B: Survey Form .............................................................20 C: Table: All Hard-to-Fill Occupations ....................... 25 D: Table: A Selection of Actual Job Titles ................... 26 E: Table: Occupations Employers Expect Will Grow .. 27

What Employers Need


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I. Introduction:

Is There a Skills Gap in the Workforce?


With nearly 200,000 Oregonians looking for jobs and the economy growing at a tepid pace, it is surprising to hear that employers are having a hard time filling job openings. But for quite some time, that has been the word on the street weve heard that employers are struggling to find applicants with the right skills. Whats more, these anecdotal reports receive support from some of our very own data. One survey we conducted in late 2011 found that 10 percent of vacancies in Oregon are open for 60 days or longer. If it takes two months or more to fill some job openings, even in these times of high unemployment, it sure sounds like there might be a skills gap in the available workforce. A different survey we conducted during the same time period found that 5 percent of employers felt a lack of qualified applicants may prevent them from hiring in the near future. We decided to conduct a pilot survey and learn more about this problem.

In Oregons Workforce Region 3 which consists of Marion, Polk, and Yamhill counties employment in the fabricated metal manufacturing industry has gradually declined during the last 10 years. This is a relatively high-paying industry with many skilled occupations. If the industry has been suffering from a lack of skilled job applicants, detailed information about the problem could help policy makers and training providers propose corrective actions. Thus we surveyed these manufacturing companies about the occupations they are struggling to fill, and the technical skills required for these occupations. We also asked about the soft skills employers struggle to find in job applicants. Finally we asked about employers expectations for the future. Some of the key findings from the survey include: Nearly one-third of the employers who responded to the survey had difficulty filling at least one position in 2011. Eight out of 10 employers with a hard-to-fill occupation said there were skills or related deficiencies in the available workforce.

Welders was cited most often by employers as an occupation that is difficult to fill and an occupation where they expect to see growth. Machine Use is one of the most important technical skills to employers, but also the skill they are having the most trouble finding in the workforce. Employers repeatedly emphasized the need for workers with a good work ethic, a soft skill which includes characteristics like honesty, reliability, and self-motivation. Some employers are not hiring and do not expect to hire in the near future. They cited reasons like the slow economy or plans to retire. These results and more are detailed in the following sections.

What Employers Need

II. Hard-to-Fill Occupations:


Welders Top the List
Two-thirds of the 70 companies who responded to the survey did not have difficulty filling any positions in 2011. The other one-third struggled to fill at least one position. Half of these 22 employers had difficulty filling positions in just one occupation, eight employers had difficulty filling positions in two occupations, and three employers had difficulty filling positions in three or more occupations. Employers reported difficulty hiring for 18 different occupations (Table 1). These occupations represented 148 positions and 60 job vacancies in 2011. For about three quarters of these occupations, difficulty filling vacancies was reported as a barrier to the companys growth.
Welders Top List of Hard-to-Fill Occupations Fabricated Metal Manufacturers, Oregon Workforce Region 3 Occupations* Welders Structural Metal Fabricators and Fitters Assemblers, Multi-task or Team Multiple Machine Tool Setters, Operators, and Tenders Computer-Controlled Machine Tool Operators Cutting, Punching, and Press Machine Setters, Operators, and Tenders Mechanical Drafters Milling and Planing Machine Setters, Operators, and Tenders Production Workers, All Other Coating, Painting, and Spraying Machine Setters, Operators, and Tenders Machinists Computer Numerically Controlled Machine Tool Programmers Grinding, Lapping, Polishing, and Buffing Machine Tool Setters, Operators, and Tenders Millwright Supervisors and Managers of Production and Operating Workers Grinding and Polishing Workers, Hand Mechanical Engineers Inspectors, Testers, Sorters, Samplers, and Weighers TOTAL * See Appendix C for the occupation codes and full titles Responses Positions Vacancies 6 55 19 5 19 8 3 15 7 3 8 4 3 8 3 2 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 36 5 5 2 6 4 6 2 2 1 1 2 2 5 148 3 2 2 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 0 1 2 60

Table 1

Welder was the most common occupation that fabricated metal manufacturers struggled to fill in 2011. It was mentioned by six companies who had a total of 55 welder positions. More than onethird of these positions (19, or 35%) were vacant at some point during 2011. Structural metal fabricators and fitters was mentioned by five companies. They had a total of 19 positions and 8 vacancies in 2011. The survey did not ask employers about the educational requirements or wages for their hard-to-fill occupations, but Employment Department data for all of Workforce Region 3 can be used to approximate this information and make general observations. In Oregon, on-the-job training is the minimum education level for most of the occupations mentioned by survey respondents. Only four of the occupations require postsecondary training or a college degree. Survey respondents, however, repeatedly emphasized their desire for applicants with previous work experience. Only three employers specifically stated that they provide training to their workers.

In 2011, the median wage for all private-sector occupations in Region 3 was $14.29 an hour. For 14 of the 18 occupations reported by employers, the median hourly wage was greater than $14.29. The median wage for the lowest-paid occupation was greater than $11 an hour in 2011. In other words, many of the difficult-to-fill positions are in occupations that pay above-average wages. Thus the educational requirements and average wages for these occupations could perhaps be summarized with the following statement from one of the respondents: We dont require or need people with college degrees but we do offer the opportunity to earn a family wage.

What Employers Need

III. Hard-to-Fill Occupations:


Employers Cite Skills and Related Shortages as Barriers
Of the 22 employers that had difficulty filling positions, most said they struggled to fill positions because of skills or skills-related deficiencies among job applicants (Graph 1). Employers frequently stated that applicants lacked soft skills, technical skills, training, or deficiencies: individuals who lack training have a shortage of knowledge and skills; insufficient work experience means limited time to develop skills and ability. Of the 10 employers who saw a lack of technical skills in the workforce, some cited specific skills such as tank fabrication and the ability to program machines using G-code. Other employers struggled to find applicants with high skills or complete skill sets.
Number of Responses 12

Employers Struggling to Fill Vacancies Due to Skills and Related Shortages


Reasons employers struggled to fill job openings
23 responses

work experience. The latter two reasons are directly related to skill

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0 Lack of Lack of work Lack of training technical skills experience Lack of soft skills (Work Ethic) Other or Unknown Unfavorable working conditions

Graph 1

The four employers who cited insufficient training as a reason they had difficulty filling vacancies pointed to the education system; one employer stated there is no training in schools anymore. In other words, these employers indicated that the absence of formal training programs related to certain occupations was, at least in part, making it difficult to fill some vacancies. All told, insufficient technical skills, experience, or training among job applicants was cited as a challenge to filling three out of five (62%) hard-to-fill occupations.

Across the board, the seven employers who cited a lack of soft skills described work ethic problems. They characterized applicants as lazy, lacking motivation, and unwilling to work. One company cited unfavorable working conditions as a barrier to filling its job opening; the employer described the position as a tedious manual job. At least two employers did not know why they struggled to fill their openings.

What Employers Need

IV.Technical Skills:

In 2011, how difficult was it to find applicants with each technical skill?
(Size of bubble indicates relative response size; number in parenthesis is actual number of responses.)

Machine Use Most Important and Hardest to Find


We asked employers to identify the most important technical skills for each hard-to-fill occupation. We also asked them if it was difficult to find applicants with these skills. Employers used a five-point scale to rate the ease of finding qualified applicants: a score of one (1) meant that they could not find any applicants with the specific skill; three (3) meant they could find some applicants; and five (5) meant that every applicant had the skill. Across all occupations, the most frequently cited technical skill was machine use (Graph 2). It was needed for nine different occupations. Some employers mentioned specific machines, such as planers and press brakes, while others used general terms such as machine operation or equipment knowledge. Machine programming was mentioned five times; CNC (computer-numerically-controlled) machine operation was mentioned four times. Employers felt that few applicants were skilled in machine use.
Cannot find skilled applicants

Other (17)

Use Hand Tools (7)

Every applicant has the skill


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Machine Use (20)

Math (6)

Welding (11)

Software

Read Blueprints (15)

Graph 2
Employers Expect to Need More Workers Skilled in Machine Use
Technical skills employers expect to need more in future
9 8 7 Number of Responses 6 5 4 3 2 1 0 Machine Use Other Software Welding Read blueprints or schematics Mathematics

Graph 3

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The technical skill mentioned the second-most by employers was the ability to read blueprints or schematics. It was needed for six different occupations. Most employers simply stated blueprint reading as the important skill, but one employer specifically desired blueprint reading for welding. Not surprising, this employer linked this skill to a hard-to-fill welding position. And she wasnt alone: three additional employers said blueprint reading was one of the most important skills for their hard-to-fill welding positions. Overall, employers felt that some applicants were skilled in reading blueprints or schematics. Although welder was one of the most common hard-to-fill occupations, welding was only the third-most frequently cited technical skill. It was needed for four different occupations. Three employers were specific about the type of welding skills: they requested TIG (Tungsten Inert Gas) welding; the ability to weld thin metals; and the ability to weld without leaks. Employers felt that some applicants were skilled in welding.

Several employers stated that the ability to use and read a tape measure is an important skill. This ability is included with the broader use hand tools skill. Employers also valued mathematical and computer software skills. Employers mentioned a number of technical skills that could not easily be grouped into a broad category. Some of these other specific skills include chroming, heat distortion, steel fabrication, custom layouts, and pressure vessel codes. On average, employers felt that few applicants had these other technical skills. We asked employers if they expect to see an increased need for any particular technical skills in the next 10 years. Fourteen employers, or one out of five survey respondents, listed a technical skill (Graph 3). More than half (8) of these employers anticipate that their need for workers skilled in machine use will grow in the future. Four employers specifically mentioned CNC (computernumerically-controlled) machine use. Thus the skill which is currently the most important to employers is expected to become even more important in the future.

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What Employers Need

V. Soft Skills:

Good Work Ethic Needed


Technical skills tend to be specific to certain occupations or industries, but soft skills are common and portable across occupations and organizations. Soft skills are the basic skills which every employee needs. They are always demanded by employers, although to varying degrees. It is difficult to train people to have good soft skills; from the perspective of some employers you either have them or you dont. Because they are so transferable, we did not ask employers to tie soft skills to specific positions, but rather asked them to identify soft skills they struggled to find among all job applicants. More than one-quarter (27%) of the survey respondents observed soft-skill shortages among job applicants. For 11 of these 19 companies, the struggle to find applicants with the right soft skills was cited as a barrier to the companys growth.
Cannot find skilled applicants
Other (4)

In 2011, how difficult was it to find applicants with each soft skill?
(Size of bubble indicates relative response size; number in parenthesis is actual number of responses.)

Problem Solving & Critical Thinking (8)

Communication (9)

Work Ethic (24)

Every applicant has the skill


1 Physical (5)

Punctual ity (7)

Interpersonal

Graph 4

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The hard-to-find soft skill described most often by employers was work ethic (Graph 4). It was mentioned by more than onequarter of respondents. The frequency at which it was mentioned (24 times) might be due to the broadness of the skill: it includes characteristics such as integrity, reliability, focus, and willingness to work. It addresses peoples attitude about work, and as Winston Churchill said, Attitude is a little thing that makes a big difference. Clearly employers are looking for people who are dependable, self motivated and trustworthy. Overall, employers said they could find few people with a good work ethic. The second-most frequently mentioned soft skill was communication. This skill includes speaking and writing. It also includes listening, which means not just hearing but, more importantly, understanding. Three employers mentioned the importance of following directions, and these references were counted as part of the communication skill. Employers felt that few applicants demonstrated good communication. Several employers mentioned the importance of problem solving and critical thinking skills, with the greater emphasis on problem solving. Employers felt that few applicants had these skills. An-

other skill mentioned almost as many times was punctuality, or the ability to be on time. Overall, employers said that some applicants were able to be on time. Only one employer mentioned interpersonal skills, which was something of a surprise. This soft skill includes the ability to work in a group setting and get along with other people. In other words, it is a key component of teamwork, and teamwork is necessary for many types of employment. About one-third of production occupations have teamwork in their skill sets. It is possible that in fabricated metal manufacturing the nature of the work requires relatively few interactions with others, or that most applicants are already good team players. Finally, a handful of employers listed physical skills, such as lifting heavy objects, and other soft skills as hard to find among job applicants.

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What Employers Need


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VI. Looking Ahead:


Employer Expectations Vary
We asked employers if they expect their need for any particular technical skills to increase in the next 10 years. Asking about the future is perhaps akin to reading tea leaves or gazing into a crystal ball, but nevertheless, employers offered some ideas. About two-thirds (66%) of the survey respondents had something to say, although less than one-third of companies actually mentioned technical skills. Several companies listed an occupation, and some companies mentioned soft skills. The technical skills were detailed in Section IV of this report. In general, the employers who listed technical skills expect to need more of the same skills which are currently important to their operations. Many respondents anticipate that their need for workers skilled in machine use will grow in coming years.

Ten employers listed eight different occupations they believe will grow in coming years, seven of which appear on the list of hardto-fill occupations. Some employers expect growth in more than one occupation. As with the hard-to-fill occupations, welder was mentioned most often as an occupation employers expect will grow. The other occupations mentioned most often were machinists and computer-controlled machine tool operators. A complete list of these voluntarily mentioned occupations is available in Appendix E. Seven employers mentioned soft skills that they expect will become more important in the future. Given its prevalence across all areas of the survey and all respondents, it was not surprising to see that work ethic was mentioned the most often. These employ-

ers stated their concern using nearly identical wording, which was: many people dont want to work. Employers also expect problem solving and critical thinking, communication, and interpersonal skills to become more important soft skills in the future. So what about the respondents who answered the future needs question but didnt list a skill or an occupation? Four companies said they are able to find qualified applicants whenever they hire. Another sixteen companies, however, cited various reasons they do not expect to hire new workers in the near future. These reasons include plans to retire and close the business, the slow economy, and the small size of the company.

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What Employers Need


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VII. Final Observations and Conclusions


As mentioned in the technical skills section of this report, employers expect to need more of the same technical skills which are important to them right now skills which they are already struggling to find. Thus if the current workforce gaps persist, they will be exacerbated as demand increases. Most employers reported that these skills and related gaps have already stymied their companys growth. This problem could extend to additional companies in the future, if the skills and related gaps are unresolved. Some employers believe the education system is deficient; that there is a lack of training from schools for the skills and occupations in fabricated metal manufacturing. At least a few employers are trying to tackle this problem by providing in-house training opportunities. There are many ways in which businesses, policy makers, and training providers can collaborate to improve the skills of the relevant workforce. We hope this report sheds light on some of the problems facing local fabricated metal manufacturers and assists key players in

crafting solutions. Despite the trend of declining employment in the manufacturing industry, there are clearly still opportunities for people here and now, if they have the right skills, training, work experience or sometimes just a good attitude.

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What Employers Need


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Appendix A:

Methodology and Notes


Methodology: The Oregon Employment Department conducted the Region 3 Hard-to-Find Skills Survey in February and March of 2012. We surveyed private firms with a North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) code of 332 located in Oregons Workforce Region 3, which consisted of Marion, Polk, and Yamhill counties. The survey universe consisted of 114 firms with at least two employees covered by the states Unemployment Insurance program. Each firm in the universe received a survey form by mail (a copy of the survey is included as Appendix B). Employers could respond by mail or through an online response tool. Employers who did not respond to the first survey received a second mailing of the same form. As a final step in the data collection process, Employment Department staff members conducted follow-up phone calls to all of the non-respondents. Overall, the survey received a 61.4 percent response rate.

Introduction: The opening statement that nearly 200,000 Oregonians are looking for jobs is based on the number of people actively using the states job-matching tool, iMatchSkills. As of April 30, 2012, there were 192,460 active job seeker accounts for people with Oregon addresses. Employment Department occupational data: The occupation section references Employment Department data on the average wages and education requirements for occupations in Oregons Workforce Region 3. The wage data comes from the 2011 Oregon Wage Information (OWI). The educational requirements are from the 2010-2020 Occupational Employment Projections. Soft Skills Responses: We received responses to the soft skills question (Section 2 of the survey) from 14 employers. In addition, five other employers listed soft skills in the technical skills section of the survey (Section 1). Thus a total of 19 employers or more than one-quarter (27%) of the respondents mentioned soft-skill shortages among job applicants.

Some employers listed skills more than once, which is why, for example, the number of references to the soft skill work ethic (24) exceeds the total number of employers who mentioned soft skills (19). License and Certifications: We asked employers if they require workers to have any particular licenses or certifications. We received 12 responses in all; nine for welding, and one each for fork lift operator, CNC machinist, and manual machinist.

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Appendix B:

The Hard-to-Find Skills Survey Form

What Employers Need

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Hard-to-Find Skills Survey


Oregon Employment Department Workforce & Economic Research 875 Union Street NE Salem, OR 97311 www.QualityInfo.org Dear Oregon Employer, When your company had job openings in 2011, was it difficult to find people with the right skills? For some companies, were hearing that the answer is Yes. The information you provide on the enclosed survey will be combined with responses from other local fabricated metals manufacturing companies. Responses will be shared with policy makers and training providers, to help them focus Oregons available training resources toward the specific needs of your company and others like you. The questionnaire asks about the positions you had the most difficulty filling in 2011. The questionnaire also asks about the technical and soft skills your company had difficulty finding in 2011. Some examples of technical skills are: welding, machine operation, and spreadsheet software use. Some examples of soft skills are: communication, problem solving, and work ethic. Whether or not you had difficulty filling positions, please take a few moments to complete this survey. Please respond by March 9, 2012. To respond, either: - Fill out the enclosed form and mail it back to us in the postage-paid envelope, or - Respond online via http://tinyurl.com/R3SkillSurvey If you have questions about the survey, please contact the survey team (Jim and John): 503-947-1719 or 855-710-550 Surveys.emp@state.or.us

Thank you for your participation!

Oregon Employment Department: Hard-to-Find Skills Survey SECTION 1: Hard-to-Fill Occupations and Technical Skills
If your company did not have trouble filling any open positions in 2011, please check the following box and skip to SECTION 2 (page 4): A. Which occupation was the most difficult to fill at your company in 2011? Please identify a specific job title: _________________________________________________________________________________ At this location, how many positions are there with this job title? ______ How many vacancies did you have for this occupation in 2011? _______ B. Why do you think this occupation was difficult to fill? _______________________________________ __________________________________________________________________________________________ C. Please list the three most important technical skills (e.g. welding) associated with this occupation: D. How difficult is it to find applicants with each skill? Cannot Can Find Every Applicant Find Some has this Skill 1 2 3 4 5 1. ______________________________________ 2. ______________________________________ 3. ______________________________________

F. How difficult is it to find applicants with each license? Cannot Can Find Every Applicant Find Some has this License 1 2 3 4 5 1. ______________________________________ 2. ______________________________________ 3. ______________________________________ E. Please list any licenses or certifications your company requires for this occupation: G. Is your difficulty filling vacancies in this occupation a barrier to your companys growth? Yes No H. Please share any other comments related to this occupation: __________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________
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(SECTION 1, continued)

What Employers Need

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In 2011, was there a second-most difficult to fill occupation? If yes, please answer the questions below. If not, please skip to SECTION 2 (page 4). A. Which occupation was the second-most difficult to fill at your company in 2011? Please identify a specific job title: __________________________________________________________________________ At this location, how many positions are there with this job title? ______ How many vacancies did you have for this occupation in 2011? _______ B. Why do you think this occupation was difficult to fill? _______________________________________ __________________________________________________________________________________________ C. Please list the three most important technical skills (e.g. welding) associated with this occupation: D. How difficult is it to find applicants with each skill? Cannot Can Find Every Applicant Find Some has this Skill 1 2 3 4 5 1. ______________________________________ 2. ______________________________________ 3. ______________________________________

F. How difficult is it to find applicants with each license? Cannot Can Find Every Applicant Find Some has this License 1 2 3 4 5 1. ______________________________________ 2. ______________________________________ 3. ______________________________________ E. Please list any licenses or certifications your company requires for this occupation: G. Is your difficulty filling vacancies in this occupation a barrier to your companys growth? Yes No H. Please share any other comments related to this occupation: __________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________
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In 2011, was there a third-most difficult to fill occupation? If yes, please answer the questions below. If not, please skip to SECTION 2 (page 4). A. Which occupation was the third-most difficult to fill at your company in 2011? Please identify a specific job title: __________________________________________________________________________ At this location, how many positions are there with this job title? ______ How many vacancies did you have for this occupation in 2011? _______ B. Why do you think this occupation was difficult to fill? _______________________________________ __________________________________________________________________________________________ C. Please list the three most important technical skills (e.g. welding) associated with this occupation: D. How difficult is it to find applicants with each skill? Cannot Can Find Every Applicant Find Some has this Skill 1 2 3 4 5 1. ______________________________________ 2. ______________________________________ 3. ______________________________________

F. How difficult is it to find applicants with each license? Cannot Can Find Every Applicant Find Some has this License 1 2 3 4 5 1. ______________________________________ 2. ______________________________________ 3. ______________________________________ E. Please list any licenses or certifications your company requires for this occupation: G. Is your difficulty filling vacancies in this occupation a barrier to your companys growth? Yes No H. Please share any other comments related to this occupation: __________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________
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What Employers Need


SECTION 2: Soft Skills
If your company did not have trouble finding applicants with the right soft skills, please check the following box and skip to SECTION 3: How difficult is it to find applicants with each skill? Please list hard-to-find soft skills (e.g. communication, teamwork, punctuality) ____________________________________ ____________________________________ ____________________________________ ____________________________________
Cannot Find 1 2 Can Find Some 3 4 Every Applicant has this Skill 5

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When you had trouble finding applicants with the right SOFT skills, was it a barrier to your companys growth? Yes No

SECTION 3: Looking Ahead


In the next ten years, do you anticipate an increased need for particular TECHNICAL skills? Please list those skills in the space provided: __________________________________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________________________________

This survey was completed by: ____________________________________ Phone Number: __________________________ The final report will be available in PDF format. If you would like a copy, please provide your email address: _________________________________________

Thank you for your participation! Page 4

Appendix C:

All Hard-to-Fill Occupations


Appendix C: All Hard-to-Fill Occupations Fabricated Metal Manufacturers, Oregon Workforce Region 3 Occupation Code and Title (SOC) 51-4121 Welders, Cutters, Solderers, and Brazers 51-2041 Structural Metal Fabricators and Fitters 51-2092 Assemblers, Multi-task or Team 51-4081 Multiple Machine Tool Setters, Operators, and Tenders, Metal and Plastic 51-4011 Computer-Controlled Machine Tool Operators, Metal and Plastic 51-4031 Cutting, Punching, and Press Machine Setters, Operators, and Tenders, Metal and Plastic 17-3013 Mechanical Drafters 51-4035 Milling and Planing Machine Setters, Operators, and Tenders, Metal and Plastic 51-9199 Production Workers, All Other 51-9121 Coating, Painting, and Spraying Machine Setters, Operators, and Tenders 51-4041 Machinists 51-4012 Computer Numerically Controlled Machine Tool Programmers, Metal and Plastic 51-4033 Grinding, Lapping, Polishing, and Buffing Machine Tool Setters, Operators, and Tenders, Metal and Plastic 49-9044 Millwright 51-1011 Supervisors and Managers of Production and Operating Workers 51-9022 Grinding and Polishing Workers, Hand 17-2141 Mechanical Engineers 51-9061 Inspectors, Testers, Sorters, Samplers, and Weighers TOTAL Responses Positions Vacancies 6 55 19 5 19 8 3 15 7 3 8 4 3 8 3 2 5 3 2 5 2 2 2 2 1 6 2 1 4 2 1 6 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 36 2 1 1 2 2 5 148 1 1 1 0 1 2 60

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What Employers Need

Appendix D:

A Selection of Actual Job Titles from Employers


Appendix D: A Selection of Actual Job Titles from Employers Fabricated Metal Manufacturers, Oregon Workforce Region 3 Occupation Code and Title (SOC) 51-4012 Computer Numerically Controlled Machine Tool Programmers, Metal and Plastic 51-4011 Computer-Controlled Machine Tool Operators, Metal and Plastic 51-4031 Cutting, Punching, and Press Machine Setters, Operators, and Tenders, Metal and Plastic 51-4035 51-4081 51-2041 51-1011 Milling and Planing Machine Setters, Operators, and Tenders, Metal and Plastic Multiple Machine Tool Setters, Operators, and Tenders, Metal and Plastic Structural Metal Fabricators and Fitters Supervisors and Managers of Production and Operating Workers Job Titles From Employers CNC Programmer CNC Machinist Press Break Operator Mill Operator Planer Operator Basic machine operations Production worker Fitter Fabricator Shop foreman

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Appendix E:

Occupations Employers Expect Will Grow


Occupations Employers Expect Will Grow Farbricated Metal Manufacturers, Oregon Workforce Region 3 Occupation Code and Title 51-4121 Welders, Cutters, Solderers, and Brazers 51-4041 Machinists 51-4011 Computer-Controlled Machine Tool Operators, Metal and Plastic 17-3013 Mechanical Drafters 51-2041 Structural Metal Fabricators and Fitters 51-4081 Multiple Machine Tool Setters, Operators, and Tenders, Metal and Plastic 51-1011 Supervisors and Managers of Production and Operating Workers 41-4012 Wholesale and Manufacturing Sales Representatives Non-technical and Scientific* TOTAL * Was not mentioned as a hard-to-fill occupation. Note : Employers were not asked to list occupations where they expect growth. The responses in this table were voluntarily provided and are not necessarily representative of all fabricated metal manufacturers in Workforce Region 3. Responses 5 3 3 2 2 2 1 1 19

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Employment Department www.WorkingInOregon.org RSPUB281 (0712)

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