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WILKES-BARRE, PA THURSDAY, JULY 26, 2012 50


timesleader.com
The Times Leader
New Dunkin Donuts opens on
Highway 315 in Plains Township.
BUSINESS, 7B
Welcome to the
neighborhood
Americans are taking even
fewer holidays than ever.
LIFE, 1C
USA - Home of
the vacationless
7
6
9
6
8
5
He has still yet to coach a
game for Penn State, but
Bill OBrien has already
received
his first
contract
exten-
sion.
Its just not the way he
would have liked to have
earned it.
Speaking on ESPNs Mike
and Mike in the Morning
show on Wednesday,
OBrien said his contract
called for an automatic
extension in the event of
NCAA sanctions stem-
ming from the Jerry
Sandusky scandal. The
extension is equal to the
length of the penalties.
That means OBriens
original five-year deal
instead runs for nine
years, through the 2020
season. On Monday, the
NCAA imposed a postsea-
son ban and scholarship
reductions that will last
for spans of four years.
Sports, 5B
SPORTS
SHOWCASE
AMERICAN LEAGUE
YANKS 5
MARINERS 2
TIGERS 5
INDIANS 3
NATIONAL LEAGUE
PHILLIES 7
GIANTS 6
NATIONALS 5
METS 2
PIRATES 3
CUBS 2
6 09815 10011
INSIDE
A NEWS: Local 3A
Nation & World 5A
Editorials 15A
Obituaries 2A, 12A
B SPORTS: 1B
BUSINESS: 7B
Weather 8B
C LIFE: 1C
Birthdays 5C
Television 6C
Crossword/Horoscope 7C
D CLASSIFIED: 1D
WEATHER
Ava Swiderski. Hotter,
more humid, a storm. High
89, low 64. Details, Page 8B
SCRANTONState police and
U.S. Drug Enforcement Adminis-
tration agents raided two West
Side businesses Wednesday and
tookone manidentifiedas anille-
gal alien into custody on drug
charges.
The first raid was at the Suno-
co gas station at 973 Wyoming
Ave., Forty Fort, at 8 a.m. After
agents stormed the station, they
moved north to Magikal Garden,
1174 Wyoming Ave. in Exeter, ac-
cording to state police at Wyom-
ing.
State police said the raids were
in response to the alleged sales of
bath salts and synthetic marijua-
na that is sold as potpourri, herb-
al incense or spice in colorful
packages.
The DEAissueda press release
later Wednesday that said the
raids were part of Operation Log
Jam, the first nationwide law-en-
forcement action against the syn-
thetic designer drug industry re-
sponsible for the production and
sale of substances that are often
marketedas incense, bathsalts or
plant food.
The release said similar raids
were made in 100 cities through-
out the country and the results
would be released today at a
press conference in Arlington,
Va.
Arrested at the Sunoco station
and later charged in U.S. federal
court with six felony counts of
distribution of synthetic marijua-
na known as spice was Man-
jinder C. Singh, also known as
Mintu, whom authorities iden-
tified as an employee of the gas
station/mini mart.
DEA raids 2 West Side businesses
CLARK VAN ORDEN/THE TIMES LEADER
This man was taken out of the Sunoco Station in handcuffs after
the Sunoco station in Forty Fort was raided on Wednesday.
Bath salts, synthetics sales alleged
By BILL OBOYLE and ED LEWIS
boboyle@timesleader.com
elewis@timesleader.com
INSIDE: Lawmakers cant keep up
with new drugs, Page 16A
See DEA, Page 16A
CELEBRATING NEW NAME
BILL TARUTIS PHOTOS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
S
elf advocate Christina Hill, center, leads self
advocates from United Rehabilitation Services
of Hazleton in the singing of the national anthem
during a ceremony at the Luzerne County Cour-
thouse on Wednesday morning celebrating the
Luzerne-Wyoming Counties Mental Health/Mental
Retardation Programs name change to the Lu-
zerne-Wyoming Counties Mental Health and De-
velopmental Services.
LEFT: Gail Perrins of Wilkes-Barre signs a unity post-
er at the conclusion of the ceremony celebrating the
Luzerne-Wyoming Counties Mental Health/Mental
Retardation Programs name change.
Two young women with ties to
Kings College in Wilkes-Barre
were killed Tuesday in separate
vehicle crashes.
State police at Shickshinny said
Wednesday that
Kelci Gibbons,
22, of Dallas, died
as a result of a
crash involving
two vehicles on
state Route 487
in Fairmount
Township near
Rickets Glen
State Park at
about 5:45 p.m.
Gibbons had at-
tended Kings
College and was
last enrolled in
the 2011 spring
semester, said
college spokes-
man John McAn-
drew.
About 16 hours
earlier on Tues-
day, Wilkes-Barre
police said Rebecca McCallick, 19,
a sophomore at Kings majoring in
psychology, was struck by a vehi-
cle that drove away on Hazle Ave-
nue at about 2:23 a.m.
McCallick was rushed to Geisin-
ger Wyoming Valley Medical Cen-
ter in Plains Township, where she
died shortly before 3 a.m.
2 Kings
students
killed on
area roads
One fatality a hit-and-run, the
other a two-vehicle crash.
By EDWARD LEWIS
elewis@timesleader.com
Gibbons
McCallick
See FATALS, Page 16A
INSIDE: For
Kelci Gibbons
obituary, see
2A, for Rebecca
McCallicks, see
12A.
A hospital in Poland has been
namedfor Nanticoke native Dr. Stan-
ley Dudrick, who pioneered what
some consider one of the three most
important advancements in surgery
during the past century.
Dudrick, who has a long list of
medical achievements listed in a
biography of his 50-year career, said
he thinks his greatest accomplish-
ment has been training thousands of
doctors andsurgeons andhelpingpa-
tients around the world.
Ive touched a lot of lives, said
Dudrick, 77, whonowserves as med-
ical director of the Physician Assist-
ant Program at Misericordia Univer-
sity in Dallas Township and as pro-
fessor of surgery inthe Yale Universi-
ty School of Medicine in
Connecticut.
Growing up in Nanticoke, the son
of a coal miner, he vividly recalls his
mother, deathly ill with severe rheu-
matic fever and heart disease.
More than anything, he was tou-
ched and moved by the doctors who
made house visits and treated his
mother, and he vowed to grow up to
Polish hospital honors Nanticoke native
By ANDREW M. SEDER
aseder@timesleader.com
See DOCTOR, Page 16A
Dr. Stanley
Dudrick
Kingston attorney John
Nardones quest to buy some
unusual real estate was ful-
filled with his pending pur-
chase of two Susquehanna
River islands.
I wanted to acquire some-
thing unique, and this was a
rare opportunity to buy
unique property, Nardone
said.
Luzerne County officials
thought the islands would end
up in limbo when they failed
to sell at a first-stage, back-tax
auction last fall because of
construction restrictions and
flooding.
We didnt think there
would be any takers, said
county tax claim operator
John Rodgers, of Northeast
Revenue Service LLC.
A subsequent news article
about the islands piqued the
interest of Nardone and oth-
ers, officials said. Two other
potential buyers surfaced for
one of the islands in the Moca-
naqua section of Conyngham
Township.
Properties that dont sell
DON CAREY/
THE TIMES LEADER
Attorney John
Nardone has
submitted a
$15,000 bid to
purchase Macks
Island near the
Mocanaqua
section of Co-
nynghamTown-
ship in the Sus-
quehanna River.
The island was
tied up in a
back-tax auc-
tion.
Islands find buyer
By JENNIFER LEARN-ANDES
jandes@timesleader.com
See ISLANDS, Page 16A
K
PAGE 2A THURSDAY, JULY 26, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
Carle, Catherine
Curtis, John Jr.
Davis, Jane
Gibbons, Kelci
Heiney, Diana
Hensley, Robert
Johnson, James
Kochan, Johanna
McCallick, Rebecca
Marinelli, Daniel
Nachlis, Dorothy
Steinert, Donald
Watkins, William
OBITUARIES
Page 2A, 12A
A STORY ON PAGE 7A OF
WEDNESDAYS Times Leader
should have identified George
Jugovic Jr. as president and
CEO of environmental ad-
vocacy group PennFuture.
BUILDING
TRUST
The Times Leader strives to
correct errors, clarify stories
and update them promptly.
Corrections will appear in this
spot. If you have information
to help us correct an inaccu-
racy or cover an issue more
thoroughly, call the newsroom
at 829-7242.
HARRISBURG One player
matched all five winning
numbers drawn in Wednes-
days Pennsylvania Cash 5
game, so the jackpot will be
worth $125,000.
Lottery officials said 211
players matched four num-
bers and won $308 each;
8,509 players matched
three numbers and won
$12.50 each; and 106,401
players matched two num-
bers and won $1 each.
Thursdays Pennsylvania
Match 6 Lotto jackpot will
be worth at least
$2,650,000 because no
player holds a ticket with
one row that matches all six
winning numbers drawn in
Mondays game.
LOTTERY
MIDDAY DRAWING
DAILY NUMBER 6-3-2
BIG 4 3-3-3-1
QUINTO 4-3-6-2-0
TREASURE HUNT
03-04-14-18-23
NIGHTLY DRAWING
DAILY NUMBER 1-9-5
BIG 4 5-4-6-3
QUINTO 0-6-0-2-4
CASH 5 21-22-29-38-41
POWERBALL 03-14-35-38-46
POWER BALL -- 16
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Issue No. 2012-208
D
iana Heiney, 56, formerly of Pitt-
ston, died Monday, July 23,
2012, at Community Hospice Care,
Dunmore.
Diana was born in Newark, N.J.,
daughter of the late Raymond and
Josephine Biscotto Bogdon.
She was educated in Belleville
High School, Belleville, N.J.
Surviving are her son, Michael
Sampino, Hughestown; grandchil-
dren, Angelia andMichael Jr.; sister,
Marlene Bartoli, Hughestown; niec-
es, Tammy Mecadon-Uritz, Diana
Mecadon, Lisa Mecadon and Ni-
chole Mecadon.
Funeral services will be held at
11a.m. today at the Yeosock Funeral
Home, 40 S. Main St., Plains Town-
ship, with the Rev. Daniel Schwebs
officiating. Committal service and
entombment will be in Greenwood
Mausoleum, Abington Township.
Friends may call this morning from
9 to 11 a.m. at the funeral home.
Diana Heiney
July 23, 2012
K
elci Gibbons, age 22, of Dallas,
died Tuesday, July 24, 2012,
from injuries suffered in an auto ac-
cident.
Born in Plains Township, Kelci
was a daughter of Raymond R. and
Kelly McCue Gibbons, Dallas.
Shewas agraduateof Dallas High
School, class of 2008. She attended
Cazenovia College, Cazenovia, N.Y.;
Hartwick College, Oneonta, N.Y.,
and Kings College, Wilkes-Barre.
Kelci currently worked as the
front deskclerkat theHamptonInn,
Wilkes-Barre.
She played in various youth soc-
cer and other sports programs
throughout her life and was a proud
member of the 2007 State Cham-
pionship Dallas High School Soccer
Team.
Kelci was active in various clubs
and functions throughout her high
school career, including the high
schools dance marathon benefiting
childhood cancer research.
Kelci was a lifelong resident of
Dallas and was working toward her
lifetime goal, moving to California
for the sun and surf.
Preceding her in death were ma-
ternal great-grandparents, Daniel
and Theresa McCue; paternal great-
grandmother, Stella Yurkin; pater-
nal grandfather, Frederick Gibbons;
uncle Robert Gibbons.
Surviving, in addition to her par-
ents, are older brother, Brian Gib-
bons, Dallas; identical twin sister,
Michelle, Dallas, who was born 12
minutes after Kelci; maternal grand-
mother, PatriciaMcCue, Dallas; ma-
ternal grandfather, Conrad
Murph Hislop, Harveys Lake; pat-
ernal grandparents, Mary Ann and
Ronald Strohl, Trucksville; numer-
ous uncles, aunts, cousins and
friends.
People keep asking if there is
anything they can do. There is. We
want to celebrate Kelcis life and not
mourn her death. There will be no
formal funeral or viewing(thats not
Kelci), but instead the greatest cele-
bration of life we can plan. We need
help. We needmusic andmemories,
songs, photos and videos. We need
peopletotell stories about Kelci and
share her life. We need to come to-
gether inpeaceandlovejust as Kelci
would want. Tie-dye and peace
signs are optional but appreciated.
Outdoor arrangements arepending.
Arrangements have been entrusted
to the Harold C. Snowdon Funeral
Home Inc., 140 N. Main St., Shaver-
town, PA18708.
Kelci Gibbons
July 24, 2012
More Obituaries, Page 12A
HANOVER TWP. - Police in
two municipalities are investi-
gating separate shootings at
apartment complexes Wednes-
day morning.
Hanover Township police said
gunfire erupted in the 1800
block of Mark Drive in the Ma-
rion Terrace Apartment com-
plex at about 4:50 a.m. A win-
dow at an apartment was dam-
aged in the shooting, township
police said.
No one was injured. A witness
reported seeing a dark colored
mini-van leaving the scene trav-
eling north toward Wilkes-
Barre.
About 20 minutes after the
shooting in Hanover Township,
Wilkes-Barre police responded
to gunfire at the Sherman Hills
apartment complex on North
Empire Street.
City police said an unknown
person fired multiple rounds
into apartments 403 and 404 in
Building 308 at Sherman Hills.
No injuries were reported.
WILKES-BARRE Ivy Hall,
39, of Academy Street, Wilkes-
Barre, was arraigned Tuesday in
Wilkes-Barre Central Court on
charges he stabbed Terry Wil-
liams with a knife inside a Sam-
bourne Street residence on July
9.
Williams was treated at a
local hospital, police said.
Hall was charged with aggra-
vated assault and simple as-
sault. He was jailed at the Lu-
zerne County Correctional Facil-
ity for lack of $5,000 bail.
A preliminary hearing is
scheduled on Aug. 2.
HAZLETON Police said
Tuesday a yellow and black
BMX bicycle was stolen from a
residence in the 600 block of
James Street.
PITTSTON TWP. A man
was arraigned Tuesday in
Wilkes-Barre Central Court on
charges he sold a stolen motor-
cycle.
Antoine McNeal, 28, of High
Street, Wilkes-Barre, was
charged with receiving stolen
property. He was jailed at the
Luzerne County Correctional
Facility for lack of $3,000 bail.
A preliminary hearing is
scheduled on July 31 before
District Judge Diana Malast in
Plains Township.
PITTSTON TWP. State
police Bureau of Liquor Control
Enforcement said it recently
cited Morgan Inc., doing busi-
ness as By Pass Lounge, 2 Bry-
den St., with fortified or con-
taminated liquor.
WEST WYOMING A man
was arraigned Saturday on
charges he burglarized a service
garage.
Police arrested Jonathan
Daniel Filippini, 19, of Birch-
wood Estates, Exeter, when he
was allegedly found inside a
service garage on Apollo Drive
at about 6:12 p.m. Saturday.
Filippini was wearing pajama
pants when he was arrested,
according to the criminal com-
plaint.
Filippini was charged with
burglary, criminal trespass,
criminal mischief, possessing
instruments of crime and dis-
orderly conduct. He was jailed
at the Luzerne County Correc-
tional Facility for lack of $15,000
bail.
A preliminary hearing is
scheduled on July 25 before
District Judge Joseph Carmody
in West Pittston.
NEWPORT TWP. A man
was arraigned Monday on charg-
es he assaulted a paramedic.
Mark Anthony Lacey, 52, was
charged with aggravated as-
sault, simple assault, resisting
arrest and disorderly conduct.
He was jailed at the Luzerne
County Correctional Facility for
lack of $50,000 bail.
Township police allege in
arrest records Lacey was found
unresponsive in a bathroom of a
Center Street residence on July
5. Lacey was placed in an ambu-
lance and allegedly assaulted a
paramedic, according to the
criminal complaint.
A preliminary hearing is
scheduled on Aug. 1 before
District Judge Donald Whittak-
er.
WEST HAZLETON Police
arrested a man early Monday
morning on charges he was in
possession of a knife and brass
knuckles.
Nick James Berkheimer, 18,
address not listed, was charged
with possession of offensive
weapon. He was jailed at the
Luzerne County Correctional
Facility for lack of $5,000 bail.
Police said Berkheimer was
spotted riding a bicycle on West
Broad Street just before 4 a.m.
Due to other crimes in the bor-
ough, Berkheimer was stopped
and questioned. Police allege in
the criminal complaint Berk-
heimer had a pocket knife and
brass knuckles.
A preliminary hearing is
scheduled on Aug. 1 before
District Judge James Dixon in
Hazle Township.
FORTY FORT A man was
arraigned Monday on charges
he fought with police officers
investigating a drunken-driving
incident in a parking lot.
Mark W. Davenport, 52, of
Main Street, Swoyersville, was
charged with driving under the
influence, resisting arrest and
restrictions on alcoholic bever-
ages. He was jailed at the Lu-
zerne County Correctional Facil-
ity for lack of $50,000 bail.
Police allege Davenport was
driving a vehicle that was in the
parking lot of Turkey Hill on
Wyoming Avenue at about 12
a.m. Monday. Davenport exhib-
ited signs of intoxication and
struggled with officers before he
was stunned by a Taser, accord-
ing to the criminal complaint.
Davenport was transported to
Wilkes-Barre General Hospital
for a blood test.
A preliminary hearing is
scheduled on Aug. 2 before
District Judge David Barilla in
Swoyersville.
WILKES-BARRE -- A woman
was arrested on charges she
stabbed her boyfriend because
he received a friend request
from another woman on Face-
book.
Felicia Alston, 33, of Madison
Street, Wilkes-Barre, was
charged with simple assault.
She was jailed at the Luzerne
County Correctional Facility for
lack of $25,000 bail.
Police responded to Alstons
residence just before 1 a.m.
Monday to investigate a domes-
tic dispute.
Jamel Lewis told police his
girlfriend, Alston, stabbed him
in the leg and slashed his leg
with scissors. Lewis claimed
Alston became upset because he
received a friend request on
Facebook from another woman,
according to the criminal com-
plaint.
A preliminary hearing is
scheduled on Aug. 2 in Wilkes-
Barre Central Court.
DUPONT Scott Suhockey,
40, of Main Street, Dupont, was
charged by police with harass-
ing and threatening neighbors
in his apartment building early
Monday morning.
Police said they responded to
Suhockeys apartment three
times for excessive noise and
banging from 2:20 a.m. to 3:30
a.m. He was arrested after he
told an officer he should have
shot the neighbors, according to
the criminal complaint.
Suhockey was charged with
terroristic threats, disorderly
conduct and harassment. He
was jailed at the Luzerne Coun-
ty Correctional Facility for lack
of $5,000 bail.
A preliminary hearing is
scheduled on Aug. 1 before
District Judge Andrew Barilla in
Pittston.
HUGHESTOWN Police
arrested Mark Smyden, 49, of
Searle Street, Hughestown,
Friday night on charges he as-
saulted his girlfriend.
Smyden was charged with
two counts of simple assault and
a single count of harassment.
He was arraigned Saturday and
jailed at the Luzerne County
Correctional Facility for lack of
$2,500 bail.
The woman sustained facial
injuries and was treated at Geis-
inger Wyoming Valley Medical
Center in Plains Township.
A preliminary hearing is
scheduled on July 25 before
District Judge Andrew Barilla in
Pittston.
PLAINS TWP. A man was
arraigned Saturday on charges
he tried to disarm a police offi-
cer investigating a disturbance
at the Mohegan Sun at Pocono
Downs casino.
Christopher Evans, 33, of
Valley Street, Exeter, was
charged with four counts of
criminal attempt to commit
simple assault, and one count
each of aggravated assault,
disarming a law enforcement
officer and terroristic threats.
He was jailed at the Luzerne
County Correctional Facility for
lack of $25,000 bail.
Police allege Evans was fight-
ing with a woman near the
casinos main entrance just after
2 a.m. Saturday. Evans refused
to leave the property and en-
tered the casino while being
followed by casino security
guards.
Evans shouted obscenities at
the guards and refused to pro-
vide an identification card. He
struggled with a township po-
lice officer after he was stunned
by a Taser, according to the
criminal complaint, and grabbed
the Taser from the officer dur-
ing the struggle.
A preliminary hearing is
scheduled on July 31 before
District Judge Diana Malast in
Plains Township.
WILKES-BARRE City
police reported the following:
Police said Monday a tire
was slashed and doors were
scratched on a 2012 Chrysler on
Henry Street.
Police said they cited James
Barber, 46, of Swoyersville, with
public drunkenness when he
was allegedly found highly in-
toxicated in Penn Avenue Laun-
dromat on South Pennsylvania
Boulevard on July 13.
Police charged Patrick
Whalen, 60, of Kingston, on
evidence of drunken driving
after he was allegedly stopped
driving the wrong way on state
Route 309 on July 16. Two
counts of driving under the
influence were filed against
Whalen with District Judge
Martin Kane.
A preliminary hearing is
scheduled on Aug. 15 in Wilkes-
Barre Central Court.
HANOVER TWP. Township
police cited Heather Muchler,
27, of Mountain Top, with pub-
lic drunkenness after she was
allegedly found intoxicated and
walking along South Main
Street near Oxford Street on
July 10. The citation was recent-
ly filed with District Judge Jo-
seph Halesey in Hanover Town-
ship.
HAZLETON Police cited
Justin Heacock, 26, of Hazleton,
with retail theft after he alleged-
ly stole nine packs of steaks
valued at $96 from Heritage
Foods on South Poplar Street on
Sunday. The citation was filed
Monday with District Judge
Joseph Zola in Hazleton.
POLICE BLOTTER
WASHINGTON -- In a politi-
cal gamble that will reverberate
through the November cam-
paigns, the Senate approved
President Barack Obamas plan
to give tax breaks to all but the
top 2 percent of American tax-
payers over the objection of Re-
publicans.
Democrats believe Wednes-
days actionwill shift the debate
in a Congress that has been
stalemated by partisan inac-
tion, giving momentumto Oba-
mas proposal - and drawing a
contrast with Mitt Romney, the
Republican presidential candi-
date - by sending it to the GOP-
led House. The Senate ap-
proved the measure 51-48, with
twoDemocrats joiningthe solid
Republican opposition.
Failure byCongress toextend
thetaxrates fromtheGeorgeW.
Bush administration would re-
sult in a tax increase on ordi-
nary Americans, a prospect that
poses enormous risk for both
parties.
At the same time, Democrats
rejected a Republican proposal
Wednesday, 45-54, to extend
the tax cuts for all Americans.
Two Republicans, Scott Brown
of Massachusetts and Susan
Collins of Maine, crossed party
lines to oppose the measure;
one Democrat, Sen. Mark Pryor
of Arkansas, joined the GOP.
Emphasizing the importance
of Wednesdays vote, Vice Presi-
dent Joe Biden made an unusu-
al appearance in the Senate to
preside over the session, which
provoked a spirited debate be-
tween party leaders in the usu-
ally cordial chamber.
"Republicans should not
force middle-class families off
their fiscal cliff to protect more
wasteful giveaways to million-
aires and billionaires," said Sen-
ate Majority Leader Harry Reid,
D-Nev. "Were on the side of the
American people."
Kentucky Sen. Mitch McCon-
nell, the Republican leader, not-
ing the presence of Biden, re-
minded the chamber that he
and the vice president negotiat-
ed the 2010 deal that extended
thethen-expiringBushtaxrates
for two more years - until this
December.
McConnell said that Biden,
who under Senate rules was un-
able to engage indebate, should
be"grateful" hedoes not haveto
explain the difference in the
White Houses position be-
tween then and now.
"This is a debate I dont think
you would want to lead,"
McConnell said.
Democrats had been reluc-
tant in 2010 to raise taxes on the
wealthy, but many Democrats
had buyers remorse over the
deal they cut and the party is
playinghardball this year onthe
tax issue.
Senate passage of the tax
measure now puts pressure on
the House, where Speaker John
A. Boehner, R-Ohio, has set
votes for next week on the GOP
proposal.
Obama wants to preserve tax
rates at their current levels for
most Americans, but raise rates
on the wealthiest.
Senate passes Obama
tax cut plan, 51-48
McClatchy Tribune News Service
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com THURSDAY, JULY 26, 2012 PAGE 3A
LOCAL
timesleader.com
SCRANTON
Lupas case delayed
The case against attorney Anthony
Lupas, who is accused of running an
investment scam, will be delayed at
least four months pending a re-eval-
uation of his mental status by a psy-
chiatrist, one of his
attorneys said
Wednesday.
Attorney William
Ruzzo said Dr.
Richard Fischbein,
who was hired to
determine if Lupas
is competent to
stand trial, complet-
ed an initial exam, but wants to
reevaluate Lupas in four months
before issuing a final opinion.
Lupas, 77, of Plains Township, was
indicted in May by a grand jury on
charges he allegedly stole $246,000
from a client. Numerous other per-
sons have filed lawsuits against Lu-
pas, alleging they were also victi-
mized. Prosecutors have said they
are continuing to investigate those
claims.
Lupas remains free on bail, with the
condition he be confined to his home,
pending resolution of the case.
WILKES-BARRE
United Way kick-off set
United Way will host a breakfast
Aug. 2 at 8 a.m. at the Sheehy-Farm-
er Campus Center on Kings College
campus to kick off its annual com-
munity campaign.
All CEO and campaign team
members are invited.
United Way will share its vision
for community-corporate partner-
ship and focus on corporate CEOs
and business leaders, followed by
how companies can have a positive
affect on its community.
Anyone interested can contact
Amy George Feldman at 570-829-
7611 ext. 232, by Tuesday.
WILKES-BARRE
Wilkes offering info
Wilkes University will host an
information session Aug. 13 from 6
to 8 p.m. for adults interested in
pursuing an advanced degree or
certification in a variety of academic
fields.
University staff will answer ques-
tions about financial aid and admis-
sions procedures. Faculty will be
available to discuss masters pro-
grams in business administration,
creative writing, education, electri-
cal engineering, engineering man-
agement, mathematics, mechanical
engineering and nursing.
Wilkes also several offers a certif-
icate in sustainability management,
masters degree programs for educa-
tors, a masters degree in bioengi-
neering and doctoral programs in
education and nursing.
Adults wishing to complete their
degree can learn about the accelerat-
ed bachelor of business adminis-
tration program. A transfer counsel-
or will be on hand to review tran-
scripts and discuss the transfer
process. Adults who have a bache-
lors degree and want to change
careers can explore the accelerated
baccalaureate degree in nursing for
second-degree students.
The session begins with regis-
tration and refreshments in the
second-floor ballroom of the Henry
Student Center, 84 W. South St.
There is free parking at the rear of
the building. Register online at
www.wilkes.edu/informationses-
sion. To learn more, call 408-4235.
WILKES-BARRE
Firm sues arson suspect
An insurance company has filed a
complaint against a Berwick woman
charged with setting fire to a Co-
nyngham apartment building and
commercial complex, alleging
$11,834 in damages.
State Farm Fire and Casualty Co.
filed the suit recently in county
court against Gail Schneider, 43, for
the Sept. 5, 2010, fire, on behalf of
its client, Christine Falvello.
Schneider is charged with six
counts of arson and one count of
criminal mischief after police said
she set a fire at the former Lantern
Lane complex on Main Street. The
blaze destroyed four businesses and
four apartments.
Schneider is awaiting trial in coun-
ty court on the charges. The suit asks
for a total of $50,000 in damages
N E W S I N B R I E F
Lupas
Six Luzerne County schools
landed on the Pennsylvania
Department of Educations
LowAchieving Schools list re-
leased Wednesday.
Students who live in the at-
tendance zones of the
schools and meet income gui-
delines can participate in the
states new Opportunity
Scholarship Tax Credit pro-
gram that could help offset
the cost of sending children to
private or other public
schools.
Businesses contribute mon-
ey to nonprofit entities creat-
ed to manage the scholar-
ships. The businesses get a
tax credit worth up to 90 per-
cent of the contribution.
Hazleton Area High School
and Hazleton Area Middle
School are on the list. In
Wilkes-Barre Area, GAR High
School and three elementary
schools Dodson, Kistler and
Heights-Murray are on the
list.
The state combined math
and reading test results in
2010-11 for each school and
determined which schools fell
in the bottom 15 percent
among high schools those
with an 11th grade and ele-
mentary schools.
The final list includes 414
schools from 74 districts in 38
counties. Charter schools and
career and technology centers
were not included in the cal-
culation. According to a press
release, this was done because
parents already have the
choice to send their children
to these educational entities.
A Times Leader analysis
published July 16 had found
the six local schools were at
risk of landing on the list.
That analysis also showed
Pringle Street Elementary in
Wyoming Valley West could
be named low-achieving, but
the school was closed this
Six schools not making grade
They make Low Achieving Schools list
Hazleton Area:
Hazleton Area High 43.7% 61.7%
Hazleton El./Middle 65% 61.2%
Wilkes-Barre Area
GAR Jr./Sr. High 50% 58.6%
Dodson El. 62.1% 47.3%
Kistler El 61.9% 52.2%
Heights-Murray El. 70.5% 50.1%
LOW-ACHIEVING SCHOOLS
The state deemed six Luzerne County
public schools as low-achieving, based
on combined state math and reading test
results. Here are the six schools and the
percentage of students scoring procient
or better in the 2010-11 tests.
Mark Guydish/The Times Leader
Math Reading
By MARK GUYDISH
mguydish@timesleader.com
See SCHOOLS, Page 11A
HATS ON FOR HISTORY
PETE G. WILCOX/THE TIMES LEADER
B
etsy Bell Condron, left, and Angel Jirau chat in the Hughes Memorial Garden behind the
Luzerne County Historical Society building in Wilkes-Barre during the societys 79th Annual
Garden Party and Hat Contest on Wednesday evening.
BEAR CREEK VILLAGE A three-year fundrais-
ing effort helped with the purchase of the final piece
of a 139-acre tract of land protected from develop-
ment.
In June, the North Branch Land Trust acquired the
entire parcel for the purpose of conserving it for per-
petuity.
The trust Tuesday formally accepted the Bear
Creek Lakeview Preserve, adding to its more than
11,500 acres of protected land in eight counties.
Paul Lumia, executive director of the Kingston
Township-based trust, said the final 74 acres cost
$579,000, withthe state Department of Conservation
and Natural Resources contributing approximately
one quarter of the overall cost. Bear CreekVillage res-
idents raised the majority of funds to purchase the
land.
The preserve overlooks Bear Creek Lake and is
open to the public, Lumia said.
Were going to do a master plan, he added.
The preserve sits among thousands of acres of con-
served land and creates a greenway corridor vital to
the maintenance of many native plant and animal
species, according to Lumia.
The preserve was part of the original holdings of
businessman Albert Lewis, according to Lumia.
Lewis, who died in 1923, founded Bear Creek Vil-
lage and lived in what is known today as the Bisch-
wind inn along state Route 115.
Land trust purchase
of acreage complete
By JERRY LYNOTT
jlynott@timesleader.com
WILKES-BARREHavingheard
from adults over the past three
months, the Rev. Michael Brewster
and others involved with the Build-
ing Bridges initiative will have the
opportunity tonight to listen to
kids onthecauses of youthviolence
in the city.
Junior high and high school-age
youths are invited to attend the 7
p.m. meeting at the Wyoming Val-
ley Catholic Youth Center at 36 S.
Washington St.
Before Tyler Winstead was fatal-
ly shot the night of April 5, he re-
portedly played basketball at the
CYC and walked to his Hill Street
home with a friend. The death of
the 14-year-old GAR student
spurred Brewster, the Rev. Shawn
Walker and city leaders into action
to develop a grass-roots communi-
ty initiative to identify issues lead-
ing to violence and come up with
solutions.
To date, mainly adults have at-
tended and offered their input at
meetings held throughout the city
as part of the initiative.
Brewster, of Mount Zion Baptist
Church, acknowledged that teen-
agers might have a totally different
take. We dont know what to ex-
pect with it, he said Wednesday
during a meeting with editors at
The Times Leader.
Neither does he knowhowmany
kids will attend. As an incentive,
gifts are being offered for attend-
ance and participation in the break-
out groups. The group whose idea
will be put into practice by the ini-
tiative will receive a Visa gift card
for eachparticipant. There alsowill
be gift baskets with coupons from
area businesses and restaurants.
From the information gathered
so far, three major issues have been
identified: drugs; parental involve-
ment and parenting skills, and eco-
nomic disparity.
Theres a lot of lack all around,
Brewster said.
The next step is to get more peo-
ple involved, outline short-term
and long-term objectives, and raise
funds through a startup nonprofit
organization created to address the
issues, he added. He estimated it
would take an initial $250,000 to
cover salaries for a full-time direc-
tor, administrative staff and seed
money for projects and programs.
If possible, the initiative wants to
have some programs ready by the
beginning of September to coinci-
de with the start of the school year.
Now, its youths turn
By JERRY LYNOTT
jlynott@timesleader.com
CLARK VAN ORDEN/THE TIMES LEADER
The Rev. Michael Brewster spoke
with Times Leader editors
Wednesday.
Junior high and high school-age
youths are invited to attend the
Building Bridges session at 7 p.m.
today at the Wyoming Valley Cathol-
ic Youth Center at 36 S. Washington
St., Wilkes-Barre.
I F YO U G O
Gene Stilp says he has always supported and
fought for the underdog in his career as a politi-
cal activist. Now he is hoping that voters and
donors will do the same for him.
The Democratic nominee in the
11th Congressional District,
Stilp, a Wilkes-Barre native who
now resides in Middle Paxton
Township near Harrisburg, said
his most recent financial report
depicting his campaign commit-
tees finances shows just how
much of an underdog he is.
From April 5 through June 30,
Gene Stilp for Congress reported
raising $12,079 and spending
$7,196. The campaign reported
entering July with $14,313 in the
bank. Conversely, his opponent,
U.S. Rep. Lou Barletta, R-Hazle-
ton, reported 23 times the money
in the bank on July 1.
With $220,077 raised between
April 5 and June 30, the Lou Bar-
letta for Congress campaign com-
mittee moved closer to the $1 mil-
lion plateau for the 2011-12 election cycle. Ac-
cording to the financial report filed with the Fed-
eral Election Committee, the Barletta campaign
received $143,435 from individual donors and
$76,642 from political committees such as PACs.
With the newly reported income, the committee
has received $982,158 since the start of 2011.
Barlettas campaign spent $121,414 and report-
ed $335,910 cash on hand as of July 1.
Underdog
Stilp lags in
fundraising
Democratic challenger to Lou Barletta in the
11th District has 23 times less in the bank.
By ANDREWM. SEDER
aseder@timesleader.com
Barletta
Stilp
INSIDE: Holden
campaign gives
out cash, Page
4A
See STILP, Page 4A
C M Y K
PAGE 4A THURSDAY, JULY 26, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
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FromApril 5,
three weeks be-
fore the pri-
mary, through
June 30, the
campaign
spent
$364,818, not
all of it on the
failed reelection campaign.
According to campaign re-
ports filed with the Federal Elec-
During his Democratic Party
primary election campaign ear-
lier this year, 10-term U.S. Rep.
Tim Holden repeatedly said the
least enjoyable part of his job
was asking for money to fund
his reelection efforts. Since he
lost in the primary to Moosic at-
torney Matt Cartwright, he
wont have to deal with that side
of the job again.
Now, instead of raising mon-
ey, the campaign committee
thats served him for so long,
Friends of Congressman Tim
Holden, has spent the past few
months giving cash away.
tion Commission, the Holden
campaign has been winding
down its cash, spending some
on office supplies, some on staff-
er salaries and some on phone
bills. But mostly, since the elec-
tion loss, its been sending mon-
ey to other campaigns or refund-
ing some donations to the peo-
ple, companies and political ac-
tion committees that
contributed.
Among those that received a
refund were: Blue Dog PAC, the
Carpenters Legislative Im-
provement Committee PAC,
Comcast Corp. PAC and Amer-
ican Crystal Sugar Co. PAC,
each of which were sent $5,000.
Plenty of Holden supporters
who stumped for him on the
campaign trail received dona-
tions to their campaign commit-
tees, including state Auditor
General Jack Wagner, state Rep.
Mike Carroll and U.S. Rep. Ste-
ny Hoyer of Maryland.
The campaign also sent
$1,000 to Holden as reimburse-
ment for mileage.
With more than five months
remaining in his term, Holden,
D-St. Clair, has no money re-
maining in his campaign coffers
but lists debts and obligations of
$1,178.41.
Another tidbit included in the
report is that the campaign
spent at least $161,000 on media
ad buys, handled by Joe Trippi
& Associates of Saint Michaels,
Md.
Cartwright will face Old
Forge resident Laureen Cum-
mings, the Republican nominee,
in the fall battle for a two-year
term to represent the 17th Con-
gressional District.
Cong. Holdens campaign committee spreading money around
By ANDREWM. SEDER
aseder@timesleader.com
Holden
Stilp, unlike Barletta, also re-
ported debts and obligations
totaling $37,623. Penn Blue
Strategies, a political consult-
ing and campaign management
firm in Harrisburg, is owed the
highest amount at $24,500.
Stilp also loaned his own cam-
paign $2,300 and has not been
repaid.
Stilp, in a phone interview,
said hes well aware of the fi-
nancial disparity between the
two campaigns, and hes hop-
ing voters will realize it too
and relate to him and his cam-
paign and what he is trying to
do to try to change Washing-
ton.
What Im trying to do is
break up the stranglehold that
lobbyists have on Washing-
ton, Stilp said, noting that he
will not accept money from
many corporate political ac-
tion committees like Barletta
has.
Stilp did not report one dime
from any PAC, but he did re-
ceive money from donors who
live out of the district and out
of state. Only three of the 16 in-
dividual donors reside in the
11th District. Others hail from
New York, Maryland, Oregon,
Virginia, New Jersey and other
parts of Pennsylvania.
Stilp said he entered politics
expecting to be the financial
underdog and thats what I am
and what Im going to be. He
said hes proud that his donors
are individuals, not big busi-
ness or politically-backed com-
mittees.
Lance Stange Jr., Barlettas
campaign manager, said Stilps
report speaks for itself.
It doesnt surprise me that
people refuse to contribute to a
candidate that would continue
President Obamas policies
that have hurt our economy.
Lou Barletta enjoys support
from across the district and is
building his campaign organi-
zation every day because he
supports a pro-growth, pro-
jobs agenda that will get our
economy back on the right
track.
STILP
Continued from Page 3A
RENO, Nev. A fighter pilot
on a Navy training mission told
air traffic controllers he was run-
ning out of gas before he crashed
and died at Fallon Naval Air Sta-
tion in March.
Retired Capt. Carroll LeFon
had been playing the enemy in an
Israeli-built F-21 before attempt-
ing to land at the base 60 miles
east of Reno.
The National Transportation
Safety Board hasnt ruled on a
cause but raisedthe fuel issue ina
preliminary report on Wednes-
day.
The NTSB said LeFon aban-
doned two initial attempts to
land at Fallon and diverted to Re-
no but foundthe same snowy and
windy conditions there. Headed
backtoFallon, he toldcontrollers
he was in a critical fuel state be-
fore he maneuvered toward one
runway, then another and
crashed into a concrete building.
NTSB: Pilot
killed in crash
low on fuel
The Associated Press
K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com THURSDAY, JULY 26, 2012 PAGE 5A
N A T I O N & W O R L D
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PITTSBURGH
EPA: Dimock water is safe
T
he U.S. Environmental Protection
Agency said Wednesday it has
completed tests on drinking water in
the northeastern Pennsylvania village
of Dimock and has determined it is
safe to drink, despite the claims of
some residents who say it has been
polluted by gas drilling.
The EPA said in a statement it
doesnt plan further tests, and that
theres no need to provide residents
with alternative supplies of drinking
water.
The town became a focus in the
debate over hydraulic fracturing, or
fracking, when opponents of drilling
showed that some residents have been
able to light their tap water on fire
because of high levels of methane gas.
Some Dimock residents and anti-
drilling groups claimed that Houston-
based Cabot Oil & Gas Corp. polluted
the local aquifer with methane and
toxic chemicals. They have disputed
earlier EPA findings that the water was
safe.
ANAHEIM, CALIF.
Mother condemns violence
The mother of a man who was shot
by Anaheim police officers has con-
demned violent protests against the
killing, saying Wednesday that she did
not want them to become her sons
legacy.
I watched as my son took his last
breath. I watched as his heart stopped
beating for the last time, Genevieve
Huizar said, breaking into sobs.
Please, please, please stop the vio-
lence. Its not going to bring my son
back, and this is the worst thing any
mother could go through.
Her news conference followed a
fourth day of violent protests over
Saturdays police shooting of Manuel
Diaz and the Sunday death of another
man.
WASHINGTON
GOP rejects drill plan
In an election-year swipe at Presi-
dent Barack Obamas energy policies,
the Republican-led House has voted to
revoke the presidents five-year plan for
offshore drilling, replacing it with its
own plan calling for more ambitious oil
and gas development off the U.S. coast.
The legislation will likely go no-
where in the Senate and the White
House has issued a veto threat, but as
with the tax and regulatory bills the
House is also taking up this month, it
puts lawmakers on the record on the
issues that divide the two parties.
BEIJING
N. Koreas leader weds
North Korean dictator Kim Jong Un
is officially off the market.
The countrys state-run television
announced Wednesday that the young
leader of the reclusive nation is mar-
ried to a woman named Ri Sol Ju.
She is believed to be the same wom-
an who has been seen by the North
Korean leaders side during various
public events in recent weeks, includ-
ing a ceremony marking the 18th anni-
versary of the death of Kims grandfa-
ther, the nations founder, Kim Il Sung.
North Korean state media reported
that Kim, accompanied by Ri, attended
a ceremony marking the completion of
an amusement park in the capital of
Pyongyang on Wednesday.
The couple are thought to be in their
late 20s. Ri is believed to be a singer
who has performed in front of national
audiences.
I N B R I E F
AP PHOTO
Muslims in month of fasting
Noor Inamuallah, 7, attends his daily
madrassa, or Islamic school, Wednes-
day during the Muslim holy fasting
month of Ramadan, in a mosque in
Islamabad, Pakistan. During Ramadan,
Muslims abstain from food and drink
during the daylight hours, breaking
their fast at sundown.
BEIRUT -- Syrian authorities were
sending reinforcements to strife-
torn Aleppo, opposition activists
said Wednesday, as outgunned re-
bels in the northern city tried to de-
liver a potentially decisive blow to
the government of President Bashar
Assad.
Street battles were ongoing in sev-
eral neighborhoods, including dis-
tricts close to the gates of the old
city, with government forces shell-
ing rebel-occupied quarters with ar-
tillery and helicopter gunships, the
activists said. Many residents had
fled or remained indoors in the city
of 2 million, they said.
Parts of Aleppo are "a ghost city,"
said one opposition activist in Alep-
po reached via Skype. "The people
are scared of going out in the
streets," noted the activist, who said
he had visited Salahuddin, said to be
under the control of rebels.
"There are destroyed buildings
there and injuries and deaths," said
the activist, who asked not to be
named for security reasons.
Residents reportedly have shut-
tered shops, and gasoline and bread
are in short supply. But neighbor-
hoods away from the fighting in the
sprawling city still retain some sem-
blance of normalcy, though many
people have left.
Video by a BBC crew in Aleppo
shows rebels setting up sniper posi-
tions in battered buildings, firing on
helicopters with a machine gun
mounted on a captured tank, and
rounding up men, presumably sus-
pected regime collaborators.
The Syrian government said its
forces in Aleppo had killed scores of
"terrorists," the official term for the
armed opposition. The state news
service accused insurgents of as-
saulting citizens and attacking prop-
erty in the al-Sakhour neighbor-
hood, which also was reportedly un-
der rebel control.
There was no definitive word on
casualties. Rebel medics were treat-
ing wounded in makeshift clinics,
which have sprung up in battle zones
across Syria during the uprising.
Insurgents called the attack on
Aleppo an all-out offensive that has
galvanized dozens of rebel brigades
from throughout northern Syria.
The fighters are seeking to wrest
control of the city and use it as a
base to expand their power in the
north, where they already have effec-
tive control of large swaths of terri-
tory.
"Aleppo now is the center of the
revolution," said another opposition
activist reached on the outskirts of
the city. "The liberation of Aleppo
means the fall of the regime."
Parts of Aleppo, Syria, a ghost city
Rebel vs. government forces battles
forcing civilians people out.
McClatchy-Tribune News Service
DENVERAdadwhotookhis teen-
age children to the new Batman movie
and was killed when a gunman opened
fire on the theater was mourned
Wednesday, the first memorial service
for a victim of the shootings.
Fifty-one-year-old Gordon Cowden
was the oldest of the 12 people killed in
the massacre at the Dark Knight Ris-
es. His teenage children escaped un-
harmed.
Cowden lived in Aurora, the Denver
suburb where the theater is located. A
family statement described him as a
true Texas gentleman who loved the
outdoors and owned his own business.
A quick-witted world traveler with a
keen sense of humor, he will be remem-
bered for his devotion to his children
and for always trying his best to do the
right thing, no matter the obstacle, his
family said.
Carrying flowers and passing a large
portrait of Cowden, about 150 mourn-
ers gathered for the memorial at a Den-
ver church. ColoradoGov. JohnHicken-
looper paused at the photo before en-
tering the church.
The memorial was also attended by
Aurora Mayor Steve Hogan and Aurora
Police Chief Dan Oates.
Later this week, families of other vic-
tims planned to say their final goodby-
es.
Funerals were planned in towns from
San Antonio, home of aspiring sports-
caster Jessica Ghawi, to Crystal Lake,
Ill., hometown of Navy intelligence offi-
cer John Thomas Larimer.
Also Wednesday, residents of the
apartment building where shooting
suspect James Holmes lived were wait-
ing to see if they could return home five
days after the shooting.
The small building near the Universi-
ty of Colorado, Denver, medical cam-
pus was clearedas a precautionbecause
police said Holmes had booby trapped
his apartment with a trip wire, explo-
sives and unknown liquids.
Because many of the shooting vic-
tims have families outside Denver, au-
thorities have assigned each victims
family a communications officer to
keep them updated on the case.
Holmes is due in court next Monday.
Meanwhile, three hospitals taking
care of people wounded in the theater
shooting said Wednesday they will lim-
it or completely wipe out medical bills
for the victims.
Some victims, many of them young,
are uninsuredandface mounting hospi-
tal bills.
Childrens Hospital Colorado an-
nounced Wednesday it would use dona-
tions to cover the medical expenses of
the uninsured.
HealthOne, which owns the Medical
Center of Aurora and Swedish Medical
Center, also says it will limit or elimi-
nate charges based on the individual
circumstances of the patients.
Goodbyes
begin in
Colorado
First memorial held for victim of
theater shooting spree.
By KRISTEN WYATT
Associated Press
NEW YORK Pioneering astro-
naut Sally Ride, who relished privacy
as much as she did adventure, chose
an appropriately discreet manner of
coming out.
At the end of an obituary that she
co-wrote with her partner, Tam
OShaughnessy, they disclosed to the
world their relationship of 27 years.
That was it.
As details trickled out after Rides
deathonMonday, it becameclear that
a circle of family, friends and co-work-
ers had long known of the same-sex
relationship and embraced it. For
many millions of others, whoadmired
Ride as the first American woman in
space, it was a revelation and it
sparked a spirited discussion about
privacy vs. public candor in regard to
sexual orientation.
Some commentators, such as
prominent gay blogger Andrew Sulli-
van of the Daily Beast, second-
guessed Rides decision to opt for pri-
vacy.
She had a chance to expand peo-
ples horizons and young lesbians
hope and self-esteem, and she chose
not to, he wrote. She was the absent
heroine.
Others were supportive of Rides
choices.
Episcopal BishopGene Robinsonof
NewHampshire, who in2003 became
the first openly gay bishop in the An-
glican world, noted that both he and
Ride were baby boomers whogrewup
in a time when coming out was al-
most unthinkable.
Robinson is 65. Ride was 61 when
she died of pancreatic cancer.
For girls whohadaninterest insci-
ence and wanted to go places women
had not been allowed to go, she was a
tremendous role model, Robinson
said Wednesday. The fact that she
chose to keep her identity as a lesbian
private I honor that choice.
However, Robinson said he had a
different standardfor younger gays
to the point of insisting that his own
clergy in New Hampshire be open
about their sexuality if they are gay or
lesbian.
While there is still discrimination
and coming out will still have reper-
cussions, the effect of those repercus-
sions are vastly reduced now, Robin-
son said. I believe that times have
changed.
AP FILE PHOTOS
In this June 1983 photo released by NASA, astronaut Sally Ride, a specialist on shuttle mission STS-7, monitors
control panels from the pilots chair on the space shuttle Challenger flight deck.
A private matter
By DAVID CRARY
AP National Writer
Sally Ride, foreground, and Tam
O-Shaughnessy in June 2008 dur-
ing an ALA conference in Anaheim,
Calif.
Ride sparks posthumous debate on coming out
WASHINGTON Relentless
GOP criticism of a 12-day-old re-
mark about business owners has tak-
en a campaign toll on President Ba-
rack Obama, forcing him to defend
himself and giving Republican Mitt
Romney a break fromsteady attacks.
The development has delighted
Republicans, who were eager to
shift the campaign focus from Rom-
neys tax returns, overseas assets
and Bain Capital record.
Acknowledging that the Republi-
cans criticisms were hitting a mark,
Obamas team rolled out two new
TV ads this week in which he em-
ployed for the first time what many
Democrats consider a powerful tool:
the president talking directly into
the camera and countering GOP
claims.
Those ads taking my words
about small business out of context
theyre flat-out wrong, Obama
says in the newest ad.
Democrats say the direct to cam-
era format plays to the presidents
strength, and they dont think Rom-
ney can match it. But like any strate-
gy deployed 15 weeks before Elec-
tion Day, it might lose some of its
impact over time.
Most GOP attacks ignored the
broader context of the speech. In it,
Obama discussed a favorite theme:
the claim that government-assisted
infrastructure including roads, re-
search and schools help sustain
American society, including private
enterprise.
Obama forced to defend biz comments
By CHARLES BABINGTON
Associated Press
C M Y K
PAGE 6A THURSDAY, JULY 26, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com THURSDAY, JULY 26, 2012 PAGE 7A
N E W S
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WILKES-BARRE The city
continues to be the host of sever-
al road and construction pro-
jects, causing delays, detours
and inconveniences.
In recent months, motorists
have had to deal with unexpect-
ed changes to traffic patterns,
making travel more complicated
and frustrating.
For example, a portion of
Northampton Street, one of the
citys busiest roads, was repaved
Tuesday and closed to traffic
most of the day. And paving was
continuing Wednesday at Black-
man and Parrish streets.
Inconveniences are inevita-
ble whenever you take on these
infrastructure projects, but they
have tremendous long-term
gains to the city and the commu-
nity as a whole, saidMayor Tom
Leighton. Better roads and ac-
cess in and out of the city create
new investment opportunities
for private business, create jobs
both during the construction
and after, and it brings more peo-
ple intothe city toshop, dine and
live.
He said the orange cones, con-
crete barricades and flagmen are
all positivesigns of ahealthycity.
One of the major detours con-
tinues near the condemned Ster-
ling Hotel, where traffic is one
way into the city from the Mar-
ket Street Bridge and River
Street. Barricades blockone lane
to guard against falling debris
fromtheformer hotel that will be
demolished soon.
We hope to determine a dem-
olition contractor within the
next two weeks, said Drew
McLaughlin, the citys adminis-
trative coordinator. At that
point, we will coordinate a meet-
ing between city, county and
state officials to finalize the fi-
nancing of the project and pro-
ceed from there.
Coal Street realignment
Coal Street is being widened,
and the $12 million project is
nearing completion, McLaugh-
lin said.
As part of the Coal Street re-
alignment project, crews are cur-
rently working on the south side
of Coal Street installing new
curbs, sidewalks and (handicap)
ramps, McLaughlin said.
He said work continues on the
retaining walls on the north side
of Coal Street.
The project is scheduled for
fall completion and is about 70
percent finished now, he said.
Throughout the city, the K-
Route Paving Project is 60 per-
cent complete, McLaughlinsaid.
Crews are currently installing
base course blacktop on North-
ampton and Franklin streets and
should be finished with that this
week. New handicap ramps are
being installed on North Main
Street with milling and base
course to follow, McLaughlin
said.
Mid-August wrap-up
All K-Route work is scheduled
to wrap up by mid-August, and
McLaughlin said the project is
currently on budget and on time.
Its a $2.2 million project fund-
ed 80 percent by the state and 20
by the city, he said.
McLaughlin said more streets
will be paved through the citys
economic development depart-
ment. He said those streets will
be announced in the near future.
Other workinthecityincludes
the Court Street wall construc-
tion near the Courtright Hous-
ing Development. The project is
out for bid and should be fin-
ished by the fall.
As part of an agreement with
the city, Pennsylvania American
Water Co. is installingnewwater
mains and services on Grant
Street fromLehigh to South, and
from Hancock to Sherman; and
York Lane from Hancock to
Grant.
Once the installations are
complete these streets will be re-
pavedcurb to curb, McLaughlin
said.
PAWC replaced water lines on
River Street between Academy
andJacksonstreets andinstalled
temporary blacktop sidewalks.
The project is expected to be
completed sometime in August
and new sidewalks will be in-
stalled. The work is being done
and paid for by the water compa-
ny, said Butch Frati, the citys di-
rector of operations. There is no
cost to the city.
Frati said the water company
wanted to complete the line re-
placement this summer in ad-
vance of the River Street Corri-
dor Project that will calm traffic
in the busy area near the River
Common. That project is expect-
ed to begin in late 2013, Frati
said.
W-B projects still make travel complicated
Mayor says orange cones,
concrete barricades and
flagmen positive signs.
By BILL OBOYLE
boboyle@timesleader.com
DON CAREY/THE TIMES LEADER
Construction workers install curbs and sidewalks at the intersec-
tion of Union and North Main streets. WILKES-BARRE A Hazle-
ton man charged with assault-
ing and robbing a man outside
a city bar was found guilty of
several offenses Wednesday
by a Luzerne County jury, but
that jury deadlocked on the
most serious charge of rob-
bery.
Alex Frederick Kraynak, 25,
of Grant Street, was found
guilty of two counts of simple
assault and one count each of
resisting arrest and harass-
ment.
The jury deliberated
Wednesday for about 3 1/2
hours, and was deadlocked on
a felony charge of robbery,
causing a mistrial on that
charge.
Kraynak was charged in Au-
gust 2011 after police respon-
ded to a report of a man on the
ground being struck by two
men outside the Capri Bar on
Alter Street.
County Judge David Lupas
said Kraynak will be sen-
tenced on the four charges on
Sept. 21, and that a pre-trial
hearing will be held on Sept. 4
for the robbery charge.
Deputy District Attorney
Alexis Falvello, who prosecut-
ed the case, could elect to re-
try Kraynak on that charge.
Kraynaks attorney, Ed Ole-
xa, said in his closing argu-
ment that his client was at the
Capri Bar and noticed Daniel
Soto there.
Jurors learned through
Kraynaks testimony that a
fight erupted between the two
after Soto allegedly tried to
make advances on Kraynaks
girlfriend. Olexa said the fight
between the two was mutual,
and that if there was a robbery
involved in the incident, it
was poorly planned because
the two men were outside the
front entrance of a business.
Olexa said prosecutors did
not present enough evidence
to have his client convicted,
and that there was enough rea-
sonable doubt in the case to
acquit Kraynak.
Falvello said in her closing
argument that Kraynaks testi-
mony was a fantasy and that
his testimony was confusing
because he was lying and had
to remember what he said.
When youre telling the
truth, you dont have to re-
member what you said, Fal-
vello told jurors.
According to court papers,
when police arrived at the
scene around 1:30 a.m., Soto
was being assaulted by two
men. Kraynak was later identi-
fied by police, but the second
person was not.
Police chased Kraynak and
tried to take him into custody,
but he began to struggle and
tried to break free.
Soto told police that while
he was being assaulted, one of
the men repeatedly asked for
Sotos money.
He said he was continually
punched and kicked until po-
lice arrived.
Police said Soto received in-
juries to his face, knee and el-
bow.
Hazleton
man guilty
of assault
near bar
But jury deadlocks on most
serious charge of robbery,
causing mistrial on charge.
By SHEENA DELAZIO
sdelazio@timesleader.com
Sheena Delazio, a Times Leader
staff writer, may be reached at 829-
7235.
C M Y K
PAGE 8A THURSDAY, JULY 26, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
N E W S
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HARVEYS LAKE Police
said they are investigating van-
dalism to five vehicles that had
windows smashed by rocks in
the areas of Pole 60 and Pole 78
on Lakeside Drive. The win-
dows were smashed between 2
a.m. and 3 a.m. Wednesday.
A witness reported a small
vehicle with no headlights was
driving in the area at the time of
the vandalism.
Anyone with information
about the vandalism is asked to
call Harveys Lake police at
639-3316.
PLAINS TWP. A man was
arraigned Wednesday in Wilkes-
Barre Central Court on charges
he assaulted a township police
officer outside Mohegan Sun at
Pocono Downs casino.
Terry Eugene Finan II, 30, of
New Columbia, was charged
with simple assault, disorderly
conduct and harassment. He
was jailed at the Luzerne Coun-
ty Correctional Facility for lack
of $1,000 bail.
Police said they were investi-
gating a report of a man enter-
ing vehicles in the casinos park-
ing lot at about midnight
Wednesday. Finan was ques-
tioned and was permitted to
leave.
He continued to walk in the
parking lot where he was asked
by casino security if he needed
help in locating his vehicle.
Police said in the complaint
Finan approached a township
officer and struck the officer in
the head.
A preliminary hearing is
scheduled on July 31 before
District Judge Diana Malast in
Plains Township.
WILKES-BARRE Three
people were arrested Tuesday
on drug charges after an in-
vestigation by state police Troop
P Vice/Narcotics Unit at Wyom-
ing and Wilkes-Barre police.
Marcus Pilgrim, 21, of Mark
Drive, Marion Terrace, Hanover
Township; Davon McAllister, 21,
of Madison Street, Wilkes-Barre;
and Dee Jones, 30, of Hutson
Street, Wilkes-Barre, were ar-
rested at about 3:15 p.m. on
Coal Street at Custer Street,
where police said they seized 4
grams of heroin and 1 ounce of
marijuana.
They were charged with the
sale and manufacture of heroin
and marijuana and arraigned
before District Judge Daniel
ODonnell in Sugarloaf Town-
ship.
PLAINS TWP. Township
police reported the following:
Darrick Sones, of Waveland,
Miss., reported at 4:48 p.m. on
July 20 that after he checked
into a room at the Red Roof Inn
on state Route 315 and when he
went outside about 15 minutes
later, he noticed that someone
stole two spools of copper weld-
ing lead wire worth about
$1,000 from the rear of his pick-
up.
An Exeter man faces nu-
merous charges after he alleged-
ly fought with police who re-
sponded to a report of a dis-
orderly man at Mohegan Sun
Casino at 2:07 a.m. Saturday.
Police said Christopher J.
Evans, of Valley Street, began
fighting with a police officer
after contact was made. Evans
was Tased several times without
any effect and he began running
away.
Casino security officers and
the police officer tackled Evans,
who then allegedly took the
Taser from the officer. The offi-
cer was able to re-secure the
Taser after several minutes of
fighting. Evans was handcuffed
and taken to police headquar-
ters, police said.
Police said Evans began
threatening the officers lives
and resisting officers directions
after getting out of the cruiser.
Evans was taken to Wilkes-Barre
General Hospital for treatment
of injuries suffered during the
altercation and then taken to
the county prison.
Evans was charged with felo-
ny counts of aggravated assault
and disarming a police officer;
four misdemeanor counts of
criminal attempt simple as-
sault; and misdemeanor counts
of resisting arrest and making
terroristic threats. He was ar-
raigned before District Judge
Rick Cronauer. He was unable
to post $25,000 bail.
POLICE BLOTTER
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com THURSDAY, JULY 26, 2012 PAGE 9A
7
6
8
2
9
7
C M Y K
PAGE 10A THURSDAY, JULY 26, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
N E W S
Hot, muggy weather has raised con-
cerns among state environmental regula-
tors about the quality of the air in the
Wilkes-Barre/Scranton Area.
Starting Aug. 1, the Department of En-
vironmental Protectionwill beginissuing
ozone forecasts for the region.
According to department spokesman
Kevin Sunday, ground-level ozone forms
when pollution from vehicles, power
plants, industry andhomes interacts with
sunlight. Pennsylvanias air quality has
improved steadily over the past 10 years,
Sunday said, mainly due to reduced vehi-
cle emissions, better pollution controls
on power plants and air-quality regula-
tions. But humidity has held pollution
close tothe groundthis summer, andsun-
light has been plentiful.
What were now seeing more as a re-
sult of the weather patterns this year is
more ozone pollutants in the air, Sunday
said. Hopefully, this year is just an aber-
ration, but if that pattern continues in the
future we can continue this monitoring.
DEP had formerly forecast air quality
in five regions clustered around the Penn-
sylvanias largest metropolitan areas, and
Sunday said on Wednesday it would add
eight new regions to that list, Wilkes-
Barre/Scranton among them.
The forecasts will use the U.S. Environ-
mental Protection Agencys color-coded
air-quality indexscale, whichranges from
1 to 200. An index above 101 warns of un-
healthy pollution levels for the very
young, the elderly and those with respira-
tory problems, while levels above 151 in-
dicate a risk for everyone.
Poor air quality makes it harder to
breathe, and can trigger acute respiratory
symptoms like asthma attacks. Sunday
saidarea residents shouldavoidoverexer-
tion on high-ozone days.
You can maybe not take that five-mile
run in the morning when theres a lot of
pollution in the air, Sunday said. Maybe
you do that in the evening when ozone
levels are lower.
Residents can view the air-quality fore-
casts at the EPAs Airnow website,
www.airnow.gov, or signup for daily fore-
cast emails at www.enviroflash.info.
Air-quality forecasts for area coming
DEP will issue reports on ozone starting Aug. 1
By MATT HUGHES
mhughes@timesleader.com
A break from the hot weather may be
coming this afternoon. The National
Weather Service at Binghamton is pre-
dicting that severe thunderstorms could
develop after 2 p.m. today in Luzerne,
Lackawanna and Wyoming counties, with
the potential for damaging winds, large
hail and isolated tornadoes.
T H U N D E R S T O R M S ,
T O R N A D O E S P O S S I B L E
U.S. Sen. Bob Casey wants the
federal government to provide
funding to put more natural gas
vehicles on roadways in Pennsyl-
vania and across the country.
Casey, D-Scranton, said
Wednesday he plans to intro-
duce a bill to create a Depart-
ment of Energy grant program
under which
states could ap-
ply for funding
for initiatives
that encourage
the use of natu-
ral gas as a fuel
and support
public and pri-
vate invest-
ment in natural gas vehicles and
transportation infrastructure.
The reality is that, unfortu-
nately, natural gas is still largely
untapped when you look at it
from the big perspective, Casey
said, adding that natural gas ve-
hicles account for less than a
tenth of a percent of vehicles on
Americas roads.
Casey said the programwould
provide flexibility for states in
different stages of natural gas de-
velopment. Pennsylvania has on-
ly 11 publicly accessible fueling
stations, for example, while the
comparably sized state of Okla-
homa has 60 and California has
140, according to the Depart-
ment of Energy.
The grants could be used by
states to fund infrastructure de-
velopment or to offer tax breaks
for the purchase of natural gas
fuels and vehicles, Casey said.
Casey formerly introduced the
FRACK Act seeking to federally
mandate disclosure of chemicals
used in the hydraulic fracturing
process used to extract gas from
shale plays like the Marcellus.
Casey said he is not abandon-
ing the FRACK Act, but he
noted passage is unlikely in the
short term due to lack of sup-
port, especially among Republi-
can senators.
He said he does not think en-
couraging the use of domestic
energy and protecting environ-
mental interests are incompati-
ble.
I have no doubt that we can
do this right, Casey said. That
we can take steps to protect our
water and our air but at the same
time not slow down that job cre-
ation. We dont have to make the
old false choices of the past,
where you have to choose jobs or
energy versus the environment.
We have to do both.
Casey
promotes
expanding
gas use
Plans bill to create grants to
encourage natural gas use as
a fuel for vehicles.
By MATT HUGHES
mhughes@timesleader.com
Casey
Man injured in fall into well
DON CAREY/THE TIMES LEADER
A man who was extricated from a pump house well at 61 Sorbertown Hill, Hunlock Town-
ship, is transported to an ambulance by emergency workers Wednesday afternoon. Hun-
lock Creek Volunteer Fire Co. Chief Chris Meeker said the worker, whose name was un-
available, slipped and fell into the approximately 5-foot-deep hole, and the property own-
er, who was nearby, called 911. The Luzerne County Technical Rescue Team was called in
and the roof of the pump house was removed to get equipment in. The extrication took
about 45 minutes. Meeker said the man complained of back injuries and possibly a broken
leg and was taken to Geisinger Wyoming Valley Medical Center in Plains Township.
FORTY FORT -- The initial
date for collection of the school
tax real estate bills will be Mon-
day at the borough building
from 2 to 5 p.m., and each Mon-
day thereafter.
Property owners can break
payment down into three in-
stallments. The first payment
must be received by Aug. 31; if
not received by this date no
other installments are allowed.
If the installment option is
taken, taxpayers do not receive
the two percent rebate, but
instead are paying the face value
total. When paying by mail, send
the complete bill and a stamped
self-addressed envelope for a
receipt and remaining coupons
showing dates due. If a mort-
gage company will be paying the
tax bill, send the company the
top portion of the bill in time for
payment at rebate. The compa-
ny will need the original bill to
send along with the check for
payment processing. Those not
receiving a bill by Aug. 10
should contact the collector for
a copy at 287-6337.
LEHMAN TWP. A public
hearing will be held at 7 p.m.
Aug. 20, in the municipal build-
ing, 1183 Old Rte. 115 regarding
a request from Joseph and Erma
Pagliante to re-zone .88 acres of
land off Route 415 from a B-1,
community business district to a
B-2, highway business district.
LUZERNE Wyoming Valley
West School real estate taxes
will be issued Monday with the
mill rate set at 13.82.
The rebate period for the
school taxes will run from Mon-
day through Sept. 27. The face
period for the school taxes is
from Sept. 28 through Nov. 26.
The penalty period for school
taxes will run from Nov. 27
through Dec. 31.
Payments can be made in the
borough building, 144 Academy
St., during the rebate period 6 to
8 p.m. Mondays and Thursdays,
and 1 to 3 p.m. Saturdays.
Property owners with escrow
accounts should forward their
tax bill to their financial in-
stitutions for payment. If you do
not receive a tax bill by Aug. 15,
call John at 288-9640 or email
luzborotax@aol.com and copy
of your tax bill will be sent;
when making payments, pre-
sent the entire bill for a re-
ceipt. For payments by mail,
enclose a self addressed
stamped envelope. The install-
ment payment plan is limited to
homestead and farmstead prop-
erties, with approval from the
County Assessment Office.
The next payments are due
Oct. 31 and Nov. 30. A10 per-
cent penalty is added to install-
ment payments made after the
due dates.
Property owners are reminded
the 2012 county, municipal real
estate, and municipal per capita
taxes are being accepted at pen-
alty value through Dec. 31.
Also:
Council will hold a work
session at 7 p.m. Wednesday,
Aug. 1, in the borough building.
A Nite Out will be held 6
to 8 p.m. Aug. 7, in the Luzerne
Bank parking lot.
The Sewer Authority will
meet at 7 p.m. Aug. 7, in the
borough building.
Council will meet at 7 p.m.
Aug. 8, in the borough building.
Window garbage stickers are
now due and are on sale in Ger-
ritys Supermarket, Union
Street.
MUNICIPAL BRIEFS
TRAVERSE CITY, Mich.
Five weeks ago, Jenn Gibbons
set off on 1,500-mile solo row-
ing journey around Lake Mi-
chigan to raise money for
breast cancer survivors, blog-
ging along the way about life
on the water. Police say some-
one following her well-chroni-
cled voyage from a distance
may have used the informa-
tion to do her harm.
A man broke in as Gibbons
slept in the vessels cabin, po-
lice say, andsexually assaulted
her while the boat was moored
along the shore in Michigans
Upper Peninsula. She is going
public about the ordeal, hop-
ing it helps catch the assailant
and sends a message of
strength to others who have
been assaulted.
Her dream of traversing the
lakes perimeter alone in a
boat is over, but shes contin-
uing the journey with a sup-
port team and partly on
land.
I dont really think its
changed me at all, she said
Tuesday in a phone interview
with The Associated Press,
which generally does not
name sexual assault victims
but is doing so in this case be-
cause Gibbons wanted to be
identified. Its made more
clear to me than ever that I
cant let things stop me from
achieving my goal.
Michigan State Police say
the assault happened around 4
a.m. Sunday as the craft was
moorednear thevillageof Gul-
liver on the lakes northern
shore.
He somehow got on the
boat. Theres a hatch, Sgt. Mi-
chael Powell said. He opened
it and gained entrance.
Investigators believe the at-
tacker, whomGibbons did not
know, may have traveled a
significant distance after fol-
lowing her movements on the
website, Powell said. The site
tracked her progress by satel-
lite and regularly updated her
location.
The assailant, described as
a man in his 30s, may have
been driving a bright yellow
Jeep Wrangler, police said. Its
spare tire had a yellow smiley
face cover. Police released an
artists sketch Wednesday.
They declined to release other
details, such as whether he
was armed and the vessels
precise location. State Police
spokeswoman Shanon Banner
said the agency does not typ-
ically comment about what
evidence has or has not been
collected during an ongoing
investigation.
Gibbons, 27, is co-founder
of Recovery on Water, a Chica-
go rowing organization for
breast cancer survivors. Its
based on the idea that exercise
can help prevent recurrence.
Woman assaulted on
rowing trip, cops say
By JOHN FLESHER
Associated Press
AUSTIN, Texas A military
judge said Wednesday that ac-
cused Fort Hood gunman Maj.
Nidal Hasan will be forcibly
shaved before his Aug. 20 court-
martial unless the Army psychia-
trist relents andagrees toremove
the beard he has grown over the
past two months.
Col. Gregory Gross, the judge,
also found Hasan to be in con-
tempt for violating Army groom-
ing standards and fined him
$1,000.
Gross and Hasan have been at
odds over the beard since June,
when Hasan appeared in court
with facial hair he said he grew
because of his Muslim faith. He
petitioned Army officials for a re-
ligious exemption to grow the
beard, but was rejected in late
June. Since he appeared with the
beard, Hasan has watched pre-
trial proceedings on closed-cir-
cuit television from a trailer out-
side the Fort Hood courtroom.
Hasan faces the death penalty on
13 counts of premeditated mur-
der and 32 counts of attempted
premeditated murder in the Nov.
5, 2009, mass shooting at
Fort Hood.
Army rules say prisoners
who refuse to shave "may be
restrained with the reasona-
bleforcenecessary" toapply
electric hair clippers and a
restraint chair may be used.
Also Wednesday, Gross said
he would review the classi-
fied version of a recently re-
leased report on the FBIs
failures tostopHasanbefore
the shooting, before decid-
ing whether it should be
provided to Hasans legal
team as part of the discov-
ery process. That review found
FBI agents dismissed emails be-
tween Hasan and an al-Qaida-
linked cleric as legitimate re-
search and balked at interview-
ingHasanbefore the shootingbe-
causetheythought it might harm
his Army career.
Accused Ft. Hood gunman to face blade
By JEREMY SCHWARTZ
Austin American-Statesman
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com THURSDAY, JULY 26, 2012 PAGE 11A
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June.
The state does not give test
results for the schools on the
list, or rank them. But The
Times Leader analysis, which
looked at combined percent-
ages of students scoring profi-
cient or better on the two tests,
found both Hazleton Area and
GAR, while in the bottom 15
percent , scored better than
most in that range. In the analy-
sis, three of the six local ele-
mentary schools scored better
than most of those in the bot-
tom 15 percent.
Neither Wilkes-Barre Area
Superintendent Jeff Namey nor
Hazleton Area Superintendent
Francis Antonelli could be reac-
hed Wednesday afternoon, but
when interviewed about the
newspapers analysis results,
both said they would not be sur-
prised if some of their schools
ended up on the official state
list.
Namey said the difficulty in
Wilkes-Barre Area is the num-
ber one school district in the ar-
ea when it comes to transient
population. That complicates
things more than people want
to admit. Were testing a good
number of students that we nev-
er taught.
Antonelli noted the high
schools attendance zone is
the entire district, meaning stu-
dents already attending another
school such as MMI in Freeland
could theoretically be eligible
for a scholarship.
The law that created the pro-
gram limits scholarships in the
coming school year to $8,500
for a regular student and
$15,000 for a special-education
student. Students also must
have household income of no
more than $60,000, plus
$12,000 for each dependent
member of the household ap-
plying for a scholarship.
Schools must apply to partici-
pate in the program and receive
students with scholarships. Pri-
vate and public schools can par-
ticipate. Hazleton Area and
Wilkes-Barre Area now have 15
days to notify parents of chil-
dren in the low-achieving
schools of that status, and to
post information on the scholar-
ship program on their websites.
SCHOOLS
Continued from Page 3A
K
PAGE 12A THURSDAY, JULY 26, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
O B I T U A R I E S
The Times Leader publish-
es free obituaries, which
have a 27-line limit, and paid
obituaries, which can run
with a photograph. A funeral
home representative can call
the obituary desk at (570)
829-7224, send a fax to (570)
829-5537 or e-mail to tlo-
bits@timesleader.com. If you
fax or e-mail, please call to
confirm. Obituaries must be
submitted by 9 p.m. Sunday
through Thursday and 7:30
p.m. Friday and Saturday.
Obituaries must be sent by a
funeral home or crematory,
or must name who is hand-
ling arrangements, with
address and phone number.
We discourage handwritten
notices; they incur a $15
typing fee.
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1-800-578-9547 ext. 6031
JAMES NATHAN JOHNSON,
age 49, diedMonday, July23, 2012,
of natural causes. He was a former
resident of Pine Street, Wilkes-
Barre, until being displaced by a
structure fire on March 6, 2012. He
is believed to have been a former
resident of South Carolina before
his relocation to Wilkes-Barre sev-
eral years ago.
The Luzerne County Coroner
Office is seeking family of Mr.
Johnson. Any person with knowl-
edge of his family is asked to call
825-1664.
DANIEL MARINELLI, 39, of
Plains Township, died Wednesday
morning, July 25, 2012, at Wilkes-
Barre General Hospital.
Funeral arrangements are
pending from the Corcoran Funer-
al Home Inc., Plains Township.
D
orothy (Dottie) Nachlis, of
Pompano Beach, Fla., formerly
of Kingston, died Monday evening,
July 23, 2012, surrounded by her
loving family.
Born in Wilkes-Barre, July 21,
1926, she was a daughter of the late
Morris Gershen and Lena Levine
Gershen.
The family lived in Pringle,
where they hada neighborhoodgro-
cery store. When Dottie was 12, the
family moved to New York.
After high school, Dottie attend-
ed Hunter College and then worked
as a laboratory technician at Syden-
ham Hospital in Harlem. At Syden-
ham, she had the opportunity to
meet Eleanor Roosevelt and jazz
greats such as Billie Holiday and
Nat King Cole.
On a visit to Wilkes-Barre, she
went on a date with her future hus-
band and love of her life, Arnold H.
Nachlis. Arnold and Dottie began
their married life in Kingston.
Before beginning a family, she
worked at Wilkes-Barre General
Hospital. Dottie was an active part-
ner and co-worker with Arnold in
the family business, Nachlis Furni-
ture, Babyland and Kids Korner.
Dottie was an active and giving
member of her community. She was
president of Temple Israel Sister-
hood, Wilkes-Barre; president of the
Council of Jewish Women, presi-
dent of Queen Esther Hebrew Aid
Society, president of the Jewish
Welfare Agency and a life member
of Hadassah.
At the Jewish Community Cen-
ter, she was the first woman to
coach a boys basketball team.
Dottie volunteered with Meals
on Wheels, regularly drove cancer
patients for their treatments toDan-
ville, was actively involved in sup-
porting the public schools, served
on the Board of the Domestic Vio-
lence Service Center and answered
calls on its hotline. She was in-
volved in both the boys and girls
scouting programs.
After relocatingtoFlorida, Dottie
participated in a rigorous training
and became a Guardian ad Litem,
representing the interests of chil-
dren involved in the juvenile court
system.
Dottie was a sports fan. For many
years, she could be seen on Friday
nights sitting in the bleachers, eat-
ing a Sugar Daddy, and supporting
her Kingston Huskies. Dottie and
Arnoldwere part-owners andfans of
the Wilkes-Barre Barons basketball
team, when they played at the King-
ston Armory.
Dottie was preceded in death by
her beloved husband, Arnold H. Na-
chlis.
She is survived by her sister, Syl-
via Freedman, a resident of Albu-
querque, N.M.; by her four children
and grandchildren, as follows, Mar-
vin (Gayle), Long Beach, Calif., and
their children, Alex and Sara; Susan
Liese (Roy), Coral Springs, Fla., and
their children, Mikole Grindel
(Ryan), Brett (Bethany) and Kylea,
Lorie (Abby) San Francisco, Calif.,
and their children, Jeremy (Jennif-
er) and Emma, and Steven (Rhon-
di), Kingston, and their children,
Billie Kenyon (Cory) and Scott. She
was also a great-grandmother to El-
lie and Teddy (children of Jeremy
andJenny), andArwyn(childof Mi-
kole and Ryan Grindel).
Funeral services will be held,
Thursday at 11 a.m. at the Rosen-
berg Funeral Chapel Inc., 348 S. Riv-
er St., Wilkes-Barre, with Rabbi Lar-
ry Kaplan and Cantor Ahron Abra-
hamofficiating. Interment will be in
Temple Israel Cemetery, Swoyers-
ville. Shiva will be observed at the
homeof StevenandRhondi Nachlis,
236 Butler St., Kingston, Thursday
from 7 to 9 p.m., Friday from 2 to 4
p.m., and daily from next Sunday,
July 29 through Tuesday, July 31
during the hours of 2 to 4 p.m. and 7
to 9 p.m.
Memorial contributions, if desir-
ed, may be sent to the Morris and
Helen Nachlis Memorial Fund for
Children, c/o Jewish Family Ser-
vice, 71 W. Northampton St.,
Wilkes-Barre, PA 18702, or the Alz-
heimers Association, 57N. Franklin
St., Wilkes-Barre, PA18701. Condo-
lences may be sent by visiting Dot-
ties obituary at www.rosenbergfu-
neralchapel.com.
Dorothy Nachlis
July 23, 2012
R
ebecca M. McCallick, 19, passed
away on Tuesday, July 24, 2012,
as the result of a hit-and-run acci-
dent.
Born on January 5, 1993, she was
a daughter of William McCallick,
Mountain Top, and Judy Habib
Pribula and husband Tom, of Dor-
rance Township.
Rebecca was a graduate of St.
Jude School, and a 2011 honors
graduate of Crestwood High
School, where she participated in
the Relay for Life, chorus, literary
magazine and the St. Judes Youth
Group.
She was entering her sophomore
year at Kings College, where she
was a member of the Young Schol-
ars Program and was a Deans List
student.
Rebecca was a member of the St.
Marys Our Lady Help of Christians
Church, Dorrance Township, and
was a part-time employee at Weg-
mans.
Rebecca was a ray of sunshine
and will be greatly missed.
Preceding her in death were her
grandfathers, William McCallick,
Sam Habib; and her great-uncle,
Mickey Habib.
Surviving, in addition to her par-
ents, are her sister, Claire McCal-
lick, Dorrance Township; grand-
mothers, Mary McCallick, Wilkes-
Barre; Jean Habib, Mountain Top.
Several aunts, uncles, cousins and
friends also survive.
Friends may call this evening
from 5 to 8 at the McCune Funeral
Home, 80 S. MountainBlvd., Moun-
tain Top. AMass of Christian Burial
will be held on Friday at 9:30 a.m. at
the St. Judes Church, Mountain
Top. Friends are askedto go directly
to the church. Private interment
services will be held following
Mass.
Memorial contributions may be
made to St. Jude Childrens Re-
search Hospital, 501 St. Jude Place,
Memphis, TN 38105.
Rebecca M. McCallick
July 24, 2012
D
onald C. Steinert, age 82, for-
mally of Wilkes-Barre, passed
away peacefully at home in Wyom-
ing, Del., surrounded by his loving
family Tuesday, July 24, 2012.
Don was born in Wilkes-Barre on
July 28, 1929, son of the late Clar-
ence and Erma Steinert.
He was a graduate of GAR High
School, class of 1947, and starred in
football, basketball and baseball.
Don enlisted in the U.S. Air Force
during the Korean War.
Hewas employedfor 46years and
retired in 1995 with the Okonite
Wire and Cable Company as a plant
manager at the North Brunswick,
N.J. location. Don is survived by his
loving wife of 55 years, the former
Joan Gyle, of Mountain Top. They
have two sons, David and his wife,
Jackie, of Somerset, Mass.; Gary
and his wife, Kim, of Clayton, Del.;
two grandchildren, Scott and Melis-
sa, also of Clayton, Del.; step-grand-
child, Robert; brother, Jeff Steinert,
and his wife, Ann, of North Caroli-
na; and sister, Ruth Conklin of Indi-
ana.
Cremation and services will
be private.
In lieu of flowers, donations may
be sent to Delaware Hospice, 911 S.
Dupont Highway, Dover, DE19901.
Donald C. Steinert
July 24, 2012
CAPRARI Samuel, memorial
service 4 p.m. today in Italian
Christian Church, 40 E. Oak St.,
Pittston.
DININNI The Rev. Nicholas, recep-
tion of the cremated remains
9:30 a.m. today in St. Aloysius
Church, Pottstown, followed by
visitation. Pontifical Mass of
Christian Burial at 11 a.m.
DOUGHERTY Helen, funeral 9
a.m. today in Nat & Gawlas Funer-
al Home, 89 Park Ave., Wilkes-
Barre. Mass of Christian Burial at
9:30 a.m. in St. Andre Bessette
Parish, Holy Saviour Church, 54
Hillard St., Wilkes-Barre.
EHRET Corey, celebration of life 11
a.m. today in St. Pauls Lutheran
Church, Route 118, Dallas.
EVANS Betty, funeral 11 a.m. today
in Forty Fort United Methodist
Church, corner of Yeager and
Wyoming Avenues, Forty Fort.
Friends may call 9 a.m. till 11 a.m.
today in the church.
FITZPATRICK David, friends may
call 5 to 8 p.m. today in the
Metcalfe and Shaver Funeral
Home Inc., 504 Wyoming Ave.,
Wyoming.
HILBERT Carol, memorial service
11 a.m. today in Kunkle United
Methodist Church, 177 Old High-
way Road, Dallas Township.
Friends may call 10 to 11 a.m. today
in the church.
HIRIAK Theodore and Mary Ann,
funeral Mass Friday in St. Philip
Neri Church in Pennsburg.
Friends may call at the church
beginning at 9 a.m.
GROSHEK Henry, funeral 9:30
a.m. Friday in Grontkowski Funer-
al Home P.C., 51-53 W. Green St.,
Nanticoke. Family and friends
may call 6 to 9 p.m. today.
JOYCE Irene, funeral 9 a.m. Friday
in Ruane & Regan Funeral Home,
1308 Grove St., Avoca. Mass of
Christian Burial at 9:30 a.m. in
Nativity of Our Lord Parish at
Holy Rosary Church, 127 Stephen-
son St., Duryea. Friends may call
5 to 8 p.m. today.
LAFRATTA Andrew, funeral 9 a.m.
Friday in Baloga Funeral Home
Inc., 1201 Main St., Pittston (Port
Griffith). Mass of Christian Burial
at 9:30 a.m. in St. Joseph Marello
Parish at Our Lady of Mount
Carmel Church, William St.,
Pittston.
MONTAGUE - Ann, Mass of Chris-
tian Burial 11 a.m. Friday in Our
Lady of Lourdes Church in
Weatherly, with visitation at 10
a.m.
MCMULLEN Clinton, funeral 11
a.m. today in Desiderio Funeral
Home Inc., 436 S. Mountain Blvd.,
Mountain Top.
NACHLIS Dorothy, funeral ser-
vices 11 a.m. today in Rosenberg
Funeral Chapel Inc., 348 S. River
St., Wilkes-Barre.
WEAVER Frances, funeral 11 a.m.
Friday in Curtis L. Swanson Fu-
neral Home Inc., corner of Routes
29 and 118, Pikes Creek. Friends
may call 6 to 9 p.m. today in the
funeral home.
WICHT Erin, memorial service 11
a.m. Saturday in Our Lady of
Mount Carmel Church, Lake
Silkworth. Celebration of life in
her parents home in Lake Silk-
worth. Family and friends may
call from 4 to 7 p.m. Friday in
Curtis L. Swanson Funeral Home
Inc., corner of Routes 29 and 118,
Pikes Creek.
WINTERS Kevin, viewing 6 to 9
p.m. today in H. Merritt Hughes
Funeral Home Inc., 451 N. Main
St., Wilkes-Barre. A Memorial
Mass at 10 Friday in St. Frances X
Cabrini Church, Carverton
WHALEY Jeanette, funeral 10 a.m.
Friday in East Lawn Memorial
Park of Marietta, Ohio.
FUNERALS
JOHANNA KOCHAN of Tunk-
hannock and Centermoreland
died Wednesday afternoon, July
25, 2012, inthe Robert Packer Hos-
pital, Sayre.
Calling hours will be at the
Sheldon-Kukuchka Funeral Home
Inc., 73 W. Tioga St., Tunkhan-
nock, Friday evening, 5 to 8 p.m.,
with a Mass of Christian Burial at
the Church of the Nativity BVMin
Tunkhannock on Saturday morn-
ing. Interment will be inMt. Olivet
Cemetery Carverton.
Robert H. Hensley, 69, a lifelong
resident of the North End section of
Wilkes-Barre, died Monday, July 23,
2012, at Riverstreet Manor, Wilkes-
Barre, following a lengthy illness.
Mr. Hensley was born in Wilkes-
Barre, son of the late Charles F. and
Betty Krumanocker Hensley, and
was a graduate of James M. Cough-
lin High School, Wilkes-Barre.
He received his teaching degree
at Bloomsburg State College (now
BloomsburgUniversity) andalsoat-
tended Seattle University.
He was part of a team from
Wilkes-Barre Area School District
that attended the Rochester Insti-
tute of Technology to learn to teach
the hearing impaired. He had
taught chemistry, Earth science,
physical and life science at Elmer L.
Meyers High School, Wilkes-Barre
Area School District, for more than
20 years prior to his retirement.
Bob was a talented actor and had
an outstanding stage presence. He
performed in many shows at the
Music Box, Swoyersville; the
Bloomsburg Theatre Ensemble; Lit-
tle Theatre of Wilkes-Barre; Show-
case Theatre; the Scranton Public
Theatre, and in two Shakespeare
shows at Kirby Park for Wilkes Uni-
versity Theatre.
In addition to acting, he also di-
rected a number of shows at Meyers
High School.
The Hensley family was commit-
ted to Boy and Girl Scouting. Bobs
father was a Scout Leader and Cub
Master of Pack 98, Christ Lutheran
Church, Wilkes-Barre. Mrs. Hensley
was anoutstandingGirl Scout Lead-
er andwas the Executive Director of
the Penns Woods Council, Girl
Scouts of America.
Bob and his brother, Charles J.
(CJ) Hensley, bothearnedthe Eagle
Scout Award and his nephews Char-
les and Daniel also received the Ea-
gle Scout Award.
Bob was a devout Lutheran and
had been a member of the former
Christ Lutheran Church, Wilkes-
Barre.
Following the merger with St.
Pauls Church to form, Good Shep-
herd Lutheran Church, Wilkes-
Barre, Bob served as president of
the Church Council; chairman of
the Stewardship Committee and al-
so served on the Worship and Music
Committee.
He had been active in the wider
church and was a delegate to the
Northeastern Pennsylvania Synod,
Evangelical Lutheran Church in
America. He was also a delegate to
Churchwide National Assembly
and was a life member of the Luth-
erans Concerned Ministry. He was
co-chair of the Gay/Lesbian Task
Force for the Northeastern Pennsyl-
vania Synod.
In addition to his parents, Bob
was also preceded in death by his
brother, Senior Master Sgt. Charles
J. Hensley, U.S. Air Force, who
passed away last year.
Surviving are his sister-in-law,
Mrs. Jane D. Hensley, Wilkes-Barre;
nephews, Col. Charles T. Hensley,
U.S. Army, and his wife, Nikki, Ft.
Hood, Texas; Daniel M. Hensley
and his companion, Brandi Morgan,
Tonawanda, N.Y.; Lt. Col. Joseph E.
Hensley, U.S. Air National Guard,
and his wife, Lisa, Tyrone, Pa.; 12
grandnieces and grandnephews; his
good friend, Steve Willis, Kingston;
and his beloved Chihuahua, Bibi
The family would especially like
to thank Dr. Citti, Dr. Saeed and Dr.
Greenwald for their compassionate
treatment and concern, and also the
nursing facilities which cared for
him with such kindness during his
last illnesses and his friends who
visited and sent cards and prayers.
A Memorial Service with Holy
Communion will be celebrated Sat-
urday at 11 a.m. at Good Shepherd
Lutheran Church, 190 S. Main St.,
Wilkes-Barre. The Rev. Peter D. Ku-
ritz, pastor, will officiate andprivate
interment will be in Memorial
Shrine Cemetery, Carverton, at the
convenience of the family. There
will be no public viewing. The fam-
ily will receive family and friends
following the service at the church
on Saturday.
The family requests that flowers
be omitted and donations, in Mr.
Hensleys name, be made to Good
Shepherd Lutheran Church, 190 S.
Main St., Wilkes-Barre. Arrange-
ments are through the H. Merritt
Hughes Funeral Home Inc., a Gold-
en Rule Funeral Home, 451 N. Main
St., Wilkes-Barre.
Robert H. Hensley
July 23, 2012
William (Bill)
R. Watkins, 70,
of Deltona, Flor-
ida, passed away
Sunday, July 15,
2012.
He was born
to the late Wil-
liamand Martha
Watkins on Oc-
tober 22, 1941 in Kingston.
He graduated from Kingston
High School and received a bache-
lors degree from Wilkes College,
Wilkes-Barre.
He and his wife, Linda, lived and
workedinAllentown, beforerelocat-
ing to Deltona, Fla., in 1996.
Bill served in the U.S. Navy from
1963 to 1965.
His professional career was spent
in accounting at firms including
Fowler Dick and Walker in Wilkes-
Barre, Junior Colony in Allen-
town, Watkins and Pagano in Alta-
monte, Fla., and Vann Data in Day-
tona Beach, Fla.
Bill is survived by his wife, the
former Linda Dymond, originally
of Dallas; brother, Daniel, of Alta-
monte, Fla.; daughter, Stacey
Evans, of Whitehall; son, Mark, of
Orlando, Fla.; grandson, JordanJa-
nowski of Whitehall; his beloved
dogs, Kelly and Terry.
AMemorial Service to hon-
or the life and legacy of Bill
will be held in Dallas, Saturday,
August 4, at 11a.m. at Dallas Meth-
odist Church. Remembrances may
be made to the American Cancer
Society or the SPCA.
William R. Watkins
July 15, 2012
J
ane L. Davis, 87, of 933 Davis
Road, LeRaysville, Pa., passed
away, Tuesday, July 24, 2012.
Born April 7, 1925 in Wilkes-
Barre, she was a daughter of the
late Murray C. and Mary I. (Seitz)
Davis.
Her husband, Francis H. Davis,
predeceased her in 2006.
She graduated from Forty Fort
High School in 1943. She was em-
ployed by Evans Pharmacy, Forty
Fort, and Dr. Raymond Bennett,
LeRaysville.
She was a past Matron of the Le-
Raysville Chapter 498 Order of the
Eastern Star and was also the for-
mer District Deputy of District 17
of the OES. Jane was a member of
the Neath Welsh Congregational
Church, where she was active in
choir, a Sunday school teacher and
a Neath Ladies Aid.
She marriedFrancis H. Davis on
October 5, 1958.
Survivors include her daughters
and son-in-law, Lynda and Alan
Coates of LeRaysville, Pa.; Carol
Davis of Liverpool, N.Y.; grandchil-
dren, Brennan and Jolie Coates of
LeRaysville, Pa.
In addition to her parents and
husband, she was predeceased by
her siblings, Nellie Trethaway, Do-
ris Anderson, Dorothy Davis, Ruth
Myers, Richard Davis, WilliamDa-
vis, Murray Davis Jr.
Memorial Service will be held
Sunday at 1 p.m. at the Neath
Welsh Congregational Church,
Neath, Pa., with her pastor, the
Rev. Dr. Paul Blasko, officiating.
The family will greet friends after
the services on Sunday at the
church. A private burial was held
in Stevens Cemetery, Pike Twp.,
LeRaysville, Pa.
Inlieuof flowers, memorial con-
tributions may be made to the
Neath Welsh Congregational
Church, c/o Alan Coates, 359 Sec-
ond St., LeRaysville, PA 18829, or
to the Stevens Cemetery Associ-
ation, c/o Shawn Russell, 288
Main St., LeRaysville, PA18829.
Jane L. Davis
July 24, 2012
More Obituaries, Page 2A
John A. Cur-
tis Jr., 24, of
Tunkhannock,
died on Mon-
day, July 23,
2012.
He is the son
of John A.
Jack and
Donna J. (nee Benigni) Curtis.
In addition to his parents, sur-
viving him are brother, Alexander
J. Curtis; his sister, Lauren P. Cur-
tis; grandparents, Joan Curtis,
John and Jean Benigni; many
aunts, uncles and cousins.
Preceding John in death is
grandson of the late William P.
Curtis Sr.
Relatives andfriends are invit-
ed Friday at 10:45 a.m. in the Dan-
jolell Memorial Home, 2811 West
Chester Pike, Broomall, PA19008.
A funeral service will be held at 11
a.m. in our Main Chapel. Inter-
ment private.
Donations would be appreciat-
ed to the Caron Foundation, P.O.
Box 150, Wernersville, PA19565.
John A. Curtis Jr.
July 23, 2012
CATHERINE M. CARLE, 93,
Dallas, passed away Monday, July
24, 2012, at the Meadows Nursing
Center, Dallas.
Arrangements are pending
fromthe Richard H. Disque Funer-
al Home, 2940Memorial Highway,
Dallas.
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com THURSDAY, JULY 26, 2012 PAGE 13A
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Prosecutors have not ruled out
additional charges against Cas-
trignano, of Kingston, despite
Castrignano waiving her right to
WILKES-BARRE Luzerne
County Assistant District Attor-
ney Mamie Phillips said Wednes-
day a search warrant was served
seeking cellphone records from
Danielle Castrignano.
Prosecutors are interested to
know if Castrignano, 20, was
talking on a cellphone or texting
when she allegedly struck Corey
Ryan, 20, as he crossed South
River Street in Wilkes-Barre on
June 15.
Ryan, confinedtoa wheelchair,
was with his girlfriend and
friends when he was struck, city
police said.
Ryan, of Wilkes-Barre, died in
Hospice Community Care in
Dunmore on June 29.
Phillips said Ryan recently
movedtoanapartment inWilkes-
Barre and was going to River
Common Park to view the Sus-
quehanna River when he was
struck.
a preliminary hearing in Wilkes-
Barre Central Court on Wednes-
day, Phillips said.
Police charged Castrignano
with accidents involving death, a
third-degree felony, and sum-
mary counts of careless driving
and reckless driving.
Castrignano, through her at-
torney, Peter Moses, waived the
felony charge and summary
counts to county court.
We havent made any decision
if any additional charges will be
filed or if we will withdrawal and
refile additional charges, Phil-
lips said. At this point, were an-
ticipating a (guilty) plea, but we
cant say for sure right now.
City police allege Castrignano
drove away after she struckRyan.
She surrendered to authorities
on June 16.
Castrignano told police she be-
lievedshe struck a shopping cart,
according to the criminal com-
plaint.
Moses credited Castrignanos
surrender as a reason why her
bail was modified from $10,000
straight to unsecured, permitting
her release from jail. She is court
orderedto report daily to the Day
Reporting Center on unrelated
probation violations.
Moses saidthere have not been
any negotiations if Castrignano
will plead guilty.
Prosecutors have until the for-
mal arraignment scheduled on
Oct. 5 to withdrawal the charges
waived to county court.
Were not going to make a
commitment to what will hap-
pen, Moses said about the possi-
bility of Castrignano pleading
guilty. She has the opportunity
to succeed and get on the right
track. Whenwe get into the court
of common pleas, the DA office
and the victims family will see
that Danielle has done a lot of the
right things and has accepted re-
sponsibility for what she had
done.
Phillips and Moses said a con-
viction or guilty plea to the third-
degree felony carries a mandato-
ry one- to two-year prison sen-
tence.
Cellphone record sought in hit-and-run case
Prosecutors want to know if
Danielle Castrignano, 20, was
talking or texting.
By EDWARD LEWIS
elewis@timesleader.com
DON CAREY/THE TIMES LEADER
Danielle Castrignano enters Wilkes-Barre Central Court on
Wednesday morning with her attorney, Peter Moses.
SCRANTON A federal
judge has granted a motion to
dismiss a lawsuit filed by a
teacher who was suspended af-
tershewasfalselyaccusedof as-
sault by several special-educa-
tionstudents.
Angela Kairo-Scibek of Ply-
mouth sued the Wyoming Val-
ley West School District in
2009, alleging her rights to due
process were
violated
when she
was suspend-
ed without
being givena
hearing to
address alle-
gations
made by
three students.
Police charged Kairo-Scibek
in December 2007 with several
counts of assault andendanger-
ing the welfare of children. The
chargeswerelater dismissedaf-
ter the students admitted they
fabricated the allegations. She
was reinstated as a teacher and
givenbackpay.
The districts attorney, Robin
Snyder of Scranton, filed a mo-
tion in November seeking to
dismissthesuit, arguingthedis-
trictwasnotrequiredtoprovide
Kairo-Scibek a pre-suspension
hearing because the serious na-
ture of the allegations required
it take immediate action.
U.S. DistrictJudgeEdwinKo-
sikonTuesday grantedthe mo-
tion, citing appellate court
cases that saidanemployeecan
be suspended without first be-
ing provided a hearing if ex-
traordinary circumstances ex-
ist.
Kairo-Scibek, ateacher, held
a position of great public trust
and high public visibility.
Therefore the district hada sig-
nificant interest inimmediately
suspending Kairo-Scibek once
she was charged, Kosiksaid.
Falsely
accused
teachers
suit tossed
Angela Kairo-Scibek sued
the Wyoming Valley West
School District in 2009.
By TERRIE MORGAN-BESECKER
tmorgan@timesleader.com
Kairo-Scibek
HARRISBURG The first le-
gal test for Pennsylvanias tough
new voter identification law be-
gan Wednesday, with state law-
yers calling the measure a com-
pletely rational step, while oppo-
nents attacked it as an unneces-
sary, unjustified and partisan
scheme that will deprive count-
less people of their right to vote.
The law is the subject of a fu-
rious debate over voting rights as
Pennsylvania is poised to play a
key role in deciding the Nov. 6
presidential election. Republi-
cans say if GOP candidate Mitt
Romney wins Pennsylvania, then
President Barack Obama, a Dem-
ocrat, will lose the national elec-
tion.
Commonwealth Court Judge
Robert Simpson, who presided
over a packed courtroom, must
decide whether to block the law
from taking effect in this years
election as part of a wider chal-
lenge to its constitutionality.
The original rationale in Penn-
sylvanias Republican-controlled
Legislature for the law to pre-
vent electionfraudwill playlit-
tle role in the legal case since the
states lawyers have decided not
to make that argument and ac-
knowledged that they are not
aware of any incidents of in per-
son voter fraud. Instead, they
are trying to show that lawmak-
ers properly exercised their lati-
tude to make election-related
laws when they chose to require
voters to show widely available
forms of photo identification.
David Gersch, a lawyer for the
plaintiffs, told Simpson that the
law could make it difficult for
more than a million people to ex-
ercise their right to vote and that
justification to prevent elec-
tionfraudis a pretext. The real
purpose is for partisan advan-
tage, Gersch said.
That is not under any circum-
stances a compelling state inter-
est, Gersch told Simpson.
The first three plaintiffs to tes-
tify Wednesday were all older
women, minorities and Philadel-
phia residents who said they vote
regularly. But they have no valid
identification under the newlaw,
and they apparently dont have
the required documents a
birthcertificate, a Social Security
card and two proofs of residency
necessarytoget themost com-
mon kind, a state photo ID.
Wilola Lee, 60, is unable to get
a birth certificate from her birth
state, Georgia, which apparently
has no record. Viviette Apple-
white, 93, who recalled marching
with Martin Luther King Jr. in
1960, testified that she is unable
to get a birth certificate and So-
cial Security card with the same
last name after being adopted
early in life. And Ana Gonzalez,
63, who also was adopted early in
life andcame tothe UnitedStates
in 1957, has no Social Security
cardanddoesnt seemtohave the
identification necessary to get a
birth certificate from Puerto Ri-
co.
Three others testified later to
similar barriers.
Deputy Attorney General Pa-
trick Cawley contended that the
state is takingpains tocreate new
ways of getting identification and
that it has removed a great num-
ber of barriers to people who
want to vote. On Election Day,
anyone who wants to vote will be
able to get an ID card that allows
them to do so, he insisted.
Pennsylvanias Department of
State said Friday it plans to begin
offering a special free photo ID
card for voters who are unable to
obtain a photo ID issued by the
Department of Transportation.
Simpson, a Republican, said he
hoped to rule during the week of
Aug. 13. His decision likely will
be appealed to the state Supreme
Court. The hearing will continue
today and was expected to last a
week.
Meanwhile, the U.S. Depart-
ment of Justice is looking at
whether Pennsylvanias lawcom-
plies with federal laws.
Politically charged Pa. voter ID law challenged in court
By MARC LEVY
Associated Press
C M Y K
PAGE 14A THURSDAY, JULY 26, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
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RESULTS
He wants to change the view of
Tonto, and he put his reputation
and his career on the line.
Chris Eyre
The Cheyenne and Arapaho filmmaker said actor
Johnny Depp deserves some credit for accepting
the role of Tonto in Disneys still-under-production version of the Lone
Ranger. The character, as portrayed in various TV and movie
adaptations, traditionally has drawn fire for spreading Native American
stereotypes.
Couple believes contempt
can lead to horrific events
C
olumbine. Virginia Tech. A Tucson
shopping center. And, now, a packed
Aurora, Colo., theater as men, women
and children enjoy a summer movie!
Like millions of Americans, we are
shocked and saddened by yet another
atrocity in a place where Americans as-
sume they will be safe. Our thoughts are
with the families and friends of those in-
nocent people whose lives were ended so
abruptly and those wounded. Once again a
shocked nation asks, How can this hap-
pen?
We are impelled to say that Aesthetic
Realism, the education founded by Eli
Siegel, explains how and lays out how such
wrenching events can be prevented. It
shows that contempt, the addition to self
through the lessening of something else,
is in every person. Contempt is the cause
of all injustice and every human cruelty. As
husband and wife, parents and selves, we
have seen that contempt can be so very
ordinary when, for instance, one spouse
doesnt listen to the other, or when we
enjoy making fun of how a person looks or
dresses. Carried far enough, contempt can
lead to multiple murders on a Colorado
night.
Only when the way contempt works in
each of us from its everydayness to its
extremes is studied, understood and
criticized will America be kind and safe.
Lauren Blaustein
and
Bruce Blaustein
New York City
Add Cartwright to list
of Democrats to reject
I
strongly agree with William Levinsons
letter, Real Democrats should reject
Obama and Casey (July 21). He has
identified a serious discrepancy in their
rhetoric.
I suggest he add another name to his list
of Democrats to be rejected for their trou-
blesome views: Matt Cartwright of Moos-
ic. This is a man who announced his con-
gressional candidacy with the self-descrip-
tion that he is a Democrats Democrat.
Then, all through the primary, he voiced
his admiration and support for both Presi-
dent Obama and U.S. Sen. Robert Casey.
Vote for the person who is running
against Cartwright and we will ensure real
jobs for the real people of our area and
district.
Lets send the message that crony cap-
italism is done and over.
Don Morgantini
Wright Township
MAIL BAG LETTERS FROM READERS
Letters to the editor must include the
writers name, address and daytime
phone number for verification. Letters
should be no more than 250 words. We
reserve the right to edit and limit writers
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Email: mailbag@timesleader.com
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Mail: Mail Bag, The Times Leader, 15
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SEND US YOUR OPINION
K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com THURSDAY, JULY 26, 2012 PAGE 15A
IGNORING THE most im-
portant fact that they do
nothing to aid the victims
NCAA sanctions against
Penn State University
spawned by the Jerry Sand-
usky tragedy are unfair not
because they are too harsh. Considering the
crime, they arent.
They are unfair because they were too
hasty.
Thats not to say the NCAA didnt wait; it
did, until Sandusky was convicted and the
damning Freeh Report had been public long
enough to digest. Such a delay was the right
thing to do.
But why mete out so massive a penalty 11
days after the Freeh Report emerged? Sand-
usky was behind bars, Joe Paterno is dead and
the other high-ranking PSU officials implicat-
ed by Freeh were out of the schools picture.
What was the rush?
If the sanctions affected only those people
responsible, the speed would not be an issue.
But its ramifications go well beyond the elite
tier of decision makers who failed to act for
a staggering 15 years on the Sandusky prob-
lem.
Im not talking about the pigskin players,
who thanks to a four-year ban on postseason
games see opportunities dim from senior to
incoming freshman. As proponents of the
sanctions rightly note, they can transfer. If
bowl bids matter more than their educations
and their allegiance to PSU, goodbye; if not,
thanks for showing commitment.
Of course, their commitment could stem
from signed apartment leases or other binding
agreements on campus, purchased textbooks,
carefully crafted course schedules they cant
recreate elsewhere in the next few weeks or
scholarships they need and cant get by trans-
ferring.
But as University of Scranton professor
Harry Dammer, a faculty representative to the
NCAA, pointed out during an interview Tues-
day, football is supposed to teach them to deal
with adversity; so deal.
Nor am I talking about students or season
ticket holders who find themselves likely to
watch a shadow of a lion prowl the field,
thanks to desertions and a scholarship pro-
gram shrunk by the NCAA. As Dammer also
noted, those fans might be inconvenienced,
but their lives arent forever changed, unlike
the children Sandusky abused.
Im talking about the unintended conse-
quences, the unforeseeable aftershocks, the
people who could suffer substantially even if
they are utterly unconnected to the scandal.
These sanctions will ripple far beyond the
PSU footballs once-hallowed halls.
Assume, for example, a top-shelf, highly
recruited player bolts, landing a starting posi-
tion at another institution in desperate need of
his particular skills. He gets an express ticket
to the starting lineup while someone who had
that job lands on the bench, wondering why
his prospects died courtesy of men he didnt
know in a state hes never been to doing some-
thing he had no inkling occurred.
Does he get to transfer as well?
Consider the entrepreneur or employee
dependent on the weekly throngs to Happy
Valley and struggling to survive in a tepid
economy the B&B owner, the bartender, the
hotel housekeeper or, as profiled by reporter
Andrew Seder in Tuesdays edition of The
Times Leader, the small bus company running
trips to Penn State games. Attendance drops
just enough to make the business unprofitable,
and the owner and employees are out of work.
Is it really too far-fetched to envision a
talented teen trapped in an impoverished
neighborhood and a fractured family losing his
best shot at climbing from the morass because
the NCAA cut the number of scholarships
Penn State can offer?
Alarmist? Sure, but the NCAAs rush to
such sanctions seemingly without more care-
fully measuring the potential consequences
was an alarmist response. The mobs were at
the gate; the need to look decisive apparently
trumped all.
An extra few weeks, a partial imposition of
sanctions with a warning more might come;
these were off the table, as was a separate
investigation independent of the Freeh Report,
bypassed because the Penn State Board of
Trustees accepted the report as a fait accom-
pli.
Why?
Because the integrity of NCAA football had
to be protected.
In a bit of irony, the NCAAs rush to judg-
ment could become an example of the foot-
ball trumps human compassion mindset the
sanctions are designed to curb.
Mark Guydish can be reached at 829-71 6 1 or email
mguydish@timesleader.com.
A rush to such sanctions; all in the name of football?
MARK GUYDISH
C O M M E N T A R Y
L
OTS OF THINGS are
still very wrong with
the U.S. economy, but
this is one that should
be getting more attention: Cen-
sus figures for 2011 are expect-
ed to show the poverty rate
jumping to its highest level
since the 1960s.
Essentially, all theanti-pover-
ty public policy of the last 50
years the war on poverty and
the expansion of the
social safety net, the
massive private-sec-
tor gains spurred by
Ronald Reagan in
the 1980s and Bill
Clinton in the 1990s
has been rendered
ineffective by the
meltdown of 2008
and the slow recov-
ery.
The numbers will
say the nation is at a 15.7 per-
cent poverty rate, an unaccept-
ably high number.
It matters. And it ought to be
more directly discussed in the
presidential campaign.
So much of the debate be-
tween left and right about the
economy is focused on the mid-
dle class and on businesses.
Both matter intensely to the
health of the economy, and the
best way to fight poverty is still
by expanding opportunity.
Businesses sell more products,
hire more people and pay more
wages. The middle class grows,
and the ranks of the impover-
ished shrink.
But in relative terms, busi-
ness has had a much healthier
bounce-backfromtherecession
than the rest of the economy
suggests. The Dow hit 13,000
again in February (it closed at
12,721 Monday), which, al-
though not
matching peak
housing-bubble
levels, was a num-
ber not seen in
four years, and
corporate profits
are soaring.
And yet many
middle-class fam-
ilies find them-
selves plunged in-
to poverty. Why?
Thats the question the presi-
dential candidates need to ad-
dress. And they need to do it in
a way that measures up to the
complexity of the problem.
This election should be
about how American promise
and opportunity get rejuvenat-
ed. Talking directly, and in con-
text, about thenations growing
poverty has to be an essential
part of that discussion.
Detroit Free Press
OTHER OPINION: ELECTION 2012
Poverty should be
campaign focus
Essentially, all the
anti-poverty public
policy of the last 50
years has been
rendered ineffective
by the meltdown of
2008 and the slow
recovery.
E
ACH YEAR IN Penn-
sylvania, somewhere
in the neighborhood
of 1 million vehicles
have their emissions systems
tested.
Ninety-eight percent of
them pass, according to the
state Department of Transpor-
tation.
Lets assume those tests cost
$40althoughthe cost is likely
slightly higher or lower de-
pending on where an owner
lives. That translates to about
$39 million spent just to hear a
mechanic say, Yep, youre
good to go.
When the emissions testing
programlaunched15 years ago
in 25 high-population Pennsyl-
vania counties, there were
more older, pollution-belching
vehicles on the road. But to-
days technology produces ve-
hicles with low emissions or
none at all, according to state
Sen. John Wozniak. The test-
ing program is outdated and
needs to be scaled back, ac-
cordingtotheCambria County
Democrat, whos pushing a bill
that would eliminate the emis-
sions testing requirement for
vehicles less than 10 years old.
This isnt something the
Legislature can or should rush
into. Pennsylvania started its
emissions program to meet
federal Environmental Protec-
tion Agency air quality guide-
lines, and the EPA would need
to sign off on any changes.
But it is something that
should be considered.
The state Department of En-
vironmental Protection and
PennDOT are doing a study of
the emissions inspection pro-
gram, and a spokesman for
Wozniak said the legislator is
willing to work with the de-
partments to find a good bal-
ance of frequency of testing,
age of cars and emissions stan-
dards.
If a balance canbe foundthat
does not erase clean air gains
made since 1997 which the
EPA wouldnt allow anyway
then lawmakers should make
the changes.
The York Dispatch
OTHER OPINION: CAR INSPECTIONS
Emissions testing
needs an update
QUOTE OF THE DAY
PRASHANT SHITUT
President and CEO/Impressions Media
JOSEPH BUTKIEWICZ
Vice President/Executive Editor
MARK E. JONES
Editorial Page Editor
EDITORIAL BOARD
MALLARD FILLMORE DOONESBURY
S E RV I NG T HE P UB L I C T RUS T S I NC E 1 8 81
Editorial
C M Y K
PAGE 16A THURSDAY, JULY 26, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
N E W S
City police said they are
searching for a black or dark-col-
ored pickup truck with a loud
exhaust and diesel engine that
they suspect struck McCallick.
On Wednesday, a city detec-
tive visited a residence on An-
derson Street in Wilkes-Barre
Township afternoon inspecting
a black truck that was parked in
a driveway and questioned its
owner. The truck and owner
were ruled out.
While the search continues
for the driver and vehicle, police
believe another driver may have
witnessed the fatal hit-and-run,
city spokesperson Drew
McLaughlin stated in an email.
McLaughlin said the second
vehicle was traveling behind the
vehicle that struck McCallick
and briefly stopped at the scene
before driving away prior to po-
lice arriving.
Anyone with information
about the fatal hit-and-run and
drivers of the two vehicles is
asked to call Wilkes-Barre police
at 208-4201. Police said they re-
viewed video from surveillance
cameras from the Hawkeye Se-
curity System and businesses
along Hazle Avenue in an at-
tempt to identity the make and
model of the pickup.
McCallick, originally from
Dorrance Township, was living
with her boyfriend, John
Schenck, 23, at 119 Hazle Ave.
for several months. She gradu-
ated from Crestwood High
School in 2011.
In the Fairmount Township
crash, state police said Gibbons
was a passenger in a vehicle dri-
ven by Charles Young III, 23, of
Dallas.
Young was traveling south on
Route 487 and crossed into on-
coming traffic colliding with a
vehicle operated by Ian Stanley,
69, of Alberton, South Africa,
early Tuesday night.
Stanley was traveling north at
the time of the crash.
Gibbons was pronounced
dead at the scene.
Young and a 17-year-old male
from Dallas, a passenger in his
vehicle, Stanley and Valerie
Stanley, 65, of Alberton, South
Africa, were transported to area
hospitals, state police said.
Autopsies were conducted on
McCallick and Gibbons at
Wilkes-Barre General Hospital
on Wednesday.
Forensic pathologist Dr. Gary
Ross determined the two wom-
en died from multiple traumatic
injuries due to motor-vehicle ac-
cidents.
The manner of death for
McCallick is pending the ongo-
ing investigation by Wilkes-
Barre police, Luzerne County
Acting Coroner William Lisman
said.
FATALS
Continued from Page 1A
at upset sales typically ad-
vance to free-and-clear auc-
tions, where liens and back
taxes are forgiven and bids
typically start at several
hundred dollars. The next
sale is Aug. 23.
However, the law allows
private sales of tax claim
property between the upset
and free-and-clear auctions
if buyers are willing to sub-
mit a reasonable offer and
accept responsibility for
liens, Rodgers said.
The court and all three
taxing bodies must approve
private sale purchases, he
said.
Rodgers said Nardone
was the only buyer to ex-
press an interest in the Exe-
ter Township island, known
as Millers Island, which
is actually a cluster of five
islands totaling 3 acres.
Nardones bid for $1,750
is expected to be accepted
by taxing bodies so owner-
ship may be transferred to
Nardone in August, tax
claim representatives say.
Because of interest from
multiple parties, Rodgers
required sealed bids for
Macks Island in Mocana-
qua, a group of large, medi-
um and small islands esti-
mated to total 23.5 acres.
One person dropped out,
leaving a sporting club and
Nardone, who presented
the highest bid -- $15,000,
officials said.
About $3,300 in taxes
were owed on the Mocana-
qua island, which is as-
sessed at $48,000. The as-
sessment will drop to
$4,800 if Nardone participa-
tes in the Clean and Green
program for non-farm par-
cels more than 10 acres that
will remain undeveloped.
Back taxes also are
$3,300 on the Exeter Town-
ship island, which is as-
sessed at $45,100 with an-
nual property taxes of about
$870.
An out-of-town relative of
the Exeter Township island
owner, the late Michael De-
girolamo, said the taxes in-
creased dramatically after
the countywide reassess-
ment, prompting the family
to stop paying them and let
it go to tax sale.
A Realtor advised the
family no one would buy
the island, he said.
The Mocanaqua island is
owned by John Krostek,
though property records are
addressed to a New Jersey
relative, Richard Krostek,
who inherited the property
and could not be reached
for comment.
Nardone said he may re-
name the islands after his
children. He was never on
the islands but plans to visit
them soon.
I hope to do some fish-
ing there someday, he said.
Private individuals or
corporations own seven
other islands within the 44-
mile Susquehanna River
stretch in Luzerne County.
The county owns Richards
Island under the 109th Field
Artillery (Carey Avenue)
Bridge in Larksville and
Plymouth.
The remaining islands
have no recorded owners
and are not taxed or as-
sessed, officials say.
Owners of several other
islands say theyre loaded
with wildlife.
Nardone doesnt plan to
seek government approval
to erect any structures on
his islands.
Im going to keep them
in their natural state, he
said.
ISLANDS
Continued from Page 1A
be just like them.
They saved my mothers
life, Dudrick said. I said I
wanted to be like these peo-
ple.
Passionate physician
And so at age 6, he was set on
his career path. By 1961, after
graduating from Franklin and
Marshall College with a biolo-
gy degree, he was enrolled at
University of Pennsylvanias
medical school.
After internships and resi-
dency he became chief of sur-
gery at the Veterans Adminis-
tration Hospital in Philadel-
phia and in 1972 he moved to
Texas to become the first pro-
fessor of surgery at the newly
established University of Texas
at Houston Medical School. He
worked there until 1994 before
heading back east to work at
Yale.
He always wanted to come
back and work in the Wyoming
Valley and made sure he visited
at least twice a year, typically
Christmas and summer.
His wife, Theresa M. Keen, a
Pittston native he met while
the two worked at Skytop
Lodge in the Poconos during
their college summers, was a
1955 Misericordia graduate.
Through conversations with
the school and its president,
Michael A. MacDowell, Du-
drick was able to help develop
the schools physician assistant
program, and he will come on
board full time this fall when
the first class enters. Finally,
his dream of working and liv-
ing in Luzerne County will be
realized.
Desire to keep helping
As for retiring, something
some accomplished 77-year-
olds might consider, Dudrick
said its not for him.
Im in the twilight of my ca-
reer and the twilight of my life,
and Imtrying to be as useful as
I can for as long as I can, Du-
drick said.
Before he started the latest
chapter of his life at Misericor-
dia, he was in Poland in May
and learned that a 28-bed hos-
pital that opened this year in
the town of Skawina, just south
of Krakow, was named in his
honor.
While there to lecture and
participate in the annual meet-
ing of the Polish Society for
Parenteral and Enteral Nutri-
tion, he was asked to visit a
new hospital that was con-
structed by two Polish doctors
he knew.
The hospital is located in an
area where all four of his grand-
parents were born and raised
before emigrating to America.
At a surprise unveiling of a
bronze plaque at the hospital
on May 24, Dudrick learned of
the new Stanley Dudricks Me-
morial Hospital.
It was a very emotional ex-
perience for me, Dudrick said.
I dont feel I deserve it and I
would have never expected it.
Dudrick, who first visited
Poland in 2003, has been a con-
sultant and member of the Pol-
ish Journal of Surgerys edito-
rial board for almost 10 years
and has contributed several
scientific papers for publica-
tion in the journal.
Dudrick said he didnt ask
for the hospital honor and was
told the name was chosen be-
cause the two Polish doctors
were inspired by his research.
Coupled with the fact I had
Polish roots and my family was
from that region, it all came to-
gether, Dudrick said. It was
an act of respect and grati-
tude.
Dudrick said its nice to be
recognized for his work, most
notably his pioneering re-
search while at the University
of Pennsylvania in develop-
ment of the specialized central
venous feeding technique
known as intravenous hyperali-
mentation or total parenteral
nutrition, which allows those
who cannot eat to be fed
through a tube that bypasses
the intestines.
Medical breakthrough
Along with open-heart sur-
gery and organ transplanta-
tion, his breakthrough has
been called one of the three
most important advancements
in surgery during the past cen-
tury.
The number one love of my
life was to be the best surgeon I
could possibly be, he said.
Being the best husband is sec-
ond.
And its a fact he told his wife
while proposing to her.
I told her if she could live
with that, would you marry
me?
The reply from the English
major who would go on to bear
his six children was: Quo Va-
dis, or where are you going?
with the implication she would
follow.
Never once in 54 years has
she interfered with me being
the best doctor I could possibly
be, Dudrick said.
SUBMITTED PHOTO
Nanticoke native Dr. Stanley Dudrick unveils a plaque in May at
a Polish hospital that was named for him.
DOCTOR
Continued from Page 1A
Name: Dr. Stanley Dudrick
Age: 77
Family: Married to former There-
sa M. Keen, the couple has six
children and 16 grandchildren
Resides: In Dallas Township,
born and raised in Nanticoke
Education: A1953 graduate of
Nanticoke High School, he
earned a degree in biology from
Franklin and Marshall College in
1957 and his M.D. from the Uni-
versity of Pennsylvania in 1961.
Career: Worked as chief of sur-
gery at the VA Hospital in Phila-
delphia before becoming the
first professor of surgery at the
University of Texas at Houston
Medical School. In 1994 he ac-
cepted a job at Yale University in
New Haven, Conn. and serves as
chair of the department of sur-
gery at Saint Marys Hospital in
Waterbury, Conn. This year he
was hired as medical director of
the Physician Assistant program
and recipient of the first en-
dowed chair at Misericordia
University.
Claim to fame: Many, but most
notably he is credited with a new
technique called Total Parenteral
Nutrition used to feed nutrients
to the ill who could not eat.
B I O G R A P H Y
Singh was arraigned Wednes-
dayafternoonbeforeU.S. District
Judge Thomas I. Vanaskie. Pend-
ing the outcome of a pre-trial re-
lease hearing that will be sched-
uled within five days, Singh was
remanded to the Lackawanna
County Prison.
Federal prosecutor Francis
Sempa moved for detention of
the defendant, who was repre-
sented by Ingrid Cronin, an as-
sistant federal public defender.
Lawenforcement personnel re-
moved several boxes from the
scene and yellow crime scene
tape was drapped around the
property and the gas station was
shut down around 10 a.m.
Singh was arraigned with the
assistance of an interpreter via a
telephone hookup from Califor-
nia. The interpreter translated
English to Punjabi, an Indo-
Aryan language spoken by inhab-
itants of the historical Punjab re-
gion of northwestern India and
easternPakistan. The interpreter
could be heard through overhead
speakers in the courtroom.
Vanaskie said a preliminary
hearing for Singh will be sched-
uled by either Chief Federal Ma-
gistrate Judge Thomas Blewitt or
federal Magistrate Judge Mala-
chy Mannion within14 days. The
judge noted that Singh is an ille-
gal alien and he has applied for
asylum in the United States.
Cronin said Singh had been liv-
ing with his employer, who was
not identified. Croninsaidher cli-
ent has nowhere to stay at this
time.
These are very serious charg-
es, Vanaskie told the defendant
as he read him his rights. Vanas-
kiesaidhereviewedafinancial af-
fidavit and was satisfied that
Singh met the eligibility require-
ments for appointment of coun-
sel. Cronin said she will serve as
Singhs counsel.
Vanaskie saidBlewitt issuedan
affidavit of probable cause that
itemized several transactions of
the controlled substance spice
at the gas station.
Neither Sempa nor Cronin
commented on the raid at Magi-
kal Garden.
Congress inJune added26syn-
thetic substances to the federal
Controlled Substance Act, listing
bath salts and synthetic marijua-
na as Schedule I substances,
those with a high potential for
abuse that have no medical use in
treatment. Cocaine and heroin
are classified as Schedule I sub-
stances.
The measure doubled the
length of time the DEA can tem-
porarily ban other synthetic sub-
stances from 18 to 36 months,
and created a new definition for
cannabis agents addressing in-
gredients used to manufacture
bath salts and synthetic marijua-
na.
Penalties for a first offense for
delivery of or intent to deliver
synthetic drugs are up to five
years inprisonanda $15,000 fine.
Possession penalties are up to
one year in jail and a $5,000 fine.
PETE G. WILCOX/THE TIMES LEADER
State Deputy Attorney General Tim Doherty, right, arrives on scene during a raid on the Exeter
business Magikal Garden on Wednesday.
CLARK VAN ORDEN/THE TIMES LEADER
Pennsylvania State Police and federal authorities took part in raid
at Sunoco Station in Forty Fort. One man was taken into custody.
DEA
Continued from Page 1A
WASHINGTON People are
inventing so many new, legal
ways to get high that lawmakers
cant seem to keep up.
Over the past two years, the
U.S. has seen a surge in the use of
synthetic drugs made of legal
chemicals that mimic the danger-
ous effects of cocaine, ampheta-
mines and other illegal stimu-
lants.
The drugs are often sold at
small, independent stores in mis-
leading packaging that suggests
common household items like
bath salts, incense and plant
food. But the substances inside
are powerful, mind-altering
drugs that have been linked to bi-
zarre and violent behavior across
the country. Lawenforcement of-
ficials refer to the drugs collec-
tivelyas bathsalts, thoughthey
have nothing in common with
the fragrant toiletries used to
moisturize skin.
President Barack Obama
signed a bill into law earlier this
monththat bans the sale, produc-
tion and possession of more than
two dozen of the most common
bath salt drugs. But health pro-
fessionals say that there are so
many different varieties of the
drugs that U.S. lawmakers are
merely playing catch up.
The moment you start to reg-
ulate one of them, theyll come
out with a variant that some-
times is even more potent, said
Dr. Nora Volkow, director of the
National Institute on Drug
Abuse.
There are no back alleys or
crack houses in Americas latest
drug epidemic. The problem in-
volves potent substances that
amateur chemists make, package
and sell in stores under brands
like Ivory Wave, Vanilla Sky
and Bliss for as little as $15.
Emergencies related to the drugs
have surged: The AmericanAsso-
ciation of Poison Control Centers
received more than 6,100 calls
about bath salt drugs in 2011
up from just 304 the year before
and more than 1,700 calls in
the first half of 2012.
The problem for lawmakers is
that its difficult to crack down on
the drugs. U.S. laws prohibit the
sale or possession of all substanc-
es that mimic illegal drugs, but
only if federal prosecutors can
show that they are intended for
human use. People who make
bath salts and similar drugs work
around this by printing not for
human consumption on virtual-
ly every packet.
Barbara Carreno, a spokeswo-
man for the Drug Enforcement
Agency, said the intended use for
bath salts is clear.
Everyone knows these are
drugs to get high, including the
sellers, she said.
Many states have bannedsome
of the most common bath salts,
which are typically sold by small
businesses like convenience
stores, tobacco shops and adult
book stores. For instance, West
Virginia legislators banned the
bath salt drug MDPV last year,
making it a misdemeanor to sell,
buy or possess the synthetic
drug. Conviction means up to six
months in jail and a $1,000 fine.
Despite the bans, bath salts
producers are constantly tweak-
ing their recipes to come up with
new drugs that arent covered by
local laws.
Bath salts still around
New synthetic drug recipes
keep turning up, frustrating
lawmakers and police.
By MATTHEWPERRONE
AP Health Writer
C M Y K
SPORTS S E C T I O N B
THE TIMES LEADER THURSDAY, JULY 26, 2012
timesleader.com
W
hen will they learn?
The Philadelphia Eagles
have to know by now their
fans dont want to hear about plans
for big dreams. They want to see
them come true.
It may turn out to be spot on that
the Eagles really are on the verge of
a dynasty, as Michael Vick alluded
last week. And its admirable if the
Eagles quarterback truly believes
that.
But based on all the hot air that
evaporated on the Eagles last year,
youd think their approach would
sound a little more humble this time
around.
Not Vick.
The multi-talented quarterback
capable of demoralizing defenses with
his legs as well as his arm passed on
a chance to downplay Philadelphias
prospects this season.
After noting his team re-signed
talented young stars such as running
back LeSean McCoy and wide receiv-
er/punt returner DeSean Jackson,
and comparing Philadelphias talent
level to other NFC East teams, Vick
predicted the Eagles are on the verge
of a dynasty.
Thats just me speaking out in
confidence, Vick said upon arriving
at Lehigh University in Bethlehem
for Eagles training camp this week.
As a quarterback, thats just how I
feel.
They can feel the laughter from
Lehigh Valley to the Wyoming Valley.
Because such bragging could send
a team tumbling into a basin.
Thats what happened to the Ea-
gles last summer, after their head-
turning offseason free agent frenzy
provoked former backup quarterback
Vince Young to proclaim he joined A
dream team.
From there, the Eagles turned into
a nightmare. They finished 8-8 and
missed the playoffs.
That doesnt seem like much of a
dream team, or a dynasty.
Maybe the Eagles should just wor-
ry about turning around their own
destiny before elevating their goals to
such dramatic heights.
There are no excuses for last
year, said Eagles coach Andy Reid,
whose team failed to develop chem-
istry during a lockout-shortened pre-
season of 2011. Everyone was dealt
the same cards.
Yet, the Eagles still believe theyre
playing with a royal flush.
Youve got to aim and shoot for
the stars, Vick said. And if you
miss, at least youll be amongst
them.
Right now, the Eagles are amongst
the teams trying to rebound from
missing the 2011 postseason.
They havent won a Super Bowl in
their history and havent been to the
NFC championship game since 2009
when Donovan McNabb was still
quarterback. A team from their own
division, the New York Giants, won
two Super Bowls during that span.
That looks more like a team on
the verge of a reign at the top of the
NFL.
The Eagles arent exactly at rock
bottom.
They have a dynamic offense and a
defense that should improve with
some solid draft choices and recent
acquisition such as former Penn State
defensive lineman Ollie Ogbu, who
arrived in training camp Wednesday
with the rest of the Eagles veterans.
Were very fired up to be back,
Reid said. When you set the Super
Bowl as your goal, the expectations
arent any higher. Thats what we do.
Coming in, expectations are high.
They always are for the Eagles.
But nobody needs to hear about
them.
We need to see some fulfillment.
PAUL SOKOLOSKI
O P I N I O N
Philly dynasty?
Now they are
really dreaming
Paul Sokoloski is a Times Leader sports
columnist. You may reach him at 970-7109 or
email him at psokoloski@timesleader.com.
CHICAGO It took just two days for
the recruiting war to reach Penn States
campus. On Monday, the NCAAleveled
the Nittany Lions with sanctions and
ruled that players could transfer with-
out penalty. Some 50 hours later, coach-
es fromopposing programs began arriv-
ing in State College, looking to recruit
from the Lions roster.
Meanwhile, a group of roughly 30
Penn State players launched a counter-
offensive on Wednesday morning,
breaking a two-day silence to say they
would remain committed to the Lions.
Seniors Michael Mauti and Mike Zor-
dich both sons of former Penn State
lettermen spoke for a group of pre-
dominately upperclassmen, delivering
brief, off-the-cuff speeches onthe teams
outdoor practice field.
P E N N S TAT E F O O T B A L L
Nittany Lions players uniting
AP PHOTO
Penn State senior running back Michael Zordich, left foreground, and senior linebacker Michael Mauti, right foreground, give a statement in support of their
team, as other players look on, Wednesday in State College.
Coaches from competing
schools appear on campus
By DEREK LEVARSE
dlevarse@timesleader.com
See PLAYERS, Page 5B
INSIDE: Sanctions lead to OBrien extension,
Notebook, Page 5B
PHILADELPHIA Cole Hamels
knew the moment he walked off the
mound to a standing ovation after allow-
ing five runs in his last start that he was
staying with the Philadelphia Phillies.
Words cant really
describe the emotions
that you get, and the
way the fans were
standing and cheering,
that was ultimately the
deciding point to be
here, Hamels said.
He had 144 million
other reasons to stay,
too.
Hamels on Wednesday signed a six-
year contract worth an average of $24
million per season that prevents the
2008 World Series MVP from becoming
a free agent in November. The deal in-
cludes a club vesting option for 2019 and
a limited no-trade provision.
The contract is the largest signed by a
Philadelphia athlete and second-highest
for a pitcher behindthe$161million, sev-
en-year deal the NewYork Yankees gave
CC Sabathia in December 2008.
It was long and laborious, general
manager Ruben Amaro Jr. said about ne-
gotiations, which started last May. We
finally got tothe finishline. (Sixyears) is
unprecedented for the Phillies, but we
M A J O R L E A G U E B A S E B A L L
Hamels is
the richest
Phillie ever
Left-hander stays with organization
signing $144M, 6-year deal, second
biggest ever for MLB pitcher.
By ROB MAADDI
AP Sports Writer
See HAMELS, Page 6B
Hamels
In 2008, a local athlete from Drums
competed in the Beijing Olympics and
represented the United States.
This year, canoeist Casey Eichfeld
will travel to London after qualifying
for his second straight Olympic
Games.
Eichfeld competed in Beijing Olym-
pics at the age of 18.
My first Olympics was like a
dream, Eichfeld said. I had trained
and raced from a young age with the
Olympics in mind and to finally reach
my first Olympics was incredible.
Despite his accomplishment, Eich-
feldthought he couldhave racedbetter
in Beijing.
Honestly, I was a little disappointed
O LY M P I C S
See CANOEIST, Page 3B
Local canoeist on quest
Drums native is partaking in
second Summer Games and hopes
to improve on previous finish.
By JOE BARESS
For The Times Leader
USA CANOE/KAYAK
Casey Eichfeld, fromDrums, enters the London Olympics with more experi-
ence fromthe Beijing games in 2008.
SCRANTON Greater Pittston
manager Drew Whyte knew after the
first game of the tournament his de-
fense might be what was standing be-
tween his squad and a trip to states.
Wednesday afternoon, Whyte was
proven right as his de-
fense let him down
and Greater Pittston
lost to Towanda 9-7 at
Connell Park. The
loss eliminated GP
from the Region 5
playoffs.
We started off the tournament play-
ing shaky defense and then we ended
the tournament playing shaky de-
fense, said Whyte.
GP jumped out to a 3-0 lead on an
RBI single by Kody Nowicki and a two-
run double by Randy McDermott. But
the defense left Towanda back in the
game in the fourth.
Two errors led to two unearned and
one earnedrunas Towanda tiedit upat
3-3.Until thenTowanda didnot have an
answer for Dylan Maloney who had
eight strike outs in the first three in-
nings.
Towanda then got a two-run double
by Austin Markle in the fifth inning to
take the lead. GP would not go away.
A M E R I C A N L E G I O N B A S E B A L L
Greater Pittstons season ended by Towanda
Towanda scored four in the bottom
of the eighth to nab
come-from-behind victory.
By By CHRIS NAGY
For The Times Leader
9
TOWANDA
7
GREATER
PITTSTON
See LEGION, Page 5B
Penn State faced the threat of a four-
year ban on playing football before the
NCAA imposed sanctions this week
over the schools handling of the Jerry
Sandusky child molestation scandal, a
university spokesman said Wednesday.
David La Torre said the potential for
the multiyear death penalty was
floated during discussions between
Penn State President Rodney Erickson
and NCAA officials before Penn State
was hit Monday with a $60 million fine,
a four-year bowl game ban, reduced
football scholarships and the forfeiture
of 112 wins.
The school trustees met on the sub-
ject at a State College hotel Wednesday,
and afterward issued a statement call-
ing the NCAA punishment unfortu-
nate but better than the alternative
the so-called death penalty. Report-
ers were barred from the conference
room where they met, and trust-
Multiyear death penalty
was floated by NCAA
By MICHAEL RUBINKAM
and MARK SCOLFORO
Associated Press
See FLOATED, Page 5B
K
PAGE 2B THURSDAY, JULY 26, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
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(Excludes Holidays and Tournaments)
CALL AHEAD FOR TEE TIMES
CAMPS/CLINICS
Kings College/Kirby Park Jr. Tennis
Camp will hold its third and final
session July 30 through August 10
at the Kirby Park Tennis courts.
The camp will run Monday through
Thursday from 9:30-11:30 a.m. with
Friday serving as a make-up day.
The camp features fundamentals
of tennis instruction, competition
and various related tennis activ-
ities. Each student will receive a
free tennis racket if required as
well as a complimentary camp
T-shirt. Enrolling in two or more
sessions a student will receive a
free junior tennis membership.
Interested parties should call the
Kirby Park Tennis Office at 714-
9697 to sign up or get an in-
formational camp flyer. Participant
may also sign up the first day of
the session.
Rock Rec Center is accepting regis-
trations for its soccer camp with
instruction from Mark Bassett,
mens soccer coach at Kings
College. The camp is open to boys
and girls entering K - second
grade. The camp runs from July
30 Aug. 2 from 9 a.m. to noon.
The camp will take place on the
Rock Recs new outdoor Astroturf
training field. For more informa-
tion, call Rock Rec at 696-2769.
LEAGUES
Chackos Family Bowling Center will
hold signups for its youth bowling
league Aug. 5 and Aug. 18 from10
a.m. to 1 p.m. at Chackos Family
Bowling Center, 195 N. Wilkes-Barre
Blvd., Wilkes-Barre. In order to
bowl in the youth division, individ-
uals must not have reached their
20th birthday on or before Aug. 1
of the current year. Certification
fee for all bowlers is $17, which
includes receipt of a USBC Bowling
Jersey. Certification fee must be
paid at the time of registration.
Chackos Youth Bowling League
bowls each Saturday morning at 9
a.m. and will begin league sessions
on Aug. 25. For more details,
please visit www.chackosfam-
ilybowlingcenter.com.
South Wilkes-Barre Teener League
will host its annual late summer/
early fall wood bat league every
Saturday and Sunday from Aug. 18
to Oct. 20 with all games played at
Christian Field in Wilkes-Barre.
Teams with players ages 13-15 will
play Saturdays and those 16-18 with
play Sundays. Cost is $50 per
team plus umpire fees. Each team
will provide one new baseball per
game. For information call, Nick at
793-6430.
Swoyersville Fall Baseball League is
seeking teams of players from
ages 12-14. For more information,
call Al at 881-2626.
MEETINGS
Checkerboard Inn Bowling League
will meet, Wednesday, August 15th
at 7PM at Chackos Family Bowling
Center. All teams are required to
have a representative attend. Also
the league is seeking bowlers &
teams for the fall/winter season.
The league is an 80% hand-
icapped mens league which bowls
Wednesday at 6:45PM. Interested
parties are asked to contact
Chackos lanes or Frank Lipski at
675-7532.
GAR Memorial High School Football
Booster Club will meet Thursday
at 7 p.m. in the Choral Room at the
high school. New members are
welcome. For any questions, call
Ron Petrovich at 970-4110 during
the day or 829-0569 at night or
call his cell at 380-3185.
Nanticoke Area Little League will
hold its monthly meeting August 1
at the High School Cafe at 7:30
p.m. Board Members are to meet
at 7 p.m.
Wyoming Valley West Aquatics
Parents Club will be having a very
important, informative meeting for
all parents on Monday,July 30 at 7
p.m. at Grotto Pizza in Edwardsville
for the upcoming 2012-13 season.
All returning parents and also
current eighth grade parents of
athletes that are going to be
joining swim, dive or water polo
next year are encouraged to at-
tend.
PHYSICALS
Greater Nanticoke Area School
District date for physical exams
for fall sports has been changed to
Saturday, July 28 from 8:30-11:30
a.m. at the office of Dr. Jon Ole-
nginski, 4 East Main Street in
Nanticoke. All PIAA forms should
be completed prior to the exam.
These forms are available online at
gnasd.com or at the GNA Business
office and the high school princi-
pals office.
Lake-Lehman High School will
conduct physicals for fall sports at
9 a.m. on the following days:
Thursday, July 26 - all senior high
girls; Wednesday, Aug. 1 - all junior
high girls; Wednesday, Aug. 8 all
junior high boys. If you are unable
to report on your scheduled day,
you may come on the next day
scheduled for a boy or a girl. There
are new PIAA sport physical forms
this year, which can be picked up
at the high school office or can be
printed from the Lake-Lehman
School District web site under
Athletics. All physical forms must
be signed prior to the exam by a
parent/guardian. There will be no
make-up exams.
Wyoming Valley West will conduct
the second physical for fall sports
at the middle school in Kingston
on July 27 at noon. Any male
athlete who missed his physical in
June should report to this phys-
ical. All necessary paperwork can
be obtained on the Wyoming
Valley West website or picked up at
the high school, middle school or
central office. Candidates should
have the paperwork completed
and signed by a parent before
arrival at the physical.
REGISTRATIONS/TRYOUTS
Dukeys Golf Outing still has open-
ings available for the Rowan Elise
Frederick Memorial, which benefits
the Childrens Hospital of Philadel-
phia. The event will take place
Sunday at Sand Springs Golf Club
with an 8 a.m. shotgun start and a
captain and crew format. Cost is
$80 per person, which includes
carts, green fees, prizes, a hot
buffet and refreshments at Du-
keys.
Duryea Little League will have
signups for fall ball July 30-31 from
6-8 p.m at the the Duryea Little
League field. The cost is $30 per
player or $45 per family. The
regular monthly meeting will be
held Aug. 5 at 7p.m. at the Duryea
Little League field. For more in-
formation, call Ron Ralston at
881-0908.
Kingston/Forty Fort Fall Baseball
League is holding registration for
players ages 12-14 at OHara Field in
Swoyersville.The league isaccept-
ing Little League-affiliated teams
to play in a 10-game season begin-
ning August 25. Travel teams are
not permitted. Please contact Dave
at d_antall@yahoo.com or 362-
3561 for more information.
Leighton Sunday Softball League is
accepting applications for its fall
league that will begin August 12.
Any mens team can contact John
Leighton at 430-8437. The entry
deadline is August 1.
Northeast Bearcats Travel Softball
will hold tryouts for its 16/18U
team. For more information and to
register for a tryout call Mark at
704-7603.
Plains Baseball will hold fall baseball
registrations Thursday from 6:30
8 p.m. at the Little League Club-
house on Wyoming Street in
Plains. Little League registrants
should be league ages 9-11, while
Fall Teener registrants should be
league ages 12-14. Little League fee
will be $50 per player, and Teener
League fee will be $65 per player.
Season runs late August through
mid October. Any questions call
Mike Wozniak at 822-2818 or e-mail
woznmich@comcast.net.
Stripes & Strikes 2013 Travel Soft-
ball Teams will hold tryouts at the
17th Street Field in Hazleton Aug.
12 at 5:30 p.m. for 12u, 6 p.m. for
14u and 7 p.m. for 16u/18u. They
will also hold tryouts August 15 at
6 p.m. for 12u/14u and 7 p.m. for
16u/18u at 844 Hayes Street,
Hazleton, PA18201. Players unable
to attend can call 233-3925 to
schedule an individual tryout or
email vince11@ptd.net.
Wyoming Area Boys Basketball
Parents Association Golf Tourna-
ment will be held August 26 at
Sands Springs Golf Course. Cost of
the tournament is $75 per golfer/
$300 per foursome. Tournament
will have an 8 a.m. shotgun start,
and will be a four-person Captain
and Crew format. Price includes
cart, green fees, on course refresh-
ments, food at the turn, contests
on the course, and a barbeque
buffet featuring clams. Additional
information can be found on the
WA Basketball website wyominga-
reabasketball.org or contact Coach
Brogna at 650-6385, Coach Hind-
marsh at 855-4097, Tracy Carey at
313-0837, or Doreen Zezza at
881-4448. Deadline for golf regis-
tration and for hole sponsorship is
Sunday, August 12.
Bulletin Board items will not be
accepted over the telephone. Items
may be faxed to 831-7319, emailed to
tlsports@timesleader.com or dropped
off at the Times Leader or mailed to
Times Leader, c/o Sports, 15 N, Main
St., Wilkes-Barre, PA18711-0250.
BUL L E T I N BOARD
BASEBALL
Favorite Odds Underdog
American League
Rays -$112 ORIOLES
BLUE JAYS -$115 As
Tigers -$168 INDIANS
MARINERS -$115 Royals
National League
CARDS -$135 Dodgers
Pirates -$155 ASTROS
BREWERS -$127 Nationals
DBACKS -$160 Mets
OLYMPIC SOCCER
Uruguay -$380 UAE
+$800
Draw +$430
GREAT BRITAIN
-$150
Senegal
+$400
Draw +$270
Mexico -$120 South
Korea
+$260
Draw +$230
Switzerland -$140 Gabon
+$360
Draw +$260
Belarus -$120 New
Zealand
+$310
Draw +$240
Brazil -$480 Egypt
+$1200
Draw +$450
AME RI C A S
L I NE
By Roxy Roxborough
L O C A L
C A L E N D A R
FRIDAY, JULY 27
LITTLE LEAGUE
STATE JUNIOR BASEBALL
(at Cranberry Area Little League)
Northwest vs. Lower Gwynedd, 10 a.m.
STATE10-11 SOFTBALL
(at McLane Little League, Edinboro)
Nanticoke vs. Avon Grove, 6 p.m.
SATURDAY, JULY 28
AMERICAN LEGION BASEBALL
Junior Regional Tournament
Nanticoke at Freemansburg Tournament
Swoyersville at Kutztown Tournament
LITTLE LEAGUE
STATE JUNIOR BASEBALL
(at Cranberry Area Little League)
Northwest vs. Pen Mar, 5:30 p.m.
EAST REGION 9-10 SOFTBALL
(at Old Forge Little League)
BobHorlacher vs. NewCity/Suffern/Congers, N.Y.,
8 p.m.
SUNDAY, JULY 29
AMERICAN LEGION BASEBALL
Junior Regional Tournament
Nanticoke at Freemansburg Tournament
Swoyersville at Kutztown Tournament
LITTLE LEAGUE
EAST REGION 9-10 SOFTBALL
(at Old Forge Little League)
Bob Horlacher vs. Maryland champ, 8 p.m.
W H A T S O N T V
GOLF
9:30 a.m.
TGC European PGA Tour, Lyoness Open, sec-
ond round, at Atzenbrugg, Austria (same-day tape)
Noon
ESPN2 The Senior British Open Championship,
first round, at Ayrshire, Scotland
12:30 p.m.
TGC Web.com Tour, Childrens Hospital Invita-
tional, first round, at Columbus, Ohio
3 p.m.
TGC PGA Tour, Canadian Open, first round, at
Ancaster, Ontario
6:30 p.m.
TGCLPGA, Evian Masters, first round, at Evian-
les-Bains, France (same-day tape)
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
12:30 p.m.
MLB Tampa Bay at Baltimore
SNY N.Y. Mets at Washington
8 p.m.
MLB Washington at Milwaukee
ROOT Pittsburgh at Houston
9:30 p.m.
SNY N.Y. Mets at Arizona
10 p.m.
YES N.Y. Yankees at Oakland
MINOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
7 p.m.
SE2, WYLN Norfolk at Lehigh Valley
OLYMPICS
6:30 a.m.
TELEMUNDO Mens soccer, Mexico vs. South
Korea, at Newcastle, England; Honduras vs. Mo-
rocco, at Glasgow, Scotland; Brazil vs. Egypt, at
Cardiff, Wales; United Arab Emirates vs. Uruguay,
at Manchester, England
7 a.m.
NBCSN Mens soccer, LIVE: Honduras vs. Mo-
rocco, at Glasgow, Scotland; Mexico vs. South Ko-
rea, at Newcastle, England; United Arab Emirates
vs. Uruguay, at Manchester, England; Britain vs.
Senegal, at Manchester, England; SAME-DAY
TAPE: Belarus vs. New Zealand, at Coventry, En-
gland
NBC SOCCER Mens, LIVE: Honduras vs. Mo-
rocco, at Glasgow, Scotland; Mexico vs. South Ko-
rea, at Newcastle, England; United Arab Emirates
vs. Uruguay, at Manchester, England; Britain vs.
Senegal, at Manchester, England; SAME-DAY
TAPE: Spain vs. Japan, at Glasgow, Scotland; Ga-
bon vs. Switzerland, at Newcastle, England; Brazil
vs. Egypt, at Cardiff, Wales; Belarus vs. New Zeal-
and, at Coventry, England
9:30 a.m.
MSNBCMens soccer, Spain vs. Japan, at Glas-
gow, Scotland; Gabon vs. Switzerland, at Newcas-
tle, England; Brazil vs. Egypt, at Cardiff, Wales
T R A N S A C T I O N S
BASEBALL
American League
BOSTON RED SOX Assigned RHP Jose De La
Torre to Pawtucket (IL).
CLEVELAND INDIANS Transferred 3B Lonnie
Chisenhall to the 60-day DL. Designated OF Aaron
Cunningham for assignment.
KANSAS CITY ROYALS Named Jim Brower
pitching coach for Surprise (Arizona Fall League).
MINNESOTA TWINS Agreed to terms with C
Brian Compton on a minor league contract.
NEW YORK YANKEES Placed 3B Alex Rodri-
guez on the 15-day DL. Recalled INF Ramiro Pena
from Scranton/Wilkes-Barre (IL). Transferred INF
Eduardo Nunez from Tampa (FSL) to Scranton/
Wilkes-Barre.
SEATTLE MARINERS Recalled OF Trayvon
Robinson from Tacoma (PCL).
TAMPA BAY RAYS Designated OF/DH Hideki
Matsui for assignment.
TORONTO BLUE JAYS Agreed to terms with
RHP Scott Copeland on a minor league contract.
National League
MIAMI MARLINS Traded 3B Hanley Ramirez
andLHPRandy ChoatetotheL.A. Dodgers for RHP
Nathan Eovaldi and RHP Scott McGough.
NEWYORK METS Optioned C Mike Nickeas to
Buffalo (IL).
PHILADELPHIAPHILLIESAgreed to terms with
LHP Cole Hamels on a six-year contract through
2018. Assigned OF Jason Pridie outright to Lehigh
Valley (IL).
PITTSBURGH PIRATES Promoted RHP Logan
Kensing from Altoona (EL) to Indianapolis (IL) and
LHPJhonathan Ramos fromBradenton (FSL) to Al-
toona.
BASKETBALL
National Basketball Association
DALLAS MAVERICKS Signed C Bernard
James.
MINNESOTATIMBERWOLVESSignedGAlex-
ey Shved.
NEW YORK KNICKS Signed G Ronnie Brewer.
UTAHJAZZAgreed to terms with GRandy Foye.
FOOTBALL
National Football League
ARIZONA CARDINALS Placed G Blake De-
Christopher on the waived-injured list.
BUFFALO BILLS Signed DE Sean Ferguson.
Released DE Lionel Dotson.
CHICAGO BEARS Placed WR Johnny Knox on
the physically-unable-to-perform list.
CINCINNATI BENGALS Signed DT Brandon
Thompson.
DALLAS COWBOYS Placed G Mackenzy Ber-
nadeau, WRDanny Coale, CBMike Jenkins, SMatt
Johnson and C/GKevin Kowalski on the physically-
unable-to-perform list.
DETROIT LIONS Released OT Johnny Cul-
breath. Signed OT Jonathan Scott.
GREENBAYPACKERSSigned GGreg Van Ro-
ten. Released GGrant Cook and S Charlie Peprah.
MINNESOTA VIKINGS Signed CB Josh Robin-
son.
NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS Signed DL Tim
Bulman and TE Visanthe Shiancoe. Released RB
Joseph Addai.
NEW ORLEANS SAINTS Agreed to terms with
TE Derek Schouman. Signed WR Marques Clark.
Waived WR Kevin Hardy.
PHILADELPHIAEAGLESSigned PMat McBriar
to a one-year contract.
PITTSBURGH STEELERS Placed S Damon
Cromartie-Smith, NT Casey Hampton, LB James
Harrison, RB Rashard Mendenhall, OT Max Starks
and LB Jason Worilds on the physically-unable-to-
perform list.
TENNESSEE TITANS Waived OL Chandler
Burden. Placed WR Kenny Britt and S Markelle
Martin on the physically-unable-to-perform list.
HOCKEY
National Hockey League
BOSTONBRUINS Entered into a one-year affil-
iation agreement with South Carolina (ECHL).
NEW YORK ISLANDERS Agreed to terms with
D Nathan McIver on a one-year, two-way contract.
OTTAWA SENATORS Re-signed F Stephane
Da Costa to a one-year, two-way contract.
American Hockey League
GRAND RAPIDS GRIFFINS Signed assistant
coach Jim Paek to a one-year contract extension.
SAN ANTONIO RAMPAGE Signed F Justin
Vaive and F Josh Birkholz to one-year contracts.
ECHL
BAKERSFIELD CONDORS Named Brian
Schmidt equipment manager.
SOCCER
Major League Soccer
COLORADO RAPIDS Re-signed G Matt Pick-
ens to a multiyear contract.
TENNIS
USTANamed F. Skip Gilbert managing director,
professional tennis operations and U.S. Open tour-
nament manager.
COLLEGE
JACKSONVILLE STATE Named Brandon Ro-
mans assistant baseball coach.
MINNESOTANamed Mike Ellis senior associate
athletics director for administration.
PENNSYLVANIA Named Ryan Klipstein mens
assistant lacrosse coach.
RADFORD Named Lindsay Walter director of
womens basketball operations.
TEXAS-SANANTONIOPromoted KCCowgill to
womens assistant basketball coach. Named Dei-
dra Johnson womens assistant basketball coach.
TEXAS TECH Named Russell Raley volunteer
assistant baseball coach.
UNC GREENSBORO Named Sarah Sargent
womens golf coach.
G O L F
Lyoness Open
Wednesday
At Diamond Country Club
Atzenbrugg, Austria
Purse: $1.21 million
Yardage: 7,386; Par: 72 (36-36)
Play was suspended by rain and darkness
Partial First Round
Pablo Larrazabal, Spain ..........................34-3064
Alastair Forsyth, Scotland........................33-3568
Oliver Wilson, England.............................36-3268
Niclas Fasth, Sweden ..............................35-3469
stephen Dodd, Wales...............................34-3670
Joakim Haeggman, Sweden...................35-3570
Gregory Bourdy, France ..........................36-3470
Shane Lowry, Ireland................................34-3670
Joel Sjoholm, Sweden .............................36-3470
Peter Hedblom, Sweden..........................36-3470
Rikard Karlberg, Sweden ........................34-3670
Christoph Pfau, Austria ............................35-3671
Lorenzo Gagli, Italy ..................................36-3571
Chris Wood, England ...............................36-3571
Sam Little, England...................................37-3471
Alessandro Tadini, Italy............................37-3471
Steven OHara, Scotland.........................34-3771
Damien McGrane, Ireland........................35-3671
Also
Yevgeny Kafelnikov, Russia ...................38-3775
Jason Knutzon, United States.................37-3976
Leaderboard
Pablo Larrazabal, Spain........................-8through18
Thorbjorn Olesen, Denmark.................-7through14
Thomas Levet, France ..........................-6through14
Wil Besseling, Netherlands ..................-6through13
Anthony Wall, England..........................-5through13
Alastair Forsyth, Scotland.....................-4through18
Oliver Wilson, England..........................-4through18
Emiliano Grillo, Argentina.....................-4through13
Felipe Aguilar, Chile ..............................-4through12
O L Y M P I C S
Women's Olympic Soccer
FIRST ROUND
GROUP E
........................................................GPWDLGFGAPts
Brazil.............................................. 1 100 5 0 5
Britain ............................................ 1 100 1 0 3
New Zealand ................................ 1 001 0 1 0
Cameroon..................................... 1 001 0 5 0
Wednesday, July 25
Cardiff, Wales
Britain 1, New Zealand 0
Brazil 5, Cameroon 0
Saturday, July 28
Cardiff, Wales
New Zealand vs. Brazil, 9:30 a.m.
Britain vs. Cameroon, 12:15 p.m.
Tuesday, July 31
Wembley, England
Britain vs. Brazil, 2:45 p.m.
Coventry, England
New Zealand vs. Cameroon, 2:45 p.m.
GROUP F
........................................................GPWDLGFGAPts
Sweden......................................... 1 100 4 1 3
Japan............................................. 1 100 2 1 3
Canada.......................................... 1 001 1 2 0
South Africa.................................. 1 001 1 4 0
Wednesday, July 25
Coventry, England
Japan 2, Canada 1
Sweden 4, South Africa 1
Saturday, July 28
Coventry, England
Japan vs. Sweden, 7 a.m.
Canada vs. South Africa, 9:45 a.m.
Tuesday, July 31
Cardiff, Wales
Japan vs. South Africa, 9:30 a.m.
Newcastle, England
Canada vs. Sweden, 9:30 a.m.
GROUP G
........................................................GPWDLGFGAPts
United States ................................ 1 100 4 2 3
North Korea.................................. 1 100 2 0 3
France ........................................... 1 001 2 4 0
Colombia....................................... 1 001 0 2 0
Wednesday, July 25
Glasgow, Scotland
United States 4, France 2
North Korea 2, Colombia 0
Saturday, July 28
Glasgow, Scotland
United States vs. Colombia, Noon
North Korea 2, Colombia 0
Tuesday, July 31
Manchester, England
United States vs. North Korea, 12:15 p.m.
Newcastle, England
France vs. Colombia, 12:15 p.m.
Thursday's Schedule
Men's Soccer
At Hampden Park, Glasgow, Scotland
Honduras vs. Morocco, 7 a.m.
Spain vs. Japan, 9:45 a.m.
At St James' Park, Newcastle
Mexico vs. South Korea, 9:30 a.m.
Gabon vs. Switzerland, 12:15 p.m.
At Old Trafford, Manchester
United Arab Emirates vs. Uruguay, Noon
Britain vs. Senegal, 3 p.m.
At City of Coventry Stadium
Belarus vs. New Zealand, 2:45 p.m.
At Millennium Stadium, Cardiff, Wales
Brazil vs. Egypt, 2:45 p.m.
B A S E B A L L
International League
North Division
W L Pct. GB
Pawtucket (Red Sox) .............. 59 47 .557
Yankees ................................... 58 47 .552
1
2
Lehigh Valley (Phillies) ........... 56 49 .533 2
1
2
Rochester (Twins) ................... 52 53 .495 6
1
2
Buffalo (Mets)........................... 51 54 .486 7
1
2
Syracuse (Nationals)............... 48 56 .462 10
South Division
W L Pct. GB
Charlotte (White Sox) ............. 61 45 .575
Norfolk (Orioles) ...................... 54 52 .509 7
Durham (Rays)......................... 50 56 .472 11
Gwinnett (Braves) ................... 47 59 .443 14
West Division
W L Pct. GB
Indianapolis (Pirates) ............. 65 41 .613
Columbus (Indians)................ 55 50 .524 9
1
2
Toledo (Tigers)....................... 42 63 .400 22
1
2
Louisville (Reds) .................... 40 66 .377 25
Wednesday's Games
Pawtucket 4, Indianapolis 2
Toledo 5, Columbus 3, 1st game
Durham16, Gwinnett 8
Norfolk 3, Lehigh Valley 2
Rochester 5, Syracuse 3
Louisville 5, Buffalo 4
Charlotte 4, Yankees 3, 11 innings
Toledo at Columbus, late
Thursday's Games
Syracuse at Rochester, 11:05 a.m.
Toledo at Columbus, 7:05 p.m.
Durham at Gwinnett, 7:05 p.m.
Buffalo at Louisville, 7:05 p.m.
Norfolk at Lehigh Valley, 7:05 p.m.
Pawtucket at Indianapolis, 7:05 p.m.
Yankees at Charlotte, 7:15 p.m.
Friday's Games
Toledo at Columbus, 7:05 p.m.
Durham at Gwinnett, 7:05 p.m.
Buffalo at Louisville, 7:05 p.m.
Norfolk at Lehigh Valley, 7:05 p.m.
Syracuse at Rochester, 7:05 p.m.
Yankees at Charlotte, 7:15 p.m.
Pawtucket at Indianapolis, 7:15 p.m.
Eastern League
Eastern Division
W L Pct. GB
Trenton (Yankees)................... 60 43 .583
New Britain (Twins) ................. 58 46 .558 2
1
2
Reading (Phillies) .................... 52 51 .505 8
Binghamton (Mets).................. 48 55 .466 12
Portland (Red Sox).................. 47 58 .448 14
New Hampshire (Blue Jays)... 41 64 .390 20
Western Division
W L Pct. GB
Akron (Indians) ....................... 62 41 .602
Bowie (Orioles)....................... 53 50 .515 9
Richmond (Giants) ................. 53 52 .505 10
Altoona (Pirates)..................... 51 52 .495 11
Harrisburg (Nationals) ........... 51 53 .490 11
1
2
Erie (Tigers) ............................ 46 57 .447 16
Wednesday's Games
New Hampshire 8, Harrisburg 3
New Britain 11, Binghamton 2
Trenton 4, Portland 2
Bowie 4, Richmond 0
Reading 6, Altoona 1
Erie at Akron, late
Today's Games
Portland at Binghamton, 6:35 p.m.
New Hampshire at Altoona, 7 p.m.
Bowie at Akron, 7:05 p.m.
Richmond at Erie, 7:05 p.m.
Harrisburg at Trenton, 7:05 p.m.
New Britain at Reading, 7:05 p.m.
Friday's Games
Harrisburg at Trenton, 6:05 p.m., 1st game
New Hampshire at Altoona, 7 p.m.
Bowie at Akron, 7:05 p.m.
Portland at Binghamton, 7:05 p.m.
Richmond at Erie, 7:05 p.m.
New Britain at Reading, 7:05 p.m.
Harrisburg at Trenton, 8:35 p.m., 2nd game
New York - Penn League
McNamara Division
W L Pct. GB
Hudson Valley (Rays) ............. 23 13 .639
Brooklyn (Mets) ....................... 22 15 .595 1
1
2
Staten Island (Yankees).......... 15 22 .405 8
1
2
Aberdeen (Orioles).................. 14 23 .378 9
1
2
Pinckney Division
W L Pct. GB
Auburn (Nationals) ................. 22 14 .611
State College (Pirates)........... 21 16 .568 1
1
2
Batavia (Cardinals)................. 19 17 .528 3
Mahoning Valley (Indians) .... 19 18 .514 3
1
2
Jamestown (Marlins) ............. 18 19 .486 4
1
2
Williamsport (Phillies) ............ 12 25 .324 10
1
2
Stedler Division
W L Pct. GB
Tri-City (Astros) ...................... 26 10 .722
Vermont (Athletics) ................ 18 19 .486 8
1
2
Connecticut (Tigers) .............. 16 21 .432 10
1
2
Lowell (Red Sox).................... 12 25 .324 14
1
2
Wednesday's Games
Aberdeen 8, Jamestown 1
Brooklyn 3, Batavia 2
Staten Island 8, Mahoning Valley 2
State College 2, Connecticut 0
Auburn 8, Vermont 7, 10 innings
Lowell 3, Williamsport 1
Tri-City at Hudson Valley, late
Today's Games
Brooklyn at Batavia, 11:05 a.m.
Staten Island at Mahoning Valley, 7:05 p.m.
Jamestown at Aberdeen, 7:05 p.m.
State College at Connecticut, 7:05 p.m.
Williamsport at Lowell, 7:05 p.m.
Vermont at Auburn, 7:05 p.m.
Tri-City at Hudson Valley, 7:05 p.m.
Friday's Games
Brooklyn at Batavia, 7:05 p.m.
Jamestown at Aberdeen, 7:05 p.m.
Staten Island at Mahoning Valley, 7:05 p.m.
Vermont at Auburn, 7:05 p.m.
Tri-City at Hudson Valley, 7:05 p.m.
State College at Connecticut, 7:05 p.m.
Williamsport at Lowell, 7:05 p.m.
T E N N I S
ATP World Tour
Farmers Classic
A U.S. Open Series event
Wednesday
At Los Angeles Tennis Stadium at UCLA
Los Angeles
Purse: $638,050 (WT250)
Surface: Hard-Outdoor
Singles
Second Round
Leonardo Mayer (3), Argentina, def. Flavio Cipolla,
Italy, 6-0, 4-0, retired.
Rajeev Ram, United States, def. Paul Capdeville,
Chile, 6-3, 6-1.
Doubles
First Round
Ruben Bemelmans and Xavier Malisse, Belgium,
def. Paolo Lorenzi, Italy, and Benoit Paire, France,
6-2, 7-6 (7).
Olivier Charroin, France, and John Paul Fruttero,
UnitedStates, def. Marcel Felder, Uruguay, andDu-
di Sela, Israel, 7-5, 7-5.
Santiago Gonzalez, Mexico, and Scott Lipsky (1),
UnitedStates, def. Chris GuccioneandMarinkoMa-
tosevic, Australia, 6-4, 6-4.
H O R S E R A C I N G
Pocono Downs Results
Wednesday Jul 25, 2012
First - $8,000 Pace 1:55.2
7-Rescue Team (Jo Pavia Jr) 5.00 2.60 2.10
5-Glowing Fashion (Ma Kakaley) 2.60 2.10
2-Spirit Of Desire (Ma Lancaster) 2.10
EXACTA (7-5) $12.20
TRIFECTA (7-5-2) $20.80
50 CENT TRIFECTA (50 Cent) $5.20
SUPERFECTA (7-5-2-4) $63.40
10 CENT SUPERFECTA (10 Cent) $3.17
Scratched: Fun Filly
Second - $4,500 Pace 1:53.2
1-Bathing Beauty (Br Simpson) 15.60 8.60 4.20
7-Fortunes Smile (Ma Kakaley) 9.40 6.40
2-Sarastar (Ge Napolitano Jr) 2.20
EXACTA (1-7) $183.20
TRIFECTA (1-7-2) $505.40
50 CENT TRIFECTA (50 Cent) $126.35
SUPERFECTA (1-7-2-8) $4,142.40
10 CENT SUPERFECTA (10 Cent) $207.12
DAILY DOUBLE (7-1) $74.00
Scratched: Upncoming Prospect
Third - $8,000 Pace 1:56.2
1-Skade (Jo Pavia Jr) 5.80 3.40 2.60
4-Justhaventmetuyet (Ji Taggart Jr) 7.40 5.00
5-Itsall Your Fault (Mi Simons) 5.20
EXACTA (1-4) $31.00
TRIFECTA (1-4-5) $188.60
50 CENT TRIFECTA (50 Cent) $47.15
SUPERFECTA (1-4-5-2) $422.60
10 CENT SUPERFECTA (10 Cent) $21.13
Fourth - $11,000 Trot 1:57.3
9-Meadowbranch Jack (Jo Pavia Jr) 41.00 11.40
7.40
1-Andover Again (Ty Buter) 4.20 3.20
2-Symphantab (Da Ingraham) 8.40
EXACTA (9-1) $213.40
TRIFECTA (9-1-2) $1,520.40
50 CENT TRIFECTA (50 Cent) $380.10
SUPERFECTA (9-1-2-7) $9,325.40
10 CENT SUPERFECTA (10 Cent) $466.27
Fifth - $8,000 Pace 1:55.2
4-Scirocco Lauren (Th Jackson) 4.00 2.40 2.10
2-Spotlight On (Br Simpson) 3.60 3.20
5-La D Da Hanover (Ma Kakaley) 2.60
EXACTA (4-2) $12.40
TRIFECTA (4-2-5) $39.40
50 CENT TRIFECTA (50 Cent) $9.85
SUPERFECTA (4-2-5-8) $279.20
10 CENT SUPERFECTA (10 Cent) $13.96
PICK 3 (1-9-4) $545.60
Sixth - $8,500 Pace 1:53.3
8-Twin BPassion (Ge Napolitano Jr) 3.60 2.80 2.10
1-U Foria B B (Gr Merton) 4.80 3.20
7-Dill And Grace A (Ma Kakaley) 4.40
EXACTA (8-1) $12.80
TRIFECTA (8-1-7) $77.80
50 CENT TRIFECTA (50 Cent) $19.45
SUPERFECTA (8-1-7-6) $270.80
10 CENT SUPERFECTA (10 Cent) $13.54
Scratched: Sams Angel
Seventh - $11,000 Trot 1:55.4
2-Casanova Lindy (An Napolitano) 26.20 9.40 5.20
3-Current Closer (Ja Doherty) 4.80 3.60
6-Freedom Ridge (Ty Buter) 3.60
EXACTA (2-3) $113.40
TRIFECTA (2-3-6) $650.40
50 CENT TRIFECTA (50 Cent) $162.60
SUPERFECTA (2-3-6-4) $3,445.80
10 CENT SUPERFECTA (10 Cent) $172.29
Eighth - $8,500 Pace 1:53.2
5-MedolandSantorini (MaKakaley) 10.406.404.00
8-Hally (Ma Romano) 7.60 6.00
4-Grngrasanhitimes (Br Simpson) 6.20
EXACTA (5-8) $113.80
TRIFECTA (5-8-4) $864.00
50 CENT TRIFECTA (50 Cent) $216.00
SUPERFECTA (5-8-4-1) $7,047.60
10 CENT SUPERFECTA (10 Cent) $352.38
Scratched: Miss Behave
Ninth - $11,000 Pace 1:51.1
2-Ricks Sign (Er Carlson) 3.40 2.60 2.10
3-San Antony-O (Th Jackson) 4.40 2.40
1-Bestnotlie Hanover (Jo Pavia Jr) 2.80
EXACTA (2-3) $12.40
TRIFECTA (2-3-1) $27.60
50 CENT TRIFECTA (50 Cent) $6.90
SUPERFECTA (2-3-1-6) $72.60
10 CENT SUPERFECTA (10 Cent) $3.63
PICK 4 ((2,8)-2-5-(2,7) (4 Out of 4)) $260.80
Scratched: Jims Guy
Tenth - $13,000 Trot 1:54.0
1-M C Felix (Ge Napolitano Jr) 6.40 3.20 2.40
2-Berkshire (Ma Kakaley) 3.00 2.40
4-Our Last Photo (To Schadel) 5.20
EXACTA (1-2) $12.80
TRIFECTA (1-2-4) $93.20
50 CENT TRIFECTA (50 Cent) $23.30
SUPERFECTA (1-2-4-6) $242.80
10 CENT SUPERFECTA (10 Cent) $12.14
Eleventh - $11,000 Pace 1:52.3
3-Gordyyys Pet (Ty Buter) 28.60 10.80 7.20
4-Shabalabadingdong (Ma Kakaley) 4.20 2.80
5-Picked By An Angel (Mi Simons) 2.80
EXACTA (3-4) $67.40
TRIFECTA (3-4-5) $239.40
50 CENT TRIFECTA (50 Cent) $59.85
SUPERFECTA (3-4-5-8) $954.60
10 CENT SUPERFECTA (10 Cent) $47.73
Twelfth - $12,000 Pace 1:51.1
1-B Js Skye (An Napolitano) 12.80 4.80 3.00
2-Another Wild Woman (Ge Napolitano Jr) 3.60
3.60
6-Trieste Seelster (Th Jackson) 6.80
EXACTA (1-2) $31.40
TRIFECTA (1-2-6) $280.80
50 CENT TRIFECTA (50 Cent) $70.20
SUPERFECTA (1-2-6-3) $1,037.80
10 CENT SUPERFECTA (10 Cent) $51.89
PICK 3 (1-3-1) $307.40
Thirteenth - $14,000 Trot 1:54.0
2-Aunt Mel (Ma Kakaley) 2.60 2.20 2.20
8-In Your Room (Mi Simons) 3.40 4.00
4-Pilgrims Power (Th Jackson) 3.60
EXACTA (2-8) $13.60
TRIFECTA (2-8-4) $56.40
50 CENT TRIFECTA (50 Cent) $14.10
SUPERFECTA (2-8-4-1) $184.80
10 CENT SUPERFECTA (10 Cent) $9.24
Fourteenth - $9,000 Pace 1:53.4
2-Scorpionette (Th Jackson) 28.40 13.40 4.40
6-Prom Queen Hanover (Ho Parker) 52.40 14.40
9-Woes Jet Filly (Ty Buter) 3.40
EXACTA (2-6) $410.40
TRIFECTA (2-6-ALL) $1,190.40
50 CENT TRIFECTA (50 Cent) $297.60
SUPERFECTA (2-6-9-3) $30,605.00
10 CENT SUPERFECTA (10 Cent) $1,530.25
LATE DOUBLE (2-2) $26.80
Scratched: Jump Start
Total Handle-$316,750
A U T O R A C I N G
NASCAR
2012 NASCAR Nationwide Series schedule,
standings
Feb. 25 DRIVE4COPD 300, Daytona Beach,
Fla. (James Buescher)
March 3 Bashas Supermarkets 200, Avondale,
Ariz. (Elliott Sadler)
March 10 Sams Town 300, Las Vegas (Ricky
Stenhouse Jr.)
March17St. Patricks Day 300, Bristol, Tenn. (El-
liott Sadler)
March 24 Royal Purple 300, Fontana, Calif.
(Joey Logano)
April 13 OReilly Auto Parts 300, Fort Worth, Tex-
as (Ricky Stenhouse Jr.)
April 27 Richmond 250, Richmond, Va. (Kurt
Busch)
May 5 Aarons 312, Talladega, Ala. (Joey Loga-
no)
May 11 Darlington 200, Darlington, S.C. (Joey
Logano)
May 20 Iowa Spring 250, Newton, Iowa (Ricky
Stenhouse Jr.)
May 26 History 300, Concord, N.C. (Brad Kese-
lowski)
June 2 5-hour Energy 200, Dover, Del. (Joey Lo-
gano)
June16 Alliance Auto Parts 250, Brooklyn, Mich.
(Joey Logano)
June 23 Road America 200, Elkhart Lake, Wis.
(Nelson Piquet Jr.)
June29FeedtheChildren300, Sparta, Ky. (Aus-
tin Dillon)
July 6 Subway Jalapeno 250, Daytona Beach,
Fla. (Kurt Busch)
July 14 F.W. Webb 200, Loudon, N.H. (Brad Ke-
selowski)
July 22 STP 300, Joliet, Ill. (Elliott Sadler)
July 28 Indy 250, Indianapolis
Aug. 4 U.S. Cellular 250, Newton, Iowa
Aug. 11 Zippo 200 at The Glen, Watkins Glen,
N.Y.
Aug. 18 NAPA Auto Parts 200, Montreal
Aug. 24 Food City 250, Bristol, Tenn.
Sept. 1 Atlanta 300, Hampton, Ga.
Sept. 7 Virginia 529 College Savings 250, Rich-
mond, Va.
Sept. 15 Dollar General 300, Joliet, Ill.
Sept. 22 Kentucky 300, Sparta, Ky.
Sept. 29 Dover 200, Del.
Oct. 12 Dollar General 300, Concord, N.C.
Oct. 20 Kansas Lottery 300, Kansas City, Kan.
Nov. 3 OReilly Auto Parts Challenge, Fort
Worth, Texas
Nov. 10 Wypall 200, Avondale, Ariz.
Nov. 17 Ford 300, Homestead, Fla.
Driver Standings
1. Elliott Sadler, 675.
2. Austin Dillon, 664.
3. Ricky Stenhouse Jr., 656.
4. Sam Hornish Jr., 633.
5. Justin Allgaier, 597.
6. Michael Annett, 569.
7. Cole Whitt, 550.
8. Mike Bliss, 491.
9. Danica Patrick, 443.
10. Brian Scott, 430.
11. Joe Nemechek, 421.
12. Tayler Malsam, 412.
13. Jason Bowles, 391.
14. Mike Wallace, 386.
15. Jeremy Clements, 384.
16. Erik Darnell, 308.
17. Timmy Hill, 272.
18. Johanna Long, 270.
19. Eric McClure, 251.
20. T.J. Bell, 241.
S O C C E R
Major League Soccer
EASTERN CONFERENCE
...................................... W L T Pts GF GA
New York..................... 11 5 5 38 37 29
Sporting Kansas City. 11 6 4 37 26 19
Houston....................... 9 5 7 34 31 25
D.C............................... 10 7 3 33 34 27
Chicago....................... 9 7 4 31 22 22
Columbus.................... 7 7 4 25 18 19
Montreal ...................... 7 13 3 24 30 42
New England .............. 6 9 5 23 25 25
Philadelphia................ 6 10 2 20 20 21
Toronto FC.................. 5 11 4 19 24 36
WESTERN CONFERENCE
...................................... W L T Pts GF GA
San Jose...................... 13 5 4 43 44 27
Real Salt Lake............ 12 7 3 39 33 26
Vancouver ................... 9 6 7 34 25 26
Seattle.......................... 8 5 7 31 25 21
Los Angeles................ 9 10 3 30 38 35
Chivas USA ................ 6 8 5 23 13 21
Colorado...................... 7 13 1 22 27 30
FC Dallas .................... 5 10 7 22 25 30
Portland ....................... 5 11 4 19 19 35
NOTE: Three points for victory, one point for tie.
Wednesday's Games
Chelsea at MLS All-Stars, 8:30 p.m.
Friday's Games
Vancouver at Real Salt Lake, 9 p.m.
Saturday's Games
Houston at Toronto FC, 4:30 p.m.
New York at Montreal, 7:30 p.m.
Los Angeles at FC Dallas, 8 p.m.
Columbus at Sporting Kansas City, 8:30 p.m.
Seattle FC at Colorado, 9 p.m.
Chicago at San Jose, 10:30 p.m.
Chivas USA at Portland, 11 p.m.
Sunday's Games
New England at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
Friday, Aug. 3
New York at Houston, 8 p.m.
Saturday, Aug. 4
Philadelphia at Montreal, 7:30 p.m.
Sporting Kansas City at New England, 7:30 p.m.
Columbus at D.C. United, 7:30 p.m.
Toronto FC at Chicago, 8:30 p.m.
Real Salt Lake at Colorado, 9 p.m.
Sunday, Aug. 5
FC Dallas at Portland, 7 p.m.
Los Angeles at Seattle FC, 9 p.m.
H O C K E Y
NHL Calendar
July 20-Aug. 4 Salary arbitration hearings held.
Aug. 6Deadlinefor salary arbitrationdecisions to
be rendered.
Sept. 15 Expiration date of Collective Bargaining
Agreement.
Sept. 19 NHL preseason schedule begins.
Oct. 11 NHL regular season begins.
F O O T B A L L
NFL Calendar
Aug. 4-5 Hall of Fame inductions;Hall of Fame
game, Canton, Ohio.
Aug. 9-13 Preseason openers.
Sept. 5 Regular-season opener.
Sept. 9-10 First full regular-season weekend.
B O X I N G
Fight Schedule
July 27
At Resorts Hotel & Casino, Atlantic City, N.J.
(ESPN2), Hank Lundy vs. Raymundo Beltran, 10,
lightweights.
July 28
At HP Pavilion, San Jose, Calif. (SHO), Robert
Guerrero vs. Selcuk Aydin, 12, for the interim WBC
welterweight title;ShawnPorter vs. AlfonsoGomez,
12, for the vacant NABO welterweight title.
Aug. 3
At Texas Station, Las Vegas (ESPN2), Mercito
Gesta vs. Ty Barnett, 10, lightweights;Mickey Bey
vs. Rob Frankel, 10, lightweights.
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com THURSDAY, JULY 26, 2012 PAGE 3B
S P O R T S
WILKES-BARRE The An-
thracite Curling Club will be
hosting its first-ever tournament
this weekend, starting, Friday, at
The Ice Rink at Coal Street.
The bonspiel, a term meaning
tournament in curling, is sched-
uled to host eight participating
clubs, including squads from
Rochester, N.Y., Plainfield, N.J.,
and Whitby, Ontario. Participa-
nts will have a weekend full of
curling matches, complimen-
tary meals, and a friendly social
atmosphere.
When hearing the word curl-
ing, most people recall it from
the Winter Olympics, but few
knowwhat the game actually en-
tails. Curling is a game played
on a long, rectangular ice sur-
face with two teams comprised
of four members. Teams go back
and forth sliding (throwing) a
total of eight granite stones per
round (end) to see who can land
theirs closest to the center of the
target.
Teams are awarded a point for
each stone that is closest to the
center of the target known as
the button than the other
teams stones.
Joshua Sophy, a curler and
board member of the Anthracite
Curling Club, has been curling
for almost two years now after
watching the 2010 Winter Olym-
pics in Vancouver, Canada. He
was fascinated by its uniqueness
and gathered a group of friends
to attend a Learn How to Curl
seminar that year.
Immediately after attending,
he and his friends signed up for
the club. Since then, his life has
been completely consumed by
the sport. Its nothing new to
hear someone say that curling is
one of the most unique sports
theyve ever watched.
Its the brooms, Sophy said.
"When watching the sport for
the first time, many interpret it
as an easy-going sport, nothing
that requires too much energy or
a high level of difficulty. Howev-
er, this sport gives you an ex-
tremely good workout.
"Along with the physical as-
pect, its also a mental game,
too. Planning exactly where to
send the stones down the ice so
they position themselves as
close to the target as possible
without knocking any of their
other stones further away from
it."
More and more people have
come out to try the sport in re-
cent years. Today, there are
more than 17,000 registered
curlers in the United States and
that number keeps growing. Ac-
cording to Sophy, curling is a
sport for all ages, all skill levels,
and can be a fun family activity.
Its never too late to try some-
thing new and meet a bunch of
people who have the same simi-
lar interest, Sophy said.
The Anthracite Curling Club
is a part of the Grand National
Curling Club and was previously
known as the Scranton Curling
Club, formed in 2005.
For more information on curl-
ing or to sign up for the club, go
to www. Facebook.com/Anthra-
citeCurling, or follow them on
Twitter at @anthracitecurl. Or
stop by the tournament this
weekend.
C U R L I N G
Not just for winter
PETE G. WILCOX/THE TIMES LEADER
The Ice Rink at Coal Street will be the host for the Diamond City Bonspiel, a curling tournament this weekend beginning with pool
play Friday at noon.
Curling craze continues with tournament
PETE G. WILCOX/THE TIMES LEADER
Tyler Piede of Allentown slides the stone along the ice surface
during a curling match earlier this week.
Pool play
Friday: Noon, 2:30, 5 and 7:30
p.m.
Saturday: 8:30 and 11 a.m.
Semifinals
Saturday: 2 and 4:30 p.m.
Third-place match
Sunday: 8:30 a.m.
Event finals
Sunday: 11 a.m.
D I A M O N D C I T Y
B O N S P I E L S C H E D U L E
By BRITTANY CAVANAUGH
For The Times Leader
DALLAS Stricken with sorrow
and finding it difficult to overcome
grief, Matt Samuel madehiswayin-
toaviewinghenever envisionedat-
tending.
He walked out with a smile on
his face.
Even in death, Corey Ehret left
themlight-hearted.
He was more of a jokester, a lot
of laughing, said Maryann Dunn,
whose son played soccer for many
years with Ehret.
It was fitting, then, that when
people paid their respects to Ehret
on Wednesday at St. Pauls Luthe-
ran Church, they walked away feel-
ing upbeat.
AnytimeI sawhim,saidEhrets
teen friend Tyler Rice, he always
had a smile on his face.
That timeless smile will stand
frozen in the minds of those who
knewEhret, after the18-year-oldre-
cent Dallas High School graduate
passed away Sunday following a
courageous three-year battle with
embryonal rhabdomyo sarcoma.
Youd never knowit fromhis up-
beat personality, though.
It didnt affect whohewas, said
his classmate, Jess Missal, who has
counted herself as one of Ehrets
many friends since the fourth
grade. It didnt define him. He was
kind of like, Dont get down about
it, get over it, suckit up. Especially
through this.
His inspirational attitude made
Ehret cherished during his life, his
friends said, and even reverberate
arounda roomfull of his mourners.
It was more like a celebration
than a mourning, said Patrick Ne-
whart, another of friend of Ehrets.
Every time youd see him, hed
come in with a smile. It definitely
made your day better.
It made Samuel do a double-
take.
The veteran Dallas High School
trackandcross countrycoachguid-
ed Ehret through part of his sports
career, and said he was having a
hard time coming to grips with the
death of such an
inspirational stu-
dent andathlete.
Im hurting,
said Samuel,
who rushed
back from a
cross country
camp in Ship-
pensburg along
with 16 of his runners to attend
Wednesdays viewing. Andmystu-
dent-athletesarehurting. I wasvery
beat-upwhenI went intothat room.
I went up and told that family I
was so uplifted, I felt like a million
bucks when I left, Samuel contin-
ued. They reminded me of the
things that made himgreat ambi-
tion, strength, perseverance.
Those things didnt just showup
on the cross country course, where
Ehret admirably returned to make
the Dallas teamin2011after under-
going initial experimental, joint-da-
maging cancer treatments.
That, Samuel said, is the epi-
tome of a great athlete.
Its also the personification of a
great person, whichmade it easyto
understand why a never-ending
line of hundreds of men and wom-
enyoungandoldsnakedout the
doors, aroundthe entranceway and
into the packed parking lots of St.
Pauls.
Heleft his markonthis commu-
nity, students, and everybody
here, Samuel said. The things
that made that young man special
are things that can help you in all
walks of life.
Most everyonewhocameincon-
tact withEhret will miss his unique
qualities, which is why some found
it difficult to hide their sorrow.
For some people, said Boyd
Dunn, Maryanns husband, it
brought out emotions. He had a
good heart.
That heart, they say, will pump
life into those who knew him long
after Corey Ehret is gone.
Ive said this before, hes my he-
ro, Samuel said. This is a celebra-
tionof alifeI foundsoinspirational.
And Imnot the only one.
What a better way to represent
this young man.
L O C A L S P O R T S
A celebration of a
light-hearted athlete
Many share stories of recent
Dallas grad, who last battle
with cancer.
By PAUL SOKOLOSKI
psokoloski@timesleader.com
Ehret
with my result in the last Olym-
pics, Eichfeld said. I raced in
the two-man canoe or C-2 and
placed 11th. That being said, we
were very young and the experi-
ence was the important part.
During the four years in be-
tween Olympics, Eichfeld
worked hard to get back and im-
proveonhis markintheprevious
Olympics. After twostages of the
three-stage selection process,
Eichfeldtrailed.
I was the second-place boat
through the first two stages, but
then pulled ahead in the final
race, Eichfeld said. It was long
andabit stressful, but well worth
the effort.
Eichfelds efforts earned him
thetopC-1paddlerrankinginthe
U.S. anda trip to London.
It is a great feeling to have
qualified for the position, Eich-
feldsaid. I amsympathetic with
my teammates that couldnt
make it, but I cant help be glad
that it endedup being me.
Eichfeld will try to improve on
the 2008 Olympics and said he
has a shot to be standing on the
podium.
I am looking seriously at the
possibility of a medal at this
years games, Eichfeldsaid. We
all gototheOlympicsracingwith
the hopes of a medal in mind. I
have proven that I can race with
thebest intheworld, andI will do
my best to showthat I amone of
the best as well.
Eichfeldwill enter the London
Olympics with more experience
and will race in a one-man canoe
or a C-1, unlike inBeijing.
London is different for me be-
cause I am rac-
ing in a differ-
ent typeof boat
andit is mysec-
ond Olym-
pics, Eichfeld
said. I have a
much better
idea of how
things work
and howI need
to conduct my-
self sothatI can
race my best.
Eichfelds
love for the
sport and row-
ing talent
stems from his
family.
My parents were recreational
paddlers when I was born, Eich-
feld said. We would go on river
trips whenI was ababyandatod-
dler.
As Eichfeld aged, his desire to
compete and talent level only
grew.
Eventually, I startedpaddling
my single canoe and gradually
got better and better, Eichfeld
said. I was racing at a national
level when I was seven and an in-
ternational level when I was 14.
My prowess has just grown from
there.
Eichfeld said he loves water
and rivers and slalom racing
came naturally to him.
It feels great to race well,
Eichfeld said. The disappoint-
ment that comes with racing
poorly only fuels my fire to im-
prove my abilities andfocus.
Eichfeld credits his coaches
and fellow athletes for helping
him become the athlete he is to-
day.
My abilities are a collage of
ideas and techniques that I have
pickedupfromall of them, Eich-
feldsaid. Without eachof themI
wouldnot have made it this far.
ThemensC-1heatsbeginSun-
day. The semifinal round is
scheduledfor Monday andthe fi-
nals start Tuesday.
CANOEIST
Continued fromPage 1B
USA CANOE/KAYAK
Casey Eichfeld, fromDrums, placed 11th in the 2008 Summer
Olympics. This weekend, he begins his quest for a medal.
I am look-
ing seri-
ously at
the possi-
bility of a
medal at
this years
games.
Casey Eichfeld,
Olympic
canoeist from
Drums
SWOYERSVILLE Alex Gul-
itus broke a 3-3 deadlock with an
RBI single in the first inning that
proved to be the difference in the
game to lead Plains to a 4-3
victory over Wyoming/West
Wyoming to move to the win-
ners bracket final of the
Swoyersville11-12 Baseball Tour-
nament.
TJ Wozniak held Wyoming/
West Wyoming to one hit while
striking out seven over the final
five innings.
Tony Egidio hit a two-run
single for Plains. Jake Brown had
an RBI. Josh Brown and Bryce
Yencha each supplied two hits.
For Wyoming/West Wyoming,
Matt Tarnalicki hit a single,
double and a pair of RBI. Jimmy
Kosco hit an RBI.
EXETERTOURNAMENT
8-9BASEBALL
Nanticoke12, Jenkins Twp. 9
Justin Spencer had three hits
to lead Nanticoke. Derek Cease
contributed two hits and three
RBI.
Joey Day picked up the win.
Day, Nick Matson, Trevor Kruc-
zek and Ethan Egenski each
tallied two hits and an RBI.
Josh Noone, Matt Rhodes,
Matt Prociak and Mike Rhodes
all had two-hit efforts for Jenkins
Township. Cameron Kohut
drove in two runs.
L I T T L E L E A G U E R O U N D U P
Early scoring carries Plains
The Times Leader staff
CHARLOTTE, N.C. Conor
Jackson tormented the Scran-
ton/Wilkes-Barre Yankees on
Wednesday as Charlotte defeated
the Yankees 4-3 in 11 innings at
Knights Stadium.
Jackson went 4-for-5 with his
seventh home run of the season
then scored the game-winning
run in the bottom of the 11th on
an error.
The SWB loss coupled with a
Pawtucket windrops theYankees
a half game behindthe PawSoxin
the North Division.
Possible playoff sites
announced
If the SWB Yankees reach the
postseason, home games will be
played at Frontier Field in Roch-
ester, N.Y., Red Wings general
manager Dan Mason made the
announcement on Wednesday.
Charlotte 4, Yankees 3
Yankees Charlotte
ab r h bi ab r h bi
McDonaldcf 5 0 0 0 Kuhn 3b 5 1 2 0
Joseph 2b 5 1 1 1 Garcia 2b 4 0 0 0
Nunez ss 4 1 0 0 Johnson 1b 3 0 0 1
Cust dh 5 0 1 1 Jackson rf 5 2 4 1
Laird 1b 5 1 1 0
McPherson
dh 5 0 0 0
Fukudome lf 2 0 1 0 Phegley c 5 1 1 0
Cervelli c 5 0 1 0 Mitchell cf 4 0 1 0
Garner rf 5 0 0 0 Gallagher lf 3 0 1 0
Bernier 3b 4 0 1 0 Gimenez 1b 1 0 0 0
Olmedo 2b 4 0 1 1
Totals 40 3 6 2 Totals 39 410 3
Yankees .............................. 100 001 001 00 3
Charlotte.............................. 000 002 100 01 4
2B: CHAKuhn, Mitchell, Jackson; HR: SWBJoseph,
C (7); CHA Jackson (7)
Team RISP: SWB 1-for-7, CHA 0-for-8; Team
LOB: SWB 8, CHA 7
IP H R ER BB SO
Yankees
Maine......................... 6 6 3 3 1 8
Wade ......................... 4 3 0 0 0 2
Igrashi (L, 2-3).......... 0.1 1 1 0 0 0
Charlotte
Axelrod...................... 5 1 1 1 3 6
Marinez ..................... 2 2 1 1 1 2
Veal ............................ 2 1 1 0 0 2
Kloess (W, 3-0) ........ 2 2 0 0 0 2
Pitches-strikes: Maine 94-60, Wade 56-39, Igarashi
9-7, Axelrod 88-51, Marinez 32-21, Veal 31-21,
Kloess 20-14; Groundouts-flyouts: Maine5-3, Wade
8-0, Igarashi 1-1, Axelrod2-3, Marinez 1-1, Veal 3-1,
Kloess 3-1; Inherited runners-scored: Wade 1-1;
Ejections: Charlotte Knights first baseman Jim Gal-
lagher ejected by HP umpire Chad Whitson (8th);
Umpires: HP: ChadWhitson. 1B: GerardAscani. 3B:
Jon Saphire; Weather: 91 degrees, partly cloudy;
Wind: 4 mph, Out to CF; T: 3:10; Att: 3,652.
I L B A S E B A L L
Knights beat Yankees in 11
The Times Leader staff
C M Y K
PAGE 4B THURSDAY, JULY 26, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
M A J O R L E A G U E B A S E B A L L
SEATTLEPinch-hitter
JaysonNix lineda three-run
double off Seattle reliever
ShawnKelley inthe eighth
inning, andthe NewYork Yan-
kees ralliedfor a 5-2 winover
the Mariners onWednesday to
complete a 2-5 West Coast trip.
Kelley left a 2-2 pitchover the
middle of the plate andNixs
liner scoredDerek Jeter, Rob-
insonCano andMark Teixeira.
It was Nixs first hit ineight
at-bats during the Yankees trip.
Jeter also homeredinthe first
inning, his eighthof the season,
off Seattle starter Hisashi Iwa-
kuma.
Nix probably will see in-
creasedplaying time withAlex
Rodriguez sidelinedfor a
monthor more because of a
fracturedleft hand. Nix andEric
Chavez, who startedat third
base onWednesday, are the
likely candidates to handle the
positionuntil Rodriguez re-
turns.
Tigers 5, Indians 3
CLEVELANDMax Scher-
zer allowedtwo runs over seven
innings to winhis fourth
straight decisionandthe De-
troit Tigers beat the Cleveland
Indians for only the secondtime
ineight meetings this season.
QuintinBerry hadthree hits
anddrove intwo runs to help
Scherzer (10-5) winfor the first
time infour career starts at
Progressive Field.
Rays10, Orioles1
BALTIMOREDavidPrice
allowedone runover seven
innings to earnhis major
league-leading14thvictory,
RyanRoberts homeredand
scoredthree runs inhis Tampa
Bay debut andthe Rays cruised
past the Baltimore Orioles.
Athletics16, Blue Jays 0
TORONTOCoco Crisp hit
two home runs andYoenis
Cespedes hada pair of RBI
doubles, leading A.J. Griffinand
the OaklandAthletics over the
Toronto Blue Jays for their
season-highseventhstraight
win.
It was the most-lopsided
shutout loss ever for Toronto.
White Sox8, Twins 2
CHICAGODayanViciedo
homeredanddrove infour runs,
andChicago completedthe
three-game sweep.
Viciedo hit a two-runsingle in
the secondinning andaddeda
two-runhomer inthe fourth,
finishing withthree hits. Alex
Rios homeredfor the White
Sox, who have won10 of their
last 11home games.
Angels11, Royals 6
ANAHEIM, Calif. Jered
Weaver wonhis seventh
straight start to tie a career-
best, andMike Trout andTorii
Hunter homeredfor Los An-
geles.
The Angels wonthe rubber
game of the three-game series
without slugger Albert Pujols,
who missedhis secondgame of
the seasonbecause of a bruised
right elbow.
A M E R I C A N L E A G U E R O U N D U P
AP PHOTO
New York Yankees Ichiro Suzuki singles against the Seattle
Mariners in the fifth inning Wednesday, in Seattle.
With A-Rod injured,
Nix powers Yankees
The Associated Press
PHILADELPHIA Jimmy
Rollins hit an RBI single off
Francisco Rodriguez with two
outs in the 10th and Philadel-
phia rallied in its last at-bat for
the fourth straight day, com-
pleting its first three-game
sweep of the season 7-6
Wednesday.
The Phillies have won four
straight, including three walk-
off wins.
Rollins had the winning hit
in the 12th against San Francis-
co on Sunday. The Phillies
scored four runs off Rodriguez
in the ninth in a 7-6 win Mon-
day, and six in the eighth in a
7-6 win Tuesday.
Michael Schwimer (2-1)
allowed an unearned run in the
10th, but earned the win.
John Mayberry Jr. walked
with one out in the 10th
against Rodriguez (2-6). Eric
Kratz followed with a double.
Pinch-hitter Carlos Ruiz hit a
sacrifice fly to tie it. Rollins hit
an RBI single.
Nationals 5, Mets 2
NEW YORK Stephen
Strasburg struck out 11 in sev-
en innings, Michael Morse and
Danny Espinosa hit consec-
utive homers and Washington
completed a sweep of free-
falling New York.
Adam LaRoche hit a two-run
homer for a second straight
day, and Espinosa doubled and
scored on one of the Mets two
errors in the Nationals fifth
straight win. The team with
the NLs best record (58-39)
has won seven of 10.
Strasburg (11-4) gave up four
hits in matching his career best
for innings, done seven times.
Ike Davis homered for New
York in the finale of an 0-6
homestand.
Pirates 3, Cubs 2
PITTSBURGH Kevin
Correia won his career-best
fifth straight start and Garrett
Jones hit a tiebreaking double
to lead Pittsburgh over Chica-
go.
Correia (8-6) gave up two
runs and four hits in six in-
nings, helping Pittsburgh avoid
getting swept at home.
Jones drove in the go-ahead
run with a two-out double in
the sixth. Neil Walker and
Michael McKenry homered for
Pittsburgh.
Braves 7, Marlins 1
MIAMI Juan Francisco
homered and drove in three
runs for Atlanta while the
downsizing Marlins jettisoned
yet another star player by trad-
ing Hanley Ramirez to Los
Angeles.
Michael Bourn and Jason
Heyward homered to back
Tommy Hanson (11-5), who
pitched around a career-high
seven walks and allowed one
run and three hits in five in-
nings.
Padres 6, Giants 3
SAN FRANCISCO Jesus
Guzman hit two home runs
and Chase Headley had one to
hand Tim Lincecum another
setback and San Diego avoided
a three-game sweep.
The NL West-leading Giants
had only their third loss in 12
games.
N AT I O N A L L E A G U E R O U N D U P
Phils roll lucky seven
against Brewers again
The Associated Press
STANDINGS/STATS
ABERDEEN, Md. Cal Rip-
ken Jr.s 74-year-old mother was
found with her hands bound in
the back seat of her car Wednes-
day after she said she was kid-
napped at gunpoint a day earlier
at her home outside Baltimore
and driven around blindfolded
by her abductor, police and
neighbors said.
Investigators do not know the
kidnappers motive and there
was no ransom demand for Vi
Ripkens release, Aberdeen Po-
lice Chief Henry Trabert said at
a news conference.
The gunman forced Ripken in-
to her silver Lincoln Continental
between 7 a.m. and 8 a.m. Tues-
day, police said. She was found
bound and unharmed but shak-
en about 6:15 a.m. Wednesday
near her home in Aberdeen,
about 30 miles northeast of Bal-
timore.
When asked if police believe
the kidnapper knew who he was
abducting, Trabert did not an-
swer, saying investigators dont
know the motive or if the sus-
pect has any ties to the Ripken
family.
A next-door neighbor said Vi
Ripken told him her kidnapper
didnt seem to know that her son
was the Hall of Fame infielder
nicknamed Iron Man for play-
ing in 2,632 consecutive games
during his 21-year career with
the Baltimore.
Gus Kowalewski said he spoke
with Vi Ripken later Wednesday
morning and she told him the
gunman tied her hands and put a
blindfold on her, but said he
wouldnt hurt her.
Cal Ripkens mother abducted, is now safe, police and neighbors say
By ALEX DOMINGUEZ
Associated Press
Cardinals 8, Dodgers 2
Los Angeles St. Louis
ab r h bi ab r h bi
HrstnJr 3b-lf 4 0 2 0 Furcal ss 4 1 2 3
M.Ellis 2b 4 0 0 0 Craig rf-lf 4 0 1 2
Kemp cf 3 0 0 0 Hollidy lf 4 1 0 0
GwynJ cf 0 0 0 0 Boggs p 0 0 0 0
Ethier rf 3 1 0 0 Beltran cf-rf 4 1 1 0
Guerra p 0 0 0 0 Freese 3b 3 1 1 1
Loney 1b 4 1 2 0 YMolin c 4 0 0 0
JRiver lf-rf 4 0 1 1 Brkmn 1b 0 0 0 0
L.Cruz ss 4 0 1 1
MCrpnt
pr-1b 3 0 0 0
Treanr c 4 0 0 0 Descals 2b 3 2 2 0
Kershw p 2 0 0 0 Wnwrg p 1 2 1 2
Lindlm p 0 0 0 0 Rzpczy p 0 0 0 0
AKndy ph 1 0 1 0 Jay ph-cf 1 0 0 0
ShTllsn p 0 0 0 0
Uribe 3b 0 0 0 0
Totals 33 2 7 2 Totals 31 8 8 8
Los Angeles....................... 000 200 000 2
St. Louis............................. 000 026 00x 8
EBerkman (4), Descalso (6). DPSt. Louis 3.
LOBLos Angeles 6, St. Louis 7. 2BHairston Jr.
(11), J.Rivera (9), Craig (17), Beltran (14), Wainw-
right (1). SBFreese (2). SWainwright.
IP H R ER BB SO
Los Angeles
Kershaw L,7-6 ......... 5
2
3 7 8 8 3 4
Lindblom..................
1
3 1 0 0 0 1
Sh.Tolleson ............. 1 0 0 0 1 0
Guerra...................... 1 0 0 0 2 0
St. Louis
Wainwright W,8-10. 7
1
3 7 2 2 1 7
Rzepczynski ............
2
3 0 0 0 0 0
Boggs ....................... 1 0 0 0 0 1
HBPby Kershaw (Berkman), by Wainwright
(Kemp).
UmpiresHome, D.J. Reyburn;First, Jeff Kellogg-
;Second, Marty Foster;Third, John Tumpane.
T2:54. A38,195 (43,975).
Giants 3, Padres 2
San Diego San Francisco
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Denorfi cf 3 0 0 0 Schrhlt rf 3 1 1 0
Forsyth 2b 4 0 0 0 Theriot 2b 2 1 1 0
Headly 3b 4 0 2 0 MeCarr lf 4 0 1 1
Quentin lf 3 1 1 0 Posey c 4 0 0 0
Grandl c 4 0 1 0 Sandovl 1b 1 0 1 1
Guzmn rf 3 1 2 1 Belt ph-1b 2 1 0 0
Venale pr-rf 0 0 0 0 Pagan cf 4 0 1 0
Alonso 1b 4 0 0 0 BCrwfr ss 4 0 1 1
EvCarr ss 3 0 0 0 Arias 3b 3 0 0 0
Volquez p 3 0 1 1 Bmgrn p 2 0 0 0
Grgrsn p 0 0 0 0 Burriss ph 1 0 0 0
Thtchr p 0 0 0 0 Romo p 0 0 0 0
SCasill p 0 0 0 0
Totals 31 2 7 2 Totals 30 3 6 3
San Diego.......................... 020 000 000 2
San Francisco.................... 200 000 001 3
No outs when winning run scored.
DPSan Francisco 3. LOBSan Diego 6, San
Francisco7. 2BQuentin(9), Grandal (5), Guzman
(15), Schierholtz (4), Sandoval (19). SBDenorfia
(8), Venable (10), Schierholtz (3), Me.Cabrera (11).
San Diego
IP H R ER BB SO
Volquez 7 3 2 2 3 8
Gregerson................ 1 1 0 0 0 2
Thatcher L,0-4......... 0 2 1 1 1 0
Bumgarner............... 7 6 2 2 2 9
Romo........................ 1 1 0 0 0 0
S.Casilla W,4-4....... 1 0 0 0 1 2
Thatcher pitched to 3 batters in the 9th.
HBPby Bumgarner (Quentin). PBGrandal 2.
UmpiresHome, Jordan Baker; First, Paul Nauert;
Second, Dana DeMuth; Third, Doug Eddings.
T2:49. A42,559 (41,915).
Diamondbacks 6, Rockies 2
Colorado Arizona
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Fowler cf 4 0 0 0 Blmqst 3b 5 0 1 1
Scutaro 2b 4 0 0 0 A.Hill 2b 4 0 1 0
CGnzlz lf 4 0 0 0 Kubel lf 5 1 2 0
Cuddyr 1b 4 2 2 2 Gldsch 1b 5 0 0 0
ABrwn rf 3 0 0 0 J.Upton rf 1 2 0 0
WRosr c 3 0 0 0 MMntr c 4 0 2 2
Rutledg ss 3 0 0 0 CYoung cf 2 2 2 2
LeMahi 3b 3 0 0 0 Drew ss 3 1 1 1
EdCarr p 1 0 0 0 JSndrs p 3 0 0 0
Roenck p 1 0 1 0 JMcDnl ph 1 0 0 0
Brothrs p 0 0 0 0 Saito p 0 0 0 0
EYong ph 1 0 0 0 DHrndz p 0 0 0 0
MtRynl p 0 0 0 0
Totals 31 2 3 2 Totals 33 6 9 6
Colorado ............................ 000 101 000 2
Arizona............................... 000 220 20x 6
EBloomquist (5). LOBColorado 3, Arizona 10.
2BBloomquist (20), Kubel (21), Drew (5). HR
Cuddyer 2 (14), C.Young (11). SBJ.Upton (12),
C.Young (6).
IP H R ER BB SO
Colorado
Ed.Cabrera L,0-2.... 3
1
3 4 2 2 4 4
Roenicke.................. 2
2
3 2 2 2 1 0
Brothers ................... 1 2 2 2 2 1
Mat.Reynolds........... 1 1 0 0 0 1
Arizona
J.Saunders W,5-6... 7 3 2 2 1 9
Saito ......................... 1 0 0 0 0 0
D.Hernandez ........... 1 0 0 0 0 1
UmpiresHome, Mark Wegner;First, Wally Bell-
;Second, Angel Campos;Third, Mike Winters.
T2:48. A20,432 (48,633).
Reds 4, Astros 2
Cincinnati Houston
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Cozart ss 5 1 1 0 Altuve 2b 4 0 2 0
Stubbs cf 4 1 3 2 MGnzlz ss 3 0 1 0
BPhllps 2b 4 1 2 0 SMoore 1b 4 0 0 0
Bruce rf 2 1 0 0 CJhnsn 3b 4 1 2 0
Rolen 3b 4 0 1 0 Maxwll rf 4 1 1 2
Paul lf 5 0 3 2 BFrncs lf 4 0 1 0
Frazier 1b 5 0 1 0 Schafer cf 3 0 0 0
Mesorc c 3 0 0 0 MDwns ph 1 0 0 0
Heisey ph 1 0 0 0 CSnydr c 3 0 0 0
Hanign c 0 0 0 0 Harrell p 2 0 1 0
Leake p 3 0 0 0 JDMrtn ph 1 0 0 0
Ludwck ph 1 0 0 0 WLopez p 0 0 0 0
Chpmn p 0 0 0 0 Corder p 0 0 0 0
FRdrgz p 0 0 0 0
Totals 37 411 4 Totals 33 2 8 2
Cincinnati ........................... 000 001 003 4
Houston.............................. 000 200 000 2
ERolen (6), S.Moore (3). DPCincinnati 1.
LOBCincinnati 12, Houston 5. 2BB.Phillips
(18). HRStubbs (10), Maxwell (10). SBB.Phil-
lips (8), Paul (1). CSStubbs (5), Altuve (6).
Cincinnati
IP H R ER BB SO
Leake W,4-6 8 7 2 2 1 6
Chapman S,18-22 .. 1 1 0 0 0 3
Harrell ....................... 7 7 1 1 3 6
W.Lopez H,9............ 1 1 0 0 1 1
Cordero L,0-1
BS,1-1 ......................
2
3 3 3 3 2 0
Fe.Rodriguez...........
1
3 0 0 0 0 0
WPCordero.
UmpiresHome, Gary Cederstrom; First, Mike
Muchlinski; Second, Fieldin Culbreth; Third, Lance
Barksdale.
T2:59. A15,908 (40,981).
S T A N D I N G S
AMERICAN LEAGUE
East Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
New York...................................... 59 39 .602 5-5 W-1 30-17 29-22
Baltimore ...................................... 51 47 .520 8 2
1
2 5-5 L-3 23-24 28-23
Tampa Bay ................................... 51 47 .520 8 2
1
2 5-5 W-2 28-25 23-22
Boston .......................................... 49 50 .495 10
1
2 5 4-6 L-1 25-28 24-22
Toronto......................................... 48 49 .495 10
1
2 5 5-5 L-2 25-22 23-27
Central Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
Chicago ........................................ 53 45 .541
1
2 4-6 W-3 27-22 26-23
Detroit ........................................... 53 45 .541
1
2 8-2 W-1 28-21 25-24
Cleveland ..................................... 49 49 .500 4 4
1
2 4-6 L-1 26-25 23-24
Kansas City.................................. 41 56 .423 11
1
2 12 3-7 L-1 17-30 24-26
Minnesota .................................... 40 58 .408 13 13
1
2 4-6 L-3 19-30 21-28
West Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
Texas............................................ 58 39 .598 5-5 W-1 31-17 27-22
Oakland ........................................ 53 44 .546 5 9-1 W-7 29-21 24-23
Los Angeles................................. 54 45 .545 5 5-5 W-1 29-20 25-25
Seattle........................................... 43 57 .430 16
1
2 11
1
2 6-4 L-1 18-29 25-28
NATIONAL LEAGUE
East Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
Washington.................................. 58 39 .598 7-3 W-5 28-19 30-20
Atlanta........................................... 54 44 .551 4
1
2 5-5 W-2 24-24 30-20
New York...................................... 47 51 .480 11
1
2 7 1-9 L-6 26-26 21-25
Miami ............................................ 45 53 .459 13
1
2 9 3-7 L-2 25-26 20-27
Philadelphia................................. 45 54 .455 14 9
1
2 7-3 W-4 21-29 24-25
Central Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
Cincinnati...................................... 57 40 .588 8-2 W-6 31-18 26-22
Pittsburgh..................................... 55 42 .567 2 6-4 W-1 33-16 22-26
St. Louis ....................................... 51 46 .526 6 2
1
2 5-5 W-1 27-21 24-25
Milwaukee .................................... 44 53 .454 13 9
1
2 3-7 L-6 26-23 18-30
Chicago ........................................ 40 57 .412 17 13
1
2 5-5 L-1 24-21 16-36
Houston........................................ 34 64 .347 23
1
2 20 1-9 L-8 24-23 10-41
West Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
San Francisco ............................... 55 43 .561 7-3 L-1 31-17 24-26
Los Angeles .................................. 53 45 .541 2 1 5-5 L-1 29-20 24-25
Arizona........................................... 49 48 .505 5
1
2 4
1
2 7-3 W-5 28-21 21-27
San Diego...................................... 42 58 .420 14 13 6-4 W-1 22-29 20-29
Colorado........................................ 36 60 .375 18 17 2-8 L-3 20-29 16-31
AMERICAN LEAGUE
Tuesday's Games
Cleveland 3, Detroit 2
Tampa Bay 3, Baltimore 1
Oakland 7, Toronto 2
Boston 2, Texas 1
Chicago White Sox 11, Minnesota 4
Kansas City 4, L.A. Angels 1
Seattle 4, N.Y. Yankees 2
Wednesday's Games
Chicago White Sox 8, Minnesota 2
L.A. Angels 11, Kansas City 6
N.Y. Yankees 5, Seattle 2
Detroit 5, Cleveland 3
Tampa Bay 10, Baltimore 1
Oakland 16, Toronto 0
Texas 5, Boston 3
Thursday's Games
Tampa Bay (Shields 8-6) at Baltimore (Tillman 2-1),
12:35 p.m.
Oakland (Milone 9-6) at Toronto (Laffey 2-1), 12:37
p.m.
Detroit (Verlander 11-5) at Cleveland (McAllister
4-2), 7:05 p.m.
Kansas City (Mendoza 4-6) at Seattle (Vargas
10-7), 10:10 p.m.
Friday's Games
Boston at N.Y. Yankees, 7:05 p.m.
Oakland at Baltimore, 7:05 p.m.
Detroit at Toronto, 7:07 p.m.
Chicago White Sox at Texas, 8:05 p.m.
Cleveland at Minnesota, 8:10 p.m.
Tampa Bay at L.A. Angels, 10:05 p.m.
Kansas City at Seattle, 10:10 p.m.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Tuesday's Games
Chicago Cubs 5, Pittsburgh 1
Philadelphia 7, Milwaukee 6
Atlanta 4, Miami 3
Washington 5, N.Y. Mets 2
Cincinnati 4, Houston 2
St. Louis 8, L.A. Dodgers 2
Arizona 6, Colorado 2
San Francisco 3, San Diego 2
Wednesday's Games
Washington 5, N.Y. Mets 2
Pittsburgh 3, Chicago Cubs 2
Atlanta 7, Miami 1
Philadelphia 7, Milwaukee 6, 10 innings
San Diego 6, San Francisco 3
Cincinnati at Houston, 8:05 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers at St. Louis, 8:15 p.m.
Colorado at Arizona, 9:40 p.m.
Thursday's Games
L.A. Dodgers (Capuano 10-5) at St. Louis (West-
brook 8-8), 1:45 p.m.
Pittsburgh (A.J.Burnett 11-3) at Houston (Keuchel
1-2), 8:05 p.m.
Washington (E.Jackson 5-6) at Milwaukee (Gallar-
do 8-7), 8:10 p.m.
N.Y. Mets (Harvey 0-0) at Arizona (Miley11-5), 9:40
p.m.
Friday's Games
St. Louis at Chicago Cubs, 2:20 p.m.
San Diego at Miami, 7:10 p.m.
Philadelphia at Atlanta, 7:35 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Houston, 8:05 p.m.
Washington at Milwaukee, 8:10 p.m.
Cincinnati at Colorado, 8:40 p.m.
N.Y. Mets at Arizona, 9:40 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers at San Francisco, 10:15 p.m.
T U E S D A Y S
L A T E B O X E S
Mariners 4, Yankees 2
New York Seattle
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Jeter ss 3 1 0 0 Ackley 2b 3 1 0 0
Grndrs cf 4 1 2 1 MSndrs cf 4 2 2 1
AlRdrg 3b 2 0 1 0 JMontr dh 3 0 1 1
J.Nix pr-3b 0 0 0 0
Figgins
pr-dh 0 0 0 0
Cano 2b 4 0 1 0 Jaso c 2 0 0 1
Teixeir 1b 2 0 0 1 Seager 3b 4 0 2 1
Ibanez lf 4 0 0 0 C.Wells lf 4 0 0 0
ErChvz dh 4 0 0 0 Carp 1b 3 0 0 0
ISuzuki rf 3 0 1 0 Peguer rf 3 0 0 0
CStwrt c 2 0 0 0 Ryan ss 3 1 1 0
RMartn ph 1 0 0 0
Totals 29 2 5 2 Totals 29 4 6 4
New York ........................... 100 000 010 2
Seattle ................................ 102 000 01x 4
DPSeattle 2. LOBNew York 7, Seattle 5.
2BI.Suzuki (16). HRGranderson (27), M.Saun-
ders (10). SBGranderson (7), Ackley (11). SF
Teixeira, Jaso.
IP H R ER BB SO
New York
F.Garcia L,4-4......... 7
1
3 5 3 3 0 8
Rapada.....................
1
3 0 1 1 1 0
Qualls ....................... 0 0 0 0 1 0
Logan........................ 0 1 0 0 1 0
Eppley ......................
1
3 0 0 0 0 0
Seattle
F.Hernandez W,9-5 7
1
3 4 2 2 3 4
Luetge H,6...............
2
3 1 0 0 0 1
Wilhelmsen
S,11-13..................... 1 0 0 0 0 2
Qualls pitched to 1 batter in the 8th.
Logan pitched to 2 batters in the 8th.
HBPby F.Hernandez (I.Suzuki, Jeter, Al.Rodri-
guez). WPF.Hernandez.
UmpiresHome, Greg Gibson;First, Manny Gon-
zalez;Second, Gerry Davis;Third, Phil Cuzzi.
T2:50. A31,908 (47,860).
Nationals 5, Mets 2
Washington New York
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Lmrdzz 2b 5 0 1 0 Tejada ss 4 0 0 0
Harper rf 4 1 1 0 Vldspn lf-rf 4 0 1 1
Zmrmn 3b 5 0 0 0 DWrght 3b 4 0 0 0
LaRoch 1b 4 1 1 2 I.Davis 1b 4 1 1 1
Morse lf 4 1 1 1 DnMrp 2b 4 0 1 0
Espinos ss 4 2 2 1 Niwnhs rf 3 0 0 0
Berndn cf 3 0 1 0 ElRmr p 0 0 0 0
Leon c 2 0 0 0 JuTrnr ph 1 0 0 0
Strasrg p 3 0 0 0 Thole c 2 1 1 0
CBrwn ph 1 0 0 0 AnTrrs cf 2 0 0 0
HRdrgz p 0 0 0 0 Hefner p 1 0 0 0
Stmmn p 0 0 0 0 RCeden ph 1 0 0 0
SBurntt p 0 0 0 0 Byrdak p 0 0 0 0
Storen p 0 0 0 0 Rauch p 0 0 0 0
Clipprd p 0 0 0 0 Hairstn lf 0 0 0 0
Totals 35 5 7 4 Totals 30 2 4 2
Washington ....................... 020 100 200 5
New York ........................... 010 000 010 2
EThole (5), Dan.Murphy (11). DPWashington
1. LOBWashington 7, New York 4. 2BHarper
(16), Espinosa (26), Thole (10). HRLaRoche (18),
Morse (7), Espinosa (9), I.Davis (16).
IP H R ER BB SO
Washington
Strasburg W,11-4 ... 7 4 1 1 0 11
H.Rodriguez ............ 0 0 1 1 2 0
Stammen H,8 ..........
1
3 0 0 0 1 0
S.Burnett H,22 ........
1
3 0 0 0 0 0
Storen H,2................
1
3 0 0 0 0 0
Clippard S,18-21..... 1 0 0 0 0 1
New York
Hefner L,1-4 ............ 6 6 3 2 2 7
Byrdak ......................
2
3 1 2 2 1 0
Rauch .......................
1
3 0 0 0 0 0
El.Ramirez ............... 2 0 0 0 1 1
H.Rodriguez pitched to 2 batters in the 8th.
UmpiresHome, Jim Wolf;First, Derryl Cousins-
;Second, Alan Porter;Third, David Rackley.
T2:53. A35,517 (41,922).
Braves 7, Marlins 1
Atlanta Miami
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Bourn cf 5 1 1 2 Reyes ss 3 0 1 0
Prado 2b 4 0 0 0 DSolan 3b 1 1 0 0
Heywrd rf 4 2 2 1 Ca.Lee 1b 3 0 0 0
McCnn c 4 1 1 0 Morrsn lf 3 0 0 0
FFrmn 1b 4 1 1 1 Ruggin cf 4 0 2 1
JFrncs 3b 4 1 3 3 Bonifac 2b 3 0 0 0
Constnz lf 4 0 0 0 Petersn rf 3 0 0 0
Janish ss 3 1 1 0 Hayes c 4 0 0 0
Hanson p 1 0 0 0 Nolasco p 2 0 0 0
Medlen p 1 0 0 0 DJnngs p 0 0 0 0
Hinske ph 1 0 0 0 Cousins ph 1 0 0 0
Venters p 0 0 0 0 LeBlnc p 0 0 0 0
Mujica p 0 0 0 0
Kearns ph 1 0 0 0
Totals 35 7 9 7 Totals 28 1 3 1
Atlanta ................................ 000 321 010 7
Miami .................................. 001 000 000 1
ED.Solano (2). DPMiami 1. LOBAtlanta 3,
Miami 8. 2BHeyward (18), Reyes (20), Ruggiano
2 (15). HRBourn (8), Heyward (15), J.Francisco
(8). SBConstanza (1), Reyes 2 (23), D.Solano 2
(4), Ruggiano (7), Bonifacio (26), Petersen (2).
CSReyes (6). SHanson.
IP H R ER BB SO
Atlanta
Hanson W,11-5....... 5 3 1 1 7 7
Medlen ..................... 3 0 0 0 1 5
Venters..................... 1 0 0 0 0 2
Miami
Nolasco L,8-9.......... 5
1
3 8 6 6 1 3
Da.Jennings ............ 1
2
3 0 0 0 0 1
LeBlanc .................... 1 1 1 1 0 0
Mujica....................... 1 0 0 0 0 1
UmpiresHome, Mike Estabrook;First, Tim Wel-
ke;Second, Paul Schrieber;Third, Laz Diaz.
T2:46. A36,711 (37,442).
Padres 6, Giants 3
San Diego San Francisco
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Venale cf-rf 5 0 1 2 GBlanc rf-lf 4 1 1 0
Forsyth 2b 5 0 2 0 Theriot 2b 3 0 1 1
Headly 3b 5 1 1 1 MeCarr lf 3 0 0 1
Quentin lf 4 1 2 0 Kontos p 0 0 0 0
Amarst lf 0 0 0 0 Pagan cf 4 0 1 0
Alonso 1b 4 0 0 0 BCrwfr ss 3 0 0 0
Guzmn rf 4 3 3 3 Belt 1b 4 1 1 0
Maybin cf 0 0 0 0 Arias 3b 4 0 1 0
JoBakr c 2 1 2 0 Whitsd c 3 1 0 0
EvCarr ss 3 0 0 0 Linccm p 1 0 0 0
Marqus p 4 0 0 0 Affeldt p 0 0 0 0
Thtchr p 0 0 0 0 Christn ph 1 0 0 0
Grgrsn p 0 0 0 0 Penny p 0 0 0 0
Street p 0 0 0 0 Schrhlt ph-rf 1 0 1 0
Totals 36 611 6 Totals 31 3 6 2
San Diego.......................... 100 220 010 6
San Francisco.................... 100 000 020 3
EEv.Cabrera (4). DPSan Francisco 1. LOB
San Diego 7, San Francisco 4. 2BVenable (17),
Pagan (17), Belt (14). HRHeadley (12), Guzman 2
(6). SBG.Blanco (17). CSJo.Baker (1), B.Craw-
ford (3). STheriot. SFMe.Cabrera.
IP H R ER BB SO
San Diego
Marquis W,4-5......... 7
1
3 3 3 1 1 8
Thatcher ...................
1
3 1 0 0 0 0
Gregerson................ 0 1 0 0 0 0
Street S,17-17......... 1
1
3 1 0 0 0 1
San Francisco
Lincecum L,4-11..... 4
2
3 7 5 5 3 8
Affeldt ....................... 1
1
3 0 0 0 0 2
Penny ....................... 2 4 1 1 0 0
Kontos ...................... 1 0 0 0 0 1
Gregerson pitched to 1 batter in the 8th.
HBPby Lincecum (Quentin). WPMarquis, Lin-
cecum 2.
UmpiresHome, Paul Nauert;First, Dana DeMuth-
;Second, Doug Eddings;Third, Jordan Baker.
T2:51. A41,871 (41,915).
Royals 4, Angels 1
Kansas City Los Angeles
ab r h bi ab r h bi
AGordn lf 4 1 3 1 Trout cf 3 0 0 0
AEscor ss 5 0 0 1 TrHntr rf 3 1 1 0
L.Cain cf 4 1 2 2 BoWlsn c 0 0 0 0
Butler dh 4 0 0 0 Pujols dh 3 0 0 0
Mostks 3b 4 0 2 0 Trumo lf-rf 4 0 2 1
S.Perez c 4 0 0 0
HKndrc
2b-lf 3 0 0 0
Francr rf 4 0 0 0 KMorls 1b 4 0 1 0
Hosmer 1b 3 1 1 0 Callasp 3b 3 0 0 0
Getz 2b 4 1 1 0 Segura ss 3 0 0 0
Hester c 2 0 0 0
MIzturs
ph-2b 1 0 0 0
Totals 36 4 9 4 Totals 29 1 4 1
Kansas City ....................... 220 000 000 4
Los Angeles....................... 100 000 000 1
EGetz (3). DPKansas City 3. LOBKansas
City 8, Los Angeles 6. 2BA.Gordon 2 (33).
3BHosmer (2). HRL.Cain (3). SBA.Gordon
(4), A.Escobar (15), L.Cain (1).
IP H R ER BB SO
Kansas City
W.Smith W,2-3........ 7 2 1 1 4 4
G.Holland H,9.......... 1 0 0 0 1 0
Broxton S,23-27...... 1 2 0 0 0 1
Los Angeles
Richards L,3-2......... 5 5 4 4 3 2
Williams.................... 4 4 0 0 0 3
WPRichards.
Phillies 7, Brewers 6
Milwaukee Philadelphia
ab r h bi ab r h bi
CGomz cf 6 2 2 1 Rollins ss 6 0 1 1
Morgan rf 4 0 1 0 Victorn cf 4 2 1 0
Bianchi ph 1 0 0 0 Utley 2b 4 1 3 3
Axford p 0 0 0 0 Howard 1b 4 0 1 0
CIzturs ph 0 0 0 0 Pence rf 5 0 1 1
FrRdrg p 0 0 0 0 Wggntn 3b 5 0 1 0
Braun lf 4 1 3 2 Pierre lf 4 1 2 0
ArRmr 3b 5 0 0 1 Mayrry lf 0 1 0 0
Hart 1b 5 1 2 0 Kratz c 5 1 3 1
RWeks 2b 4 1 4 1 Fontent pr 0 1 0 0
Mldnd c 5 0 1 1 Worley p 2 0 1 0
Ransm ss 3 1 1 0 Kndrck p 0 0 0 0
Estrad p 2 0 0 0 Bastrd p 0 0 0 0
Thrnrg p 0 0 0 0 L.Nix ph 1 0 0 0
Ishikaw ph 1 0 1 0 Papeln p 0 0 0 0
LHrndz p 0 0 0 0 Schwm p 0 0 0 0
Aoki ph-rf 2 0 0 0 Ruiz ph 0 0 0 1
Totals 42 615 6 Totals 40 714 7
Milwaukee .................... 010 002 020 1 6
Philadelphia................. 012 200 000 2 7
Two outs when winning run scored.
EWigginton 2 (12). DPMilwaukee 1, Philadel-
phia 1. LOBMilwaukee 13, Philadelphia 10.
2BC.Gomez (9), Braun 2 (17), Ransom (10), Ut-
ley 2 (2), Pierre (7), Kratz 2 (2). HRBraun (28),
R.Weeks (10). SBHart (3), R.Weeks (7), Utley
(3). CSBraun (6). SC.Izturis, Ransom, Worley.
SFAr.Ramirez, Ruiz.
IP H R ER BB SO
Milwaukee
Estrada..................... 4 8 5 5 3 4
Thornburg................ 1 2 0 0 0 0
L.Hernandez............ 2 2 0 0 0 0
Axford....................... 2 0 0 0 0 3
Fr.Rodriguez L,2-6
BS,6-9 ......................
2
3 2 2 2 1 0
Philadelphia
Worley ...................... 5
1
3 10 3 3 1 6
K.Kendrick H,2........ 1
2
3 1 0 0 1 2
Bastardo BS,3-3...... 1 2 2 2 0 1
Papelbon.................. 1 2 0 0 0 1
Schwimer W,2-1 ..... 1 0 1 0 1 0
HBPby Worley (R.Weeks).
UmpiresHome, Chad Fairchild;First, Alfonso
Marquez;Second, Tom Hallion;Third, Brian ONo-
ra.
T3:52. A44,715 (43,651).
Pirates 3, Cubs 2
Chicago Pittsburgh
ab r h bi ab r h bi
DeJess cf 4 1 2 0 Presley lf 4 1 1 0
SCastro ss 4 0 0 0 Walker 2b 4 1 1 1
Rizzo 1b 3 1 2 2 AMcCt cf 3 0 1 0
LaHair rf 4 0 0 0 GJones rf 3 0 1 1
Clevngr c 3 0 0 0 Grilli p 0 0 0 0
Valuen 3b 4 0 0 0 Hanrhn p 0 0 0 0
Barney 2b 3 0 1 0 McGeh 1b 3 0 0 0
Campn lf 3 0 0 0 PAlvrz 3b 3 0 0 0
Dmpstr p 2 0 0 0 McKnr c 3 1 1 1
Maine p 0 0 0 0 Barmes ss 3 0 0 0
Corpas p 0 0 0 0 Correia p 1 0 0 0
RJhnsn ph 1 0 0 0 JHrrsn ph 1 0 0 0
Camp p 0 0 0 0 JHughs p 0 0 0 0
GHrndz rf 1 0 0 0
Totals 31 2 5 2 Totals 29 3 5 3
Chicago.............................. 101 000 000 2
Pittsburgh .......................... 100 011 00x 3
LOBChicago 4, Pittsburgh 2. 2BDeJesus (18),
Barney (19), G.Jones (15). HRRizzo (5), Walker
(9), McKenry (8). CSClevenger (1).
IP H R ER BB SO
Chicago
Dempster L,5-5....... 6 5 3 3 0 6
Maine........................
1
3 0 0 0 0 0
Corpas......................
2
3 0 0 0 0 1
Camp........................ 1 0 0 0 0 1
Pittsburgh
Correia W,8-6.......... 6 4 2 2 2 4
J.Hughes H,10 ........ 1 0 0 0 0 1
Grilli H,25................. 1 1 0 0 0 2
Hanrahan S,29-32 .. 1 0 0 0 0 1
UmpiresHome, Andy Fletcher;First, Rob Drake-
;Second, Joe West;Third, Sam Holbrook.
T2:32. A33,935 (38,362).
Yankees 5, Mariners 2
New York Seattle
ab r h bi ab r h bi
ISuzuki rf 5 0 1 0 Ackley 2b 4 0 0 0
Jeter ss 4 2 3 1 MSndrs cf 4 1 1 0
Cano 2b 5 1 2 0 JMontr c 4 1 1 0
Teixeir 1b 4 1 1 0 Jaso dh 1 0 0 0
Grndrs cf 4 0 1 0 Seager 3b 2 0 0 1
Ibanez dh 3 0 0 0 Carp 1b 3 0 0 1
J.Nix ph-dh 1 1 1 3 C.Wells lf 4 0 1 0
ErChvz 3b 2 0 0 0 Peguer rf 4 0 0 0
AnJons lf 4 0 0 0 Kawsk ss 3 0 0 0
RMartn c 3 0 1 1
Totals 35 510 5 Totals 29 2 3 2
New York ........................... 100 000 040 5
Seattle ................................ 200 000 000 2
DPNew York 1, Seattle 1. LOBNew York 8,
Seattle 6. 2BCano (29), J.Nix (7). HRJeter (8).
SBGranderson (8). CSI.Suzuki (3).
IP H R ER BB SO
New York
Nova ......................... 5 2 2 2 6 5
Rapada.....................
2
3 0 0 0 0 0
Phelps W,2-3........... 1
1
3 0 0 0 0 2
D.Robertson H,13... 1 0 0 0 0 2
R.Soriano S,26-28.. 1 1 0 0 0 1
Seattle
Iwakuma................... 5 6 1 1 3 3
O.Perez H,2............. 1 0 0 0 0 1
Kinney H,1............... 1 0 1 1 0 2
Luetge L,1-1 H,7.....
1
3 2 2 2 0 0
Kelley BS,2-2 ..........
2
3 2 1 1 1 1
Delabar..................... 1 0 0 0 0 1
Kinney pitched to 1 batter in the 8th.
Nova pitched to 2 batters in the 6th.
HBPby Kinney (Jeter).
UmpiresHome, Manny Gonzalez;First, Gerry
Davis;Second, Phil Cuzzi;Third, Greg Gibson.
T3:27. A36,071 (47,860).
Angels 11, Royals 6
Kansas City Los Angeles
ab r h bi ab r h bi
AGordn lf 4 1 1 0 Trout lf 4 3 2 2
AEscor ss 5 1 1 0 TrHntr dh 5 3 4 3
L.Cain cf 3 0 0 0 Trumo rf 4 1 2 1
Butler dh 4 2 2 3 KMorls 1b 5 0 0 1
Mostks 3b 5 0 1 0 Callasp 3b 4 1 3 1
S.Perez c 4 1 1 0 HKndrc 2b 4 0 2 0
Francr rf 4 1 1 3 MIzturs ss 4 0 1 1
Hosmer 1b 2 0 0 0 Bourjos cf 4 1 2 0
YBtncr 2b 4 0 0 0 BoWlsn c 2 2 1 1
Totals 35 6 7 6 Totals 36111710
Kansas City ..................... 000 020 031 6
Los Angeles .................... 331 100 03x 11
EMoustakas (10), Hosmer (7), M.Izturis (6).
DPKansas City 2. LOBKansas City 8, Los An-
geles 6. 2BMoustakas (24), Trout (20), Callaspo
2 (10), M.Izturis (10). HRButler (20), Francoeur
(9), Trout (16), Tor.Hunter (11), Bo.Wilson (2). CS
M.Izturis (1). SBo.Wilson 2.
IP H R ER BB SO
Kansas City
Hochevar L,6-9 ....... 3 9 8 6 1 2
Teaford..................... 4 6 1 1 0 1
L.Coleman ............... 1 2 2 2 1 1
Los Angeles
Weaver W,13-1....... 5 3 2 2 2 8
Isringhausen............ 1 0 0 0 0 2
Hawkins.................... 1 0 0 0 0 0
S.Downs...................
2
3 2 3 3 2 1
Jepsen H,5 ..............
1
3 0 0 0 0 0
Frieri ......................... 1 2 1 1 0 2
Hochevar pitched to 2 batters in the 4th.
Teaford pitched to 1 batter in the 8th.
HBPby Hochevar (Trout), by Weaver (L.Cain,
L.Cain). WPHochevar 2.
UmpiresHome, Bob Davidson;First, Brian Gor-
man;Second, Todd Tichenor;Third, Tony Randaz-
zo.
T3:07. A39,107 (45,957).
White Sox 8, Twins 2
Minnesota Chicago
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Span cf 4 1 2 0 De Aza cf 4 1 1 0
Revere rf 5 0 1 0 Youkils 3b 2 0 1 1
Mauer c 3 1 0 0
EEscor
ph-3b 2 0 0 0
Wlngh dh 3 0 0 0 A.Dunn 1b 4 1 1 0
Mornea 1b 4 0 1 1 Konerk dh 3 0 1 1
Doumit lf 4 0 1 0 Rios rf 3 2 1 2
Dozier ss 3 0 1 0 AlRmrz ss 4 2 2 0
ACasill 2b 3 0 0 0 Viciedo lf 4 1 3 4
Mstrnn 2b 0 0 0 0 JrDnks lf 0 0 0 0
JCarrll 3b 4 0 0 0 Flowrs c 4 0 1 0
Bckhm 2b 4 1 1 0
Totals 33 2 6 1 Totals 34 812 8
Minnesota.......................... 100 100 000 2
Chicago.............................. 022 220 00x 8
ESpan (4), Viciedo (1). DPMinnesota1, Chica-
go 1. LOBMinnesota 9, Chicago 4. 2BSpan 2
(26), Morneau (19), A.Dunn (13), Al.Ramirez (15),
Viciedo (10), Flowers (4). HRRios (16), Viciedo
(16). SBDe Aza (18). SFKonerko.
IP H R ER BB SO
Minnesota
Blackburn L,4-6....... 4
1
3 10 8 8 1 1
Fien........................... 1
2
3 1 0 0 0 2
Burton....................... 1 1 0 0 0 1
Perkins ..................... 1 0 0 0 0 2
Chicago
Peavy W,8-7............ 6 6 2 1 2 6
Septimo.................... 2 0 0 0 0 1
Crain.........................
2
3 0 0 0 3 0
H.Santiago...............
1
3 0 0 0 0 0
WPCrain.
UmpiresHome, Angel Hernandez;First, Ed Hick-
ox;Second, Chris Conroy;Third, Tim Timmons.
T3:09. A32,261 (40,615).
Athletics 16, Blue Jays 0
Oakland Toronto
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Crisp cf 6 3 3 2 Lawrie 3b 4 0 1 0
JGoms lf 3 2 2 1 Rasms cf 3 0 0 0
Moss ph-rf 1 0 1 1
RDavis
ph-cf 0 0 0 0
Reddck rf 4 1 1 1 Encrnc 1b 2 0 1 0
S.Smith
ph-rf-lf 2 1 0 0
YGoms
ph-c 1 0 0 0
Cespds dh 4 2 2 2 Lind dh-1b 4 0 0 0
Carter 1b 3 2 1 3 Arencii c 0 0 0 0
Inge 3b 5 1 1 2
Mathis
ph-c-p 3 0 1 0
Sogard 3b 0 0 0 0 KJhnsn 2b 4 0 0 0
DNorrs c 4 2 2 1 Snider lf 4 0 0 0
Hicks ss 5 1 1 2 Vizquel ss 4 0 1 0
JWeeks 2b 4 1 0 0 Gose rf 3 0 1 0
Totals 41161415 Totals 32 0 5 0
Oakland............................ 181 011 022 16
Toronto ............................ 000 000 000 0
EK.Johnson (9), Snider (1). LOBOakland 5,
Toronto 8. 2BReddick (20), Cespedes 2 (15), In-
ge (12), D.Norris (1), Hicks (5), Encarnacion (20),
Gose (1). HRCrisp 2 (5), Carter (6). SBCes-
pedes (8).
IP H R ER BB SO
Oakland
Griffin W,3-0 ............ 6 3 0 0 2 9
Blevins...................... 1 0 0 0 0 2
J.Miller ...................... 2 2 0 0 1 2
Toronto
R.Romero L,8-7 ...... 1
1
3 4 8 8 6 1
Beck..........................
2
3 2 1 1 0 0
A.Carpenter ............. 4 3 3 3 1 5
Loup.......................... 2 2 2 1 0 1
Mathis ....................... 1 3 2 2 0 0
WPR.Romero.
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com THURSDAY, JULY 26, 2012 PAGE 5B
S P O R T S
Were going to take this as an
opportunity to create our own leg-
acy, Mauti said. This program
was not built by one man, and this
programsureas hell is not goingto
get torn down by one man. This
programwas built oneveryalumni
and every single player who came
before us. Built on their backs.
We know there are going to be
tough times ahead, Zordich said.
But we know what our coaches
aremadeof, andweknowwhat the
university is made of. Were ready
and willing to fight and to stick to-
gether and see this thing through
to the end.
Thegroup, whichincludedWest
Scranton grads Matt McGloin and
Eric Shrive, did not field any ques-
tions. Among those in attendance
were projected starters Adrian
Amos, Adam Gress, DaQuan
Jones, Pete Massaro, Stephon
Morris, Matt Stankiewitch, Dono-
van Smith and John Urschel.
Lions coach Bill OBrien held
squad meetings on Monday and
Tuesday, hoping to convince his
players to stay. On Wednesday, he
was off to ESPNs campus in Bris-
tol, Conn., to do a series of live
spots for radio, TVandthe webbe-
fore heading to Chicago for Big
Ten media days.
As OBrien was heading out of
town, other programs were just ar-
riving. During an interview with
ESPN, OBrien said coaches from
multiple schools had begun stak-
ing out places on campus such as
the Lions Lasch Building head-
quarters to try and talk to his play-
ers.
Our players are in our building
right now, and they dont want to
leave the building because there
are coaches from other schools in
the parking lot waiting to see
them," OBrien said.
That phenomenon extended to
players homes as well. Morris and
Amos, both of whom would likely
start at cornerbackthis year for the
Lions, said Wednesday they were
being tracked beyond the football
building.
We have chosen to stay at PSU
and other opposing coaches are
outside our apartment, Morris
wrote on his Twitter account.
Was that the intention of the
NCAA. #LeaveUsAlone.
As strange as it sounds, all of
that is legal whenit comes toPenn
State players, according to the
NCAA. Because of the sanctions
against the program, restrictions
that wouldnormallyprohibit other
schools from contacting Lions
players on scholarship have been
lifted until Penn States classes
start on Aug. 27.
Opposing schools must notify
Penn State ahead of time which
players theyplantopursue, andLi-
ons players interested in talking to
another school must alsofirst noti-
fy Penn State.
ESPN reported that one of the
programs withcoaches oncampus
Wednesday was Big Ten Leaders
Division rival Illinois. An Illini ath-
letic official confirmed that foot-
ball coaches weretherefor thepur-
pose of recruiting.
Without identifying specific
players, OBrien said that some of
his top talents have received offers
from up to 50 different schools.
"I want everybody to under-
stand our fans, everybody in-
volvedwiththis program what is
going on with these student-ath-
letes right now," OBrien said.
"Theyre under tremendous pres-
sure."
OBrien has said repeatedly this
week that keeping the 2012 squad
as intact as possible is his mainpri-
ority.
On Wednesday, he got some vo-
cal support from his players.
No sanctions, no politician is
ever going to take away what we
got here, Mauti said. None of
that is ever going to tear us apart.
All we can do is put our heads
down and go to work. Were going
tofight for PennState. Were going
tofight for eachother, becausethis
is what Penn State is about fight-
ing through adversity.
Were going to show up every
Saturday and raise hell.
PLAYERS
Continued from Page 1B
CARDIFF, Wales Gold-
medal favorites United States,
Japan and Brazil won their
matches onthe first day of wom-
ens football on Wednesday, but
all the talk was about an embar-
rassing mistake by organizers
who displayed the South Ko-
rean flag instead of the North
Korean one before a game in
Glasgow.
The two-time defending
Olympic champion Americans
beat France 4-2, World Cup win-
ner Japan got past Canada 2-1
and Brazil the silver medalist
inthe last twoOlympics rout-
ed Cameroon 5-0 with two goals
by five-time world player of the
year Marta and one by Cris-
tiane, who become the all-time
top Olympic womens scorer
with 11 goals.
Also, Britain edged NewZeal-
and 1-0 in its first competitive
game ever in womens football,
giving the host the first victory
at the London Games.
The football tournament
started early because of its long
match schedule. The mens
competition will begin today.
The flag flap happened as
North Korea prepared to play
Colombia at Hampden Park. A
North Korean player was intro-
duced on the jumbo screen
alongwitha pictureof theSouth
Korean flag, prompting the
team to refuse to take the field
and delaying the game start for
more than an hour.
London Olympic organizers
later apologized, saying that
clearly that is a mistake and
promising that steps will be
taken to ensure this does not
happen again.
When the match finally start-
ed, North Korea came out press-
ing to win 2-0 with goals by Kim
Song Hui in the 39th and 86th
minutes.
In the first match in Glasgow,
Scotland, the United States al-
lowed two quick goals before
rallying for its win over France.
After Gaetane Thiney scored in
the 12th and Marie-Laure Delie
added another in the 14th, the
U.S. came back with goals by
AbbyWambachinthe19th, Alex
Morgan in the 32nd and Carli
Lloyd in the 56th. Morgan
scored again in the 66th.
Its not the game we wanted
to play, U.S. defender and cap-
tain Christie Rampone said.
But weve got a lot of games
ahead of us to try and get our
rhythm back.
Wambach now has 139 inter-
national goals in her pursuit of
Mia Hamms record of 158.
Japan, whichupset the U.S. to
winthe Womens WorldCuplast
year, got goals fromNahomi Ka-
wasumi in the 33rd and Aya Mi-
yama in the 44th for its 2-1 win
over Canada in Coventry. Melis-
sa Tancredi pulled one back for
Canada just 10 minutes after
halftime but the Japanese held
on.
I thinkit was all about the de-
fense today, Japan coach Norio
Sasaki said. We couldrunmore
than Canada and from the de-
fense through to the attack ev-
eryone went for the ball.
In the later match in Coven-
try, Lotta Schelin scored twice
to help Sweden defeat South
Africa 4-1.
O LY M P I C S O C C E R
U.S. opens with a
win against France
Action is also highlighted by
a flag mistake in North
Korean match.
By TALES AZZONI
AP Sports Writer
LONDON Two-time Olympic fencing champion Mariel Zagunis will
carry the U.S. flag in the opening ceremony of the London Games.
The U.S. Olympic Committee says Zagunis won a vote of the 529-
strong team ahead of Fridays ceremony.
Zagunis says she is extremely humbled by this incredible privilege.
She was the first American to win a fencing gold in 100 years at the
2004 Athens Games.
F E N C I N G C H A M P T O B E U S F L A G B E A R E R
CHICAGO He has still yet to
coach a game for Penn State, but
Bill OBrien has already received
his first contract extension.
Its just not the way he would
have liked to have earned it.
Speaking on ESPNs Mike and
Mike in the Morning show on
Wednesday, OBrien said his con-
tract called for an automatic ex-
tension in the event of NCAA
sanctions stemmingfromthe Jer-
ry Sandusky scandal. The exten-
sion is equal to the length of the
penalties.
That means OBriens original
five-year deal instead runs for
nine years, through the 2020 sea-
son. On Monday, the NCAA im-
posed a postseason ban and
scholarship reductions that will
last for spans of four years.
The contract posted online by
Penn State for the public in Janu-
ary makes no mention of this
clause. Rather, it appears in an
addendumsignedbyOBrienand
acting athletic director Dave
Joyner, according to the Centre
Daily Times.
The addendum reads, Any
sanction by the NCAA of a) loss
of scholarships or b) bowl eligi-
bility due to the actions of the
previous staff or lack of institu-
tional control prior to 2012 will
immediately result in an auto-
matic extension of coachs con-
tract at 2016 total compensation
and bonus package in years equal
to the number of years of the
sanctions."
OBrien will earn a base salary
of $950,000 in 2012, a figure that
increases by 5 percent annually.
He also receives compensation
totaling $1.35 million from TV,
radio and the schools contract
with Nike.
Bowl substitutes?
Penn States four-year postsea-
sonbanis one of manysignificant
hurdles OBrien and his staff will
have toovercome, particularly on
the recruiting trail. On Tuesday,
OBrien said he considered every
Lions home game to be similar to
a bowl game due to the crowd.
But that pitch may only go so
far, particularly if the NCAA pe-
nalties limit the Lions success on
the field, leading to decreased at-
tendance. So Penn State may ex-
plore other options, such as uti-
lizing an NCAA clause that al-
lows teams to play a 13th regular
season game on the road against
Hawaii, OBrien said on ESPNs
SportsCenter on Wednesday.
Later in the day in a chat with
fans on ESPN.com, OBrien also
talked of scheduling more mar-
quee non-conference games to
give players something to shoot
for.
Thats already in the works,
trying to change the schedule a
little bit, like a Miami, Southern
Cal, Hawaii, OBrien wrote.
Something you can point to like
a bowl game or just a big game.
"We should be willing to play
anybody. At least once or twice a
year. Thats what were trying to
get started now."
By his lonesome
After spendingmuchof theday
at ESPN on Wednesday, OBrien
left for Chicago, where Big Ten
media days begin today. He
wont, however, be joined by any
of his players.
Before the NCAA sanctions
hit, Penn State was scheduled to
senddefensivetackleJordanHill,
tailback Silas Redd and guard
John Urschel as player represen-
tatives for interviews on Friday.
But a Big Ten spokesman con-
firmed Wednesday that no Lions
players will be attending this
years event. No reasonwas given
by Penn State.
The spokesman said that only
head coaches are required to at-
tend. Schools can bring up to
three players as well but are not
obligated to bring any.
Both Hill and Urschel are ex-
pectedtoreturntoplay for the Li-
ons. Redds future remains very
much up in the air, as the All-Big
Ten tailback is receiving interest
from schools like USC.
OBrien is scheduled to speak
at the Big Ten event at 12:30 p.m.
today.
P E N N S TAT E F O O T B A L L N O T E B O O K
Sanctions led to contract extension for coach
Addendum in contract gives
OBrien extension equal to
length of penalties.
By DEREK LEVARSE
dlevarse@timesleader.com
ees avoided them after the
meeting broke up.
The potential for a four-year
ban, first reported by ESPN,
showed how high the stakes
were as college sports govern-
ing body considered how to re-
spond to an internal school in-
vestigation by former FBI Di-
rector Louis Freeh that found
former coach Joe Paterno and
three other top college officials
helped conceal reports that
Sandusky was abusing children.
NCAA president Mark Em-
mert said this week that if a to-
tal football ban had been im-
posed, other penalties would
have accompanied it.
If the death penalty were to
be imposed, Im quite sure that
the executive committee and I
... would not have agreed to just
the death penalty. It would have
included other penalties as
well, Emmert said as the sanc-
tions were unveiled.
An NCAA spokeswoman de-
clined further comment
Wednesday on negotiations
with Penn State.
Many alumni and some trust-
ees were incensed over the un-
precedented NCAA penalty
which will cost Penn State tens
of millions of dollars and likely
cripple its football team for
years to come and Penn
States quick acceptance of it.
A person with knowledge of
the meeting said earlier
Wednesday that trustees were
to discuss whether Erickson
had the authority to agree to
the sanctions without first get-
ting the boards approval. The
person was not authorized to
discuss the meeting and spoke
on condition of anonymity.
Some trustees had expressed
concern that Erickson may
have violated a board rule that
says the board must authorize
the signing of contracts, legal
documents, and other obliga-
tions.
The board statement made
no reference to the proprietary
of what Erickson had done, say-
ing trustees held a discussion
but did not take any votes.
The board finds the punitive
sanctions difficult and the proc-
ess with the NCAA unfortu-
nate, the statement said. But
as we understand it, the alterna-
tives were worse as confirmed
by NCAA President Mark Em-
merts recent statement that
Penn State was likely facing a
multi-year death sentence.
La Torre said Wednesday that
Erickson had authority to act
without the approval of the full
board.
FLOATED
Continued from Page 1B
Ron Musto slammed a three-run
home run to left in the seventh
and GP took the lead back 6-5.
Musto had a huge tourna-
ment, said
Whyte. He was
unbelievable.
But Towanda
had one more rally
left in them.
In the bottom of
the eighth with
twoouts, Towanda
got two runners on
and chased Malo-
ney after156 pitch-
es.
Adam Romanowski, who
threw 11
2
3 innings on Sunday,
came in and the wheels fell off.
Towanda was able to push four
runs across to make it 9-6 with
GP having just one more at bat
left.
Dylan was a horse, said
Whyte. He pitched great today.
It is a shame that he pitched two
great games in this tournament
and because of our defense he
ended up being 0-1.
GPtriedtorally andloadedthe
bases with one out in the ninth.
After a hit by pitch scored one
run, Towandas ZachPlace struck
the next two batters out to put
Towanda in the championship
game, a game it lost 8-7.
We just didnt get the hits
when we needed them, said
Whyte. We battled back though
and the kids played a great
game.
Towanda 9, Greater Pittston 7
Greater Pittston Towanda
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Nowicki cf 5 2 2 1 Roof lf 4 1 1 0
McDrmtt ss 3 2 2 2 Dinelli 2b 4 2 1 1
Musto c 5 1 2 3 Ripic p 5 2 2 2
Maloney p 4 0 0 0 Place 3b 5 1 2 1
Bone lf 4 0 1 0 Markel 1b 4 1 2 2
Chupka 1b 4 0 2 1 Place c 4 1 1 1
Loftus 2b 4 1 0 0 CHuff cf 3 0 0 0
Carey 3b 3 1 0 0 Bates ss 4 0 1 1
Debona rf 4 0 1 0 NHuff rf 3 1 2 0
Romanowski
p 0 0 0 0
Granteed 2b 1 0 0 0
Totals 37 710 7 Totals 36 911 8
Greater Pittston................... 030 000 301 7
Towanda.............................. 000 320 04x 9
2B Nowicki, Musto, Chupka, Ripic, Markel, Bates;
HR Musto
IP H R ER BB SO
Greater Pittston
Maloney..................... 7.1 7 6 4 6 15
Romanowski (L)....... .1 4 3 3 0 0
Granteed................... .1 0 0 0 0 0
Towanda
Ripic........................... 1.2 4 3 3 2 2
Place (W) .................. 7.1 6 4 4 3 5
LEGION
Continued from Page 1B
JASON RIEDMILLER / FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Towandas Zack Ripic is too late with the tag at second base as Greater Pittstons Kody Nowicki is
called safe with a stolen base during Wednesday afternoons Region 5 Tournament elimination game.
To see
additional
photos, visit
www.times
leader.com
C M Y K
PAGE 6B THURSDAY, JULY 26, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
CHEVROLET `99
S-10 PICK-UP
Silver,
85,000 miles,
excellent condition,
covered bed.
$3800
570-822-7657
412 Autos for Sale
PONTIAC `93
GRAND AM SEDAN
4 Cyl, automatic,
air, CD/stereo,
22 mpg, Very
good condition
$1,450 Call
570-299-0772
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
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VOLVO `01 XC70
Original owner,
garage kept, no
accidents, non
smoker, impeccable
condition $6900
570-261-5161 or
570-690-2837
527 Food Services/
Hospitality
Outside the
Wyoming Valley
Mall
Immediate
openings for:
- Delivery Driver
- Line Cook
- Bartender (Full
or part time)
Apply in Person
No Phone Calls
533 Installation/
Maintenance/
Repair
AUTO BODY
(2) POSITIONS
AVAILABLE
1 with experi-
ence. 1 helper
willing to learn.
Full time posi-
tions, possible
part time.
570-574-
LABORER
To set scaffolding
and work off
scaffolding
mixing mortar
570-239-2780
548 Medical/Health
FULL TIME COOK &
PART TIME AIDE
Seeking qualified
candidates for the
positions of
- Full time Cook
- Part time Aide
Health Care experi-
ence preferred. Hol-
idays, weekends
and varied shifts
required. We offer a
competitive wage
package, benefits &
attendance bonus.
Fax (570) 668-1570
or email resume to
Elaine Parsons
HTNCDIET@PTD.NET
EOE M/F
NUTRITION EDUCATOR
Nutrition Educator
wanted for regional
non-profit. Educator
will provide group
workshops, activi-
ties and classroom
instruction for pre-
school through sen-
ior populations with
diverse ethnic and
socio-economic
backgrounds. Posi-
tion requires excel-
lent public speaking
and written commu-
nication skills and
ability to work with
diverse audiences.
Individual must have
a Bachelors
Degree in Educa-
tion, Nutrition or
Dietetics. Attention
will be given to
those with bi-lingual
capabilities. For
more information,
please contact
cmat@epix.net
PHLEBOTOMIST
For In-home
insurance exams.
FT/PT. Send resume
to zuby@
appsexam.com
Phlebotomy Position
Part time Phleboto-
my position avail-
able. Ideal candi-
date will have a min-
imum of 1 year
venipuncture expe-
rience. Sent resume
to:
rhrsr@nlmlabs.com
BUTTONWOOD/
HANOVER TWP.
89 Polaski Street
Sat, July 28th, 8-12
Antique hutch &
washer, household,
tools, baby items,
decorative & crafts.
DALLAS
*HUGE*
Back Mtn. Storage
641 Main Road
Fernbrook (Dallas)
Route 309 N, turn
right just before
Bullock Tire.
Saturday, July 28;
8am - 3pm
Records, furniture,
electronics, house-
hold, baby and kids
stuff. Too much
to list.
DALLAS
27 Maple Seed Dr.
(Off Upper
Demunds Rd.)
Fri-Sat. 7/27-28,
8:00am3:00pm
Contents of
exceptional home!
Living room suite,
oak kitchen suite,
3 nice bedroom
suites, tables,
lamps, tvs,
Records, books,
toys, antique
childs desk,
Patio furniture,
outside dcor,
hammock,
Hobart meat slicer,
and meat grinder,
restaurant items,
Antique candy
counter, sets of
dishes, glassware,
Wedding dress size
10, shower sup-
plies, jewelry,
Menss and
Womens clothing,
exercise
equipment,
2 safes, shelving,
riding mower,
water cooler,
Full basement and
garage, too much
to list, all priced
to sell!!
DALLAS
8 Village Green Dr.
Saturday July 28th
8am to 1pm
Toys, bikes, clothes,
books, crafts, exer-
cise equipment,
this and that.
DUPONT
109 Everhart Street
Starting at 9am
household items,
and clothes!
DUPONT
126 Center Street
Saturday 9am-2pm
No earlybirds. Chil-
drens items,
clothing, toys &
home items!
HARVEY'S LAKE
Turn @ Pole #129
onto Grandview -
2nd right
Saturday 9a-1p
Newer Queen Bed.
Ping Pong Table.
Occasional Tables.
Corner TV Stand.
Household. Misc.
EXETER
975 Wyoming Ave
Saturday, July 28
8am - 2pm
Gigantic Yard
Sale! (across from
Barber Ford)
Toddler toys - Play
cottage & kitchen,
rocking horse. Kids
clothes, books, vhs
tapes, bikes, crib &
household items.
FORTY FORT
1407 Wyoming Ave.
Fri., Sat., Sun.
July 20, 21 & 22nd
9am - 5pm
Antique collectible
and fine furniture to
include: (2) 10 piece
Hepplewhite dining
room sets, set of 6
late 1800s Chip-
pendale victorian
dining room chairs,
restored, Victorian
sheet music cabi-
nets, (2) cherry
high poster beds; 1
pineapple 1 canopy,
Gov. Winthrop drop
front secretary
desk, Larkin oak
drop front desk,
oak wash stand, 2
grandfather clocks,
3 love seats, mini
highly carved Victo-
rian chairs, set of
marble top tables
with matching Vic-
torian lamps, many
other tables. 2
antique floor model
radios, Colonial
sofa, 3 fine sets of
china: Noritake,
Franciscan Ivy Leaf,
Limoges, 2 large
Anglo Persian rugs
and many other
rugs, primitive jelly
cupboard, Empire
cherry chest, tons
of jewelry, records,
very old books, chil-
drens books, 3
1940s Wyoming
Valley West Year-
books, 10 cent
comic books, (2) 5
piece patio sets,
much much more
too numerous to
mention. Sale by
Betty Thompson
FORTY FORT
99 Center Street
Sat, July 28th, 8-12
Piano, holiday
decorations,
girls clothing.
Something for
Everyone!
HANOVER TWP.
183 Red Coat Lane
Saturday 8am-1pm
Furniture,
collectibles,
household items &
much more!
HANOVER TWP.
214 Ferry Road
Sat, July 28, 8-4
Bar stools & chairs,
large size clothing,
dining room table
set, small furniture,
dog crate. More!
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
KINGSTON
20 Gershom Place
Saturday 7-3
Something for
everyone!
Rain or Shine
HANOVER TWP.
VENDORS
WANTED
For Hampton
House Harvest
Fest and Craft
Fair.
1548 Sans Souci
Parkway
Sunday, Sept.
16th
11am - 3pm
Registrations
accepted now.
Call for more
information
570-825-8725
KINGSTON
3 FAMILIES
79 S Thomas Ave
3 family yard sale
Sat., 7/28; 9-2
Raindate Sun. 7/29
Womens golf clubs,
holiday decorations,
bedding, draperies,
ice cream maker,
fan, word proces-
sor, wooden mir-
rors, Deacons
bench, wooden wall
shelves, paintings,
household items,
clothing, stuffed ani-
mals, books, craft
items, toys & more!
KINGSTON
615-623 Gibson Ave
Friday & Saturday
8:30-2 Rain or
Shine! Books,
household, tools,
baby
gear/toys/clothes
tables, original
paintings & pottery
by a local artist.
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
Its a showroom in print!
Classifieds got
the directions!
LUZERNE
205 Main Street
Thursday & Friday
11am - 5pm
Saturday
10am - 3pm
SIZZLING
SUMMER SALE!
New-Vintage-
Antiques
Furniture, lighting,
jewelry, linens,
artwork & home
decor.
MOUNTAINTOP
26 Greystone Drive
Saturday 8am-2pm
Infant and toddler
toys, clothing,
maternity, kitchen,
and pool toys. Hot
dog and lemonade
stand will be
at sale!
NANTICOKE
Garfield Street
Playground sat.,
July 28th 8-3
Food, Crafts, a
Little Bit of
Everything!
NUANGOLA
46 Ridge Ave
Rain or Shine!
7/28 9am-2pm
Antiques, furniture,
tools, sports cards,
dog crate and
much more!
PITTSTON
BACKYARD
120 Searle Street
Sat., July 28th, 9-2
Kids regular &
school dress code
clothes, jewelry,
purses, household
items, golf clubs &
balls, toys, books,
glassware.
Proceeds from
Lemonade/Snack
Stand Will Go the
the SPCA.
PLAINS
18 Riverview Drive
Saturday 8-2
Furniture, baby
clothes, toys, &
more. Rain or
Shine!
PRINGLE
41 Valley View Dr.,
by Vo-Tech
Cleaning Out
Grandmas Attic
Sat., July 28th, 7-1
Antique toys, fishing
rods, sewing
machines, vintage
porcelain dolls, col-
lectible dishes, Star
Wars toys, etc.
Oak curio cabinet,
furniture, col-
lectibles, bikes,
Power Wheels
Barbie car, patio
bar table & chairs,
Pfaltzgraff, TVs,
electronics, kids &
womens clothing,
childrens books.
Too Much
More to List.
Strictly No Early
Birds!
SHAVERTOWN
CARPOR CARPORT T
SALE SALE
1121 Chase Road
Sat. July 28th, 9-2
Across from former
General Jackson
General Store
Last one this year!
Youve seen the
rest, this ones the
best.
Clothes - misses,
many new with
tags, military, hunt-
ing, antique chair,
casks, brass tables,
lamps, wine bottle,
decanters, CDs,
DVDs, many new
items, too much to
list. No early birds.
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
SHAVERTOWN
HUGE PATIO &
R. 195 N. Main
St.(across from
Natl Penn Bank)
Friday & Saturday
10am - 2pm
July 27 & 28
Household, vintage
tools, Harley David-
son items, patio
table and chair,
metal cabinets, new
and vintage Christ-
mas, glassware and
dish sets, new and
vintage clothing,
oak dresser, blan-
ket trunk, ice cream
parlor set, white
wrought iron bench,
wagon seat, Hoda-
ka Motorcycle Man-
uals, piano bench,
cradle, crib, lawn
spreader and much
much more!!!!
SWOYERSVILLE
98 and a half
Dennison Street
Saturday 9-4
Limited admittance
Whirlpool, side by
side refrigerator,
Frigidaire stand up
freezer, Amana
front load washer,
Whirlpool dryer,
TVs, glassware,
china, chest of
drawers, rocker,
chairs, Hide-a-bed
sofa, books,
games, biking
clothes, hunting
clothes, 2 garmin
portable GPS units,
cameras, kitchen-
ware, tables,
pictures, mirrors,
lawnmowers, Mil-
waukee tools, yard
tools, 1999
Suburban 4x4,
and much more!
WEST PITTSTON
305 Montgomery
Avenue
Saturday, July 28
8am - 1pm
Wide verity of items
incl. childrens, sea-
sonal decorations,
electronics, home
decor, VHS, sports
euipment, unique
food items and
more!!!!!
WEST WYOMING
585 1/2 W. Sperling
Sat. only, 8-2:30
Off Shoemaker
Ave. up W. Sperling
to Rays Lane.
Something for
Everyone!
Collect cash, not dust!
Clean out your
basement, garage
or attic and call the
Classified depart-
ment today at 570-
829-7130!
WILKES-BARRE
30 WEST RIVER ST.
SATURDAY, JULY 28
8:00-4:00
DIRECTIONS: Turn
By Dorothy Dickson
Darte Center
Entire Contents
Of Beautiful
Home &
Carriage House
including antiques,
early walnut drop
leaf table, antique
mirrors, like new
suede sectional,
beautiful glassware
& porcelain, Stangl
dinnerware set, 19th
century enameled
Russian Icons, jew-
elry, prints, decora-
tor items, designer
clothes, books, lots
of vintage architec-
tural items including
doors, mantels &
windows, quality
computer desks,
Christmas & Hal-
loween items,
Honda Harmony 215
lawn mower, mod-
ern work bench,
power trim edger,
gas grill, lawn and
garden and much
more. This is a
nice sale!
CREDIT CARDS
ACCEPTED!
SALE BY COOK &
COOK ESTATE
LIQUIDATORS
WWW.COOKAND-
COOKESTATELIQ-
UIDATORS.COM
WILKES-BARRE
63 Brader Drive
Parsons Manor
Saturday 8-2
Tons of kids &
baby toys, clothes,
etc, household
items, furniture,
decorations,
something for
everyone!!
WILKES-BARRE
649 N. Franklin St.
Fri & Sat, July 28th
& 29th, 9-4
Childrens clothing,
baby items, stroller,
booster seat, play
mat, bathtub, bed-
ding, toys,
Halloween
costumes & more.
WILKES-BARRE
ST. ALOYSIUS CHURCH
143 West
Division St.
July 26th, 27th
and 28th
10am to 3pm
August 2nd, 3rd
and 4th,
6pm-10pm
(Church Bazaar)
Info: 823-3791
Looking for that
special place
called home?
Classified will address
Your needs.
Open the door
with classified!
WILKES-BARRE
TOWNSHIP
133 OLD ASHLEY RD
THURSDAY, FRIDAY
& SATURDAY
9 TO 5
GARAGE FULLY
STOCKED.
LOOK UP, LOOK
DOWN, LOOK ALL
AROUND. THE
MORE YOU LOOK,
THE MORE YOU
FIND. AMAZING
VARIETY!
BUYING/
SELLING
ALL US &
FOREIGN
COINS
CURRENCY
POSTCARDS
STAMPS
GOLD &
SILVER
-TOP DOLLARS for
Silver Dollars
-TOP DOLLAR for
all United States,
Canadian, &
Foreign Coins &
Paper Money
-Gold Coins
greatly needed
-Proof & Mint Sets
-Wheat backs &
Indian Heads
-All Types of Old
Coins
-Gold & Silver
Jewelry & Bullion
-Sterling Silver & -
Local Postcards.
NO ONE WILL
MATCH OUR
PRICE$
WE GIVE FREE
APPRAISALS
(No obligations,
No pressure)
Over 35 years as
a respected local
coin dealer.
HERITAGE
GALLERIES
52 Carr Ave.
DALLAS, PA
Across from
Dallas Agway
on Rt. 415
TUES-SAT,
10-6
OR BY APPT.
or b
674-2646
815 Dogs
YORKIE PUPS
Tiny, registered.
Pics available.
$800-$950
Born 6/20/12.
Ready 8/18/12.
Taking deposits.
570-436-8053
Job Seekers are
looking here!
Where's your ad?
570-829-7130 and
ask for an employ-
ment specialist
906 Homes for Sale
DURYEA TOWNHOME
3 year old town-
home in gated com-
munity of Forest
Heights with pool.
Cathedral ceilings &
skylights, air, cherry
floors & cabinets,
granite countertops,
fireplace, 3 bed-
rooms with 1st floor
master bedroom &
walk in closet. 2.5
tiled baths, waterfall
sinks in master bath
& powder room. All
season sun porch &
large private patio.
Full basement. End
unit with 2 car
garage.
$309,000.
570-479-1084
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
EXETER
Senior Apartments
222 SCHOOLEY
AVE.
EXETER, PA
Accepting appli-
cations for 1 bed-
room apart-
ments. Quality
apartments for
ages 62 and
older. Income lim-
its apply. Rent
only $450
month.
*Utilities Included
*Laundry Facilities
*On Site
Management
*Private parking
Call for appointment
570-654-5733
Equal Housing
FORTY
FORT
UNITS
NEARLY
COMPLETE
Managed by
America Realty.
Small efficien-
cies in process
with new
kitchens, built-
ins, laundry,
managed servic-
es, parking,
electric, window
covering. $500.
+ utilities, same 2
years! No Pets,
No Smoking,
Application,
Employment
Verification.
America Realty
288-1422
WILKES-BARRE
307-309 South St
E.
2 bedroom apart-
ment, available
now, 1 bath, new
carpet, ceramic tile
in kitchen & bath,
6x8 porch, landlord
pays heat & water.
NO HOOKUPS, NO
PETS. $650 /month,
1st month & securi-
ty required.
Call Manny
718-946-8738 or
917-295-6254
950 Half Doubles
WEST PITTSTON
MAINTENANCE FREE!
One block to ele-
mentary school.
3 Bedrooms.
Off-Street Parking
No Smoking.
$700 + utilities,
security, last month.
570-885-4206
953Houses for Rent
WYOMING
TOWNHOUSE
2 bedrooms, 1.5
baths, living/dining
combination, refrig-
erator & stove,
washer/dryer
hookup, off-street
parking, no pets.
Gas heat with
central air. Front &
back porches.
$675/month + utili-
ties, security &
1st month.
570-655-8928
746 Garage Sales/
Estate Sales/
Flea Markets
746 Garage Sales/
Estate Sales/
Flea Markets
746 Garage Sales/
Estate Sales/
Flea Markets
746 Garage Sales/
Estate Sales/
Flea Markets
746 Garage Sales/
Estate Sales/
Flea Markets
746 Garage Sales/
Estate Sales/
Flea Markets
MIAMI Former NL batting
champion Hanley Ramirez was
tradedfromMiami to the Los An-
geles Dodgers on Wednesday,
part of what appears to be the
third big fire sale in Marlins his-
tory.
Left-handed reliever Randy
Choate also was dealt to the
Dodgers. The Marlins received
right-hander Nathan Eovaldi and
minor league pitcher Scott
McGough.
The 28-year-
old Ramirez is
hitting .246
with 14 home
runs and 47
RBIs, far from
his big season
in 2009 when
he hit a league-
leading .342 with 24 homers and
106 RBIs.
I am sad to go, Ramirez said.
This will be always be my home,
but it will just be a little differ-
ent.
A three-time All-Star, he shift-
ed from shortstop to third base
this season to make roomfor free
agent Jose Reyes.
The trade came two days after
the Marlins sent pitcher Anibal
Sanchez and infielder Omar In-
fante to the Detroit Tigers for
pitching prospect Jacob Turner
and two minor leaguers.
We werent winning with the
group we had and we want to
make changes, Marlins presi-
dent of baseball operations Larry
Beinfest said.
M L B
Ramirez
traded to
Dodgers
In fire sale, Marlins send
infielder and reliever Choate
to Los Angeles.
The Associated Press
Ramirez
didit withthe right person.
The 28-year-old Hamels be-
comes the third Phillies starter
making $20 million per season,
joining Roy Halladay and Cliff
Lee. A three-time All-Star, Ha-
mels passed up an opportunity to
possibly get more money on the
openmarket tostaywiththeteam
that draftedhimin2002.
I wantedtogivethePhilliesev-
ery opportunity, Hamels said.
Its veryhardtoleaveaplacethat
youve had so many great memo-
ries. Youdont want tomiss it and
not beapart of it. I knowtheorga-
nization has always done a good
job of going out to win. We have
great playershere. Youdont want
tohave toleave that or stray away
and see them win and youre not
part of it.
I understand that free agency
is great, those opportunities of
the unknowing. But this is the
place that I call home andwant to
call home for a really long time. I
grew up watching Tony Gwynn
play and he made San Diego his
home for his entire career. Thats
ultimately what I want to make
here inPhiladelphia.
Hamels is 11-4 with a 3.23 ERA
this season. The lanky lefty is 85-
58 with a 3.38 ERAin seven years
inPhiladelphia. Hamelshasnever
won more than15 games in a sea-
son, andhis 2.79 ERAin2011was
the only time he was under 3.06.
Still, thePhillieswerewillingto
pay big bucks to make sure they
didnt lose a fanfavorite.
Therealityisthisisacommod-
ityweknowverywell,teampres-
ident David Montgomery said.
We know Cole as a talent. We
know Cole as a competitor. We
know Cole as his character and
what he and Heidi have done as
farashisfoundationisconcerned.
Weknewall alonghewastheright
fit for Philadelphia.
Signing Hamels means the
Phillies could potentially have
$155 million committed to just 11
players for 2013. Montgomery
said the team would consider ex-
ceeding the luxury tax threshold
for the first time.
We may very well need to do
that to do the right things on the
field, he said.
HAMELS
Continued from Page 1B
C M Y K
Area home foreclosures up
The percentage of Scranton/Wilkes-
Barre area residential mortgages in
foreclosure continued to exceed state
and national rates in May, according to
a report by real estate industry analyst
firm CoreLogic. The local foreclosure
rate in May was 3.67 percent, up from
3.14 percent a year earlier and above
the national rate of 3.41 percent, which
was down slightly from May 2011.
The 6.81 percent of local mortgages
90 days or more delinquent was just
below the national rate of 6.94 percent.
But whil the national rate declined
over the past year, the local rate rose.
The local 90-day delinquency rate
has remained relatively steady over the
past two years, according to CoreLogic,
while the foreclosure rate has risen
steadily.
New home sales fall
The Commerce Department said
Wednesday that sales of new homes fell
8.4 percent last month from May to a
seasonally adjusted annual rate of
350,000.
Sales in the Northeast plunged 60
percent in June to the lowest level
since November.
Nationwide, sales in May and April
were revised much higher. Junes sales
pace is 15.1 percent higher than the
same month last year.
The median price of a new home fell
1.9 percent in June from May to
$232,600.
Zynga results disappoint
Zynga stock sank $2.09, or 41 per-
cent, to $2.99 in after-hours trading
after the online game maker reported a
loss in the second quarter, with ad-
justed earnings and revenue below Wall
Streets already-low expectations.
The company behind games City-
Ville and FarmVille also lowered its
outlook for the year because of delayed
games, reduced expectations for its
Draw Something game and what it
called a more challenging environ-
ment on the Facebook Web platform.
Big order for Boeing
Mexican airline Aeromexico said
Wednesday it intends to order 100
Boeing aircraft in an order with a list
price of approximately $11 billion.
Grupo Aeromexicos letter of intent
includes 90 of Boeings forthcoming
737-8 MAX and 10 787-9 Dreamliners.
The airline also has nine previously
ordered 787-9 Dreamliners.
I N B R I E F
$3.46 $3.72 $3.27
$4.06
07/17/08
JPMorgCh 35.17 +.44 +5.8
JacobsEng 36.61 +.21 -9.8
JohnJn 67.53 +.18 +3.0
JohnsnCtl 23.68 +.17 -24.2
Kellogg 46.51 -.02 -8.0
Keycorp 7.89 +.04 +2.6
KimbClk 83.40 -.09 +13.4
KindME 81.53 -1.49 -4.0
Kroger 21.25 +.14 -12.3
Kulicke 8.79 +.22 -5.0
LSI Corp 6.05 +.12 +1.7
LancastrC 68.76 +.62 -.8
LillyEli 43.12 +1.14 +3.8
Limited 45.68 +.97 +13.2
LincNat 19.29 -.07 -.7
LockhdM 87.68 -.11 +8.4
Loews 40.30 ... +7.0
LaPac 10.40 -.19 +28.9
MarathnO 25.34 -.08 -13.4
MarIntA 35.34 +.31 +21.2
Masco 12.92 -.73 +23.3
McDrmInt 11.04 +.10 -4.1
McGrwH 44.99 -.52 0.0
McKesson 92.68 -.09 +19.0
Merck 42.62 -.07 +13.1
MetLife 28.64 -.04 -8.1
Microsoft 28.83 -.32 +11.1
NCR Corp 22.41 -.09 +36.1
NatFuGas 48.25 -.44 -13.2
NatGrid 50.16 +.29 +3.5
NY Times 7.05 ... -8.8
NewellRub 17.43 ... +7.9
NewmtM 45.80 +1.47 -23.7
NextEraEn 68.82 -.43 +13.0
NiSource 25.12 +.01 +5.5
NikeB 93.51 +.55 -3.0
NorflkSo 71.70 -.26 -1.6
NoestUt 39.48 +.15 +9.5
NorthropG 63.91 -.27 +9.3
Nucor 36.82 -.30 -6.9
NustarEn 53.26 -.53 -6.0
NvMAd 15.46 +.05 +5.3
OcciPet 83.52 -.22 -10.9
OfficeMax 4.27 -.03 -5.9
Olin 19.67 +.11 +.1
ONEOK s 43.12 -.24 -.5
PG&E Cp 44.90 +.46 +8.9
PPG 107.49 -1.07 +28.7
PPL Corp 28.53 -.10 -3.0
PennVaRs 24.18 -.93 -5.3
Pfizer 23.33 -.05 +7.8
PinWst 52.67 -.19 +9.3
PitnyBw 13.18 -.12 -28.9
Praxair 102.94 -1.87 -3.7
PSEG 32.49 -.04 -1.6
PulteGrp 10.02 -.46 +58.8
Questar 20.40 -.08 +2.7
RadioShk 2.60 -1.05 -73.2
RLauren 143.08 -1.99 +3.6
Raytheon 55.08 -.23 +13.8
ReynAmer 45.41 +.06 +9.6
RockwlAut 62.97 -2.18 -14.2
Rowan 34.02 +.31 +12.2
RoyDShllB 70.40 +.58 -7.4
RoyDShllA 68.06 +.60 -6.9
Ryder 37.50 +.78 -29.4
Safeway 15.00 -.26 -28.7
Schlmbrg 68.25 +.31 -.1
Sherwin 129.61 -1.93 +45.2
SilvWhtn g 26.52 +1.19 -8.4
SiriusXM 2.08 +.04 +14.3
SonyCp 11.26 -.39 -37.6
SouthnCo 47.40 +.29 +2.4
SwstAirl 8.47 -.19 -1.1
SpectraEn 29.69 +.04 -3.4
SprintNex 3.37 -.08 +44.0
Sunoco 47.42 -.18 +39.0
Sysco 28.31 -.16 -3.5
TECO 17.67 -.05 -7.7
Target 60.36 -.19 +17.8
TenetHlth 4.39 -.06 -14.4
Tenneco 25.45 +.73 -14.5
Tesoro 26.45 +.12 +13.2
Textron 25.31 +.10 +36.9
3M Co 88.75 +.51 +8.6
TimeWarn 38.55 +.67 +6.7
Timken 42.09 -.11 +8.7
Titan Intl 21.17 +.57 +8.8
UnilevNV 32.11 -.18 -6.6
UnionPac 117.39 +.60 +10.8
Unisys 18.52 +1.93 -6.0
UPS B 74.27 -.07 +1.5
USSteel 17.93 -.29 -32.2
UtdTech 72.61 +.67 -.7
VarianMed 57.31 +1.65 -14.6
VectorGp 16.85 -.14 -5.1
ViacomB 45.28 ... -.3
Weyerhsr 22.78 -.03 +22.0
Whrlpl 64.61 +2.36 +36.2
WmsCos 30.61 -.36 +13.5
Windstrm 9.31 -.24 -20.7
Wynn 92.79 -.21 -16.0
XcelEngy 28.68 -.04 +3.8
Xerox 6.38 -.11 -19.8
YumBrnds 63.51 +.75 +7.6
Mutual Funds
Alliance Bernstein
BalShrB m 15.27 -.01 +5.7
CoreOppA m 12.88 -.04 +6.5
American Cent
IncGroA m 25.61 -.03 +6.0
ValueInv 5.88 ... +4.7
American Funds
AMCAPA m 19.89 +.01 +6.1
BalA m 19.29 +.01 +7.0
BondA m 12.95 ... +4.8
CapIncBuA m51.02 +.10 +5.6
CpWldGrIA m33.19 +.12 +5.1
EurPacGrA m35.98 +.16 +2.3
FnInvA m 37.21 +.10 +5.8
GrthAmA m 30.87 +.06 +7.4
HiIncA m 10.96 ... +7.2
IncAmerA m 17.28 +.03 +5.1
InvCoAmA m 28.64 +.01 +6.7
MutualA m 27.08 +.06 +5.9
NewPerspA m27.86 +.14 +6.5
NwWrldA m 48.03 +.16 +4.1
SmCpWldA m35.88 +.12 +8.1
WAMutInvA m29.80 +.05 +6.1
Baron
Asset b 47.20 -.06 +3.3
BlackRock
EqDivI 19.00 +.02 +5.6
GlobAlcA m 18.52 +.03 +2.7
GlobAlcC m 17.24 +.02 +2.2
GlobAlcI 18.60 +.02 +2.8
CGM
Focus 24.69 -.14 -3.7
Mutual 25.33 -.13 +3.8
Realty 28.96 -.07 +8.2
Columbia
AcornZ 28.62 +.10 +5.1
DFA
EmMktValI 25.75 +.06 -0.3
DWS-Scudder
EnhEMFIS d 10.77 -.03 +10.5
HlthCareS d 27.03 +.16 +11.8
LAEqS d 37.11 +.22 -0.5
Davis
NYVentA m 34.02 -.05 +4.7
NYVentC m 32.70 -.05 +4.2
Dodge & Cox
Bal 71.31 +.22 +7.1
Income 13.80 ... +5.8
IntlStk 28.91 +.21 -1.1
Stock 108.32 +.42 +7.7
Dreyfus
TechGrA f 31.64 +.06 +6.0
Eaton Vance
HiIncOppA m 4.38 ... +7.7
HiIncOppB m 4.39 ... +7.3
NatlMuniA m 10.07 +.02 +9.9
NatlMuniB m 10.07 +.02 +9.5
PAMuniA m 9.16 +.01 +6.0
FPA
Cres d 27.03 +.02 +1.8
Fidelity
AstMgr20 13.18 ... +4.4
Bal 19.26 -.01 +6.8
BlChGrow 45.95 -.06 +8.3
CapInc d 9.10 ... +8.5
Contra 73.52 -.12 +9.0
DivrIntl d 26.34 +.13 +3.2
ExpMulNat d 22.44 -.02 +8.5
Free2020 13.80 +.01 +5.5
Free2030 13.56 +.02 +5.9
GNMA 11.98 ... +2.7
GrowCo 89.25 +.22 +10.3
LatinAm d 47.36 +.01 -3.1
LowPriStk d 37.47 -.12 +4.9
Magellan 68.11 -.16 +8.4
Overseas d 28.02 +.15 +5.8
Puritan 18.84 -.02 +7.5
StratInc 11.17 +.01 +5.8
TotalBd 11.29 +.01 +5.2
Value 67.54 +.09 +6.4
Fidelity Advisor
ValStratT m 25.36 -.04 +8.8
Fidelity Select
Gold d 34.04+1.10 -19.4
Pharm d 14.65 +.06 +8.5
Fidelity Spartan
500IdxAdvtg 47.44 -.01 +7.6
500IdxInstl 47.44 -.01 +7.6
500IdxInv 47.44 -.01 +7.6
First Eagle
GlbA m 46.37 -.02 +2.8
FrankTemp-Franklin
CA TF A m 7.53 +.01 +8.2
GrowB m 44.56 +.01 +4.5
Income A m 2.14 ... +5.8
Income C m 2.16 ... +5.5
FrankTemp-Mutual
Discov Z 28.47 +.05 +3.6
Euro Z 19.37 +.06 +2.2
Shares Z 21.02 +.01 +5.4
FrankTemp-Templeton
GlBond A m 12.90 +.03 +6.8
GlBondAdv 12.86 +.03 +7.0
Growth A m 16.43 +.08 +0.9
GMO
QuVI 22.39 -.02 +7.4
Harbor
CapApInst 39.70 -.01 +7.6
IntlInstl d 54.05 +.32 +3.1
INVESCO
ConstellB m 19.65 -.11 +3.1
GlobQuantvCoreA m10.46+.03 +1.8
PacGrowB m 17.45 +.02 -2.2
YTD
Name NAV Chg %Rtn
YTD
Name NAV Chg %Rtn
YTD
Name NAV Chg %Rtn
YTD
Name NAV Chg %Rtn
YTD
Name NAV Chg %Rtn
YTD
Name NAV Chg %Rtn
52-WEEK YTD
HIGH LOW NAME TKR DIV LAST CHG %CHG
52-WEEK YTD
HIGH LOW NAME TKR DIV LAST CHG %CHG
Combined Stocks
AFLAC 41.29 -.73 -4.6
AT&T Inc 35.33 +.70 +16.8
AbtLab 64.12 +.18 +14.0
AMD 4.01 -.05 -25.7
AlaskAir s 34.45 -.24 -8.2
Alcoa 8.02 ... -7.3
Allstate 33.66 -.06 +22.8
Altria 35.40 -.17 +19.4
AEP 41.22 -.22 -.2
AmExp 56.05 +.42 +18.8
AmIntlGrp 30.15 -.37 +30.0
Amgen 77.96 +1.59 +21.4
Anadarko 69.52 +.61 -8.9
Annaly 17.39 +.13 +9.0
Apple Inc 574.97-25.95 +42.0
AutoData 55.41 +.16 +2.6
AveryD 29.91 -.40 +4.3
Avnet 30.36 +.43 -2.3
Avon 15.16 -.11 -13.2
BP PLC 39.88 +.07 -6.7
BakrHu 45.02 -.12 -7.4
BallardPw 1.04 -.03 -3.7
BarnesNob 14.63 -.26 +1.0
Baxter 56.83 +1.87 +14.9
BerkH B 84.04 +.34 +10.1
BigLots 38.68 -.25 +2.4
BlockHR 16.04 -.02 -1.8
Boeing 74.03 +2.00 +.9
BrMySq 34.95 +.22 -.8
Brunswick 20.42 -.12 +13.1
Buckeye 53.41 -.38 -16.5
CBS B 31.11 +.21 +14.6
CMS Eng 24.04 -.08 +8.9
CSX 21.83 +.18 +3.7
CampSp 32.59 +.07 -2.0
Carnival 32.42 +.54 -.7
Caterpillar 82.60 +1.17 -8.8
CenterPnt 20.57 +.02 +2.4
CntryLink 40.34 -.28 +8.4
Chevron 106.06 -.24 -.3
Cisco 15.42 +.30 -14.4
Citigroup 25.79 +.55 -2.0
ColgPal 102.25 +.15 +10.7
ConAgra 23.85 +.28 -9.7
ConocPhil s53.24 -1.40 -4.1
ConEd 63.48 -.10 +2.3
Cooper Ind 70.54 +.91 +30.3
Corning 11.14 -.93 -14.2
CrownHold 34.86 +.04 +3.8
Cummins 87.08 +.22 -1.1
Deere 73.73 -.14 -4.7
Diebold 35.08 -.01 +16.7
Disney 48.30 +.14 +28.8
DomRescs 53.29 +.28 +.4
Dover 50.94 -.06 -12.2
DowChm 30.27 +.22 +5.3
DryShips 2.15 +.04 +7.5
DuPont 48.16 +.42 +5.2
DukeEn rs 65.82 +.55 0.0
EMC Cp 25.16 -.18 +16.8
Eaton 42.06 +1.06 -3.4
EdisonInt 45.14 -.19 +9.0
EmersonEl 45.60 +.25 -2.1
EnbrdgEPt 28.70 -.70 -13.5
Energen 46.41 +.25 -7.2
Entergy 70.81 -.18 -3.1
EntPrPt 53.38 -.75 +15.1
Ericsson 8.67 +.17 -14.4
Exelon 38.50 -.37 -11.2
ExxonMbl 85.24 +.66 +.6
Fastenal 42.81 +.17 -1.8
FedExCp 87.23 -.44 +4.5
Fifth&Pac 9.25 -.37 +7.2
FirstEngy 48.84 -.56 +10.2
Fonar 3.53 +.02+107.2
FootLockr 32.35 -.34 +35.7
FordM 8.97 -.09 -16.6
Gannett 14.04 -.02 +5.0
Gap 29.29 +.37 +57.9
GenCorp 8.11 +.26 +52.4
GenDynam 62.00 -1.40 -6.6
GenElec 20.00 +.03 +11.7
GenMills 37.96 +.05 -6.1
GileadSci 51.19 +.09 +25.1
GlaxoSKln 44.26 -.54 -3.0
Goodrich 127.20 +.02 +2.8
Goodyear 9.74 -.06 -31.3
Hallibrtn 31.30 -.25 -9.3
HarleyD 42.07 -.32 +8.2
HartfdFn 15.97 +.04 -1.7
HawaiiEl 28.00 -.20 +5.7
HeclaM 4.45 +.20 -14.9
Heico s 35.84 -.05 -23.3
Hess 45.46 +1.53 -20.0
HewlettP 17.78 -.21 -31.0
HomeDp 51.07 -.10 +21.5
HonwllIntl 56.80 +.12 +4.5
Hormel 27.87 -.04 -4.8
Humana 70.07 -2.01 -20.0
INTL FCSt 18.30 -.69 -22.4
ITT Cp s 18.33 -.12 -5.2
ITW 52.70 +.41 +12.8
IngerRd 39.54 -.37 +29.8
IBM 191.08 +.74 +3.9
IntPap 31.37 -.04 +6.0
Name Last Chg %YTD Name Last Chg %YTD Name Last Chg %YTD Name Last Chg %YTD Name Last Chg %YTD Name Last Chg %YTD
Stocks of Local Interest
92.79 72.26 AirProd APD 2.56 78.91 +.03 -7.4
36.44 25.39 AmWtrWks AWK 1.00 35.64 -.62 +11.9
46.47 36.76 Amerigas APU 3.20 41.01 -.08 -10.7
26.93 19.28 AquaAm WTR .66 26.30 -.17 +19.3
33.98 23.69 ArchDan ADM .70 26.71 +.02 -6.6
399.10 266.25 AutoZone AZO ... 378.39 +2.05 +16.4
10.10 4.92 BkofAm BAC .04 7.07 +.03 +27.2
25.97 17.10 BkNYMel BK .52 20.60 +.20 +3.5
10.50 2.23 BonTon BONT .20 7.21 -.23 +113.9
48.69 31.30 CVS Care CVS .65 44.54 -.05 +9.2
52.90 38.79 Cigna CI .04 39.95 -1.27 -4.9
79.36 63.34 CocaCola KO 2.04 77.02 +.36 +10.1
32.78 19.19 Comcast CMCSA .65 31.36 -.04 +32.3
29.47 21.67 CmtyBkSy CBU 1.04 26.86 +.32 -3.4
28.79 14.61 CmtyHlt CYH ... 25.35 +.05 +45.3
49.68 29.57 CoreMark CORE .68 46.76 -.46 +18.1
55.65 39.50 EmersonEl EMR 1.60 45.60 +.25 -2.1
44.47 30.78 EngyTEq ETE 2.50 41.36 -.90 +1.9
8.64 4.61 Entercom ETM ... 5.69 -.22 -7.5
17.04 10.25 FairchldS FCS ... 12.86 +.33 +6.8
8.17 3.06 FrontierCm FTR .40 3.59 -.01 -30.3
17.75 13.37 Genpact G .18 16.96 -.05 +13.4
10.24 6.52 HarteHnk HHS .34 6.40 -.16 -29.6
55.48 48.17 Heinz HNZ 2.06 54.37 +.03 +.6
72.97 53.83 Hershey HSY 1.52 70.33 -.06 +13.8
40.29 31.88 Kraft KFT 1.16 38.84 -.18 +4.0
32.29 18.07 Lowes LOW .64 25.60 -.17 +.9
89.38 66.40 M&T Bk MTB 2.80 84.40 -.06 +10.6
102.22 82.01 McDnlds MCD 2.80 88.04 -.02 -12.2
24.10 17.05 NBT Bcp NBTB .80 20.54 ... -7.2
9.73 5.53 NexstarB NXST ... 6.45 +.13 -17.7
67.89 42.70 PNC PNC 1.60 57.67 +.30 0.0
30.27 25.00 PPL Corp PPL 1.44 28.53 -.10 -3.0
16.09 6.50 PennaRE PEI .64 13.93 -.31 +33.4
70.89 58.50 PepsiCo PEP 2.15 70.30 +1.51 +6.0
91.39 60.45 PhilipMor PM 3.08 86.89 -.80 +10.7
67.95 57.56 ProctGam PG 2.25 64.02 ... -4.0
65.17 42.45 Prudentl PRU 1.45 45.85 +.39 -8.5
2.12 .85 RiteAid RAD ... 1.15 -.02 -8.7
17.00 10.91 SLM Cp SLM .50 15.63 +.34 +16.6
57.10 39.00 SLM pfB SLMBP 2.22 46.50 +1.00 +19.2
45.39 25.07 TJX s TJX .46 44.28 +.27 +37.2
32.00 24.07 UGI Corp UGI 1.08 29.92 -.26 +1.8
46.41 32.28 VerizonCm VZ 2.00 43.72 -.05 +9.0
73.46 48.31 WalMart WMT 1.59 72.08 -.06 +20.6
45.96 36.52 WeisMk WMK 1.20 41.75 +.21 +4.5
34.59 22.58 WellsFargo WFC .88 33.16 -.07 +20.3
USD per British Pound 1.5511 +.0007 +.05% 1.5643 1.6299
Canadian Dollar 1.0145 -.0075 -.74% 1.0053 .9453
USD per Euro 1.2160 +.0099 +.81% 1.3084 1.4380
Japanese Yen 78.12 -.06 -.08% 77.81 78.25
Mexican Peso 13.5954 -.1200 -.88% 13.0256 11.6432
6MO. 1YR.
CURRENCY CLOSE PVS. %CH. AGO AGO
Copper 3.38 3.35 +0.66 -11.76 -24.00
Gold 1608.00 1576.00 +2.03 -5.40 -0.43
Platinum 1395.10 1382.30 +0.93 -11.56 -22.79
Silver 27.45 26.79 +2.44 -17.06 -32.32
Palladium 564.35 560.45 +0.70 -18.54 -32.19
Foreign Exchange & Metals
JPMorgan
CoreBondSelect12.15+.01 +4.3
John Hancock
LifBa1 b 12.79 +.01 +5.5
LifGr1 b 12.53 +.02 +5.2
RegBankA m 13.78 +.05 +14.4
SovInvA m 16.12 -.02 +5.2
TaxFBdA m 10.51 +.01 +6.9
Lazard
EmgMkEqtI d 17.69 ... +5.3
Loomis Sayles
BondI 14.48 +.02 +7.0
Lord Abbett
ShDurIncA m 4.61 ... +3.9
MFS
MAInvA m 20.04 +.06 +7.8
MAInvC m 19.36 +.06 +7.3
Merger
Merger b 15.73 ... +0.9
Metropolitan West
TotRetBdI 10.84 ... +7.1
Mutual Series
Beacon Z 12.32 ... +5.5
Neuberger Berman
SmCpGrInv 18.28 +.01 +3.7
Oakmark
EqIncI 27.46 -.09 +1.5
Oppenheimer
CapApB m 39.68 -.03 +5.6
DevMktA m 30.67 -.03 +4.6
DevMktY 30.37 -.02 +4.8
PIMCO
AllAssetI 12.08 +.01 +6.3
ComRlRStI 6.82 +.04 +5.9
HiYldIs 9.33 -.01 +7.6
LowDrIs 10.57 ... +4.3
RealRet 12.49 -.01 +7.3
TotRetA m 11.47 ... +7.3
TotRetAdm b 11.47 ... +7.4
TotRetC m 11.47 ... +6.9
TotRetIs 11.47 ... +7.5
TotRetrnD b 11.47 ... +7.4
TotlRetnP 11.47 ... +7.5
Permanent
Portfolio 46.64 +.32 +1.2
Principal
SAMConGrB m13.42+.01 +4.5
Prudential
JenMCGrA m 29.72 +.19 +6.9
Prudential Investmen
2020FocA m 14.80 -.11 +0.4
BlendA m 16.74 ... +1.9
EqOppA m 14.11 +.04 +3.8
HiYieldA m 5.53 ... +7.3
IntlEqtyA m 5.40 +.03 +0.7
IntlValA m 17.40 +.06 -0.8
JennGrA m 19.45 ... +7.6
NaturResA m 40.96 +.14 -11.6
SmallCoA m 20.23 +.06 +1.7
UtilityA m 11.43 -.01 +6.9
ValueA m 13.83 +.03 +0.3
Putnam
GrowIncB m 12.99 +.01 +4.4
IncomeA m 7.10 -.01 +6.8
Royce
LowStkSer m 13.53 +.14 -5.5
OpportInv d 10.84 +.01 +5.0
ValPlSvc m 12.28 +.04 +2.3
Schwab
S&P500Sel d 21.07 ... +7.7
Scout
Interntl d 28.46 +.12 +2.5
T Rowe Price
BlChpGr 42.38 -.13 +9.7
CapApprec 21.94 +.05 +6.4
DivGrow 24.65 +.04 +6.5
DivrSmCap d 16.18 +.12 +4.7
EmMktStk d 29.01 ... +1.8
EqIndex d 36.07 -.01 +7.5
EqtyInc 24.37 +.07 +6.8
FinSer 13.07 +.02 +10.1
GrowStk 35.12 -.14 +10.3
HealthSci 40.60 +.49 +24.5
HiYield d 6.73 ... +7.9
IntlDisc d 40.30 +.23 +8.0
IntlStk d 12.55 +.04 +2.1
IntlStkAd m 12.49 +.04 +2.0
LatinAm d 36.82 +.04 -5.2
MediaTele 52.68 -.25 +12.3
MidCpGr 54.69 +.28 +3.7
NewAmGro 33.06 -.01 +3.9
NewAsia d 14.67 -.05 +5.5
NewEra 39.61 +.02 -5.8
NewHoriz 33.79 +.27 +8.9
NewIncome 9.94 ... +4.5
Rtmt2020 16.80 +.01 +5.6
Rtmt2030 17.50 +.02 +5.8
ShTmBond 4.85 ... +2.0
SmCpVal d 36.01 +.05 +4.4
TaxFHiYld d 11.76 ... +10.0
Value 23.95 +.07 +6.3
ValueAd b 23.69 +.06 +6.1
Thornburg
IntlValI d 24.79 +.03 +1.9
Tweedy, Browne
GlobVal d 23.37 -.02 +7.0
Vanguard
500Adml 123.45 -.03 +7.6
500Inv 123.44 -.03 +7.6
CapOp 30.89 +.40 +4.7
CapVal 9.64 +.02 +4.4
Convrt 12.38 +.01 +6.2
DevMktIdx 8.46 +.05 -0.4
DivGr 15.99 +.01 +4.9
EnergyInv d 55.77 -.03 -5.4
EurIdxAdm 50.99 +.45 -1.2
Explr 73.33 +.32 +2.6
GNMA 11.10 -.01 +2.2
GNMAAdml 11.10 -.01 +2.2
GlbEq 16.62 ... +4.5
GrowthEq 11.56 -.05 +7.1
HYCor 5.92 -.01 +7.9
HYCorAdml 5.92 -.01 +8.0
HltCrAdml 58.29 -.05 +7.5
HlthCare 138.14 -.11 +7.4
ITGradeAd 10.37 -.01 +6.6
InfPrtAdm 29.14 -.03 +5.7
InfPrtI 11.87 -.01 +5.7
InflaPro 14.84 -.01 +5.6
InstIdxI 122.66 -.03 +7.7
InstPlus 122.66 -.04 +7.7
InstTStPl 30.10 ... +7.3
IntlExpIn 12.97 +.07 +1.2
IntlGr 16.62 +.12 +1.7
IntlStkIdxAdm 21.82 +.12 -0.1
IntlStkIdxIPls 87.30 +.48 0.0
LTInvGr 11.22 +.02 +12.4
MidCapGr 19.89 +.13 +5.6
MidCp 20.46 +.03 +4.1
MidCpAdml 92.90 +.12 +4.2
MidCpIst 20.52 +.03 +4.2
MuIntAdml 14.39 +.01 +4.4
MuLtdAdml 11.19 ... +1.4
MuShtAdml 15.94 ... +0.8
PrecMtls 14.55 +.27 -22.6
Prmcp 64.84 +.40 +5.0
PrmcpAdml 67.30 +.42 +5.1
PrmcpCorI 14.04 +.09 +4.1
REITIdx 21.71 +.01 +14.5
REITIdxAd 92.62 +.01 +14.6
STCor 10.80 ... +2.9
STGradeAd 10.80 ... +2.9
SelValu 19.33 -.07 +4.0
SmGthIdx 22.65 +.09 +5.4
SmGthIst 22.71 +.10 +5.5
StSmCpEq 19.67 +.03 +4.5
Star 19.58 +.03 +5.4
StratgcEq 19.33 +.03 +5.4
TgtRe2015 12.89 +.01 +4.8
TgtRe2020 22.73 +.02 +4.8
TgtRe2030 21.95 +.03 +4.9
TgtRe2035 13.13 +.02 +5.0
Tgtet2025 12.87 +.02 +4.9
TotBdAdml 11.25 +.01 +4.0
TotBdInst 11.25 +.01 +4.0
TotBdMkInv 11.25 +.01 +3.9
TotBdMkSig 11.25 +.01 +4.0
TotIntl 13.04 +.07 -0.2
TotStIAdm 33.26 ... +7.3
TotStIIns 33.27 +.01 +7.3
TotStIdx 33.25 ... +7.2
TxMIntlAdm 9.73 +.07 -0.6
TxMSCAdm 28.56 +.07 +4.8
USGro 19.51 -.06 +8.1
USValue 10.94 +.02 +7.3
WellsI 24.03 +.03 +6.5
WellsIAdm 58.23 +.09 +6.6
Welltn 32.78 +.07 +6.1
WelltnAdm 56.62 +.12 +6.1
WndsIIAdm 48.54 ... +7.3
WndsrII 27.35 ... +7.3
Wells Fargo
DvrCpBldA f 6.47 +.01 +3.2
DOW
12,676.05
+58.73
NASDAQ
2,854.24
-8.75
S&P 500
1,337.89
-.42
RUSSELL 2000
769.31
+1.56
6-MO T-BILLS
.14%
-.01
10-YR T-NOTE
1.40%
+.01
CRUDE OIL
$88.97
+.47
p p q q p p q q
p p p p q q q q
NATURAL GAS
$3.07
-.12
6MO. 1YR.
METALS CLOSE PVS. %CH. AGO AGO
BUSINESS S E C T I O N B
THE TIMES LEADER THURSDAY, JULY 26, 2012
timesleader.com
IMAGINE YOURE
sitting on a park
bench, minding your
own business, when
suddenly the smell
of cooking hot dogs
pervades the air.
You know, I
could really go for a hot dog right
now, you think, even though you
werent hungry a moment before.
Your mouth watering, you look
around, trying to spot the vendor.
No luck. Then you notice the hot
dog stand down the street.
You gladly spend a few dollars to
satisfy your craving, and dont no-
tice the smug expression on the
vendors face as you walk away.
Theres nothing unusual about
this scenario. Smell is one of the
most primal senses and its closely
linked with taste and therefore,
hunger.
Well, advertising technology has
arrived that takes advantage of the
hold those delicious aromas have
over us.
In practice, the prototype doesnt
lure customers with the smell of a
cooking hot dog, but rather that of
freshly brewed coffee.
Donut and coffee vendor Dunkin
Donuts has begun employing Fla-
vor Radio on city buses in Seoul,
South Korea.
Morning commuters are greeted
by the smell of fresh-brewed Dun-
kin Donuts coffee, dispensed using
off-the-shelf technology developed
for air-fresheners.
The aroma is closely followed
with an advertising message from
the brand.
Since the buses stop near a Dun-
kin Donuts shop, the result was
predictable; according to the compa-
ny, the campaign yielded a 16 per-
cent uptick in sales.
Over the past five years or so,
advances in digital scent technol-
ogy have been numerous.
A web protocol describing smells
was developed, a scent generating
USB device was manufactured, and
researchers have announced theyre
working on televisions that can
dispense smells. Sound like a ridicu-
lous gimmick? Thats what they
were saying 10 years ago about 3D.
So picture this: As youre watch-
ing TV the smell of freshly baked
cookies fills the room. Driven to a
nearly intolerable hunger for deli-
cious baked confections, you run to
the supermarket, which is freshly
stocked with the very cookie you
were smelling at home.
Digital scent technology cou-
pled with detailed profiles of cus-
tomers (Facebook Likes, for exam-
ple) could prove to be a deadly com-
bination.
Like a pizzeria? Well, in a few
years, you might just be able to
smell their pizza once you do. And
youll probably be buying a slice or
two soon thereafter.
TECH TALK
N I C K D E L O R E N Z O
Tech could bring business sweet smell of success
Nick DeLorenzo is director of interactive and
new media for The Times Leader. E-mail him
at ndelorenzo@timesleader.com.
NEW YORK Sandy Weill is
having a change of heart.
Weill, the aggressive dealmak-
er whobuilt Citigroupontheidea
that in banking, bigger is better,
said Wednesday that he believes
big banks should
be broken up.
Speaking on
CNBCs
Squawk Box,
the 79-year-old
Weill appeared
to shock the
shows anchors
when he said consumer banking
units should be split from riskier
investment banking units. That
would mean dismembering Citi-
group as well as other big U.S.
banks, like JPMorgan Chase and
Bank of America.
Its an idea thats traditionally
more in line with the banking in-
dustrys harshest critics, not its
founding fathers. Its an ironic
twist coming from an empire-
builder who nursed Citigroup in-
to a behemoth. And its directly
opposed to the stance of the in-
dustrys current leaders, like
JPMorgan CEO Jamie Dimon,
whohave beentryingtoconvince
regulators and lawmakers of just
the opposite, that big banks do
not need to be split.
Weill said the radical change is
necessaryif U.S. banks want tore-
build trust and remain on top of
the worlds financial system.
Weill alsocriticizedbanks for tak-
ingontoomuchdebt andnot pro-
viding enough disclosure about
whats on their balance sheets.
Our world hates bankers, he
said.
Investment banking, which of-
fers services like trading stocks
and packaging loans into securi-
ties, can be spectacularly profit-
able in the good times and spec-
tacularly unprofitable in the bad.
Consumer banking, the plain-va-
nilla business of making loans
andacceptingdeposits, generally
offers a steadier, if slower, way to
make profits. Until the late 90s,
federal regulations kept them
largely separated.
A Citigroup spokeswoman de-
clined to comment. A JPMorgan
spokesman didnt immediately
return a message seeking com-
ment.
Weill retired as CEO of Citi-
group in 2003 but remained
chairman until 2006, building it
into a giant that offered both con-
sumer and investment banking.
Ex-banker:
Big banks
not better
By CHRISTINA REXRODE
AP Business Writer
Weill
A NEWPLACE TO GO DUNKIN
BILL TARUTIS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Store owner Michelle Wise, left, shift leader Lynne Lukasavage, and crew member Bryce Triplett wait on cus-
tomers Wednesday at the grand opening of Dunkin Donuts on Highway 315 in Plains Township. It is the 13th
Northeastern Pennsylvania store for partners Michelle Wise, Jon Wise, Michael Costa, Danny Costa and Mark
Pesce. The store, located in the new Richland 315 mixed-use development between the Woodlands Inn and
Mohegan Sun at Pocono Downs, is one of the first in the nation to feature digital menu boards with video. It is
open 24 hours every day.
C M Y K
PAGE 8B THURSDAY, JULY 26, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
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ALMANAC
REGIONAL FORECAST
NATIONAL FORECAST
For more weather
information go to:
www.timesleader.com
National Weather Service
607-729-1597
Forecasts, graphs
and data 2012
Weather Central, LP
Yesterday 83/59
Average 82/61
Record High 96 in 1941
Record Low 48 in 1903
Yesterday 6
Month to date 283
Year to date 502
Last year to date 470
Normal year to date 318
*Index of fuel consumption, how far the days
mean temperature was above 65 degrees.
Precipitation
Yesterday 0.00
Month to date 1.92
Normal month to date 3.01
Year to date 18.38
Normal year to date 20.84
Susquehanna Stage Chg. Fld. Stg
Wilkes-Barre 0.18 -0.10 22.0
Towanda 0.09 0.08 21.0
Lehigh
Bethlehem 3.07 0.75 16.0
Delaware
Port Jervis 2.61 0.03 18.0
Todays high/
Tonights low
TODAYS SUMMARY
Highs: 84-90. Lows: 68-71. Thunderstorms
developing. Thunderstorms likely tonight.
The Poconos
Highs: 85-89. Lows: 75-78. Chance of
thunderstorms. Scattered thunderstorms
tonight.
The Jersey Shore
Highs: 76-94. Lows: 63-69. Thunderstorms
likely. Chance of
thunderstorms tonight.
The Finger Lakes
Highs: 95-96. Lows: 77-79. Slight chance
of thunderstorms. Slight chance of
thunderstorms tonight.
Brandywine Valley
Highs: 92-98. Lows: 77-79. Slight chance
of thunderstorms. Slight chance of
thunderstorms tonight.
Delmarva/Ocean City
Anchorage 63/50/.00 63/51/pc 64/51/sh
Atlanta 97/76/.00 96/75/pc 94/74/t
Baltimore 87/69/.00 97/76/pc 97/73/t
Boston 83/65/.00 79/69/t 79/68/t
Buffalo 83/60/.00 84/69/t 81/64/t
Charlotte 91/72/.05 99/74/pc 98/74/t
Chicago 98/70/.01 88/73/pc 85/73/pc
Cleveland 88/61/.00 91/69/t 81/69/t
Dallas 100/79/.00 100/79/pc 99/78/pc
Denver 89/64/.00 90/62/pc 92/65/pc
Detroit 89/61/.00 90/70/t 83/68/t
Honolulu 85/75/.00 88/73/s 89/74/s
Houston 92/75/.00 93/77/pc 95/78/pc
Indianapolis 102/74/.00 95/71/t 92/68/pc
Las Vegas 104/84/.00 106/81/s 105/81/s
Los Angeles 70/61/.00 68/61/s 69/62/s
Miami 92/79/.00 91/79/s 91/80/s
Milwaukee 95/70/.24 84/71/pc 79/68/pc
Minneapolis 91/75/.00 85/67/t 79/62/pc
Myrtle Beach 90/73/.00 92/81/pc 92/79/pc
Nashville 95/78/.00 97/76/pc 92/72/t
New Orleans 92/77/.09 92/78/t 92/78/t
Norfolk 82/77/.00 97/78/pc 99/78/pc
Oklahoma City 102/80/.00 100/73/t 100/75/t
Omaha 104/83/.00 92/65/s 88/67/s
Orlando 94/73/.00 97/77/s 95/77/s
Phoenix 104/86/.00 107/86/s 108/87/pc
Pittsburgh 83/59/.00 90/70/t 84/66/t
Portland, Ore. 82/57/.00 83/59/s 74/58/s
St. Louis 107/86/.00 96/76/t 99/71/s
Salt Lake City 92/68/.00 97/72/s 96/73/s
San Antonio 95/78/.00 97/76/pc 98/75/pc
San Diego 72/64/.00 72/64/s 72/63/s
San Francisco 72/59/.00 66/55/s 66/55/s
Seattle 76/56/.00 81/57/s 72/55/s
Tampa 90/79/.00 92/77/s 92/77/s
Tucson 96/76/.00 101/73/pc 100/73/t
Washington, DC 88/72/.00 98/78/pc 97/75/t
City Yesterday Today Tomorrow City Yesterday Today Tomorrow
Amsterdam 82/59/.00 77/59/s 78/61/t
Baghdad 118/90/.00 118/89/s 120/88/s
Beijing 82/75/.00 93/74/t 90/74/t
Berlin 90/61/.00 84/63/pc 84/64/s
Buenos Aires 57/30/.00 57/36/pc 56/39/s
Dublin 64/48/.00 67/49/c 66/45/pc
Frankfurt 90/63/.00 82/61/pc 86/64/pc
Hong Kong 84/77/.00 88/81/t 88/81/t
Jerusalem 93/68/.00 93/73/s 90/71/s
London 79/61/.00 81/63/s 80/55/t
Mexico City 73/57/.00 73/55/t 71/51/t
Montreal 77/57/.00 77/65/sh 79/61/pc
Moscow 81/64/.00 79/62/pc 77/61/t
Paris 88/61/.00 89/70/s 85/64/t
Rio de Janeiro 90/73/.00 84/65/s 79/66/pc
Riyadh 115/86/.00 113/88/s 111/87/s
Rome 82/64/.00 87/68/pc 90/71/s
San Juan 91/79/.00 89/78/pc 88/78/t
Tokyo 90/77/.00 87/76/t 88/77/t
Warsaw 84/59/.00 84/64/pc 81/67/pc
City Yesterday Today Tomorrow City Yesterday Today Tomorrow
WORLD CITIES
River Levels, from 12 p.m. yesterday.
Key: s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms, r-rain, sn-snow, sf-snowurries, i-ice.
Philadelphia
94/78
Reading
96/73
Scranton
Wilkes-Barre
90/71
90/71
Harrisburg
95/74
Atlantic City
88/76
New York City
90/77
Syracuse
85/68
Pottsville
90/71
Albany
88/72
Binghamton
Towanda
90/67
91/68
State College
89/70
Poughkeepsie
91/70
100/79
88/73
90/62
100/75
85/67
68/61
63/54 92/73
91/64
81/57
90/77
90/70
96/75
91/79
93/77
88/73
73/50
63/51
98/78
Sun and Moon
Sunrise Sunset
Today 5:54a 8:26p
Tomorrow 5:55a 8:25p
Moonrise Moonset
Today 2:10p none
Tomorrow 3:20p 12:25a
First Full Last New
July 26 Aug. 1 Aug. 9 Aug. 17
That refreshingly
dry air we had in
town Wednesday
is now gone.
Today, we go
back into the
soup with hotter
and more humid
conditions, ripe
for the develop-
ment of thunder-
storms. Some
storms will have
the potential to
go severe, so
keep alert and
stay tuned. Much
of the day, how-
ever, will feature
a warm gusty
breeze and hazy
sunshine with
afternoon tem-
peratures
approaching 90.
Storms could be
roaming tonight,
as well. When we
see distant light-
ning on warm
summer nights
without hearing
thunder, it is
commonly called
heat lightning.
This is just ordi-
nary lightning so
far away that the
thunder it cre-
ates cannot be
heard.
- Tom Clark
NATIONAL FORECAST: A frontal system will trigger showers and thunderstorms from the Ohio Valley
into the Northeast today. Strong to severe thunderstorms will be possible, with strong winds and
large hail being the main threats. An associated frontal boundary will also produce scattered showers
and thunderstorms from the Mid-Mississippi Valley into the southern Plains.
Recorded at Wilkes-Barre/Scranton Intl Airport
Temperatures
Cooling Degree Days*
Precipitation
TODAY
Hotter, more humid,
a storm
FRIDAY
A shower,
storm
85
70
SUNDAY
Mostly
sunny
85
62
MONDAY
Partly
sunny,
shower
85
60
TUESDAY
Partly
sunny,
shower
85
65
WEDNESDAY
Partly
sunny,
warm
85
65
SATURDAY
Partly
sunny,
shower
85
62
89

64

C M Y K
Life S E C T I O N C
THE TIMES LEADER THURSDAY, JULY 26, 2012
timesleader.com
ATLANTA This spring, during a
weeklong vacation in Florida, Caren
West wasnt just wired, she was literally
wired or wireless. The local public-re-
lations whiz spent most of her time in a
beach house with laptop open, smart-
phone ringing and brain firing as she
dealt with clients. On the one day she
planned a boat trip, she asked for a mo-
ment of peace which she got, until she
returned to land and her mobile phone
blew up.
It is to the point where it almost
doesnt make sense togoonvacationbe-
cause not only are you working, but you
come back to twice as much work, said
West, co-owner of
Caren West Public
Relations. I al-
ways feel guilty
about not work-
ing.
West isnt alone.
More than half
of American work-
ers ended 2011
with an average of
11days unused va-
cation time, ac-
cording to a recent
survey by Harris
Interactive for Jet-
Blue. Financial constraints, fear of los-
ing a job and just having too much work
to do are among the reasons workers
give for not taking earned time off.
If they do go on vacation, many work-
ers find it hard to disconnect, keeping
their smartphones, computers and oth-
er gadgets at the ready. Managers seem
to do better at taking time off. Accord-
ing to one survey from CareerBuilder-
.com, 81 percent of managers took or
plan to take vacation this year, com-
pared with 65 percent of full-time em-
ployees.
While no one disputes the value of a
vacationresearchsupports the needto
avoid burnout and reduce stress find-
ing the time and the money for a geta-
way can be a challenge.
West, a self-confessed workaholic,
takes about 10 vacation days per year,
but not without extensive preparation.
Determining when I can take a vaca-
tion is tough because we are in a field
that changes daily, she said. We try to
prepare clients by letting themknowwe
have a team of two and four interns.
Her safety net, however, is planning va-
cations where she knows there is wire-
less access just in case she needs to put
in some office time.
Janet Walsh, president and CEO of
Birchtree Global LLC, said the working
vacation has become the norm, partic-
ularly as the workforce becomes more
global.
I am seeing a huge trend in people
taking their work with them on vaca-
tion, she said. The boss isnt going to
know if you are sitting on a beach in
America
has become
a nation of
no vacations
By NEDRA RHONE
The Atlanta Journal-Constitution
MCT PHOTO
Caren West works at her office in At-
lanta, Ga. West, like many others, is
finding it hard to break away from
work while on vacation.
More than half of
American workers
ended 2011 with
an average of 11
days unused
vacation time,
according to a
recent survey by
Harris Interactive
for JetBlue.
See VACATIONS, Page 2C
C
ant seem to find 7-year-old Trever Newell when you
need him? Just look up.
Almost guaranteedhes perchedatopsomethinghigh.
Newell has taken to climbing on anything he can, which is par-
tially why he loves the James S. Keiper Memorial ParkonHamil-
ton Avenue in Kingston so much.
Can I show you how fast I can
climb up the twisty slide? hell ask.
Before anyone can even answer, hes
gone, nimbly making his way up the
plastic play apparatus then sliding
right back down.
Hes definitely in the climbing
stage now, his mom, Diane Newell,
said. Im afraid pretty soon thats go-
ing to become the emergency-room
stage.
The park, dedicated in July 2003,
has plenty of diversions for little ones,
climbingexperts or not: a mixof older
and newer equipment, metal slides,
baby and traditional swings, a metal
teeter-totter and a giant play place
with several slides, monkey bars and
pedestals as well a shaky, tricky-to-
cross bridge. Trever refers to it as the
wiggly bridge and has made quick
work of it.
Five-year-old Ryan Kersey of King-
ston is a fellow climber.
Ill go all the way up to the top, he
said of the rope grid that sits on one
side of the playground. His dad, C.J.,
40, likes the parkfor different reasons.
Theres a lot of extra space here.
Ryan was part of the Kingston Light-
ning soccer league, so we like to bring
a ball to kick around. Sometimes well
even bring a basketball and shoot
hoops.
The park is flanked by a baseball
diamond, tennis courts, a soccer field
All the amenities for amusement
By SARA POKORNY
spokorny@timesleader.com
See KEIPER, Page 2C
Faythe Seniuk, 6, and Jeremy Hules, 5, both of Wilkes-Barre, climb the rope ladder at James S. Keiper Memorial Park.
BILL TARUTIS PHOTOS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Lathan Jones, 18 months, of Plymouth, experiences his first time in
a pool this one the kiddie offering at the Kingston Community
Swimming Pool, adjacent to James S. Keiper Memorial Park.
What: James S. Keiper Memorial Park
Where: Hamilton Avenue, Kingston
How to get there: From River Street in Wilkes-Barre, turn onto
the Veterans Memorial Bridge. Turn right onto North Gates
Avenue, then take the first right onto Hamilton Avenue.
IF YOU GO
C M Y K
PAGE 2C THURSDAY, JULY 26, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
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Cancun emailing a customer in
Portugal, and the customer
isnt going to care either.
Walsh, who recently moved
her business, which provides
human resources, tax, legal and
financial solutions to compa-
nies expanding globally, from
Atlanta to Bedford Hills, N.Y.,
found herself working with a
client in India on the Fourth of
July.
They understand it is a holi-
day, but they are sitting in their
offices waiting for us to re-
spond. If we dont, someone
else will, she said.
A leaner workforce and poor
staffing also create a challenge
for employees looking to take
vacation especially at compa-
nies with fewer than 200 em-
ployees, which includes 80 per-
cent of total U.S. businesses,
Walsh said.
On a personal level, many
employees simply dont have
vacation plans.
The stay-cation is the new
reality, Walsh said.
Other employees may not
take vacation because they fear
losing their jobs, and some
companies promote that
thought process, Walsh added.
But for organizations that
want to encourage employees
to take a break, the remedy is
simple: Institute a use-it-or-
lose-it policy.
Several years ago, Smyrna,
Ga.-based United Acceptance
Inc., a financial organization
with more than 140 employees,
shifted from a policy that al-
lowed employees to carry over
unused vacation time to one in
which only 40 hours are al-
lowed to roll from year to year,
said human resources manager
Katrina Jackson.
Last year, only a handful of
employees lost vacation hours,
and about 65 percent rolled
VACATIONS
Continued from Page 1C
See VACATIONS, Page 3C
and the Kingston Community
Swimming Pool.
Its nice to come here when
theres a game going on because I
can sit and relax, the kids play,
and I can watch a ball game, Tra-
vis Samson, 42, of Forty Fort said
about the time he spends at the
park with his 6-year-old son, Tra-
vis Jr. If its hot we can just hop
on over to the pool.
The Kingston Community
Swimming Pool is open for 10
weeks, beginning with the first
Saturday after the closing of the
schools for summer. Its open
from1to 8 p.m. Monday through
Saturday and1to6 p.m. Sundays.
Thursday night is Teen Night
from 8 to 10. Swimming lessons
are given from 9 a.m. to noon
Monday through Friday
Those who come are welcome
to sign up for a membership, but
guest rates are available.
They keep it very clean in the
pool area, Diane Newell said.
They keep this whole place
clean, which is part of the reason
I like coming here so much. Sun-
days are like a ritual for us. We go
to church then come hang out
here at the park. Sometimes we
swim, and then we top it off with
ice cream from Dairy Queen.
KEIPER
Continued from Page 1C
BILL TARUTIS PHOTOS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Michael Lugiano, 6, of Jack-
son Township takes a trip
down the slide at James S.
Keiper Memorial Park.
Jacob Wesley, 12, of Dallas, goes in for a lay-up on the basketball
court.
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com THURSDAY, JULY 26, 2012 PAGE 3C
L I F E
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over the 40-hour maximum,
Jackson said. Most employees
are good about taking their time
off, she said. The management
staff makes sure people are tak-
ing their paid time off, including
themselves.
Another solution Walsh said is
to just allowpeople to take what-
ever time off they need. If peo-
ple resign or leave, you dont
have to pay unused vacation,
she said. The sticky part is figur-
ing out how to manage people
who may abuse such a free-flow-
ing system.
West said she prefers a flexible
vacation policy. When a team
member goes on vacation, she
tries to have as much respect as
possible for his or her time off.
I want people to like working
for CWPR. I dont want them to
followthe mistakes I make, said
West, who realizes the need to
step away to fuel creativity. Im
not going to deny someone the
opportunity togoaway andexpe-
rience a great trip.
VACATIONS
Continued from Page 2C
I am seeing a huge trend in people taking their
work with them on vacation, she said. The boss
isnt going to know if you are sitting on a beach in
Cancun emailing a customer in Portugal, and the
customer isnt going to care either.
Janet Walsh
President and CEO of Birchtree Global LLC
C M Y K
PAGE 4C THURSDAY, JULY 26, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
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Eleven Kings College students were recently inducted into Beta Gamma Sigma, an honor society that
serves business programs that are accredited by The Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Busi-
ness (AACSB), an international accrediting agency. The undergraduate programs of the McGowan School
of Business at the college are accredited by the AACSB International, a distinction earned by only 10
percent of the business schools in the world. Junior or senior students earn an invitation for membership
to Beta Gamma Sigma, which was founded in 1913, by earning a grade-point-average that is within the top
10 percent of their respective class. At the induction ceremony, from left, first row, are Matthew Weitz,
Molly Dahl, Laura Panzitta and Matthew Fiorino. Second row: Barry Williams, dean of the McGowan
School of Business; Michael Bocan; Joseph Foreman; Preston Balavage; William Grabinski; Ryan Cording-
ly; Michael Zema; and Dr. Joan Blewitt, faculty advisor. Also inducted was Michael Daly.
Kings students join business honor society
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C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com THURSDAY, JULY 26, 2012 PAGE 5C
C O M M U N I T Y N E W S
Gabrielle (Gabby) Bohinski,
daughter of Joanne Marusak
and Michael Bohinski, both of
Nanticoke, is celebrating her 1 1th
birthday today, July 26. Gabby is
a granddaughter of Debbie Wolfe
and Joan and Vincent Bohinski,
all of Nanticoke. She has two
sisters, Hailey, 2, and Abigail, 9,
and two brothers, Dylan, 9, and
Austin, 5.
Gabrielle Bohinski
Alivia Marie Graboske, daughter
of April Welebob and Mike Gra-
boske, Hanover Township, is
celebrating her sixth birthday
today, July 26. Alivia is a grand-
daughter of Mike and Jane
Welebob and Henry Graboske, all
of Hanover Township. She has a
sister, Alexa, 12.
Alivia M. Graboske
HAPPY BIRTHDAY!
Abington Heights High School
Class of 1982 is hosting its 30th
anniversary reunion from 5-11
p.m. on Aug. 1 1 at Camelot
Restaurant and Inn. Tickets
are $35 per person. For de-
tails, contact
ahhs82@groups.face-
book.com. During the reunion
the class is holding a fundrais-
er to benefit Liberty Reins
Ranch, and equestrian center
and co-educational program
that provides services for
disabled veterans and their
immediate family members
from Pennsylvania. The ranch,
which operates solely on
donations, was founded by
Deborah Basalyga, a 1982
Abington Heights graduate,
who serves as the executive
director.
Dallas High School
Class of 1982 is hosting its 30th
anniversary reunion on Aug.
18 at the Checkerboard Pavil-
ion. Anyone interested, con-
tact Holly and Jim Daubert at
stepupcat@live.com.
GAR Memorial High School
Classes of 1950 and 1951 will
meet for lunch at 1 p.m. on
Aug. 22 at Mariannacis Res-
taurant, 252 W. Eighth St.,
Wyoming. All classmates,
spouses and friends are in-
vited. For reservations, call
Marilyn at 288-3102; Gil at
824-9425; or Don at 417-2421.
Luzerne High School
Class of 1962 is contemplating a
reunion. Anyone interested,
call Walter at 689-2468.
Meyers High School
Class of 1962 is holding a re-
union planning meeting at 2
p.m. on Aug. 5 at Grotto Pizza,
Edwardsville. All classmates
are invited. The 50th reunion
will take place on Sept. 29. A
tour of Meyers High School
will be held prior to a lun-
cheon at the American Le-
gion, 54 Chestnut St., Wilkes-
Barre Township. Contact Ron
Kammer at 287-5247 for more
information.
Nanticoke Area High School
Class of 1977 is planning a 35th
anniversary reunion on Sept.
15 at Konefals Grove. Any
classmate who did not receive
an invitation, or needs more
information, can call Judi
Dongoski at 823-1540 or
Debbie Bukowski Kearney at
718-1830.
Plains Memorial and Sacred
Heart High School
Class of 1961 is beginning a
monthly get together at 12:30
p.m. on Wednesday at Norms
Pizza and Eatery, Wilkes-
Barre. All classmates, family
and friends are invited. For
more information contact
Mike at 443-7642.
Race Family
Reunion will take place at noon
on Aug. 19 at the old Beau-
mont School, Beaumont.
Participants should bring a
dish to pass and their own
table service. They should also
bring family, family informa-
tion and photos. Pictures can
also be emailed to
mrace@stny.rr.com. There will
be a piata and games for
children. A Facebook page is
also available. If not friend-
ed go to the Facebook pages
of Caroline Wintermute or
Violet Race.
REUNIONS
Editors note: To have your
announcement published in this
column please submit the in-
formation to Reunions, The
Times Leader, 15 N. Main St.,
Wilkes-Barre, PA1871 1. E-mail
submissions must be sent to
people@timesleader.com. Please
type Reunion News in the
subject line. The deadline is each
Monday for all copy.
MOUNTAIN TOP: St.
Jude School is accepting
registrations for the 2012-
2013 academic year for
three-year-old through
eighth-grade students.
School office hours are 9
a.m.-3 p.m. Monday
through Thursday during
July and 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Mon-
day through Friday during
August.
The three-year-old pro-
gram is offered full days on
Tuesdays and Thursdays.
Pre-kindergarten sessions
are five full days or three
full days on Mondays,
Wednesdays and Fridays.
Parents/guardians are
asked to bring the students
social security card, birth
certificate, baptismal certif-
icate, immunization records
and a $100 registration fee.
For more information, or
to schedule a tour, call the
school office at 474-5803.
IN BRIEF
Renata ODonnell, Wilkes-Barre,
daughter of attorneys Neil and
Catherine ODonnell, received
the Harry W.
and Emma
R. Ruggles
Award for
the Out-
standing
Graduate
during
Wyoming
Seminarys
commencement. The award
was given in recognition of
her scholarship, character and
contributions to school life.
She also received the Francis
J. Mehm III Memorial Award in
recognition of her outstanding
contributions to school spirit.
Prior to commencement, she
received the Presidents Edu-
cational Excellence Award, the
Charlotte R. Levy Memorial
Mock Trial Prize, the Wyoming
Seminary Government Lead-
ership Prize, the Irving Robin
Memorial Prize and the
Brooks Christian Citizenship
Prize. A Levi Sprague Fellow,
she has been inducted into
the Cum Laude Society, the
national academic honor
society for college preparato-
ry schools. She was one of
four student speakers at the
commencement.
Colleen Steelman, a front desk
clerk at Woodloch Pines,
Hawley, recently received a
$2,500 scholarship from the
Resort Hotel Association,
Richmond, Va. Steelman is
pursuing a degree in hospital-
ity at the Lackawanna College
Kiesendahl School of Hospital-
ity, Hawley. She has been a
full-time employee at Wood-
loch Pines for a year. Steel-
man is the mother of three
daughters.
NAMES AND FACES
ODonnell
Two teams from Crestwood High School were recognized for their
expertise and knowledge of the stock market in the 2011-2012 Stock
Market Game conducted by The Honesdale National Bank Center for
Economic Education at The University of Scranton. The game is a
10-week simulation where students from three grade categories (4-6,
7-8, 9-12) invest an imaginary $100,000 in stocks, bonds and mutual
funds listed on the major securities exchanges. Separate competi-
tions are held annually, one in the fall semester and two in the spring
semester. Student teams that finished first, second and third in their
grade categories from the area served by the Honesdale National
Bank Center for Economic Education at The University of Scranton
Center are invited to attend an annual pizza party and awards cere-
mony. Among those recognized at this years event were two teams
from Crestwood High School. These were the first and third-place
teams in the 9-12 grade level from the fall 2011 competition. At the
ceremony, from left: Mike Williamson, vice president, Prudential
Financial; Tom Plishka, team adviser; Charles J. Rafalko, team mem-
ber; Raymond Cecotti, senior vice president, The Honesdale National
Bank; Gavin L. Lewis, team member; and Mark Graziado, vice presi-
dent, The Honesdale National Bank.
Crestwood students excel in Stock Market Game
Seventh-grade students at St. Jude School, Mountain Top, enjoyed a field trip to the Health Science
Center of Luzerne County Community College to become acquainted with careers in biology and sci-
ence. They dressed in scrubs to experience the surgical technology program and were able to partici-
pate in a simulated operating room experience where laparoscopic surgery was performed to remove
part of a human intestine. They also intubated pig lungs. Participants, from left, first row, are Bridget
Dugan, Emily Hons, Autumn Kaminski, Julia Foust, Gigi Alberti, Randie Kuhar, Madison Shideler, Aaron
Hoda, Adam Abad, Zachary Erwine and Stephen Glova. Second row: Christian Koshinski, Connor
Evans, Alex Abad and Josh Zapusek.
St. Jude seventh-graders visit LCCC Health Science Center
The Pennsylvania Anthracite Section of AIME/SME recently award-
ed 2012-2013 John Kaminski Memorial scholarships to several area
mining and geology students. John Ackerman, outgoing section
delegate, and Frank Derrick, outgoing section chairman, presented a
scholarship award to Walter Price, Hazleton, a sophomore at Penn
State Hazleton, at the sections annual summer meeting. Additional
awards were given to Angela Moyer, Schuylkill Haven, Penn State
University Park, and Jordan Oakill, Pottsville, Wilkes University. The
scholarship is named in honor of John Kaminski, former president of
Kaminski Brothers Coal and Coolbaugh Sand and Gravel, Pittston.
Kaminski was also the SME section chairman 1980-1981. The Kaminski
family and The Pennsylvania Anthracite Section endow annual schol-
arships for Pennsylvania students in mining engineering, mineral
processing, mineral economics, geosciences, environmental re-
sources management and earth and environmental sciences. For
more information on the scholarship program and the Pennsylvania
Anthracite Section of SME, visit http://www.SMEanthracite.com. At
the award ceremony, from left, are Ackerman, Price and Derrick.
Mining and geology students receive scholarships
C M Y K
PAGE 6C THURSDAY, JULY 26, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
T E L E V I S I O N
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LIF
Trading Spouses:
Meet New Mommy
Trading Spouses:
Meet New Mommy
Project Runway (CC)
(TVPG)
Project Runway The unconven-
tional challenge. (TVPG)
Project Runway The unconven-
tional challenge. (TVPG)
MTV
That 70s
Show
(:39) True Life Living with
Tourettes syndrome. (CC)
Awkward. Awkward. Snooki &
JWOWW
Snooki &
JWOWW
Snooki &
JWOWW
Awkward.
(N)
Snooki &
JWOWW
Awkward.
NICK
Victorious Victorious Figure It
Out (N)
Splatalot
(N) (TVG)
Victorious Victorious Hollywood Heights
(N) (CC) (TVPG)
George
Lopez
George
Lopez
Friends
(TVPG)
Friends
(TVPG)
OVAT
Bright Lights, Big City (5:30) (R, 88)
Michael J. Fox, Phoebe Cates. (CC)
The Pianist (R, 02) Adrien Brody, Thomas Kretschmann, Frank Fin-
lay. A Jewish musician witnesses the horrors of the Holocaust.
The Pia-
nist
SPD
NASCAR Race
Hub (N)
Pass Time Pass Time Car Warriors Race
Cars (TV14)
Wrecked
(TV14)
Wrecked
(TV14)
Hard
Parts
Hard
Parts
Car Warriors Race
Cars (TV14)
SPIKE
Jail (CC)
(TV14)
Jail (CC)
(TV14)
Worst
Tenants
Worst
Tenants
iMPACT Wrestling (N) (Live) (CC) UFC Unleashed MMA
Uncensored
Ways to
Die
SYFY
Wrong Turn 3:
Left for Dead (5:00)
Wrong Turn 4: Bloody Beginnings (R,
11) Sean Skene, Scott Johnson. (CC)
The Silence of the Lambs (R, 91) Jodie
Foster, Anthony Hopkins, Scott Glenn. (CC)
Saw III

TBS
King of
Queens
King of
Queens
Seinfeld
(TVPG)
Seinfeld
(TVPG)
Family
Guy (CC)
Family
Guy (CC)
Big Bang
Theory
Big Bang
Theory
Sullivan &
Son
Big Bang
Theory
Conan (N) (TV14)
TCM
The Dirty Dozen (5:15) (67) Lee
Marvin, Ernest Borgnine. (CC)
Private Screenings:
Ernest Borgnine
Marty (55) Ernest Bor-
gnine. (CC)
From Here to Eternity
(10:45) (53) (CC)
TLC
Toddlers & Tiaras
(CC) (TVPG)
Four Houses (CC)
(TVPG)
Four Weddings (CC)
(TVPG)
Four Weddings ...
And a Moustache
Four Weddings ...
And a Knife Dance
Four Weddings ...
And a Moustache
TNT
The Mentalist (CC)
(TV14)
The Mentalist Red
Rum (CC) (TV14)
The Mentalist (CC)
(TV14)
The Mentalist (CC)
(TV14)
The Mentalist (CC)
(TV14)
CSI: NY Manhattan-
henge (TV14)
TOON
Regular
Show
Total
Drama
Advent.
Time
Advent.
Time
Annoying
Orange
Regular
Show
King of
the Hill
King of
the Hill
American
Dad
American
Dad
Family
Guy (CC)
Family
Guy (CC)
TRVL
Bizarre Foods With
Andrew Zimmern
Man v.
Food
Man v.
Food
Sandwich Sandwich Trip Flip
(TVPG)
Trip Flip
(TVPG)
Water-
parks
Water-
parks
Top Spot
(TVPG)
Top Spot
(TVPG)
TVLD
M*A*S*H
(TVPG)
(:32)
M*A*S*H
(:05)
M*A*S*H
(:43) Home Improve-
ment (TVG)
Home
Improve.
Love-Ray-
mond
Love-Ray-
mond
Love-Ray-
mond
Love-Ray-
mond
Love-Ray-
mond
King of
Queens
USA
NCIS Guilty Plea-
sure (CC) (TV14)
NCIS Moonlighting
(CC) (TV14)
NCIS Tell-All (CC)
(TVPG)
Burn Notice (N) (CC)
(TVPG)
(:01) Suits All In (N)
(TVPG)
(:02) Political Animals
(CC) (TVPG)
VH-1
Hollywood Exes
(TV14)
40 Greatest Feuds Opinions on recent
celebrity battles. (TV14)
Malibus Most Wanted (PG-13, 03)
Jamie Kennedy, Taye Diggs.
Soul Plane (04)
WE
Charmed (CC)
(TVPG)
Charmed Wicca
Envy (CC) (TVPG)
L.A. Hair The Big
Blow Out
L.A. Hair L.A. Hair
Confidential (N)
L.A. Hair L.A. Hair
Confidential
L.A. Hair The Big
Blow Out
WGN-A
30 Rock
(TV14)
30 Rock
(TV14)
Americas Funniest
Home Videos (CC)
How I Met How I Met How I Met How I Met WGN News at Nine
(N) (CC)
Americas Funniest
Home Videos (CC)
WYLN
Storm
Politics
Legally
Speaking
Minor League Baseball Norfolk Tides at Lehigh Valley IronPigs.
(N) (Live)
Late Edition Classified Beaten
Path
YOUTO
Revision3 Remix Revision3 Remix Revision3 Remix Revision3 Remix Diggna-
tion on
Diggna-
tion on
The X-Files Fresh
Bones (TV14)
PREMIUM CHANNELS
HBO
Hereafter (5:45) (PG-13, 10) Matt
Damon, Ccile de France. Death touches
three people in different ways. (CC)
Your Highness (R, 11)
Danny McBride, James Franco,
Natalie Portman. (CC)
The
Bourne
Legacy
The Newsroom The
team learns about a
protest. (TVMA)
True Blood Sookie
considers life as a
human. (TVMA)
HBO2
50 First Dates (6:15) (PG-13, 04)
Adam Sandler. A man falls for a woman
who has short-term memory loss. (CC)
True Blood Sookie
considers life as a
human. (TVMA)
Contagion (PG-13, 11) Marion
Cotillard, Matt Damon. Doctors try to con-
tain the spread of a lethal virus. (CC)
Namath (CC) (TVPG)
MAX
Water
for Ele-
phants
The Cutting Edge: Going
for the Gold (06) Christy Carl-
son Romano. (CC)
The Rundown (8:15) (PG-13, 03)
The Rock. A bounty hunter must find his
boss son in the Amazon. (CC)
Road House (R, 89) Patrick Swayze.
A legendary bouncer agrees to tame a
notorious gin mill. (CC)
MMAX
The Great White
Hype (5:20) (R, 96)
(CC)
Green Lantern (PG-13, 11) Ryan
Reynolds, Blake Lively. A test pilot joins a
band of intergalactic warriors. (CC)
Fast Five (PG-13, 11) Vin Diesel,
Paul Walker. Dom Toretto and company
ramp up the action in Brazil. (CC)
(:15)
Femme
Fatales
Hotel
Erotica
SHO
Heart
Special
Carol Channing: Larger
Than Life (6:45) (PG, 11)
(CC)
Lost in Translation (8:15) (R, 03)
Bill Murray. A middle-aged actor falls for a
young woman in Tokyo.
The Real L Word (N)
(TVMA)
Poly-
amory:
Married
The Real
L Word
(TVMA)
STARZ
Easy A (5:50) (PG-13, 10)
Emma Stone. (CC)
When a Stranger Calls (PG-
13, 06) Camilla Belle.
The Sorcerers Apprentice (PG, 10)
Nicolas Cage, Jay Baruchel. (CC)
Tron: Legacy
(10:55) (CC)
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com THURSDAY, JULY 26, 2012 PAGE 7C
D I V E R S I O N S
UNIVERSAL SUDOKU
MINUTE MAZE
W I T H O M A R S H A R I F & T A N N A H H I R S C H
CRYPTOQUOTE
GOREN BRIDGE
B Y M I C H E A L A R G I R I O N & J E F F K N U R E K
JUMBLE
B Y H O L I D A Y M A T H I S
HOROSCOPE
CROSSWORD
PREVIOUS DAYS SOLUTION
HOW TO CONTACT:
Dear Abby: PO Box 69440, Los Ange-
les, CA 90069
For more Sudoku go to www.timesleader.com
O N T H E W E B
Dear Abby: I am
planning a trip to
Thailand next year
and would like to
find a traveling
partner. My plan is
to visit the country
and rent a cabin for a
month. My interest is solely to share
expenses and have a platonic relation-
ship with my travelmate. Thanks for
whatever input you can give me.
Traveler From Kansas City
Dear Traveler: Youre welcome. My
input is to urge you to rethink this.
I do NOT recommend that you go to
a foreign country and rent a cabin in
the middle of nowhere with someone
you dont know because it could be
dangerous.
Traveling can present problems
unless you have a high degree of
compatibility and similar habits. Low-
budget tours are available, and I urge
you to research them.
Dear Abby: A few weeks ago my hus-
band and I were having an argument.
He stormed out of the house and was
killed in a wreck while talking to his
brother on his cellphone.
His family blames me for arguing
with him. While I feel sad that the
last thing we did was argue, I feel
his brother should shoulder some
of the blame because he was on the
cellphone with him, which is illegal in
our state.
Luckily, no one else was hurt in the
crash, but I am very hurt that Johns
family is so angry at me. Please re-
mind folks not to drive while on a
cellphone.
Idaho Widow
Dear Widow: Please accept my
sympathy for the tragic loss of your
husband. It is important you under-
stand that your former in-laws are
angry at the fact that he is dead, and
are looking for someone other than
him to blame for their pain. If your
brother-in-law knew John was on his
cellphone while driving, then Im sure
he carries some guilt about it. But the
fault lies with your husband.
P.S. If your letter serves as a
reminder to readers not to use a cell-
phone or text while driving, his
death will not have been in vain.
Dear Abby: I am dating a recently
divorced man who was married to a
very controlling woman for 31 years.
I love him very much and see myself
with him in the future. However, at
the age of 53, he is interested in pur-
suing a singing career.
I dated a musician for 16 years
and I do not want a relationship with
another one. Im pretending to be
supportive because I dont want to be
another woman telling him what to
do or stifling his dreams. Inside I am
dreading it.
On the other hand, I cant imagine
my life without him. Should I con-
tinue to pretend to support him and
hope he fails, or let him know that I
dont want to be with a musician?
Out of Tune in Dayton, Ohio
Dear Out Of Tune: It is in neither
of your best interests for you to con-
tinue lying to him because the truth
will come to light eventually. He is
not the person you dated for 16 years,
so let him pursue his dream. After
31 years of misery with his ex, if he
can enjoy some success, please dont
begrudge him.
DEAR ABBY
A D V I C E
Traveling with a stranger is a risky and dangerous way to save money
To receive a collection of Abbys most
memorable and most frequently re-
quested poems and essays, send a busi-
ness-sized, self-addressed envelope, plus
check or money order for $3.95 ($4.50 in
Canada) to: Dear Abbys Keepers, P.O. Box
447, Mount Morris, IL 61054-0447. (Postage
is included.)
ARIES (March 21-April 19). Consider
that you may not actually be the
most qualified person to assess
your own life. An outside view
will help you understand a part
of you that you didnt before.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20).
Because the task before you
seems to warrant your full focus,
you will ration your attention.
The ones to the right and left of
you cant compete with the job
thats at your center.
GEMINI (May 21-June 21). Though
you may think its no big deal,
theres something impressive
in your presentation today. Its
spontaneous. Youll do what you
feel and it boomerangs back
to you.
CANCER (June 22-July 22). It
does take an effort to keep cur-
rent, but youll manage to stay
abreast of peoples lives that
interest you. The ones who mat-
ter most to you will be aware of
their honored place.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22). This is the
day to honor a loved one with
the kind of thing that will matter
most a special look, body lan-
guage that speaks big time, and
a quality of attention you havent
given up for a while.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22).
Enthusiasm goes a long way
toward helping you accomplish
professional goals right now,
while personal goals require
more restraint and sensitivity.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23). It is rare
these days that you do some-
thing for the sake of doing it,
because the experience is the
main goal. Enjoyment and expan-
sion is the focus now, so get
ready to have a good time.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 21).
Spending too much time watch-
ing television is dangerous
because passive entertainment
keeps you from interacting with
the ones who will profoundly
influence your future.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21).
Boldness is not about putting
your head inside the croco-
diles mouth. Thats foolishness.
Boldness is putting your heart in
the hands of another person and
hoping for mercy.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19). You
take ownership of your actions,
partly because youre hyper-
responsible and partly because
you recognize that its the best
way to guide and control your
destiny.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18). There
are always things in life that you
must do and dont much like
doing. Taking out the garbage
and paying the bills are things
that will make their way into
your day.
PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20). Youll
be in the position to choose your
focus. Look at the moral implica-
tions, and let them weigh heavily
on your decision-making pro-
cess. Enjoying what you do is not
a sufficient reason for doing it.
TODAYS BIRTHDAY (July 26).
Keep your ears and eyes open
through the next six weeks as
exciting changes and subtle
shifts are happening behind the
scenes. In September, youll feel
like a veil is lifted. November and
March bring accomplishment
and financial bonus. Libra and
Sagittarius adore you. Your lucky
numbers are: 20, 3, 5, 49 and 1.