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Mandel attendance probe to expand nationwide, p3 T he D ELPHOS Security jitters on eve

Mandel attendance probe to expand nationwide, p3

The

DELPHOS

Security jitters on eve of Olympics,

p6

HERALD

Security jitters on eve of Olympics, p6 H E R A L D Telling The Tri-County’s

Telling The Tri-County’s Story Since 1869

50¢ daily

www.delphosherald.com

Friday, July 27, 2012

Delphos, Ohio

www.delphosherald.com Friday, July 27, 2012 Delphos, Ohio Marbletown Festival 2012 Cross-McNeal 2012 Marbletown Parade

Marbletown Festival 2012

Cross-McNeal 2012 Marbletown Parade grand marshal

BY NANCY SPENCER nspencer@delphosherald.com

DELPHOS — Marbletowners will see a very familiar face in this year’s parade marshal. Bev Cross- McNeal has been chosen to represent the neighborhood. Cross-McNeal is a ser- geant with the Delphos Police Department and a past Delphos Herald Tri-county Woman of the Year. She also grew up in Marbletown and is fiercely loyal to her stomping grounds. “For some reason, Marbletown has gotten a bad reputation but these are the first people to pull togeth- er and help each other out,” she said. “You can depend on your neighbors, everyone knows everyone and we take care of each other.” According to Marbletown Festival Committee head Kathy Gengler, Cross-McNeal is a perfect choice for parade marshal. “Bev is always looking for ways to help people. She has participated in the festi- val each year and the com- mittee thought she would be a great representative of what Marbletown stands for,”

Gengler said. Cross-McNeal has many fond memories of growing up in Marbletown, like riding her bike down Devil’s Hill.

“We were told not to do that but as kids, of course we did it anyway. We’d take our sleds down it in the winter, too,” she said. “I also remember all the little mom and pop stores, renting double- seat bicycles and trapping turtles my dad would fry for

us to eat. A lot of people had chick- ens for eggs and meat, too, and I also had a pig farmer just down the street.” Cross-McNeal has enjoyed the festival over the years. “I love watching the parade and I’m going to miss that this year but overall, I think the festival is a great, family-oriented event,” she said. “Families come together to enjoy the day.” The Marbletown native is

a 1975 Jefferson High School

graduate and earned her pro-

fessional secretary associate’s degree from Northwestern Business College. She found

a job in her field but found

Christmas Project, screen-

ing potential recipients since

1980.

“My heart reaches out to

these people,” she said. “So

“My heart reaches out to these people,” she said. “So Cross-McNeal it less than sat- many

Cross-McNeal

it

less than sat-

many need help and some

it the most. They tell me, ‘Oh,

isfying. She returned to

who won’t come forward need

I know there’s someone who

school and earned an asso-

ciate’s degree in lawenforcement and police basic training from Lima Technical College and

needs it more than we do’.” Cross-McNeal says she spends a lot of time sitting down with them to get them to accept the assistance. “A lot of times, kids will go without a new toy or anything

became

a

for Christmas. It affects them.

full-time offi- cer at the Delphos Police

It’s hard on a child to go back to school after Christmas and hear others talk about what

D e p a r t m e n t

in November

1979.

they got or show a new toy,” she said. Cross-McNeal also serves on the Delphos Wesleyan Church Board and is trea- surer for Delphos Wesleyan Women. She is a member of the American Legion and volunteers at the Van Wert County Youth Bureau, coor- dinating investigations for adoptions. She has also been

a Big Sister through the Allen Acres Children’s Home and chaperoned numerous school

events at Jefferson when her son, Sean McNeal, now 25, was in school.

“I always wanted to help people and this seemed like a good way to do that,” she said. Her parents, Art and Joyce Cross, were hesitant at first. “They didn’t want me to be a cop,” she said. “They were concerned. The first

time they listened to the scan- ner and I was in pursuit of someone, I got scolded when

I got home.” She is also every active

with the Delphos Community

Rodriguez, Diltz vie for Marbletown mayor

BY NANCY SPENCER nspencer@delphosherald.com

MARBLETOWN — Two candidates have thrown

their hats in the ring for Marbletown Mayor. Paula Rodriguez and John Diltz are collect-

ing votes to see who will head Marbletown

Festival events this year. Rodriguez is an Ottawa native who has lived in Marbletown for the past six years. She works

at Lakeview Farms and enjoys gardening. She said she has enjoyed living in Marbletown. “I love where I live and I

want to be part of the com- munity and help

any way I can,” Rodriguez said. The 59-year- old will also assist with the children’s games during the festival.

She has four children and 18

grandchildren. Diltz, 35, was born in Marbletown and his family moved to

Van Wert when he was a youngster. He returned to his roots seven years ago

with his wife, Maria (Klaus). He is employed at Vanamatic, Co., attends St. John the Evangelist Catholic Church, is an assistant sev- enth-grade boys basketball coach at St. John’s Elementary School and is a member of the Delphos Eagles, VFW, American Legion and Coon and Sportsman’s Club.

VFW, American Legion and Coon and Sportsman’s Club. Rodriguez Diltz He likes spending time with family

Rodriguez

American Legion and Coon and Sportsman’s Club. Rodriguez Diltz He likes spending time with family and

Diltz

He likes

spending time with family and friends and hopes his votes (each

$1 raised is a vote) help

make Garfield Park a bet- ter place for the children. He is the son

of Justin and Marcia Diltz and the grandson of Roger and Shirley Diltz. The winner will be announced prior to the Little Miss/Mini Miss Marbletown Pageant at 7 p.m. Aug. 10 at Trinity United Methodist Church.

Sports

Putnam BBBS sets golf outing Aug. 18

Big Brothers Big Sisters of Putnam County will host its first Golf For Kids’ Sake event Aug. 18 at Pike Run Golf Club, 10807 Road H, Ottawa, beginning with a shotgun start at 8 a.m. The cost per team includ- ing skins is $220, which includes golf for four, two carts, non-alcoholic drink tickets and goodie bags. In addition, there are prizes for the first, second, third and highest score and hole prizes for guys and gals. Awards and lunch will be held in the clubhouse imme- diately following the event. All funds raised through the event will support Big Brothers Big Sisters mentoring programs in Putnam County. Sponsorships are available beginning at $75 for a hole sponsor up to $400 for bev- erage cart sponsor. A hole sponsorship and team are entry are available for $295. Big Brothers Big Sisters of Putnam County is affili- ated with Big Brothers Big Sisters of America, the nation’s premier mentor- ing organization. For more information about the Golf For Kids’ sake or BBBS mentoring programs, contact Melissa Weaver at 419- 523-4016 or mweaver@ bbbswco.com or Todd Pester at 419-306-2616 or esti- matortoddp@yahoo.com.

Forecast Sunny Saturday; high in low 80s. See page 2.
Forecast
Sunny
Saturday; high
in low 80s.
See page 2.

Index

Obituaries

2

State/Local

3

Politics

4

Community

5

Sports

6

Church

7

Classifieds

8

TV

9

World News

10

7 Classifieds 8 TV 9 World News 10 Tender Times Olympiads Photo submitted Students at
Tender Times Olympiads Photo submitted Students at Tender Times Child Development Center are preparing for

Tender Times Olympiads

Photo submitted

Students at Tender Times Child Development Center are preparing for the Olympics with their own games. Everyone won medals.

Former county home now houses new psychiatric hospital

BY ED GEBERT Times Bulletin editor egebert@timesbulletin.com

MIDDLE POINT — For many years, the Van Wert County Home stood along Lincoln Highway with nurses and caregivers helping the patients inside the facility. Now, a new hospital with a different focus is housed in that building. Ridgeview Hospital is now open at 17872 Lincoln Hwy. accepting patients for mental health disorders and substance abuse. “If a person is in crisis, we will accept that person.

It doesn’t matter if they are

indigent or carry cash into the facility. It doesn’t matter. We are there as a licensed psychiatric provider,” stated Ridgeview Hospital Director of Outreach Services Walter Asbury. “Not only do we want to do that, we are

required to do that.” The owner is Oglethorpe, Inc., a Florida-based medi- cal management company which purchased the for- mer Lincolnway Behavioral Hospital which had already closed. That acquisition was completed in mid-Febru- ary. According to Asbury, Oglethorpe has more than 35 years experience in managing and taking unprofitable facil- ities and bringing them into a larger group to receive cost benefits. The company owns

five facilities in Florida, two in Louisiana one in Texas. With the Van Wert County location, the company now

has three in Ohio. Oglethorpe acquired a facility in Gahanna

in 2005 and owns the former

state hospital in Cambridge.

“It is a secure facility,” Asbury explained. “We have

a doctor on staff every day

and a full contingent of nurs- ing, 24 hours a day, therapists

and counselors. As a primary psychaitric facility in today’s world, we also treat dual diagnosis folks in a psychi- atric setting. Mental health primary is the main diagno- sis, then any of those other issues that may be there will be addressed as well.” Ridgeview is offering both voluntary and involun- tary comprehensive treatment programs for adults. They are designed to treat those dealing with substance abuse and psychiatric issues such as anxiety, panic attacks, depression, phobias, mood disorders, obsessive/compul- sive disorder, schizo-affective disorder, prescription medi- cation abuse, post-traumatic

stress disorder and depres- sion due to chronic pain. Right now, the hospital is licensed to handle 20 patients

but Asbury revealed that this number will grow to around

40.

“That will grow when we get to our anticipated maxi- mum census,” he said. “It will be licensed for 40, but we’re never going to see 40. We’ll cap it between 36-38 because we want those rooms designated as patient beds to be used for something other than a patient bed, whether that is a patient lounge or a community room or some- thing like that.” With increased patient capacity, Ridgeview is expected grow as an employ- er. Right now the facility employs around 40 full-time workers. “We’re glad to be here and we’re glad we’ve had the opportunity to provide services as well as employ- ment in the area. We want to be good corporate citizens,” Asbury stated. “We won’t take levy funding. We don’t bill Medicaid, so we can be

a referral source for those

folks when people escalate to the point of needing a secure facility.” Part of becoming a part of the community includes working with Westwood Behavioral and the Van Wert County Board of Developmental Disabilities. Those conversations have already taken place. “The recovery community is already being very sup- portive. They are bringing in three 12-step meetings

a week already, and we’ve

only been open and accepting patients for around 45 days,” Asbury said. Treatments included at the facility include psychiatric assessments, group psycho- therapy, medication evalua- tion and management, crisis evaluation, patient education, substance abuse counseling, 12-step programs, activ- ity therapy, and providing relapse prevention education.

2 – The Herald

Friday, July 27, 2012

www.delphosherald.com

2 – The Herald Friday, July 27, 2012 www.delphosherald.com For The Record UN worries showdown in

For The Record

UN worries showdown in Aleppo could be imminent

By JOHN HEILPRIN and BASSEM MROUE Associated Press

GENEVA — A show- down between government troops and opposition forc- es in Syria’s largest city, Aleppo, is “imminent,” the U.N.’s human rights office said today, as the Red Cross said it is pulling some of its foreign staff from Damascus out of concern for the safety of its workers. The country’s chaos has spread to Syria’s biggest cit- ies in some of the most wide- spread and sustained violence the two areas have seen in more than 17 months of con- flict. Rebels have been locked in fierce fighting with govern- ment troops in Aleppo for six days and are bracing for an attack amid reports that the regime is massing reinforce- ments to retake the embattled city of 3 million. U.N. High Commissioner for Human Rights Navi Pillay said unconfirmed reports are coming out of the capital, Damascus, of extra-judicial killings and shootings of civilians during fighting in the city’s suburbs. Expressing deep alarm at the situation, Pillay said the report “bodes ill for the people of that city (Aleppo).” “And it goes without saying, that the increas- ing use of heavy weapons, tanks, attack helicopters and — reportedly — even jet fighters in urban areas has already caused many civilian casualties and is putting many more at grave risk,” she said

in a statement read aloud to reporters by her spokesman Rupert Colville. The statement also said that there have been clashes in Homs and Deir el-Zour. A senior U.N. diplomat close to the mediation effort of international envoy Kofi Annan said they are “watch- ing the situation in Aleppo with great concern.” “The ground is shifting.

We use words like ‘It’s fluid’

It has

been a roller-coaster ride,” the diplomat said, while speak- ing on condition of anonym- ity because of the delicacy of the negotiations among world powers on the U.N. Security Council. The International Committee of the Red Cross said today it is temporar- ily moving some of its for- eign staff from Damascus to neighboring Lebanon. A Red Cross spokesman in Geneva, Hicham Hassan, said the move was prompted by secu- rity concerns but that a core team of about 50 staff would remain. Hicham Hassan also told The Associated Press on today that the Syrian Arab Red Crescent was suspend- ing some of its operations in Aleppo due to heavy fighting but that the Red Cross hopes to bring its staff back into the country. Turkey’s state-run agency said a Syrian legislator from Aleppo has fled to Turkey and also warned that Syria was preparing for a massive offensive on cities where reb- els are fighting government

— and it certainly is

forces. The Anadolu agency said today that Ikhlas Badawi

has defected in protest of the Syrian regime’s “violence against the people.” She would be the first member of Syria’s parliament

to defect from the parliament

that was elected in May. In January, Legislator Imad Ghalioun left the country to join the opposition, saying Syria was suffering sweeping human rights violations. He

was from the city of Homs that was being subjected to a massive regime attack at the time. On today, the Britain- based Syrian Observatory for Human Rights said troops bombarded the neighborhood

of Fardous killing at least four

people. It added that Sunni cleric Abdul-Latif al-Shami was kidnapped and killed in Aleppo. It gave no further details, although some activ-

ists said al-Shami is a govern- ment supporter. Mohammed Saeed, an Aleppo-based activist, said helicopters were bombing with heavy machine-guns rebel-held areas east and west of the city on today. He added that army reinforce- ments arrived in the city on Thursday and a major attack

is expected any time.

Rami Abdul-Rahman, who heads the Observatory, said army reinforcements took positions around Aleppo. “I expect the attack to begin today,” he said. ——— Mroue reported from Beirut. Frank Jordans con- tributed from Berlin.

Boston advises teens on how to break up — safely

By BRIDGET MURPHY The Associated Press

BOSTON — Andrew Curtin said it happened at least twice at his Boston-area high school in the last year. Angry about a breakup, a boy ended up at the school nurse’s office with a broken hand after punching a locker or a wall. “You don’t think about when you see two people walking down the hall, ‘Are

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they in a bad relationship or

is it good?”’ the 17-year-old Waltham High School senior said Thursday. But he was among about 250 teenagers doing a lot of

thinkingabouthealthyrelation-

ships at a seminar at Simmons College on Thursday. And the dating advice was coming from an unlikely source: city government officials. Boston’s Public Health Commission partnered with local social service agen- cies to put on its third annual “Break-Up Summit” for teens as part of a $1 million, four- year grant from Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. Nationwide, the $18 mil- lion program known as Start Strong is aimed at teaching teens in 11 cities to prevent dating violence. Counselors in Boston on Thursday focused on teaching teens to end rela- tionships in ways that don’t spark negative behavior like cheating, public humiliation, or worse. Nicole Daley, who heads Boston’s Start Strong pro- gram, said a bad teenage relationship can lead to problems like depres- sion, low self-esteem, fall- ing academic grades, and even unwanted pregnancies

in cases where one part- ner tries to manipulate the other. There’s also the risk of a physically dangerous confrontation. “In popular media, cheat- ing is seen as an excuse for violence,” Daley said. Recent studies by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention showed about

10 percent of students nation- wide reported a boyfriend or girlfriend had physically hurt them in the last year. CDC statistics also showed that among adults who were victims of rape, physical vio- lence or stalking by an inti- mate partner, 15 percent of men and 22 percent of women first experienced some kind

of partner violence when they

were between 11 and 17 years old. Teens who were part of Thursday’s seminar described

a dating scene where social

media can make ending rela- tionships even more emotion- ally fraught. Many said that changing one’s Facebook sta- tus back to “single” was the worst way to break up with a significant other.

“The world knows before you do,” said Cassie Desrochers, 17, another Waltham High senior.

Call me today at (419) 695.7010

Jo An M M. Smith, CFP® practitioner Financial Advisor

227 N Main St. Delphos, OH 45833

419-695-7010

joan.m.smith@ampf.com

www.ameripriseadvisors.com/

joan.m.smith

Brokerage, investment and nancial advisory services are made available through Ameriprise Financial Services, Inc. Member FINRA and SIPC. Some products and services may not be available in all jurisdictions or to all clients. Ameriprise Financial cannot guarantee future nancial results. © 2012 Ameriprise Financial, Inc. All rights reserved.

WEATHER

Delphos weather

High temperature Thursday in Delphos was 91 degrees, low was 76. High a year ago today was 88, low was 62. Record high for today is 99, set in 1956. Record low is 50, set in 1977.

WEATHER FORECAST Tri-county

Associated Press

TONIGHT: Partly cloudy with a 20 percent chance of showers and storms in the evening. Then mostly clear overnight. Lows in mid 60s. North winds around 5 mph. SATURDAY: Mostly sunny. Highs in the lower 80s. North winds around 10 mph. SATURDAY NIGHT:

Mostly clear. Lows in the lower 60s. East winds 5 mph. SUNDAY: Mostly sunny. Highs in the mid 80s. Light and variable winds. SUNDAY NIGHT: Mostly clear. Lows in the lower 60s. EXTENDED FORECAST MONDAY: Partly cloudy with a 40 percent chance of showers and storms. Highs in the mid 80s. MONDAY NIGHT, TUESDAY: Partly cloudy with a 20 percent chance of showers and thunderstorms. Lows in the upper 60s. Highs in the mid 80s. TUESDAY NIGHT, WEDNESDAY: Partly

cloudy. Lows in the upper 60s. Highs in the mid 80s. WEDNESDAY NIGHT, THURSDAY: Mostly clear. Lows in the upper 60s. Highs in the mid 80s.

LOCAL PRICES

Corn:

Wheat:

Beans:

$8.01

$8.74

$16.44

OBITUARY

Ted L. Ladd

Ted L. Ladd, 70, of Houma, La., passed away Monday at the Terrebonne General Medical Center in Houma. He was born in Delphos to Lawrence and Thelma (May) Ladd, who preceded him in death. Surviving are sons, Andrew Ladd of Lafayette, Ind., and Roy Ladd of Midland, Mich.; daughter, Paula Kern; six grandchildren; three brothers, Kenneth Ladd of Wauseon, Dale Ladd of Wharton and Arthur Ladd of North Carolina; and one sister, June Dunlap of Delphos. Prior to his retirement, Mr. Ladd had worked as a car- penter. Funeral services will be pri- vate. Burial will be in the Zion Bloom Cemetery in Hancock County. Edgar-Grisier Funeral Home in Wauseon has been entrusted with arrangements. Online condolences may be offered to the family at www. grisierfh.com.

FUNERAL

BRUSKOTTER, Sharon M., 70, of Van Wert, Mass of Christian Burial will be held at 9 a.m. Saturday at St. Joseph Catholic Church, Fort Jennings with the Rev. Joseph Przybysz officiat- ing. Burial will follow in the church cemetery. Visitation will be from 2-8 p.m. today at Love-Heitmeyer Funeral Home, Jackson Township (at the corner of St. Rts. 224 & 634) and one hour prior to the mass at church on Saturday. Memorials may be made to Community Health Professionals (Noah’s Fund). Condolences can be expressed at: www.lovefuneralhome. com.

Facebook’s stock tumbles after 1st public quarter

By BARBARA ORTUTAY The Associated Press

NEW YORK — Facebook’s first earnings report as a public company had solid numbers, but in the end it landed with a thud — much like its rocky initial public offering two months ago. Facebook reported stron- ger-than-expected revenue and a gain in user numbers Thursday. But investors weren’t impressed and after a brief spike, its stock fell more than 10 percent, or $2.74, to $24.10 in after-hours trading. The decline means Facebook’s stock will most

likely open at its lowest level since going public. It’s another big disappoint- ment for the Harvard-born company that was supposed to usher in the next Internet boom. “They didn’t break any banks,” said Debra Aho Williamson, an analyst at research firm eMarketer. “They did not come out any better than anybody had expected.” What may have rattled investors is that Facebook’s

revenue growth has slowed. Between 2009 and 2010, the company’s revenue nearly tripled. In the first quarter of this year, revenue climbed 44 percent. In the second quarter, Facebook Inc.’s rev- enue increased 32 percent to $1.18 billion from $895 mil- lion a year earlier. Analysts, on average had expected slightly lower revenue of $1.16 billion, according to FactSet. For a freshly public com- pany such as Facebook, the decelerating revenue growth is a concern. A bet on fast- growing revenue is the reason investors are willing to value new companies highly even if they are not making a profit. Another reason jittery inves- tors may be even more ner- vous: Facebook didn’t offer investors and financial ana- lysts its outlook for the rest of the year. Meanwhile, the number of people who access Facebook regularly inched closer to 1 billion. The company said it had 955 million active month- ly users as of June 30, up 29 percent from a year earlier. At the end of the first quarter, it had 901 million users.

The Delphos Herald

Vol. 143 No. 32

Nancy Spencer, editor Ray Geary, general manager Delphos Herald, Inc. Don Hemple, advertising manager Tiffany Brantley, circulation manager

TheDailyHerald(USPS 1525 8000) is published daily except Sundays and Holidays. By carrier in Delphos and area towns, or by rural motor route where available $2.09 per week. By mail in Allen, Van Wert, or Putnam County, $105 per year. Outside these counties $119 per year. Entered in the post office in Delphos, Ohio 45833 as Periodicals, postage paid at Delphos, Ohio. No mail subscriptions will be accepted in towns or villages where The Daily Herald paper carriers or motor routes provide daily home delivery for $2.09 per week. 405 North Main St. TELEPHONE 695-0015 Office Hours 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Mon.-Fri. POSTMASTER:

Send address changes to THE DAILY HERALD, 405 N. Main St. Delphos, Ohio 45833

North and South Korea mark war armistice

PANMUNJOM, Korea (AP) — Veterans in medal-laden uniforms streamed into North Korea’s capital today for cer- emonies marking the end of the Korean War, an annual event being closely watched after the secretive country’s new leader reshuffled the military. Over the last two weeks, 20-something leader Kim Jong Un has taken on a new military title, “marshal,” and replaced his military chief — once thought to be a key mentor — moves seen as an effort to build loyalty among the million-man armed forces and solidify his credentials as commander. North Korea has also revealed that the stylish mys- tery woman at Kim’s side in a series of public appearances this month is his wife. Scenes of her walking with Kim arm-in-arm are a carefully choreographed attempt to show the new leader as modern and down-to-earth, analysts said, and serve as a sharp contrast to his intensely private father, Kim Jong Il, who ruled for 17 years before his death in December. While South Korea and the U.S.-led U.N. forces that fought in the Korean War call today the 59th anniversary of the armi- stice that ended the 1950-1953 conflict, North Korea calls it a celebration of “victory in the Fatherland Liberation War.” Veterans dressed in med- al-laden uniforms traveled to Pyongyang from around the country, state media said, for the anniversary. “Airports, railway stations and parking lots were crowded with delegates to the celebra- tions, their comrades-in-arms, families and relatives, people from all walks of life and youth and students,” the official Korean Central News Agency said.

LOTTERY

TODAY IN HISTORY

CLEVELAND

Ohio

(AP)

were

These

lotteries

drawn Thursday:

Mega Millions Estimated jackpot: $52 M Pick 3 Evening

4-4-9

Pick 4 Evening

8-7-4-3

Powerball Estimated jackpot: $139 M

Rolling Cash 5

14-27-28-33-37

Estimated

jackpot:

$100,000

Ten OH Evening

01-02-16-19-20-22-27-28-

29-36-40-46-57-58-66-67-72-

73-76-79

By The Associated Press Today is Friday, July 27, the 209th day of 2012. There are 157 days left in the year. Today’s Highlight in History:

On July 27, 1942, during World War II, the First Battle of El Alamein in Egypt ended in a draw as Allied forces stalled the progress of Axis invaders. (The Allies went on to win a clear victory over the Axis in the Second Battle of El Alamein later that year.) On this date:

In 1789, President George Washington signed a measure establishing the Department

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of Foreign Affairs, forerunner of the Department of State. In 1861, Union Maj. Gen. George B. McClellan took command of the Army of the Potomac during the Civil War. In 1866, Cyrus W. Field finished laying out the first successful underwater tele- graph cable between North America and Europe (a pre- vious cable in 1858 burned out after only a few weeks’ use). In 1909, during the first official test of the U.S. Army’s first airplane, Orville Wright flew himself and a passenger, Lt. Frank Lahm, above Fort Myer, Va., for one hour and 12 minutes. In 1921, Canadian researcher Frederick Banting and his assistant, Charles Best, succeeded in isolating the hormone insulin at the University of Toronto. In 1942, Benny Goodman and his Orchestra and vocal- ist Peggy Lee recorded “Why Don’t You Do Right” in New York for Columbia Records.

www.delphosherald.com

Friday, July 27, 2012

The Herald –3

www.delphosherald.com Friday, July 27, 2012 The Herald –3

STATE/LOCAL

B RIEFS

Injured workers fund battling painkillers

COLUMBUS (AP) — Ohio’s insurance fund for injured workers says nearly a third of its prescriptions last

year were for powerful narcot- ics, a trend the agency is trying to reverse. John Hanna, pharmacy director at the Ohio Bureau of Workers’ Compensation, says

the fund has seen a 37-percent

increase in the doses of these narcotics per injured worker per year over the past decade. Hanna said Thursday that nearly a dollar of every $5 the

agency pays out in benefits goes to cover prescription drugs. Hanna says the bureau is part of the problem when it comes to the state’s prescrip- tion painkiller epidemic. Hanna says the agency is making progress reversing these trends. Since February it’s seen a 13-percent drop

in patients receiving the most

powerful narcotic painkillers.

More severe storms could hit Ohio

COLUMBUS (AP) — One day after storms downed trees, knocked out power and tem- porarily shut down the state

fair, Ohio could be in store for more severe weather. Forecasters say there is a risk of storms, possibly with high winds, this afternoon. The weather blowing through

in the afternoon and evening

Thursday knocked out power

to at least 50,000 customers in

central and southwest parts of the state, but wasn’t as bad as expected. Some customers were

without power today, but had been restored in most areas. Thursday’s storm temporar-

ily shut down operations at the

Ohio State Fair in Columbus, where visitors were asked to take shelter. Activities resumed

after it blew through.

Ohio auditor: Attendance probe to expand statewide

By JULIE CARR SMYTH AP Statehouse Correspondent

COLUMBUS (AP) — Ohio’s state auditor said Thursday he is expanding an investigation into changes made to student attendance data to local school districts, community schools and the state Education Department. In a letter sent Thursday to Ohio Board of Education PresidentDebeTerhar,Auditor Dave Yost said the possible infractions under investigation in Columbus, Toledo and sub- urban Cincinnati suggest the problem may be systemic. There’s no evidence that anyone at the state Education Department is involved, “but the apparently widespread nature of the practice begs the nature of the question of at least a lack of oversight,”

Yost wrote. Yost asked Terhar to direct Education Department employees to preserve all records, even those set to be destroyed under normal public records schedules. The Republican auditor fur- ther warned state education employees not to tamper with records or interfere with wit- nesses in the case. He said his office may need help data-mining Education Department records and access to documents, person- nel and interviews. It wasn’t immediately clear

Thursday how the role of the Education Department would

change as a result of Yost’s decision, said Yost spokes- woman Carrie Bartunek. State Superintendent Stan Heffner, who leads the depart- ment, has launched his own investigation and has said the probe could lead to criminal charges against educators who committed fraud. Heffner spokesman John Charlton said the department

“I will be asking our office of profes- sional conduct to launch investiga- tions along with the attorney general’s office if I find there is evidence of fraud so we have civil and criminal investiga- tions at the same time. Those people have no business in our public schools.”

— Stan Heffner, State Superintendent

will continue to work with Yost’s office. “(The Ohio Department of Education) believes in the integrity of data. When it is misused we want the inves- tigation to go wherever it leads,” he said. The Columbus Dispatch reported that Heffner dis- cussed that possibility Wednesday, the same day the state Education Department announced the Lockland dis- trict in suburban Cincinnati filed false attendance data to improve its state report card. Changing attendance data can change the entire report card by controlling which stu- dents end up in the final pool of test-takers whose results are counted. The department is investi- gating claims that Columbus and Toledo schools also retro- actively altered student atten- dance records to boost district results. Heffner said he’ll seek simultaneous criminal and civil investigations if there’s evidence of fraud.

“I will be asking our office of professional conduct to launch investigations along with the attorney general’s office if I find there is evi- dence of fraud so we have civil and criminal investigations at the same time,” Heffner said. “Those people have no busi- ness in our public schools.” Heffner has said he has the option of downgrading dis- tricts’ ratings on their state report cards, fining them and withholding up to 20 percent of their state aid if it is deter- mined that district officials rigged state report-card data. “However, I also don’t want to do anything that hurts the opportunities of students because of the bad behavior of adults,” he said. Heffner said the data ques- tions and a focus on improv- ing student test scores have created an overemphasis on state report cards for districts. The state quickly amended Lockland’s state report cards, which detail how students do on proficiency tests, how fre- quently they attend class and how many graduate. The state says 36 students were falsely reported as having left the district and then added back to the roster later. The break in enrollment led to their test scores not being counted in the district’s overall perfor- mance rating. Lockland officials released a written statement saying the school board has not had an opportunity to review the alle- gations and that the district had no comment. The Blade of Toledo reported Thursday that some Toledo public schools leaders had detailed in back-and-forth emails their desires to exclude special education students and those absent for a length of time from their records — apparently to affect the weighted average of student test scores.

Reviews good for parole panelists

COLUMBUS (AP) — The two Ohio Parole Board mem- bers removed without warn- ing earlier this year both had good reviews since joining the board, including positive comments within just a few months of the decision to fire them, records show. Board member Cathy Collins-Taylor demonstrated “a sound understanding of policies and procedures,” was “very response” to requests for information and “very reli- able,” according to her April 18 annual review that came two months to the day before

she was removed. “I appreciate her hard work and support of new initia- tives,” said board chairman Cynthia Mausser in writ- ten comments on the form obtained by The Associated Press through a records request. Collins-Taylor also received a positive review a year earlier. Board member Jose Torres was encouraged to improve his organizational skills in his Sept. 26 review, but was also deemed “always enthusiastic and respectful,” according to his review.

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Made in the USA for Team USA

U.S. Senator

Sherrod Brown

Shouldn’t Team USA be

textiles and apparel indus- try. According to the National Council of Textile Organizations (NCTO), the

textiles and apparel indus- try. According to the National Council of Textile Organizations (NCTO), the
textiles and apparel indus- try. According to the National Council of Textile Organizations (NCTO), the

wearing uniforms Made in

the USA? By now you’ve heard this

isn’t the case. Instead, the U.S. Olympic Committee (USOC)—made up of law- yers, bankers, and other executives—outsourced the uniforms Team America will be wearing in the opening ceremony for 2012 games in London.

U.S.

O l

Committee’s use

of

apparel is partic- ularly egregious due to the ongo-

ing

competition that

China

American manu-

facturers.

time

when

good jobs have disappeared overseas, the news that Team America is being forced to wear uniforms made in China should outrage every Ohioan. When it comes to cheat- ing trade laws, China would get the gold medal. It’s unconscionable that the U.S. Olympic Committee would hand over the production of the uniforms displayed by our athletes to a country that

flouts international trade laws, manipulates its currency, and cheats on trade. It makes no sense that an American organization would place a Chinese-made beret

on the heads of our best ath- letes when we have capac-

ity to make high-end apparel

right here at home.

All American Clothing

in Darke County is a great

example of a company that prides itself on its “USA- made” label. In 2002, Lawson Nicol found out that his pre- vious employer was out-

sourcing some of its work

to Mexico. With this news,

he founded All American Clothing Company. And, since its inception, his com- pany has seen growth every year. The company is plan- ning to expand, creating more jobs in Southwest Ohio. All American Clothing is part of a strong American

many

U.S. is the third largest export- er of textile products in the world, employing more than 500,000 workers in 2011. Which team is the USOC rooting for? We need answers. That’s why I wrote a let- ter to the USOC asking it to meet with American manu- facturers and workers for the future USOC uni- form demands, and offering to connect USOC with these manufacturers and unions. And I was pleased to learn that the USOC pledged that the 2014 Olympic uni- forms will be made in America. While this is

good news, there’s

more that we can do now to boost American manufacturing. We also need to crack down on unfair foreign trade that puts Chinese companies at an advantage over American manufacturers. Since Congress passed a trade deal with China more than ten years ago, we’ve seen the elimination of more than five million manufactur- ing jobs in the U.S. between 2000 and 2010. We can — and we must — stop this trend. That’s why I’ve introduced the Wear American Act of 2012. This “Buy America” plan would ensure that the federal government purchases apparel that is 100-percent American made. That means all textiles and apparel purchased with U.S.

tax dollars will go to U.S. businesses and communities – not China. This isn’t rocket science. It just makes plain sense to put U.S. tax dollars back into the

U.S. economy.

We must also level the playing field for American manufacturers facing unfair foreign competition. Because China manipulates its curren- cy, its exports have a 25-40 percent price advantage over American-made products. Recently, the Senate passed a bill I authored, The Currency

i

c

the Senate passed a bill I authored, The Currency i c Brown The y m p

Brown

The

y

m

p

Chinese-made

and

unfair

poses

to

At

a

so

i c Brown The y m p Chinese-made and unfair poses to At a so Exchange

Exchange and Oversight Reform Act. This legisla- tion represented the biggest bipartisan jobs bill—at no cost to U.S. taxpayers— that the Senate passed last year. The bill allows the U.S. government to stand up for American jobs when China cheats by manipulating its currency to give its exports and unfair advantage. It’s time for the U.S. House of Representatives to pass the bill and for the President to sign it into law. We should be in the busi- ness of creating policies that reward hardworking Americans, rather than sup- porting a tax code and trade policy that helps big compa- nies send U.S. jobs overseas. Right now, the stakes couldn’t be higher. We must do everything we can to sup- port American workers.

Your Community News Source.

to sup- port American workers. Your Community News Source. From sports stats to business news, the

From sports stats to business news, the Delphos Herald keeps you in the local loop.

The Delphos Herald

www.delphosherald.com | 419-695-0015 ext. 122 405 N. Main St. | Delphos, OH 45833

in the local loop. The Delphos Herald www.delphosherald.com | 419-695-0015 ext. 122 405 N. Main St.

4 — The Herald

Friday, July 27, 2012

www.delphosherald.com

4 — The Herald Friday, July 27, 2012 www.delphosherald.com

POLITICS

“We usually know what we can do, but temptation shows us who we are.” — Thomas a Kempis, German theologian (1380-1471)

are.” — Thomas a Kempis, German theologian (1380-1471) I T WAS NEWS THEN One Year Ago

IT WAS NEWS THEN

One Year Ago

• The Delphos Public Library’s Summer Reading Program

concluded Tuesday evening with a pool party at the Delphos Municipal Swimming Pool for the participants and their families. Children’s Librarian Denise Cressman expressed her gratitude to those who make the program possible.

25 Years Ago — 1987

• A 1932 Ford coupe owned by Jim Bechtel of Lima took

best of show honors Saturday at the Delphos Area Car Club show and swap meet. Although the parade was to be one of the highlights of this year’s car show, less than half of the cars participated in the parade because of the extreme heat and pos-

sibility of engines overheating on some of the older cars, said Ron Siefker, president of the club.

• The Delphos Braves recently won the Fourth of July

Tournament when they narrowly defeated the VFW Cardinals. Team members included Eric Kerner, Ryan Illyes, Eric Mueller, Chad MacWhinney, Todd Elwer, Jon Brenneman, batboy Aaron Elwer, Coach Roger Wilhelm, Ed Mueller, Troy

Joseph, Coach Dave Fought, Phil Lawrence, Luke Vonderwell, Dave Blockberger and Coach Jim Friemoth.

• Mr. and Mrs. Terry Kleman of Fort Jennings will

assume ownership of the Dairy Hut, 910 E. Fifth St., from Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Williams of Delphos. The Klemans said they have no immediate plans for changes. They said

they are considering catering soup and sandwiches for pickup and-or delivery to the lunch hour crowd during the off-season.

50 Years Ago — 1962

• Boy Scout Troop 48, sponsored by St. John’s Church,

recently spent a week at Camp Lakota, Defiance. Scoutmaster Bernard Niemeyer had eleven boys at camp. William Wiesenberg and Edward Wurst camped with the boys for a part of the week. Troop members are Tom Lehmkuhle, Tom Meyers, Robert Burger, David Ditto, Robert Dannhausen, John Grothouse, Will Wiesenberg, Mike Wurst, Mike Niemeyer, and Andrew Shenk.

• Mrs. Ralph Best, president of the Delphos Green Thumb

Garden Club, has received notice from the state publicity chairman of the Ohio Association of Garden Clubs, that the

local garden club won first place in the state for the 1961-62 program yearbook. This is the first time that the local has ever received first place in the state.

• Members of the ladies branch of the Catholic Knights

of America held their annual picnic meeting Thursday at the

home of Mrs. Anton Van Autreve on East Fourth Street. Cards were played during the afternoon followed by a basket supper. High honors in cards went to Mrs. Joseph Busch and low to Mrs. Eugene Williams.

75 Years Ago — 1937

• A balloon ascension will be one of the features of the

Allen County Delphos Fair again this year. Claude Shaffer of

Indianapolis, will be placed under contract by the fair board to make triple parachute drops each day from a free balloon. The ascensions will be made from the Old Mill Lot on North Canal Street this year as in the past.

• Miller’s Opticians defeated Fleming Markets of Van Wert

Monday night in a game played at Waterworks Park. The score was 4 to 1. W. Briggs was on the mound for Miller’s. He gave

up only three hits during the game. Miller’s collected a total of six hits off the delivery of Hawk.

• The Delphos Waterworks Park track and field meet will

be held Wednesday at Waterworks Park under the direction of Philip Hall and John Miller, supervisors under the WPA recreational program. The competition is being held for the

purpose of picking a track team of boys to go to Lima on July 29 to represent Waterworks Park in an All-County Track Meet.

A team of girls will also be entered on July 30.

Moderately confused

girls will also be entered on July 30. Moderately confused No push for new gun laws

No push for new gun laws

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Barack Obama will not push for stricter gun laws this election year, the White House said Thursday, one day after his impassioned remarks about the need to keep assault weapons off the streets sug- gested he may plunge into that political fight and challenge Congress to act. Instead, Obama’s stand on the government’s role ended

up right where it was after the mass shooting in Colorado last week: Enforce existing law better. That is same view held by his Republican opponent, Mitt Romney, as both reach for broader and more politically appealing ways to keep guns away from killers. Obama still wants Congress to reinstitute a federal ban on military-style assault weap- ons that lapsed years ago, his spokesman Jay Carney said. But the president is not and has not been pushing for that ban, a nod to the politics of gun control. There is no interest among many lawmakers of both par- ties to take on the divisive matter. Especially not with an election in just over 100 days. Sealing the matter, Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid said Thursday the Senate’s schedule is too packed to even have a debate on gun control. Asked if the Senate might debate the issue next year, Reid said, “Nice try.” Public opinion has shifted away from tighter gun con- trol. Twenty years ago, polls

showedthatasubstantialmajor-

ity supported stricter limits on guns. Now Americans appear evenly divided. Nearly every statement on the matter from Romney and Obama includes reminders that they stand by the Second Amendment. From the White House, Carney said: “There are things that we can do short of legisla- tion and short of gun laws.” The lack of legislation reflects that reality, too: Police say laws and background checks are often futile in keep- ing someone with horrifying intent from executing a massa- cre. Authorities say the suspect in the Aurora, Colo., shootings broke no laws when he pur- chased the guns he is accused of using, and he passed the required background checks. Obama and his team “gain nothing politically, and they just don’t have the horsepower to pass anything,” said William Vizzard, professor emeritus of criminal justice at California State University, Sacramento, and an author on gun control politics. “And then the prob- lem is trying to craft a law that would really do something.” It was Obama who stirred the issue in speak- ing Wednesday night to the National Urban League, a civil rights organization whose mis- sion is to help black Americans secure economic opportunity and power. In his most extensive remarks on guns since the Colorado shooting left 12 dead and dozens wounded, Obama said steps to reduce violence have been opposed by Congress and “we should leave no stone unturned” in the national imperative of keeping young people safe. And he got specific on assault-style weapons. “A lot of gun owners would agree that AK-47s belong in the hands of soldiers, not in the hands of criminals — that they belong on the battlefield of war, not on the streets of our cities,” he said.

Iraq ‘rebuilders’ died by hundreds, says report

By ROBERT BURNS AP National Security Writer

WASHINGTON — In the first tally of its kind, a fed- eral investigative agency has calculated that at least 719 people, nearly half of them Americans, were killed work- ing on projects to rebuild Iraq following the U.S. invasion in 2003. The toll represents an aspect of the Iraq war that is rarely brought to public atten- tion, overshadowed by the much higher number killed in combat as well as the billions of taxpayer dollars squan- dered on reconstruction. There is no confirmed total number of Iraq war deaths. The U.S. military lost 4,488 in Iraq, and its allies a little over 300. The number of Iraq deaths has not been estab- lished but is thought to exceed

100,000.

Navy Cmdr. Duane G. Wolfe was among the 719. He was not fighting the insurgen- cy, but it was fighting him. He was among the army of lawyers, engineers, con- tractors and others who paid a heavy price trying to put a broken Iraq and its shattered economy back together. Their deaths were recorded among the war’s combat fatalities, but until now no one has carved out the “rebuilder” deaths as a subset of the over-

all casualty list. Wolfe was killed on May 25, 2009, in a road- side bombing while return- ing to Baghdad after inspect- ing a waste water treatment plant under construction near Fallujah in Iraq’s west- ern province of Anbar. The $100 million project endured long delays and large cost

overruns, and a U.S. federal audit last fall concluded that it probably was not worth the cost. The audit said “many” people died getting it built, but it did not say how many. The 54-year-old Wolfe,

a Navy reservist, was run- ning the Army Corps of Engineers’ office in Anbar at the time of his death; in civilian life he worked at Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif. Two other U.S. civil- ians — Terry Barnich, 56,

of the State Department, and

Maged Hussein, 43, of the Army Corps — died in the same bombing. Wolfe’s wife, Cindi, said in a telephone interview last week that he knew the dan- gers of working in Iraq but made a point of not talking about security or any close calls that he might have had in violent Anbar province. “He was careful not to worry us with information like that,” she said. The actual number of peo- ple killed doing reconstruction work is probably much higher

than 719 but cannot be reli- ably determined, the Office of the Special Inspector General for Iraq Reconstruction said in releasing its estimate today. The U.S. government has no central database for this cat- egory of war casualties, and even within the U.S. military, the records on hundreds of troop deaths are too imprecise to categorize, the report said. “We know our number is understated,” Glenn D. Furbish, the deputy inspector general for Iraq reconstruc- tion, said in an interview. Sen. Susan Collins,

R-Maine, called the report a “reminder that attempting to build roads, schools and other infrastructure in the middle of a war zone not only carries with it an increased frequency of fraud and waste, but also a dev- astating price in human life.” The 719 include U.S. gov- ernment civilians, private contractors, military mem- bers, Iraqi civilian workers and third-country nationals. They were trainers, inspectors, auditors, advisers, interpreters and others whose mission was directly tied to the largely ad hoc reconstruction effort that began early in the war. They helped restore Iraq’s dilapi- dated electrical grid, improve its oil infrastructure, develop a justice system, modernize a banking system, set up town councils and reopen hospitals, training centers and schools.

Gov’t stepping up fight against health care fraud

By MARK S. SMITH and RICARDO ALONSO-ZALDIVAR Associated Press

WASHINGTON — Stepping up their game against health care fraud, the Obama administration and major insurers announced Thursday they will share raw data and investigative know- how on a scale not previously

seen to try to shut off billions

of dollars in questionable pay-

ments. At a White House event with insurance executives, Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius said the new public-private partnership will allow govern- ment programs and the insur- ance industry to take the high ground against scam artists constantly poking the system for weaknesses. “Lots of the fraudsters have used our fragmented health care system to their advan- tage,” Sebelius told report- ers. “By sharing information across payers, we can bring this potentially fraudulent activity to light so it can be stopped.” State investigators are also part of the effort. Fraud is an endemic prob- lem plaguing giant govern- ment programs like Medicare

and Medicaid, and a head- ache also for private insurers. But many of the details of the new partnership have yet

to be worked out. It doesn’t

even have a budget, officials said. However, the goal is to start producing results in six months to a year. Extensive sharing of claims data will take longer because difficult legal and technical issues have to be worked out. The agreement is unusual because it brings together long- time foes to tackle a common problem. Insurers are grudg- ingly carrying out the many requirements of President Barack Obama’s health care overhaul law, even as they continue lobbying to roll back some of its provisions, such as new taxes on the industry and cuts to private plans offered through Medicare. Obama con- tinues to rail against industry “abuses.” Industry leaders stressed that combating fraud is in everyone’s interests. “What’s in it for us is that if you have more data, you are going to be able to recog- nize aberrant patterns more reliably,” said Dr. Richard Migliori, an executive vice president of UnitedHealth Group, the nation’s largest insurer. “These perpetrators

are moving around from one place to another. You are going to have more eyes on them and they are going to

feel surrounded. Attorney General Eric Holder, who took part in the announcement, said insurers and government will “come together as never before to share information while pro- tecting patient confidentiality.” Fraud is estimated to cost Medicare about $60 billion a year, and the Obama admin- istration has beefed up the government’s efforts to stop it, bringing in record settle- ments with drug companies for marketing violations as well as using new powers in the health care law to pur- sue low-level fraudsters with greater zeal. Yet, although Medicare is becoming a harder target, it’s too early to say if the tide has turned. Some anti-fraud efforts launched with great fanfare have not delivered convinc- ing results. For example, in the summer of 2011 Medicare unveiled a $77-million com- puter system designed to head off fraud before it happened. By last Christmas, it had stopped just one suspicious payment from going out, for

$7,591.

Poll: Few think Romney’s faith resembles their own

WASHINGTON (AP) — Most of America doesn’t relate to Mitt Romney’s reli- gion but that may not matter in his race against President Barack Obama. Those are the findings of

a new Pew Research Center poll released Thursday, about

a month before Republican

Romney is set to become the first Mormon presidential nominee of a major political party. Misgivings about the Mormon faith are widespread and persistent. Nearly two- thirds of non-Mormons said they see Romney’s faith as very different from their own while just half consider it a Christian faith. Those numbers are little changed since Romney’s first run for the presidency pushed Mormonism to the political forefront in 2007. Despite those qualms, most voters who know that Romney is a devout Mormon say they are comfortable with his religious beliefs, and few voters reject his candidacy solely because of concerns about his faith. Romney rarely discusses the details of his faith in public, preferring to focus

on how it has helped him connect with people. In an interview Wednesday with NBC News, Romney again credited his religion with shaping his perspective and

said he would talk about his

experiences in the church. He did not address his spiritual beliefs. “I’m — without ques- tion — I’m a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of

Latter-day Saints. I’m proud

of that,” Romney said. “Some

call that the Mormon Church,

that’s fine with me. I’ll talk about my experiences in the church. There’s no question they’ve helped shape my per- spective.” Views of Mormonism gen- erally have held steady. About six in 10 non-Mor- mons see it as very differ- ent from their own faith, and about half say they consider

it to be a Christian religion,

as Mormons themselves do. Among other Christians, black Protestants (66 percent) and white evangelicals (63

percent) are most apt to say they consider the faith sharp- ly different from their own, while white evangelicals (42 percent) were most likely to say the Mormon faith is not a Christian one. The poll, conducted jointly

by the Pew Research Center’s

Forum on Religion and Public Life and its Center for the People and the Press, found the public’s knowledge about the religious beliefs of the two men vying for the presidency remains murky — even as two-thirds say it is important that a president have strong

religious beliefs. Nearly three in 10 voters (29 percent) were unaware of or incorrect about the religious backgrounds of both candidates. Sixty percent of registered voters know Romney is a Mormon, about the same as in a March poll. Nine percent think he follows another faith and 32 percent weren’t sure. About eight in 10 who know of Romney’s beliefs are either comfortable with them (60 percent) or say it doesn’t mat- ter (21 percent). Discomfort with Romney’s faith peaks among sever- al groups not often on the same side in politics: white evangelical Protestants, black

Protestants, atheists and agnostics. White evangeli- cal Protestants broadly back Romney for president despite their misgivings about his religious background, while the other groups are far more likely to support Obama. Overall, the poll found Obama holding a 50 per- cent to 43 percent lead over Romney. Concerns about Romney’s religion seem to dampen enthusiasm for his candidacy among some Republicans. Those Republicans who are aware of Romney’s faith and are uncomfortable with it are far more tepid about his can- didacy than Republicans who express no concerns about his faith.

www.delphosherald.com

Friday, July 27, 2012

The Herald – 5

www.delphosherald.com Friday, July 27, 2012 The Herald – 5

Lowest Price & Best Quality of the

Year!

COMMUNITY

LANDMARK

a l i t y o f t h e Year! C OMMUNITY L ANDMARK Delphos

Delphos

Welcome Sign

CALENDAR OF EVENTS

TODAY 1-4 p.m. — Interfaith Thrift Store is open for shopping.

SATURDAY

8 a.m.-noon — Farmer’s

Market at Third and Main

streets in Delphos.

9 a.m.-noon — Interfaith

Thrift Store, North Main Street. St. Vincent DePaul Society,

located at the east edge of the St. John’s High School park- ing lot, is open.

10 a.m to 2 p.m. — Delphos

Postal Museum is open.

12:15 p.m. — Testing of warning sirens by Delphos Fire and Rescue 1-3 p.m. — The Delphos Canal Commission Museum,

241 N. Main St., is open.

5 p.m. — Delphos Coon

and Sportsman’s Club hosts a

chicken fry.

7 p.m. — Bingo at St.

John’s Little Theatre.

SUNDAY 1-3 p.m. — The Delphos

Canal Commission Museum,

241 N. Main St., is open.

Delphos Canal Commission Museum, 241 N. Main St., is open. Happy Birthday July 28 Trent Lee

Happy Birthday

July 28 Trent Lee Teman Gwen Leigh Teman Lindsey Trentman Draven Dickman Callie Shawhan Adain Rushing

CAMPUS NOTE

OSU names graduates

TheOhioStateUniversity

has issued the list of seniors and graduate students who received degrees at the spring quarter commence- ment exercises on June 10 in the Ohio Stadium. Cloverdale Katie Eickholt — bach- elor of science in social work — magna cum laude Nicholas Miller — asso- ciate in applied science Sally Spitnale — master of arts Delphos Michael Antalis — bach- elor of science in chemical engineering — cum laude

Nicole Baldauf — bach- elor of science in nursing

— magna cum laude

Elizabeth Crites — mas- ter of education Dustin Hesseling — master of education Rachel Miller — bache- lor of science in education Kimberly Miller — mas- ter of social work Jeffrey Unterbrink — doctor of optometry — magna cum laude Christopher Wilkin

— bachelor of science in

human ecology

Nicholas Bockey —

bachelor of science in allied health professions — magna cum laude

Trina Pohlman — bach- elor of science in agricul- ture Elida Joelle Albanese — bach- elor of science in dental

hygiene Bethany Billings — bachelor of arts— cum laude Kimberly Brocklehurst

— bachelor of science in nursing Eric Dix — associate of arts John Engberg — bach-

elor of science in education

— cum laude Desiray Goedde — bach-

elor of science in education

— cum laude Adam Goes — bache- lor of arts — magna cum laude Jessica Good — bach-

elor of science in education

— cum laude Jennifer Kline — bach- elor of science in dental hygiene Brady Overholt — mas- ter of arts

Heather Piper — bach- elor of science in allied health professions Katie Ream — bachelor of fine arts — summa cum laude Sarah Troyer — bach- elor of science in human ecology Eric Warren — bachelor of science in hospitality management Fort Jennings Kelsey Askins — master of science Jessica Ladd — bachelor of science in allied health professions — magna cum laude Kayla Laudick — bach- elor of science in nursing

Julie Markward — mas- ter of education Erica Metzger — bach- elor of science in human ecology Kylee Warnecke — bachelor of science in allied health professions — magna cum laude Zachary Weber — bach- elor of science in agricul- ture Kalida

Craig Miller — bachelor of science in agriculture — cum laude Middle Point Ethan Weldy — bachelor of Science in Agriculture — Magna Cum Laude Ottoville Travis Hohlbein — bachelor of science in agri- culture Brooke Kaufman — bachelor of arts Krystal Markward — bachelor of science in allied health professions — cum laude

Amanda Schroeder — bachelor of science in allied health professions — magna cum laude Spencerville Jamie Daily — master of

education Timothy Horner — bach- elor of science in allied

health professions Matthew McPheron — bachelor of arts Anna Raines — master of education Venedocia

Tyler Reed — bachelor of science in social work — magna cum laude Eric Renner — bachelor of science in agriculture — cum laude

LINCOLN HIGHWAY YARD SALE DELPHOS COMMUNITY GARAGE SALES Thursday, Friday & Saturday August 9-11, 2012

LINCOLN HIGHWAY YARD SALE

DELPHOS COMMUNITY GARAGE SALES Thursday, Friday & Saturday August 9-11, 2012

Place your ad in the Delphos Herald by Aug. 3 and your location will appear on our Delphos Community Garage Sale Map that will be available at local businesses, the Chamber and the Delphos Herald office starting August 8th.

OPTION 1 - $21 *2 DAYS GARAGE SALE AD *LOCATED ON GARAGE SALE MAP

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*2 DAYS GARAGE SALE AD *LOCATED ON GARAGE SALE MAP

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OPTION 3 - $30

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Garage sale ad must be 40 words or less. Send your typed or clearly written ad with payment, indicating what days you would like it published in the paper to

COMMUNITY GARAGE SALES C/O THE DELPHOS HERALD 405 N. MAIN ST., DELPHOS, OHIO 45833 email: classifieds@delphosherald.com

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At the movies
At the movies

Van Wert Cinemas 10709 Lincoln Hwy. in Van Wert The Dark Knight Rises (PG-13) Fri-Thurs.: 1:00/4:15/7:30 Ice Age: Continental Drift (PG) Fri.-Thurs.:

1:00/3:00/5:00/7:00/9:00

Ted (R) Fri.-Thurs.: 1:00/3:30/6:00/8:30 The Amazing Spider-Man (PG-13) Tues.- Thurs.: 1:00/4:15/7:30 The Watch (R) Fri.-Thurs.:

1:00/3:30/6:00/8:30

Van-Del Drive In 19986 Lincoln Hwy. Middle Point Friday through Monday Screen 1

Dark Knight Rises (PG-13) Dark Shadows (PG-13) The Avengers (PG-13) Saturday only Screen 2 Ice Age: Continental Drift (PG) Madea’sWitnessProtection

(PG-13)

Brave (PG) Saturday only Screen 3 The Watch (R) Ted (R) Magic Mike (R) Saturday only Gates open at 8 p.m.; showtime at dark.

American Mall Stadium 12 2830 W. Elm St. in Lima Saturday and Sunday Step Up Revolution (PG-13) 3:45/9:35 Up Revolution 3D (PG-13) 1:20/6:55 The Watch (R) 1:30/4:40/7:10/9:50

The Dark Knight Rises (PG-13) 12:10

/12:40/1:10/2:50/3:20/3:50/4:20/5:00/6

:30/7:00/7:30/8:00/9:30/10:00/10:30

Ice Age: Continental Drift (PG) 1:50/4:10/6:50/9:20 Ice Age: Continental Drift (PG) 3D 12:00/2:35/5:10/ 7:40/10:00 The Amazing Spider-Man (PG-13) 3D

3:30/9:45

The Amazing Spider-Man (PG-13) 12:05/6:40

(R)

( R )

: 4 5 The Amazing Spider-Man (PG-13) 12:05/6:40 (R) ( R ) Magic 7:35/10:15 Ted Mike

Magic

7:35/10:15

Ted

Mike

1:35/4:35/7:05/9:40

Brave (PG) 1:45/4:15

Eastgate Dollar Movies 2100 Harding Hwy. Lima Saturday and Sunday

Abraham

Lincoln:

Vampire

Hunter

(R)

1:15/5:00/7:15/9:20

Rock

of

Ages

(PG-13)

1:00/4:30/7:00/9:30

Dark

Shadows

(PG-13)

7:00/9:20

 

Snow

White

and

the

Huntsman

(PG)

1:00/4:00/7:00/9:30

The Hunger Games (PG) 1:00/5:00/8:00

Shannon Theater 119 S. Main St. in Bluffton Ice Age: Continental Drift (PG) 2D show times are every evening at 7 p.m. with 1:30 p.m. and 4 p.m. Saturday and Sunday matinees. Ted (R) Show times are every evening at 9:30 p.m.

matinees. Ted (R) Show times are every evening at 9:30 p.m. Washington Jumbo Dark Sweet CHERRIES

Washington Jumbo Dark Sweet

CHERRIES

evening at 9:30 p.m. Washington Jumbo Dark Sweet CHERRIES $ 1 98 lb. Cherry Benefits Actual

$ 1 98

lb. Cherry Benefits Actual Cherry Size! Anthocyanins, found in cherries, blocks inflammatory enzymes which reduce
lb.
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Anthocyanins, found in cherries,
blocks inflammatory enzymes
which reduce regular pain and
pain associated with arthritis.
Cherry Mojitos
1 1/4 cup sugar
Jumbo
1 1/4 cup freshly squeezed lime
juice (about 9 limes)
Limes 3/ 99 ¢
3 pounds cherries
18 oz. black cherry or plain vodka
(optional)
Cherry Nutrition
1 bottle sparkling water (750 ml)
Bring sugar & 1 1/4 cups water to
(per 1/2 cup serving)
43 calories
White Chocolate
a boil in a small pan, stirring until
sugar has dissolved. Remove from
heat & let cool.
Put lime juice in bowl. Halve & pit
cherries; add to lime juice. Stir
0
fat
Cherries
0
cholesterol
Melt a bag of white chocolate
0
sodium
8% Vitamin C
in syrup. Refrigerate 1 hour (or
overnight).
Stir cherry mixture & vodka in a
large bowl. Spoon 1/2 cup mixture
into each glass. Top off with spar-
kling water. Serve immediately.
chips in the microwave for
approximately 1 minute. Stir until
you reach a smooth consistency.
Dip dry, pre-cleaned cherries in
the chocolate and place on a wax
paper lined cookie sheet. Chill in
the refrigerator for at least 30
minutes. Enjoy!

Advertised items good SATURDAY, July 28, 2012 and while supplies last at all Chief & Rays Supermarket locations

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6 – The Herald

Friday, July 27, 2012

www.delphosherald.com

6 – The Herald Friday, July 27, 2012 www.delphosherald.com

SPORTS

LIMA JUNIOR GOLF ASSOCIATION

McDonald’s Junior Series - Bob Fridley Classic Shelby Oaks Golf Club (Sidney) - Par 72 (white tees) Thursday’s Results Notes: Regular-season finale. The Girls 16-18 division was

shortened to a 17-hole tournament

due to

is set for Monday night. We will be handing out trophies for each tour- nament throughout this summer. BOYS 12-13 1. Jared Hernandez 42; 2. Sam Reed 45; 3. Jared Miller 46; 4. Brad Gottemoeller 47; 5. Ryan Moody 53; 6. (tie) Christian Nartker and Collin Nartker 55; 7. Marcus McGee 62. BOYS 14-15 1. Carter Bowma 38-37-75; 2. (tie) Wesley Markward 39-37- 76 and Aaron Wilker 40-36-76 (Markward won a playoff for 2nd place); 3. Grant Ricketts 38-40- 78; 4. Alex Britton 39-41-80; 5. (tie) Brandon Hernandez, 42-39- 81, Caleb Meadows 41-40-81, Joshah Rager 40-41-81 and Drew Wayman 40-41-81; 6. (tie) Adam Vieira 41-42-83 and Westin Young 41-42-83; 7. Jake Shivley 43-41-84; 8. Britton Hensel 46-39-85; 9. Evan Hall 41-45-86; 10. Devin Mouser 45-42-87; 11. Ryan Smelewski

Banquet

44-46-90; 12. Luke Dapore, 45-46- 91; 13. Jacob Nolte 50-55-105; 14. Nick Hemminger 61-69-130. BOYS 16-18

1. (tie) Brian Schatzer 37-39-

76 and Blaine Ricketts 40-36-76 (Schatzer won a playoff for 1st

place); 2. (tie) Darin Bergman 40-37-

77 and Tyler Turnwald 36-41-77; 3.

(tie) John Copella 39-39-78, Xavier Francis 38-40-78 and Jordan Sosby 40-38-78; 4. Matt Holt 39-40-79; 5. Treg Francis 39-41-80; 6. Evan Wilker 41-40-81; 7. Brad Anderson 40-42-82; 8. Bobby Crow 40-43- 83; 9. John Burke 41-44-85; 10. (tie) Alex Dammeyer 46-40-86 and Thomas Nolte 44-42-86; 11. Austin Tebbe 45-42-87; 12. Mike Omlor 45-43-88; 13. (tie) Reed Bok 48-43-

91 and Freddie Purdy 42-49-91. GIRLS 15 & UNDER

1. Emily Knouff 42; 2. Jennifer

Mitchell 52; 3. Kristin Barhorst 53; 4. Jessica Armstrong 54; 5. Alyssa

Campbell 65; 6. Annika Heminger

74. GIRLS 16-18

1. Shelby Warner 36-30-66; 2.

Heather Comer 43-36-79; 3. (tie)

Sean Pusey 43-38-81 and Morgan VanMeter 44-37-81; 4. Sydney Hooks 46-40-86; 5. Zoe Rayburn 52-42-94; 6. Sydney Holdren

59-38-97.

MLB CAPSULES

NL By The Associated Press CARDINALS 7, DODGERS 4 ST. LOUIS — David Freese and Matt Carpenter each had three of the Cardinals’ season-high 18 hits, handing the Dodgers their second straight loss since acquiring Hanley Ramirez. Obtained a day earlier from Miami, Ramirez started at third base and batted fifth for the second straight game. He had an infield hit, two walks and a steal, and he also hit a double-play grounder. The 2009 NL batting champion is 2 for 6 with three walks an RBI with his new team. Matt Holliday hit his 17th homer, his third on a 6-1 homestand for St. Louis, which fell behind 4-2 by allow- ing four runs in the fifth and then scored four in the bottom half. Allen Craig and Tony Cruz each had an RBI for the Cardinals, who are six back in the NL Central. Jake Westbrook (9-8) pitched seven innings, lasting at least that long for the third straight start. He allowed four runs — three earned — and seven hits with six strikeouts. Jason Motte pitched the ninth for his 22nd save in 26 chances. Chris Capuano (10-6) gave up six runs and 11 hits in 4 1-3 innings. NATIONALS 8, BREWERS 2 MILWAUKEE — Edwin Jackson pitched seven scoreless innings, Steve Lombardozzi hit a three-run tri- ple and Washington sent Milwaukee to its seventh consecutive loss. The Nationals have won six con- secutive games, matching a season high, and improved to 59-39. The last time a Washington-based team was 20 games over .500 was 1933, when the American League Senators finished 99-53 and lost the World Series in five games to the New York Giants. Jackson (6-6) scattered eight hits and a walk while striking out four. Milwaukee starter Yovani Gallardo (8-8) gave up seven runs on seven hits and two walks with six strikeouts in five innings. PIRATES 5, ASTROS 3 HOUSTON — Prized prospect Starling Marte homered on his first major league pitch to help the Pirates hand the Astros their 10th straight loss. A.J. Burnett (12-3) shut out Houston until Chris Johnson and Carlos Corporan connected for solo homers in the eighth. Burnett allowed four hits with five strikeouts in 7 1-3 innings. Johnson hit a two-out RBI single off Joel Hanrahan in the ninth, but Hanrahan struck out Brian Bogusevic for his 30th save. Garrett Jones and Clint Barmes each added homers for Pittsburgh. Dallas Keuchel (1-3) gave up five hits and five runs in six innings for Houston. METS 3, DIAMONDBACKS 1 PHOENIX — Matt Harvey daz- zled in his major league debut, hold- ing Arizona to three hits and striking out 11 over 5 1-3 innings. Scott Hairston hit a two-run dou- ble and Andres Torres tripled and scored for the Mets, who snapped a six-game losing streak. New York won for the second time in 13 games since the All-Star break, narrowly avoiding the fate of the 1962 club that went 1-14 to start the second half. Harvey (1-0) set a franchise record for strikeouts in a debut. He also doubled and singled to become the first pitcher since 1900 to strike

out more than 10 and collect two hits

in his first game. Arizona’s Wade Miley (11-6)

gave up three runs and nine hits in 5 1-3 innings. AL BLUE JAYS 10, ATHLETICS 4 TORONTO — Edwin Encarnacion

hit a three-run homer, Kelly Johnson

added a solo shot and the Toronto Blue Jays ended the Oakland Athletics’ seven-game winning streak with a 10-4 victory Thursday. Johnson went 2 for 4 with two RBIs as the Blue Jays avoided a three-game sweep and rebounded from Wednesday’s 16-0 loss. Travis Snider had two hits and

two RBIs, driving in the tying run with

a squeeze bunt, and Brett Lawrie

scored three runs. Brandon Lyon (1-0) pitched 1 1-3

innings for his first win since joining Toronto in a 10-player trade with Houston Friday. Tommy Milone (9-7) gave up eight runs — five earned

— and six hits in seven innings with no walks and seven strikeouts as Oakland dropped to 16-3 in July. ORIOLES 6, RAYS 2 BALTIMORE — Chris Tillman

took a three-hitter into the seventh inning, Chris Davis homered and drove in four runs, and Baltimore avoided a three-game sweep. Nick Markakis had two hits for the Orioles, who had scored only one run

in

each of their three previous games.

It

was just the second time in 10

games that Baltimore scored more than four runs. Tillman (3-1) allowed two runs, five hits and four walks in six-plus innings. James Shields (8-7) gave up five runs, six hits and five walks in six innings. INDIANS 5, TIGERS 3 CLEVELAND — Asdrubal Cabrera singled home the go-ahead run in a four-run seventh inning as Cleveland rallied to beat Detroit ace Justin Verlander. Carlos Santana and Travis

Hafner tied it at 3 by homering on the first two pitches of the inning by Verlander (11-6). Joe Smith (7-2) threw two pitches

to

get the win. He got Miguel Cabrera

to

ground into an inning-ending dou-

ble play in the top half. Vine Pestano pitched the eighth and Chris Perez the ninth for his 29th save in 31 chances. Jason Kipnis followed Cabrera with another RBI single as Cleveland took two of three in the series, drop- ping Detroit a half-game behind the idle Chicago White Sox in the AL Central. Austin Jackson had three hits and Delmon Young homered for Detroit, which lost for only the fourth time in 18 games. MARINERS 4, ROYALS 1 SEATTLE — Jason Vargas

allowed one hit in eight innings to win his career-high 11th game, and Mike Carp had three hits to lead Seattle. Vargas (11-7) allowed only a fourth-inning double. He struck out five and walked three. He retired the first 11 batters he faced before Billy Butler’s 200th career double drove in Lorenzo Cain

in the fourth. Vargas walked Cain,

then fell behind 3-0 before Butler

drilled a fastball to t left-center. Kansas City did not get a runner

to second base against Vargas after

the fourth. Luis Mendoza (4-7) threw five innings, allowed nine hits, four earned runs, walked three and hit a batter.

STOCKS

Quotes of local interest supplied by EDWARD JONES INVESTMENTS Close of business July 26, 2012

Description

Last Price

Change

DJINDUAVERAGE

12,887.93

+211.88

NAS/NMS COMPSITE

2,893.25

+39.01

S&P 500 INDEX

1,360.02

+22.13

AUTOZONE INC.

373.38

-5.01

BUNGE LTD

64.81

+3.04

EATON CORP.

43.16

+1.10

BP PLC ADR

40.91

+1.03

DOMINION RES INC

54.13

+0.84

AMERICAN ELEC. PWR INC

41.95

+0.73

CVS CAREMARK CRP

44.56

+0.02

CITIGROUP INC

26.28

+0.49

FIRST DEFIANCE

16.05

-0.05

FST FIN BNCP

15.87

-0.04

FORD MOTOR CO

8.96

-0.01

GENERAL DYNAMICS

62.90

+0.90

GENERAL MOTORS

19.11

+0.31

GOODYEAR TIRE

9.89

+0.15

HEALTHCARE REIT

61.05

+0.18

HOME DEPOT INC.

52.91

+1.84

HONDA MOTOR CO

31.16

+0.73

HUNTGTN BKSHR

6.41

+0.13

JOHNSON&JOHNSON

68.74

+1.21

JPMORGAN CHASE

35.81

+0.64

KOHLS CORP.

47.60

-0.26

LOWES COMPANIES

26.60

+1.00

MCDONALDS CORP.

89.00

+0.96

MICROSOFT CP

29.16

+0.33

PEPSICO INC.

71.22

+0.92

PROCTER & GAMBLE

64.56

+0.54

RITE AID CORP.

1.18

+0.03

SPRINT NEXTEL

4.05

+0.68

TIME WARNER INC.

38.35

-0.20

US BANCORP

33.59

+0.30

UTD BANKSHARES

9.23

+0.23

VERIZON COMMS

44.46

+0.74

WAL-MART STORES

73.67

+1.59

Security jitters on eve of London Olympics

By PAISLEY DODDS The Associated Press

LONDON — Security jit-

ters were being felt across the

British capital on the eve of

the

London Olympics, with

the

biggest mall in Europe

briefly evacuated Thursday

and noticeable security chang-

es in place at the Olympic Park. Prime Minister David Cameron said, however, that he was confident that the games

which Britain has worked to produce

for years will be

successful and safe. “You can never provide

a 100 percent guarantee but

what I’ve seen, and what

I’ve helped to coordinate is, I

think, a fully joined-up effort

that involves one of the best

armed services anywhere in the world,” Cameron told reporters Thursday. “I’m con-

fident we can deliver on that, working with visiting delega- tions as well.”

A

fire alarm forced authori-

ties

to briefly clear the mas-

sive Westfield shopping mall beside the Olympic Park on Thursday afternoon.

Hundreds of people flooded

into the street, a day before the opening ceremony at nearby Olympic Stadium. Police allowed shoppers to return after a few minutes. Westfield mall authorities said the alarm was triggered

in a restaurant area.

Fears of terrorism have been

at the center of preparations

for the London Olympics, and authorities have twice been

forced to deploy more troops

in the last two weeks — first

an extra 3,500, then anoth- er 1,200 — when security arrangements fell short. Britain’s Ministry of Defense also scrambled

a Typhoon fighter jet

Wednesday after an airplane

lost contact with air traffic

controllers. Communications were quickly restored and no further action was required.

Britain’s terror threat level is at substantial, which means a terror attack is a strong pos- sibility. It is a notch below severe, the level Britain has been at for most of time since the 2005 suicide bombings when 52 people were killed in morning rush-hour attacks on London trains and buses. One British security offi- cial told The Associated Press there was no existing intelli- gence to indicate the threat level would change i m m e d i a t e l y . Several terror suspects have been arrested in the last month but none have been accused of plotting

directly against the games. He spoke on condition of ano- nymity because he was not authorized to speak to the media. At some Olympic Park secu- rity entrances on Thursday, there was a noticeable shift from having military per- sonnel man the airport-like security machines to having

civilian security guards. At one entrance, an AP reporter put his bags through secu- rity but the scanning machine that checks Olympic creden- tials was broken and the staff waved him through. The G4S security firm, responsible for the bulk of Olympic security, said Thursday it was getting hun- dreds more workers each day and hoped to replace some

military personnel. Company spokesman Adam Mynott

said many new workers had passed the accreditation process or completed train- ing. The hope, he said, is to

numerically replace the extra military personnel. The security firm was lam- basted earlier this month by the government for failing to provide enough security per-

sonnel for the games. Mynott said he would look into why the AP reporter’s credential wasn’t scanned but said the changes Thursday were routine station changes

but said the changes Thursday were routine station changes between civilian and military guards. Cameron has

between civilian and military guards. Cameron has promised to go after G4S if they don’t ful- fill their contract and to make sure the company helps pay for the cost of the additional military personnel. The firm expects to lose between 35 million and 50 million pounds ($54 million-$78 million) on its Olympic contract, equal to about 12 percent of its annual profit. One American tourist said the extra security seemed a tad daunting. “With the police all around and troops, you definitely feel like something could happen at any time,” said Melissa Johnson, a 36-year-old tour- ist from Los Angeles. “I’m not sure if I feel safer or just more worried. Then again, at least there are fewer guns here, right?”

Weekend Olympic Daily Schedule All Times EDT (Subject to change) Saturday Archery At Lord’s Cricket Ground Men’s Team 1/8 eliminations, 4 a.m. Men’s Team quarterfinals, semifinals, bronze and gold medal matches, 10 a.m. Badminton At Wembley Arena Men’s and Women’s Singles, Doubles and Mixed Doubles Prelims, 3:30 a.m. Men’s and Women’s Singles, Doubles and Mixed Doubles Prelims, 7:30 a.m. Men’s and Women’s Singles, Doubles and Mixed Doubles Prelims, 1:30 p.m. Basketball At Olympic Park-Basketball Arena Women China vs. Czech Republic, 4 a.m. Canada vs. Russia, 6:15 a.m. Turkey vs. Angola, 9:30 a.m. United States vs. Croatia, 11:45 a.m. Brazil vs. France, 3 p.m. Australia vs. Britain, 5:15 p.m. Beach Volleyball At Horse Guards Parade Men’s and women’s Prelims (4 matches), 4 a.m. Men’s and women’s Prelims (4 matches), 9:30 a.m. Men’s and women’s Prelims (4 matches), 3 p.m. Boxing At ExCel Men’s Bantamweight (56kg) and Men’s Middleweight (75kg) round of 32, 8:30 a.m. Men’s Bantamweight (56kg) and Men’s Middleweight (75kg) round of 32, 3:30 p.m. Cycling (Road) At The Mall Men’s Road Race, 5 a.m. Equestrian (Eventing) At Greenwich Park Individual & Team Eventing: dres- sage, day 1, 5 a.m. Fencing At ExCel Women’s Individual Foil round of 64,

round of 32, round of 16, quarterfinals, 5:30 a.m. Women’s Individual Foil semifinals, bronze and gold medal matches, 1 p.m. Gymnastics At Artistic North Greenwich Arena Men’s qualification, 6 a.m. Men’s qualification, 10:30 a.m. Men’s qualification, 3 p.m. Judo At ExCel Men’s -60kg and Women’s -48kg elimination rounds, quarterfinals, 4:30 a.m. Men’s -60kg and Women’s -48kg repechages, semifinal contests, bronze and gold medal contests, 9 a.m. Rowing At Eton Dorney, Buckinghamshire Men’s Pairs, Lightweight Fours, Eights, Single Sculls, Double Sculls, Quadruple Sculls heats; Women’s Pairs, Single Sculls, Quadruple Sculls heats, 4:30 a.m. Shooting At The Royal Artillery Barracks Men’s 10-Meter Air Pistol qualifica- tion and final; Women’s 10-Meter Air Rifle qualification and final, 3:15 a.m. Soccer Women At City of Coventry Stadium Japan vs. Sweden, 7 a.m. Canada vs. South Africa, 9:45 a.m. At Millennium Stadium, Cardiff, Wales New Zealand vs. Brazil, 9:30 a.m. Britain vs. Cameroon, 12:15 p.m. At Hampden Park, Glasgow, Scotland United States vs. Colombia, Noon France vs. North Korea, 2:45 p.m. Swimming At Olympic Park-Aquatics Centre Men’s 100 Breaststroke, 400 Freestyle, 400 Individual Medley heats; Women’s 100 Butterfly, 400 Individual Medley, 4X100 Freestyle Relay heats, 5 a.m. Men’s 100 Breaststroke semifinals, 400 Freestyle final, 400 Individual Medley final; Women’s 100 Butterfly semifinals, 400 Individual Medley final, 4X100 Freestyle Relay final, 2:30 p.m. Table Tennis At ExCel Men’s Singles Prelims; Women’s Singles Prelims, first round, 4 a.m. Men’s Singles and Women’s Singles first round, 9:30 a.m. Men’s Singles and Women’s Singles first round, 2 p.m. Team Handball Women At Copper Box Russia vs. Angola, 4:30 a.m. Spain vs. South Korea, 6:15 a.m. Croatia vs. Brazil, 9:30 a.m. Denmark vs. Sweden, 11:15 a.m. Montenegro vs. Britain, 2:30 p.m. Norway vs. France, 4:15 p.m. Tennis At Wimbledon Men’s and women’s Singles first round; Men’s and women’s Doubles first round, 6:30 a.m. Volleyball At Earls Court Women Algeria vs. Japan, 4:30 a.m. China vs. Serbia, 6:30 a.m. Britain vs. Russia, 9:45 a.m. Italy vs. Dominican Republic, 11:45 a.m. United States vs. South Korea, 3 p.m. Brazil vs. Turkey, 5 p.m. Weightlifting At ExCel Women’s 48kg group A (medal), 10:30 a.m.

NFL launches wellness program for players

By LYNN DeBRUIN The Associated Press

video messages from various NFL stars, including Brett Favre, Michael Irvin, Michael Strahan, Herschel Walker, Jevon Kearse and Cris Carter, urging players to get help and letting them know they are not alone. Shannon Jordan, presi- dent of the Gridiron Greats Assistance Fund, a charity for NFL retir- ees who need health care, said the program is long overdue. “Unfortunately sometimes it takes a tragedy to put some- thing together quicker, but we’re just happy that it’s finally here and we’ll keep expanding on it,” said Jordan, who is part of the NFL’s effort. “There are a lot of pieces that still need to be worked out, but we couldn’t be more elated to be able to refer guys to a program like this and hopefully save a lot more lives.” Goodell also sent an open letter to NFL fans outlining the program. “NFL Total Wellness will empower players to make positive health decisions,” Goodell said, “promote help- seeking behaviors in con-

NEW YORK — In an offseason marked by Junior Seau’s suicide and scores

of lawsuits over brain inju- ries, the NFL on Thursday

launched a comprehensive

wellness program for current and retired players — including a confi- dential mental health phone line. “There is no higher priority for

the National Football

League than the health and wellness of our players,” NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell said in an

email Thursday to more than 11,000 players announcing NFL Total Wellness. “This service is here for you.” An outside agency will

run NFL Life Line, a free

consultation service to inform

players and family members

about the signs of crisis, symptoms of common mental

health problems, as well as

where to get help. Experts in suicide prevention and sub- stance abuse are among those involved in developing and administering the program. The website for the pro- gram also features special

program. The website for the pro- gram also features special nection with behavioral and mental health

nection with behavioral and mental health issues; provide education on family safety; and enhance transition pro- grams that help players adjust to new stages of life.” The announcement came as many training camps are getting under way. It also comes just days after former Raiders quar- terback Ken Stabler became the latest big name from the NFL’s past to sue the league over head injuries. Stabler is the first plaintiff among 73 listed in a fed- eral lawsuit filed Monday in Philadelphia, where other cases involving some of the more than 2,400 NFL vet- erans suing the league were recently consolidated into a master complaint. Like Stabler, the other retirees claim the NFL did not do enough to shield them from the long-term effects of repeated hits to the head, even when medical evidence estab- lished a connection between head trauma in football and health problems later in life. Seau’s family recently requested that brain tissue of the NFL linebacker be sent to the National Institutes of Health for examination. The former All-Pro died

May 2 of a self-inflicted gunshot wound to the chest. He was 43, just 2 1/2 years retired from a career that saw him picked for 12 Pro Bowls. His death had similarities to that of former Chicago Bears safety Dave Duerson, who died of a self-inflicted gunshot wound to the chest last year. Duerson left a suicide note, asking that his brain be studied for signs of trauma. While not mentioning the lawsuits or deaths, Goodell’s emailed letter noted that members of the NFL family are not immune to challenges all individuals face. The Plaintiffs Executive Committee for the NFL con- cussion litigation said in a statement Thursday afternoon that the latest program lends credence to lawsuits against the league. Thursday’s announce- ment came following a meet- ing at NFL offices attend- ed by Goodell, Jordan, Dr. David Satcher, a former U.S. Surgeon General, along with Vincent and The NFL Player Care Foundation also will build upon its national health screening program for former players, with Hall of Famers Dick Butkus and Mike Haynes serving as ambassadors.

Big 10 notebook
Big 10 notebook

Wisconsin coach Bret Bielema a newlywed

CHICAGO (AP) — His Badgers won the inaugural Big Ten championship game and now there’s another new experience for Wisconsin coach Bret Bielema. He’s a relative newlywed. “Nineteen weeks and five days that we’ve been into this relationship. It’s because I get reminded on a daily basis, not that I knew that stat,” Bielema said to laughter Thursday dur- ing the Big Ten media day. “But it’s been fun for me. I go back to seven years ago when I got the job and every- body was like, ‘Wow, you’re single, da, da, da.’ And every- body gave me different pieces of advice. But hopefully it’s going to make me a smarter and wiser and more mature coach.”

———— RULES ARE RULES Citing player safety, Big Ten Coordinator of Football Officials Bill Carollo addressed several rule changes set to be imple- mented for this season.

One of the biggest changes takes place on kickoffs, where the kicking team will kick from the 35-yard line, and touchbacks will automatically place the ball on the 25-yard line instead of the 20. “The situation for a kickoff

is the No. 1 play scenario that lends itself to injury,” Carollo said. “Because of the injuries we’ve seen, if it’s a touchback, we’re encouraging them to stay in the end zone.” The 10 non-kicking players on the kicking team must also start within five yards of the kickoff line.

In another effort to avoid vio-

lent collisions, the receiving team

will also be given an opportunity to call for a fair catch on onside

kicks. Carollo said a committee com- prised of coaches, athletic direc- tors and commissioners decided the rule changes, which includes ramifications for unwarranted hel- met removal.

A player whose helmet is

removed on the field — not due to a play — must sit out the fol- lowing snap. Among the other changes include personal fouls for spe- cial teams defenders who try to

leap over the punt protector, and an expanded zone for low-block penalties. “(Player safety) has been our mantra for the last several years, and we’ll continue to work on the health and safety of the players,” Carollo said. ———— WATCH OUT The Big Ten announced its preseason players to watch on Thursday. Included were quar- terbacks Denard Robinson of Michigan and Braxton Miller of Ohio State, and running backs Montee Ball of Wisconsin and Rex Burkhead of Nebraska.

Ball finished fourth in Heisman Trophy voting in 2011 after rush- ing for 1,923 yards and 39 total touchdowns — 33 rushing. Robinson was sixth in Heisman voting in 2010. The senior has rushed for over 1,000 yards and passed for over 2,000 in each of the last two years. Also included in the play- ers to watch list were offensive

tackle Taylor Lewan of Michigan, cornerback Johnny Adams of Michigan State, defensive end William Gholston of Michigan State, defensive lineman John Simon of Ohio State, defensive tackle Kawann Short of Purdue

and linebacker Chris Borland of Wisconsin. ———— DEFINING ROLES Commissioner Jim Delany said a goal of the Big Ten is to formulate a plan or document to make sure the roles of coaches

and admnistrators and their rela- tionships are more well-defined. “There’s no confusion in the NBA or NFL who the owner is. In college, sometimes there’s

a question of who the owner

is because power is diffuse. Trustees, presidents, faculty, athletic directors, compliance directors. So our challenge going

forward after I thought about this,

is how do we make the lines

brighter?” Delany said Thursday during the Big Ten media day. “Do we make sure the coach fits with the institution and not vice versa,” he said. “It’s not about firing the coaches. It’s

about clarifying roles even after great success, because these are great people, they’re com- petitive people, they’re fun peo-

is coach, and other

people on campus get to do their job to protect whatever the infra- structure of the institution is, in terms of its values, traditions, et cetera.”

Coach

www.delphosherald.com

Friday, July 27, 2012

The Herald – 7

Lehmann’s

To shush, or not to shush

By Terry Mattingly

At the altar, the priest extends his hands over the bread and wine, then makes the sign of the cross and leads worshippers into the most sacred moments of the Mass. The prayer is familiar: “To you, there- fore, most merciful Father, we make humble prayer and petition through Jesus Christ, your Son, our Lord: that you accept these holy and unblemished sacrifices, which we offer you firstly for your holy catholic Church.” The atmosphere is reverent, or it’s sup- posed to be. The problem is the people in the pew right behind you who -- just -- will -- not -- stop -- talking. What are Catholics supposed to do under these circumstances, as they kneel and try to pray? It’s hard not to fire frustrated or even angry glances at these people. Is it sinful to chuck a Roman missal at egregious offend- ers? How about heaving a loud, dramatic sigh in their general direction? This is when the voice inside Andrew Sciba’s head says: “It’s come to this. The true presence of God is on the altar and these dopes aren’t paying attention in spite of your

repeated attempts to correct them.” It’s tempt- ing to turn and politely whisper, “Excuse me, would you mind continuing your conversa- tion after Mass?” At this point, one of three things will hap- pen, noted Sciba in a satirical commentary entitled “Five Ways to Shush the Church Chatter” at the Truth and Charity website (truthandcharity.net). Sciba teaches theology at Loyola College Preparatory High School in Shreveport, La., but also, as a layman, has served on a parish staff. There is a slim chance, he noted, that the chatterers will feel guilty and fall silent. Then again, some will ignore your request and keep right on talking. Most offenders will simply be quiet for several seconds, then re- sume right where they left off. Among the comments after Sciba’s piece, one reader confessed that he recently tried this even edgier “shush” remark: “I’m sorry if my praying is disturbing your conversa- tion. Would you prefer that I go outside and pray?” That one didn’t work either. These tense clashes happen in a variety of religious groups, but disruptive chatter is es- pecially distracting in liturgical traditions in

which services contain long periods of medi- tation, reverent hymnody or formal prayers. While this kind of conflict rarely makes headlines, said Sciba in a telephone interview, the topic stirs deep emotions for clergy and laypeople alike. Some are convinced that, in the age of multimedia screens and pop-rock praise bands, the trend toward chatty church informality is getting worse. Who’s to blame? Sciba’s essay unleashed a blitz of comments, with some insisting that the worst offenders are elderly worshippers who really should know better. What about ushers who keep shaking hands and talking to the faithful, even as they line up to receive Holy Communion, then return to their pews to pray? Others blame the young. After all, there are legions of teens, and others, who decline to silence -- or even set down -- their cell- phones. In some churches without sound- proof “crying rooms,” church leaders strug- gle to know how to gracefully handle parents who fail to understand that their tiny children are making sounds resembling car alarms. Eventually, as arguments ricocheted back and forth among frustrated readers, Sciba

was forced to shut down the comments page on this particular article. “Things were get- ting nasty,” he said. It’s clear, explained Sciba, that it does lit- tle good -- spiritual or practical -- to confront people about these issues during worship. It may help to post signs at sanctuary entrances instructing worshippers: “Please maintain sa- cred silence.” One church has begun project- ing an image of Jesus on screens at the front of the sanctuary, with the caption, “Need to talk? Try Me, I listen.” Clergy and lay leaders will certainly, dur- ing pre-service announcements, need to place a stronger emphasis on calls for reverence. “I once asked an old Jesuit what we can do about people who talk all the time dur- ing Mass and he said, ‘Nothing. If they knew better, they wouldn’t be talking in the first

I think that we’re just going to have

place.’

to reeducate a lot of people these days,” said Sciba. Then he let out a long sigh. “I think that many of these people genuinely don’t realize that they’re doing anything out of sorts.”

realize that they’re doing anything out of sorts.” 8-noon, 1-4- p.m. dElphos every month. Communion at
8-noon, 1-4- p.m. dElphos every month. Communion at Van Crest Health Care Center - First
8-noon, 1-4- p.m.
dElphos
every month.
Communion at Van Crest Health
Care Center - First Sunday of each
month at 2:30 p.m., Nursing Home
and assisted living.
and October.
Administered upon
45891
request.
A.C.T.S.
NEW TESTAMENT FELLOWSHIP
Rev. Linda Wannemacher-Pastor
Jaye Wannemacher
-Worship Leader
Contact: 419-695-3566
Sunday - 7:00 p.m. Bible Study
landECk
Ph: (419) 238-2788
Sr. Pastor Stephen Savage
Outreach Pastor Neil Hammons
Sunday - Worship services at
9:00 a.m., 10:30 a.m. & 6:30 p.m.
Wednesday-Ministries at 7:00
p.m.
ST. MICHAEL CHURCH
Kalida
Fr. Mark Hoying
Saturday – 4:30 p.m. Mass.
Sunday – 8:00 a.m. & 10:00
a.m. Masses.
Weekdays: Masses on Mon.,
Tues., Wed. and Friday at 8:00
am; Thurs. 7:30 p.m.
withworship@ACTSChapel-8277
German Rd., Delphos
Thursday - 7:00 p.m. “For
Such A Time As This” All &
Non Denominational Tri-County
Community Intercessory Prayer
Meeting @ Presbyterian Church
(Basement), 310 W. 2nd St.
Delphos - Everyone Welcome.
ST. PETER LUTHERAN CHURCH
422 North Pierce St., Delphos
Phone 419-695-2616
Rev. Angela Khabeb
Saturday-8:00 a.m. Prayer
Breakfast
Sunday-9:00 a.m. Worship
Service
Wednesday - 7:00 p.m. Worship
Service; 7:45 p.m. InReach/
OutReach Meeting
Saturday - 8:00 a.m. Prayer
Breakfast; 8:30 a.m. TDTR Retreat
Sunday - 9:00 a.m. Worship
Service
ST. JOHN THE BAPTIST CHURCH
Landeck - Phone: 419-692-0636
Rev. Mel Verhoff, Pastor
Administrative aide: Rita Suever
Masses: 8:30 a.m. Sunday.
Sacrament of Reconciliation:
ZION UNITED METHODIST
CHURCH
Corner of Zion Church & Conant
Rd., Elida
Pastors: Mark and D.J.
Fuerstenau
Sunday - Service - 9:00 a.m.
PIKE MENNONITE CHURCH
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
13887 Jennings Rd., Van Wert
Ph. 419-238-0333
Saturday.
Newcomers register at parish.
Marriages: Please call the par-
ish house six months in advance.
Baptism: Please call the parish.
3995 McBride Rd., Elida
Children’s Storyline:
Phone 419-339-3961
419-238-2201
spEnCErVillE
We thank the
sponsors of this
page and ask you
to please
support them.
DELPHOS BAPTIST CHURCH
Pastor Terry McKissack
302 N Main, Delphos
Contact: 419-692-0061 or
ST. PATRICK’S CHURCH
LIGHTHOUSE CHURCH OF GOD
Elida - Ph. 222-8054
Rev. Larry Ayers, Pastor
Service schedule: Sunday–
10 a.m. School; 11 a.m. Morning
Worship; 6 p.m. Sunday evening.
500 S. Canal, Spencerville
FIRST ASSEMBLY OF GOD
“Where Jesus is Healing
Hurting Hearts!”
419-647-6202
FAITH BAPTIST CHURCH
Email: fbaptvw@bright.net
Pastor Steven A. Robinson
Sunday– 9:30 a.m. Sunday
School for all ages; 10:30 a.m.
Family Worship Hour; 6:30 p.m.
Evening Bible Hour.
Wednesday - 6:30 p.m. Word
of Life Student Ministries; 6:45
p.m. AWANA; 7:00 p.m. Prayer
Saturday
-
4:30
p.m.
4750 East Road, Elida
and Bible Study.
419-302-6423
Reconciliation; 5 p.m. Mass, May
Pastor - Brian McManus
808 Metbliss Ave., Delphos
Sunday - 10:00 a.m. Sunday
School (All Ages) , 11:00 a.m.
Sunday Service, 6:00 p.m Sunday
Evening Service
Wednesday - 7:00 p.m. Bible
Study, Youth Study
Nursery available for all ser-
vices.
One block so. of Stadium Park.
1 - Oct. 30. Sunday - 10:30 a.m.
Mass.
419-692-6741
Lead Pastor - Dan Eaton
Sunday - 10:30 a.m. - “Celebration
of Worship” with Kids Church
& Nursery provided.; 6:00 p.m.
Youth Ministry at The ROC
Wednesday - 7:00 p.m.
Discipleship in The Upper Level
For more info see our website:
SPENCERVILLE FULL GOSPEL
107 Broadway St., Spencerville
Pastor Charles Muter
Home Ph. 419-657-6019
Sunday: Morning Services -
10:00 a.m. Evening Services - 7:00
p.m.
Wednesday: 7:00 p.m. Worship
service.
Sunday – 9:30 a.m. Sunday
School; 10:30 a.m. Worship, nurs-
ery available.
Wednesday – 6:30 p.m.
Youth Prayer, Bible Study; 7:00
p.m. Adult Prayer and Bible Study;
8:00 p.m. - Choir.
MANDALE CHURCH OF CHRIST
IN CHRISTIAN UNION
Rev. Don Rogers, Pastor
Sunday–
9:30
a.m.
Sunday
School all ages. 10:30 a.m.
Stop in & See Us
After Church
For
Worship Services; 7:00
Worship.
p.m
Sunday
Wednesday
-
7
p.m.
Prayer
Rolls!
FIRST UNITED PRESBYTERIAN
310 W. Second St.
GOMER UNITED CHURCH
OF CHRIST
7350 Gomer Road, Gomer, Ohio
meeting.
419-692-5737
www.delphosfirstassemblyofgod.
419-642-2681
662 Elida Ave., Delphos
Pastor Harry Tolhurst
com.
Sunday: 11:00 Worship Service
- Everyone Welcome
gomererucc@bright.net
Rev. Brian Knoderer
Sunday – 10:30 a.m. Worship
419-692-0007
Open 5 a.m.-9 p.m.
Communion
first
Sunday
of
DELPHOS CHRISTIAN UNION
Pastor: Rev. Gary Fish
470 S. Franklin St.,
(419) 692-9940
9:30 Sunday School
10:30 Sunday morning service.
Youth ministry every
Wednesday from 6-8 p.m.
Children’s ministry every third
Saturday from 11 to 1:30.
SPENCERVILLE CHURCH
OF THE NAZARENE
317 West North St.
419-296-2561
Van WErt County
Pastor Tom Shobe
9:30 a.m. Sunday School; 10:30
a.m. Morning Worship; 7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service
BREAKTHROUGH
101 N. Adams St., Middle Point
Pastor Scott & Karen Fleming
Sunday – Church Service - 10
a.m, 6 p.m.
Wednesday - 7:00 p.m.
112 E. Third St.
ST. PAUL’S UNITED METHODIST
TRINITY UNITED METHODIST
Corner of Fourth & Main,
Spencerville
Phone 419-647-5321
Rev. Jan Johnson, Pastor
Sunday - 9:30 a.m. Sunday
School; 10:30 a.m. Worship ser-
vice.
CALVARY EVANGELICAL
335 S. Main St.
Delphos
419-692-3413
CHURCH
PENTECOSTAL WAY CHURCH
Pastors: Bill Watson
Rev. Ronald Defore
1213 Leeson Ave., Van Wert
Phone (419) 238-5813
Head Usher: Ted Kelly
10:00 a.m. - Sunday School
11:10 a.m. - Worship 10:00 a.m.
until 11:30 a.m. - Wednesday
Morning Bible Class 6:00 p.m.
until 7:00 p.m. - Wednesday
Evening Prayer Meeting
7:00 p.m. - Wed. Night Bible
Study.
Thursday - Choir Rehearsal
Anchored in Jesus Prayer
Line - (419) 238-4427 or (419)
Alexander &
Bebout Inc.
Pastor - Rev. David Howell
10686 Van Wert-Decatur Rd.
232-4379.
Lucy Pohlman
Sunday
-
9:00
a.m.
Van Wert, Ohio
Emergency - (419) 993-5855
Worship Service
419-238-9567
419-339-9196
419-238-9426
Schmit, Massa, Lloyd
419-692-0951
Rhoades Ins.
DELPHOS WESLEYAN CHURCH
11720 Delphos Southworth Rd.
Delphos - Phone 419-695-1723
Pastor Rodney Shade
putnam County
UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST
Spencerville
Rev. Ron Shifley, Pastor
Rev. Clark Williman. Pastor
Sunday- 8:45 a.m. Friends and
Family; 9:00 a.m. Sunday School
LIVE; 10:00 a.m.
Sunday–
9:30
a.m.
Church
10098 Lincoln Hwy.
Van Wert, OH
www.AlexanderBebout.com
419-238-2341
937-397-4459
School;
10:30
a.m.
Worship
SALEM UNITED
Asst. Pastor Pamela King
Service.
PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
419-204-5469
15240 Main St. Venedocia
The
Animal
Sunday - 10:30 a.m. Worship;
9:15 a.m. Sunday School for all
ages.
Wednesday - 7 p.m. Service
and prayer meeting.
AGAPE FELLOWSHIP
MINISTRIES
9250
Armstrong Road,
House
TRINITY UNITED
Spencerville
Pastors Phil & Deb Lee
Sunday - 10:00 a.m. Worship
service.
METHODIST CHURCH
Boarding Kennel
and Grooming
Wed. - 7:00 p.m. Bible Study
Rev. Wendy S. Pratt, Pastor
Church Phone: 419-667-4142
Sunday - 8:30 a.m. - Adult
Bell Choir; 8:45 a.m. Jr. Choir;
9:30 a.m. - Worship; 10:45 a.m. -
Sunday school; 6:30 p.m. - Capital
Funds Committee.
Monday - 6 p.m. Senior Choir.
FAITH MISSIONARY
BAPTIST CHURCH
Road U, Rushmore
Pastor Robert Morrison
Sunday – 10 am Church
School; 11:00 Church Service;
6:00 p.m. Evening Service
Wednesday - 7:00 p.m. Evening
Service
Foster Parents
Needed!
ST. ANTHONY OF PADUA
CATHOLIC CHURCH
512 W. Sycamore, Col. Grove
211 E. Third St., Delphos
Phone 419-302-2982
animalhousekennels.com
20287 Jennings Delphos Rd.
Delphos, Ohio 45833
Rev. David Howell, Pastor
Sunday - 8:15 a.m. Worship
Service; 9:15 a.m. Seekers Sunday
School class meets in parlor; 10:30
a.m. Worship Service; 11:30 a.m.
Radio Worship on WDOH
Thurs. - 4:30 p.m. - 6:30 pm.
Suppers on Us
Fri. - Office Closed
HARTFORD CHRISTIAN CHURCH
(Independent Fundamental)
Rt. 81 and Defiance Trial
Rt. 2, Box 11550
Spencerville 45887
Rev. Robert King, Pastor
Sunday - 9:30 a.m. Sunday
school; 10:30 a.m. Worship
Service; 7:00 p.m. Evening wor-
ship and Teens Alive (grades
ST. MARY’S CATHOLIC
CHURCH
601 Jennings Rd., Van Wert
Sunday 8:30 a.m., 10:30 a.m.;
Monday 8:30 a.m.; Tuesday 7 p.m.;
Wednesday 8:30 a.m.; Thursday
8:30 a.m. - Communion Service;
Friday 8:30 a.m.; Saturday 4 p.m.
Office 419-659-2263
Fax: 419-659-5202
Father Tom Extejt
Masses: Tuesday-Friday - 8:00
a.m.; First Friday of the month
- 7 p.m.; Saturday - 4:30 p.m.;
Sunday - 8:30 a.m. and 11:00
a.m.
Confessions - Saturday 3:30
p.m., anytime by appointment.
419.238.1695 or
www.marshfoundation.org
MARION BAPTIST CHURCH
2998 Defiance Trail, Delphos
7-12).
VAN WERT VICTORY
CHURCH OF GOD
GOOD FOOD
Pastor Jay Lobach 419-339-6319
COOL TREATS
Services:
Sunday - 11:00 a.m.
and 6:00 p.m.; Wednesday - 7:00
p.m.
• Burgers
ST. JOHN’S CATHOLIC CHURCH
• Fries
Wednesday - 7:00 p.m. Bible
service.
Tuesday & Thursday– 7- 9 p.m.
Have you ever wanted to preach
the “Word of God?” This is your
time to do it. Come share your
love of Christ with us.
10698
US 127S., Van Wert
CHURCH OF GOD
(Next to Tracy’s Auction Service)
Tommy Sandefer, lead pastor
Ron Prewitt, sr. adult pastor
Sunday worship & children’s
ministry - 10:00 a.m.
www.vwvcoh.com
facebook: vwvcoh
18906 Rd. 18R, Rimer
419-642-5264
Rev. Mark Walls
Sunday
-
9:30 a.m.
Sunday
Bringing
School;
10:30
a.m.
Worship
Service.
331 E. Second St., Delphos
buyers
• Shakes
419-695-4050
Elida/lima/GomEr
& sellers
• Rev. Mel Verhoff, Pastor
Rev. Chris Bohnsack,
Associate Pastor
Fred Lisk and Dave Ricker,
Deacons
Mary Beth Will, Liturgical
Coordinator; Mrs. Trina
Shultz, Pastoral Associate; Mel
Rode, Parish Council President;
Lynn Bockey, Music Director
Celebration of the Sacraments
Eucharist – Lord’s Day
Observance; Saturday 4:30 p.m.,
Sunday 7:30, 9:15, 11:30 a.m.;
Weekdays as announced on
Sunday bulletin.
Baptism – Celebrated first
Sunday of month at 1:00 p.m. Call
rectory to schedule Pre-Baptismal
instructions.
Reconciliation – Tuesday and
Friday 7:30-7:50 a.m.; Saturday
3:30-4:00 p.m. Anytime by
request.
Matrimony – Arrangements
must be made through the rectory
six months in advance.
Anointing of the Sick –
Communal celebration in May
Ice Cream
TRINITY LUTHERAN
303 S. Adams, Middle Point
The Main Street
HOLY FAMILY CATHOLIC CHURCH
Rev. Robert DeSloover, Pastor
7359 St. Rt. 109 New Cleveland
Saturday Mass - 7:00 p.m.
Sunday Mass - 8:30 a.m.
together!
Ice Cream Parlor
Rev. Tom Cover
Sunday– 9:30 a.m. Sunday
School; 10:30 a.m. Worship ser-
vice.
122 N. Washington St.
Van Wert, Ohio 45891
www.BeeGeeRealty.com
107 E. Main Street • Van Wert, OH
IMMANUEL UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
699 Sunnydale, Elida, Ohio 454807
Pastor Kimberly R. Pope-Seiberlin
Sunday - 8:30 a.m. traditional;
10:45 a.m. contemporary
419-238-2722
IMMACULATE CONCEPTION
CATHOLIC CHURCH
Ottoville
Rev. John Stites
419-238-5555
NEW HOPE CHRISTIAN CENTER
Saturday - 4
2240 Baty Road, Elida
GRACE FAMILY CHURCH
634 N. Washington St., Van Wert
Pastor: Rev. Ron Prewitt
Sunday - 9:15 a.m. Morning wor-
ship with Pulpit Supply.
Mass schedule:
p.m.; Sunday - 10:30 a.m.
Randy altenbuRgeR
InsuRance
agency, Inc.
Ph. 339-5673
Rev. James F. Menke, Pastor
Sunday – 10 a.m. Worship.
Wednesday – 7 p.m. Evening ser-
vice.
KINGSLEY UNITED METHODIST
ST. BARBARA CHURCH
160 Main St., Cloverdale 45827
15482 Mendon Rd., Van Wert
419-488-2391
CORNERSTONE BAPTIST
CHURCH
2701 Dutch Hollow Rd. Elida
Phone: 339-3339
Rev. Frank Hartman
Sunday - 10 a.m. Sunday School
Phone: 419-965-2771
Pastor Chuck Glover
Sunday School - 9:30 a.m.;
Worship - 10:25 a.m.
Wednesday - Youth Prayer and
Bible Study - 6:30 p.m.
Adult Prayer meeting - 7:00
p.m.
Choir practice - 8:00 p.m.
Fr. John Stites
Mass schedule: Saturday 5:30
p.m., Sunday 8:00 a.m.
DRAPERIES, ALTERATIONS
BULK CLEANING FOR
INSTITUTIONS
ST. JOSEPH CATHOLIC CHURCH
Locally owned and operated
Ron Roberts - owner
135 N. Water St., Ft. Jennings
Brian
Randy
Altenburger
Altenburger
(all ages); 11 a.m. Morning Service;
123 E. Main St., Ottoville, Ohio
Phone 419-453-3424
6 p.m. Evening Service.
Wednesday - 7 p.m. Prayer
Meeting.
Office Hours: Monday-Friday,
114 N. Washington Street
Van Wert, Ohio
TRINITY FRIENDS CHURCH
Rev. Joe Przybysz
Phone: 419-286-2132
Mass schedule: Saturday 5
p.m.; Sunday 7:30 a.m. and 9:30
605 N. Franklin St., Van Wert
a.m.
419-238-2133
email: rjaltins@bright.net
RAABE FORD LINCOLN 11260 Elida Road DELPHOS, OH 45833 Ph. 692-0055 Toll Free 1-800-589-7876

RAABE FORD LINCOLN

11260 Elida Road DELPHOS, OH 45833 Ph. 692-0055 Toll Free 1-800-589-7876

130 N. MAIN ST.

DELPHOS

PHONE

419-692-0861

•CARPET

•FURNITURE

Summer Hours

Daily 9-5:30 Sat. 9-3, Sun. 12-3

HARTER & SCHIER FUNERAL HOME

209 W. 3rd St. Delphos, Ohio 45833

419-692-8055

PITSENBARGER

SUPPLY

Professional Parts People

PITSENBARGER SUPPLY Professional Parts People 234 N. Canal St. Delphos, O. Ph. 692-1010

234 N. Canal St. Delphos, O. Ph. 692-1010

BALYEATS

Coffee

Shop

133 E. Main St. Van Wert Ph. 419-238-1580

Hours: Closed Mondays Tuesday-Saturday 6:00 a.m.-10:00 p.m.

Vanamatic

Company

AUTOMATIC AND HAND SCREW MACHINE PRODUCTS

701 Ambrose Drive Delphos, O.

8 – The Herald

Friday, July 27, 2012

Classifieds

Classifieds

Classifieds
Classifieds

www.delphosherald.com

010 Announcements

ADVERTISERS: YOU can place a 25 word classified ad in more than 100 news- papers with over one and

a half million total circula- tion across Ohio for $295.

place one

order and pay with one check through Ohio Scan-Ohio Statewide Classified Advertising Net- work. The Delphos Herald advertising dept. can set this up for you. No other classified ad buy is sim-

It's easy

you

pler or more cost effective. Call 419-695-0015, ext

138.

020

Notice

0 2 0 Notice FreshLocal Produce •Sweet Corn •Squash •Peppers •Tomatoes, etc. ON STATE RT. 309
0 2 0 Notice FreshLocal Produce •Sweet Corn •Squash •Peppers •Tomatoes, etc. ON STATE RT. 309
FreshLocal Produce

FreshLocal Produce

•Sweet Corn

•Squash •Peppers

•Squash •Peppers

•Tomatoes, etc.

•Tomatoes, etc.

ON STATE RT. 309 - ELIDA

ON STATE RT. 309 - ELIDA

Produce •Sweet Corn •Squash •Peppers •Tomatoes, etc. ON STATE RT. 309 - ELIDA 0 4 0

040

419-339-6800

Services

LAMP REPAIR Table or floor. Come to our store. Hohenbrink TV.

419-695-1229

080 Help Wanted

DRIVERS & OWNER OPERATORS Growing company is seek- ing drivers and owner op- erators for a dedicated

customer

Wert.

CDL class A and 2 years experience required. For details call (419)238-2155.

in

Van

HIRING DRIVERS with 5+ years OTR experi- ence! Our drivers average 42cents per mile & higher! Home every weekend! $55,000-$60,000 annually. Benefits available. 99% no touch freight! We will treat you with respect! PLEASE CALL 419-222-1630

Weneedyou at Vancrest HealthCareCenter Housekeeper position available Vancrest of Delphos is a long-term care
Weneedyou
at Vancrest
HealthCareCenter
Housekeeper
position available
Vancrest of Delphos is
a long-term care facility
providing skilled reha-
bilitation services, as-
sisted living, post acute
medical care and more.
We are looking for car-
ing, outgoing, energetic,
HOUSEKEEPER to
join our team. Part time
positions are available,
for all shifts. Check us
out onlineandstopbyto
completeanapplication.
www.vancrest.com
Vancrest of Delphos
1425 E. Fifth St.
Delphos, OH 45833

080 Help Wanted

IMMEDIATE POSITIONS for Full-time Drivers. Dedi-

cated

Routes/Home daily.

Full

benefits

including

401K, Dental & Vision, Paid vacations & Holidays.

CDL

Class

A

required.

2yrs

experience.

Good

MVR. Call 419-733-0642 or email:

dkramer_mls@aol.com

STAFFING SERVICE   We are hiring for long term temporary positions 6 a.m. to 6:30

STAFFING SERVICE

 

We are hiring for long term temporary positions 6 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. and 4:30 p.m. to 5 a.m. - 2 Shifts Overtime required

MUST MEET BACKGROUND AND DRUG TEST REQUIREMENTS

Packers / Material Handlers

$8.00 /hour

Visit us in-person between the hours of 9:00 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday Ask us about our Signing bonus!

Axcess Staffing 707 N. Cable Road Suite H Lima, Ohio 45805

567-712-2200

(Behind Walgreens)

Evening appointments available Ask us about our benefit offerings! Send resumes to:

limaresumes@axcessstaffing.com

FULL TIME AUTO BODY REPAIR TECHNICIAN WANTED

Minimum of 3 years auto body experience. Must have own tools. Excellent wages. Monday thru Friday 8-5. Send resume to PO Box 306, Ottoville, OH 45876 or see Mark at Mark’s Auto Body 24074 US 224 East, Ottoville.

MECHANIC

Thermo King of Delphos is looking for a truck refrigeration technician. If you have mechanical training in Auto, Ag, Heavy Duty, or Industrial Mechanics, or are an experienced mechanic, and are interested in learning some new skills, contact Tom or Don at Thermo King of Delphos, or please E-Mail your resume to tom@tkofohio.com

OTR SEMI DRIVER NEEDED Benefits: Vacation, Holiday pay, 401k. Home weekends & most nights. Call Ulm !s Inc.

419-692-3951

604 W. 7th St., Delphos

Open House

9am-5pm

Fri., Sat. & Sun.

W. 7th St., Delphos Open House 9am-5pm Fri., Sat. & Sun. $0 Down • $0 Closing

$0 Down • $0 Closing Home warranty. Remodeled!

3 bedroom, 3 car garage. New roof, new furnace & central air, updated kitchen, bath, and more! $70,500. Approx. monthly payment - $ 376.48

details, pics and more chbsinc.com

419-586-8220

080 Help Wanted

PART-TIME

PARTS

DELIVERY

Thermo King of Delphos is looking for part-time parts delivery person. This position includes occasional lifting of up to 75 pounds. Contact Tom or Don at Thermo King of Delphos, or please E-Mail your resume to tom@tkofohio.com

VANCREST HealthCareCenters Weneedyou Now hiring – at Vancrest of Delphos We’re looking for out- going,energetic,
VANCREST
HealthCareCenters
Weneedyou
Now hiring –
at Vancrest of Delphos
We’re looking for out-
going,energetic, caring
RN/LPN to join the
teamat our long-term
care facility. Full and
part-time positions
available. Benefits
packageavailable.
Stopbyand fill out an
application
Fordetailsvisit
www.vancrest.com
Vancrest of Delphos
1425 E. Fifth St.
Delphos, OH 45833

290 Wanted to Buy

LOOKING

used, self-propelled lawn

mower, under $100. Call Sandy at 419-692-2720

FOR a good,

Raines

Jewelry

Cash for Gold

Scrap Gold, Gold Jewelry, Silver coins, Silverware, Pocket Watches, Diamonds.

2330 Shawnee Rd. Lima (419) 229-2899

300

Goods

Household

LIVING ROOM furniture, dining room furniture, 8x10 rug, surround sound system, other household items. 419-692-0069

340 Garage Sales

1342 N. Main St.

9am-1pm

Recliners, desk, tarp for 14ft boat, household items.

Saturday Only!

1501 S. Bredeick St.

8am-5pm,

8am-noon. DOWN-SIZ- ING SALE, Come See! Collectibles, nice variety, aquariums, girl’s baby-size 3, boy’s jeans.

7/27

7/28

Weneedyou at Vancrest HealthCareCenter ST N As Vancrest of Delphos is along-term care facility providing
Weneedyou
at Vancrest
HealthCareCenter
ST N As
Vancrest of Delphos is
along-term care facility
providing skilled reha-
bilitation services, as-
sisted living, post acute
medical care and more.
We are looking for car-
ing, outgoing,energetic,
skilled STNA’s to join
our team. Full timeand
part time positions are
available, for all shifts.
Visit us at Vancrest for
details and application
information.
www.vancrest.com
Vancrest of Delphos
1425 E. Fifth St.
Delphos, OH 45833

120 Financial

IS IT A SCAM? The Del- phos Herald urges our

readers to contact The Better Business Bureau,

or

1-800-462-0468, before entering into any agree- ment involving financing, business opportunities, or work at home opportuni- ties. The BBB will assist in the investigation of these businesses. (This notice provided as a cus- tomer service by The Del- phos Herald.)

(419)

223-7010

6 FAMILY Garage Sale 2158 Middle Point Wetzel

to Van Del, turn

North of

right,

Rd. Go

2

miles

Wetzel. Clothes, lots of misc. Thurs Fri & Sat 10-5

735 W. First, Delphos Sports collectibles, misc pictures, clothes, shoes, OSU jerseys. Friday 8-5, Saturday 9-3, July 27th &

28th.

GARAGE SALE Friday & Saturday 9-5. 659 Leonard Ave., Menke Meadows. School uni forms, sports equipment, teacher supplies & home decor.

GARAGE/MOVING SALE 1240 Joshua Street, off Carolyn. Baby and toddler girl NB-2T clothing, toys and gear, adult clothing, furniture items, deck/patio set, other misc. 7/26-7/27,

8am-3pm

ONE DAY Only, Saturday 9-2pm. 267 Elida Road, Apt. 3. Thomas Kinkade painting, original price. Old records with covers, 3 Gucci watches, lots of the unusual.

PORCH/YARD SALE 627 N. Washington St. Fri. 27th & Sat. 28th 9-5. Women’s clothing, scrubs, baby clothes N-3/6mo, Jumparoo, Playstation 1 with games, nice electric fireplace, DVDs and more!

1 with games, nice electric fireplace, DVDs and more! OPEN HOUSE 9am-5pm Fri., Sat. & Sun.

OPEN

HOUSE

9am-5pm Fri., Sat. & Sun.

19176 Venedocia-Eastern Rd., Venedocia

Beautiful country 4 bedroom, 1 1/2 bath, oversized 2 car garage. Updated everywhere. Must See! $89,900. Approx. monthly payment - $ 482.60

www.creativehomebuyingsolutions.com

AT YOUR

S ervice

6 0 www.creativehomebuyingsolutions.com AT YOUR S ervice 9 5 0 Car Care Geise Transmission, Inc. •

950 Car Care

Geise

Transmission, Inc.

• automatic transmission

• standard transmission

• differentials

• transfer case

• brakes & tune up

2 miles north of Ottoville

419-453-3620

OIL - LUBE FILTER

Only $ 22.95*

*up to 5 quarts oil

 

FLANAGAN’S

CAR CARE

 

816 E. FIFTH ST.

DELPHOS

Ph. 419-692-5801 Mon.-Fri. 8-6, Sat. 8-2

Ph. 419-692-5801 Mon.-Fri. 8-6, Sat. 8-2
 
  816 E. FIFTH ST. DELPHOS Ph. 419-692-5801 Mon.-Fri. 8-6, Sat. 8-2   9 5 0
  816 E. FIFTH ST. DELPHOS Ph. 419-692-5801 Mon.-Fri. 8-6, Sat. 8-2   9 5 0
  816 E. FIFTH ST. DELPHOS Ph. 419-692-5801 Mon.-Fri. 8-6, Sat. 8-2   9 5 0

950

Construction

 
T i m A n d r e w s M A S O N
T i m A n d r e w s
M A S O N R Y
R E S T O R A T I O N
C h i m n e y R e p a i r
419-204-4563

Amish Crew

Needing work

Roofing • Remodeling Bathrooms • Kitchens

Hog Barns • Drywall

Additions • Sidewalks

Concrete • etc.

FREE ESTIMATES

419-733-9601

POHLMAN

POURED

CONCRETEWALLS

Residential & Commercial

• Agricultural Needs

• All Concrete Work

Mark Pohlman

419-339-9084

cell 419-233-9460

POHLMAN

BUILDERS

ROOM ADDITIONS

GARAGES • SIDING • ROOFING BACKHOE & DUMP TRUCK SERVICE FREE ESTIMATES FULLY INSURED

Mark Pohlman

419-339-9084

cell 419-233-9460

950 Lawn Care

SPEARS LAWN CARE Total Lawncare & Snow Removal 22 Years Experience • Insured Commercial &
SPEARS
LAWN CARE
Total Lawncare &
Snow Removal
22 Years Experience • Insured
Commercial & Residential
•LAWN MOWING•
•FERTILIZATION•
•WEED CONTROL
PROGRAMS•
•LAWN AERATION•
•SPRING CLEANUP•
•MULCHING & MULCH
DELIVERY•
•SHRUB INSTALLATION,
TRIMMING & REMOVAL•
Lindell Spears
419-695-8516
check us out at
www.spearslawncare.com

950 Miscellaneous

SAFE & SOUND DELPHOS SELF-STORAGE Security Fence •Pass Code •Lighted Lot •Affordable •2 Locations Why
SAFE &
SOUND
DELPHOS
SELF-STORAGE
Security Fence
•Pass Code •Lighted Lot
•Affordable •2 Locations
Why settle for less?
419-692-6336
COMMUNITY SELF-STORAGE GREAT RATES NEWER FACILITY 419-692-0032 Across from Arby’s 950 Tree Service
COMMUNITY
SELF-STORAGE
GREAT RATES
NEWER FACILITY
419-692-0032
Across from Arby’s
950 Tree Service

TEMAN’S

OUR TREE

SERVICE

• Trimming • Topping • Thinning • Deadwooding Stump, Shrub & Tree Removal Since 1973

419-692-7261

Bill Teman 419-302-2981 Ernie Teman 419-230-4890

L.L.C.
L.L.C.

• Trimming & Removal

• Stump Grinding

• 24 Hour Service • Fully Insured

KEVIN M. MOORE

(419) 235-8051

www.delphosherald.com

340 Garage Sales

18812

Road

23Q,

Delphos.

Good

men’s

stuff.

Friday

noon-?,

Saturday 9am-?

501 Misc. for Sale

3-PIECE SOLID oak end table and cocktail tables with wicker and glass -$100 or best offer. (2) Brass lamps with shades -$20 pair. (1) Navy blue playpen -$20. (2) Brass chandeliers -1 modern with glass shades, 1 tradi- tional -$30 each. (1) Musi- cal baby swing -$7. (1) Self standing infant play station -$30. Call 419-232-2158 for informa- tion.

530 Farm Produce

Kings Elida Grown Blackberries

419-339-1968

Kings Elida Grown Blackberries 419-339-1968 Call for Pricing Sold by pints 5 5 0 Pets &

Call for Pricing Sold by pints

550

Pets & Supplies

 
 

• Pet Food

• Pet Supplies

• Purina Feeds

419-339-6800

On S.R. 309 in Elida

SHIH TZU, Adult male $50 PUPPIES: Malti-poms, Chihuahuas, Yorkie/Shih Tzus, Morkie-poos. Soon:

Shih Tzus. Garwick’s the Pet People 419-795-5711. See them at:

garwicksthepetpeople.com

580 For Rent or Lease

RESERVE NOW for inside storage, for boat or car. $150 for winter season. Located in block building at rear of 409 W. Sixth St. Call 419-692-6241

590 House For Rent

Today’s Crossword Puzzle

Today’s Crossword Puzzle ACROSS DOWN 1 Prior to yr. 1 1 Pricey car logo 4 Exclamation

ACROSS

DOWN

1

Prior to yr. 1

1

Pricey car logo

4

Exclamation of surprise

2

Anthracite

7

Cone producer

3

Ferber or Best

11

Trendy

4

German sausage

12

Butterfly stage

5

Unseal, to a poet

13

Ancient empire

6

Roll of bills

14

Rambled

7

Sanctimoniously

16

Garbage bin output

8

Famous 500

17

Hideouts

9

Cpls.

18

Great bargains

10

Hoop site

19

However

12

Pore over

20

Towel word

15

Claims

21

Bear down

18

Lobster eater’s wear

24

Genghis’ grandson

20

Shades

27

31-day mo.

21

Duffer’s goal

28

Buffalo’s lake

22

Completely wreck

30

Oh, gross!

23

Like custard

32

Truckers’ trucks

24

Memorable first

34

Helper (abbr.)

25

Import vehicle

36

Female antelope

26

Desktop picture

37

Synthetic fabrics

29

Scream and shout

39

Doing a takeoff

31

Cookout plus

41

Repeatedly

33

Bogs

42

Chem. or geol.

35

Ploy

43

Hassock

38

Not on duty

45

Rose petal oil

40

Actor Brad --

48

Kin of the twist