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PHILIPPINE NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH ACTION PLAN (NEHAP) 2010-2013

TABLE OF CONTENTS
Foreword ............................................................................................................................................................................... 2 Acronym and Abbreviations ........................................................................................................................................ 3 I. Background................................................................................................................................................................. 6 A. B. C. D. E. F. G. H. I. II. Introduction.......................................................................................................................................................6 The Philippine National Environmental Health Action Plan ............................................................6 The NEHAP Framework ..............................................................................................................................7 Objectives of NEHAP....................................................................................................................................7 Principles in the Formulation of the NEHAP.........................................................................................7 Regional Forums on Environmental Health ...........................................................................................8 The 2007 NEHAP ...........................................................................................................................................9 The 2009 NEHAP ........................................................................................................................................11 The Philippine NEHAP 2010 Updating Process...............................................................................12

Sector Situation, Accomplishment Report and Plans, 2010-2013 ....................................................... 13 A. B. C. D. E. F. G. Toxic and Hazardous Substances............................................................................................................13 Air .....................................................................................................................................................................16 Water Sector ..................................................................................................................................................19 Sanitation Sector...........................................................................................................................................21 Food Safety ....................................................................................................................................................24 Occupational Health....................................................................................................................................26 Solid Waste ....................................................................................................................................................28 Next Steps: Conclusions, Cross Cutting Issues And Recommendations ........................................ 32

III.

Annex 1. Framework for the Drafting of the NEHAP........................................................................................ 33 Annex 2: Action Plan 2010-2013 by Sector ........................................................................................................ 34 Annex 3. Proposed Reorganization of the Sectoral Task Force Composition............................................ 54 Annex 3. Report to the 5th High Level Meeting..................................................................................................... 58

FOREWORD
The threat of environmental hazards to man has not been more emphasized than at present times. Despite notable achievements in the health indicators (e.g. increasing life expectancy at birth, decreasing infant death rates, etc.), these are now being threatened by changing environmental scenarios such as industrialization and rapid urbanization. With the emergence of modern environmental hazards (e.g. improper disposal of hazardous substances from industries and households; vehicular and industrial emissions) and the persistence of traditional hazards (e.g. lack of access to fundamental resources such as safe water, sanitation, housing, among others), the Filipinos are now faced with the burden of both communicable diseases closely linked with traditional hazards and noncommunicable diseases associated with modern hazards. In terms of urbanization and population growth, the country ranks among the highest in Southeast Asian countries. An expanding population can have serious environmental and health implications and is a major threat to the remaining resources of the country since our limited resources may not be able to cope with the growing needs of the population. This may render greater difficulty, especially to the impoverished sectors of society, in acquiring basic needs essential for healthy living water, food, shelter, and sanitation. The development of a comprehensive and integrated approach to address environmental health issues warrant the participation and commitment of all stakeholders, from the national agencies, nongovernment organizations, the academe, the business group, the local government units and the communities. The National Environmental Health Action Plan (NEHAP) will direct the provision of environmental health services in the Philippines for the next three years through strategic approaches by various partnerships in the following key areas: Sanitation Water Air Toxic Chemicals and Hazardous Waste Occupational Health Food Safety Solid Waste Climate Change

ACRONYM AND ABBREVIATIONS

AFP ATO BAFPS BAI BAR BFAR BFP BHDT-DOH BLGS-DILG BOC BOI-DTI BPI BPS BWC BWC-DOLE CAA CC CCO CENRO CLUP CLTS CSC DA DBM DBM DENR DepED DEWATS DILG DOE DOF DOH DOH-BOQ DOH-HEMS DOH-NCHP DOH-NEC DOH-NNC DOLE DOLE-BWC DOST DOST-PCHRD

Armed Forces of the Philippines Air Transportation Office Bureau of Agriculture and Fisheries Product Standards Bureau of Animal Industry Bureau of Agricultural research Bureau of Fisheries and Aquatic Resources Bureau of Fire Protection Bureau of Health Devices and Technology Bureau of Local Government Supervision Bureau of Customs Bureau of Investments Bureau of Plant Industry Bureau of Public Standards Bureau of Working Conditions Bureau of Worker's Conditions Civil Aviation Authority Climate Change Chemical Control Order City Environment and Natural Resources Office Comprehensive Land Use Plan Community Led Total Sanitation Civil Service Commission Department of Agriculture Department of Budget and Management Department of Budget and Management Department of Environment and Natural Resources Department of Education Decentralized Wastewater treatment Interior and Local Government Department of Energy Department of Finance Department of Health Bureau of Quarantine Health Emergency Management Staff National Center for Health Promotion National Epidemiology Center National Nutrition Council Department of Labor and Employment Bureau of Working Conditions Department of Science and Technology DOST -Philippe Council for Health Research and Development 3

DOTC DOTC-PPA DPWH DTI DTI-BPS EASAN2 ECOP EMB EOHO-DOH ETS FAO FDA FDA-DOH FDC FNRI FPA FPA GSIS HCW IACEH ICAO IEC IHP IRR ITDI-DOST IWRM LDWQMC LGPMS LGU LGU LLDA LMP LTO MOA/U MSDS MMDA MWSS NAWASA NCDPC NCHP NDA NDCC WASH NEDA NEHAP NFA NFSCC NGO

Department of Transportation and Communication DOTC- Philippine Ports Authority Departments of Public Works and Highways Department of Trade and Industry DTI Bureau of Product Standards 2nd East Asia Ministerial Conference on Sanitation and Hygiene Employers Confederation of the Philippines Environmental Management Bureau Environmental and Occupational Health Office Educational Testing Service Food and Agriculture Organization Food and Drug Administration Food and Drug Authority-Department of Health Food Development Center Food and Nutrition Research Institute Fertilizer and Pesticide Authority Fertilizer and Pesticide Authority Government Service Insurance System Health Care Wastes Inter-Agency Committee on Environmental Health International Civil Aviation Organization Information, Education and Communication Industrial Hygienists Association of the Philippines Implementing Rules and Regulations Industrial Technology Development Institute Integrated Water Resources Management Local Drinking Water Quality Monitoring Committee Local Governance Performance Management System Local Government Unit Local Government Unit Laguna Lake Development Authority League of Municipalities Land Transportation Office Memorandum of Agreement/Understanding Material Safety Data Sheets Metropolitan Manila Development Authority Metro Manila Water and Sewerage System National Water and sanitation Association of the Philippines National Center for Disease Prevention and Control National Center for Health Promotion National Dairy Authority National Disaster Coordinating Council - Water, Sanitation and Hygiene National Economic Development Authority National Environmental Health Action Plan National Food Authority National Food Safety Coordinating Council Non- Government Organizations 4

NIA NMIS NPMCC NSBBSP NSSMP NSWMCS NWRB OHNAP OH/EH OSCH PATAMABA PCA PCL PCOM PCUP PHA PIA PIA PNSDW PNP PNRI-DOST PPA PSSR PWAD PWP PWSSR PWWA RITM SAICM SOPI SRA SSS SWATOFS SWM TSP ULAP UNDP-GEF UNEP US-EPA WATSAN WHO WSP VOC

National Irrigation Authority National Meat Inspection Service National Poison Management Control Centre National Search for Barangay with Best Sanitation Practices National Sewerage and Septage Management Plan National Solid Waste Management Commission National Water Resources Board Occupational Health Nurses Association of the Philippines Occupational Health / Environmental Health Occupational Safety and Health Center Pambansang Tagapag-ugnay ng mga Manggagawa sa Bahay Philippine Coconut Authority Priority Chemical List Philippine College of Occupational Medicine Presidential Commission for the Urban Poor Philippine Hospital Association Philippine Information Agency Philippine Information Agency Philippine National Standards for Drinking Water Philippine National Police Philippine Nuclear Research Institute Philippine Ports Authority Philippine Sustainable Sanitation Roadmap Philippine Association of Water Districts Philippine Water Partnership Philippine Water Supply Sector Roadmap Philippine Water Works Association Research Institute for Tropical medicine Strategic Approach to International Chemicals Management Safety Organization of the Philippines, Inc. Sugar Regulatory Administration Social Security System Solid Waste, Water, Air, Toxic and Hazardous Wastes, Occupational Health, Food Safety, and Sanitation Solid Waste Management Total Suspended Particulates Union of Local Authorities of the Philippines UNDP - Global Environment Facility United Nations Environment Programme US - Environmental Protection Agency Water and Sanitation World Health Organization Water and Sanitation Program Volatile Organic Compound

I. BACKGROUND
A. INTRODUCTION
The World Health Organization(WHO) Commission on Health and Environment has concluded that if the future of the human race is to be safeguarded, its manner of dealing with the environment must change drastically and if the human race continuers to ignore this fact, its improved health and well-being will not be an attainable goal. The inherent link between the environment, health and development cannot be overemphasized. Recognition of the need to preserve the environment in order to prevent threats to human health while at the same time ensuring that development goals are met is paramount. One need not look at the health profile of our country to see that the top leading causes of illnesses continue to be communicable diseases like diarrhea, malaria, typhoid fever, etc. which are wrought by traditional environmental key risks like inadequacy of safe water, poor waste management, nonpractice of food safety, etc. Furthermore, the country is now experiencing growing environmental challenges that impact not only in health but also in terms of livelihood and well being of the citizens. This would include population growing in exponential terms and the impacts of climate change that has caused several cases of extreme emergency. Environmental Health, being defined here as referring to the practice of assessing, correcting, controlling and preventing factors in the environment that can potentially adversely affect the health of present and future generations (WHO, 1993), needs to be given more emphasis in governance. If the priority of this government is poverty alleviation then, environmental health should be recognized as a tool to achieve this. Any intervention that will reduce the environmental health risks to the poor is a must to reduce poverty. A mechanism to give purpose and direction to Environmental Health activities is the collective formulation of a National Environmental Health Action Plan or NEHAP.

B. THE PHILIPPINE NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH ACTION PLAN


Environmental Health concerns itself with the prevention of illness, either through management of the environment or through changing behaviors. The approach to prevention consists of interventions that prevent the generation of agents, vectors or risk factors; interrupt the transmission of the disease agents and reduce the contact between man and these agents. The National Environmental Health Action Plan or NEHAP is seen as an inter-agency plan to achieve long-term policy objectives. It is the framework for actions on priority Environmental Health issues. It recognizes the need to coordinate the Environmental Health activities of all stakeholders to give it direction, support its implementation and avoid duplication of efforts. The list of actions identified to address these issues will form a checklist to assess the countrys progress in its efforts. The formulation of the NEHAP adhered to the interdependence of health, development and the environment. Efforts to protect health should always include efforts to preserve the environment and all activities wrought by development should be aligned along the line of preservation and restoration of 6

both. Thus, the need to require that health and environment protection be integrated in the policies and plans of the other sectors.

C. THE NEHAP FRAMEWORK


The Philippines is party to different international agreements. The NEHAP plan is seen as a convergence of all these international commitments: the UN Millennium Development Goals, international agreements such as those embodied in the Philippines Agenda 21 and the ,Johannesburg Plan of Implementation of 2002. The NEHAP Plans are also informed by the Environmental Health National Laws, Philippine Medium Term Plan and Development Program and the National Objectives for Health. A diagram of the NEHAP Framework is included in Annex 1.

D. OBJECTIVES OF NEHAP
1. To foster better collaboration at all levels between those responsible for health and those responsible for the environment and between these two and the other players; 2. To foster better collaboration between the national, regional and local authorities to ensure that efforts are coordinated and synergistic; 3. To allow the participation of the public in the decision-making process whenever possible and at all appropriate levels.

E. PRINCIPLES IN THE FORMULATION OF THE NEHAP


1. The NEHAP subscribes to the definition of Sustainable Development, which is development that meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs. 2. Environmental Health issues will be seen from the health and environment perspective taking into account all relevant national and local interests and priorities using an integrated and multidimensional approach. 3. The tenet of Prevention is better than cure shall be the best approach. 4. There shall be recognition of the importance of economic valuation of health and environment impact for more optimal use of scarce resources. Trade and economic policies affecting Environmental Health policy shall also be considered. 5. Environmental Health initiatives shall take into consideration the use of economic instruments to finance its activities by way of taxes, user fees, etc. There shall likewise be subscription to the Polluter Pays principle. 7

6. The plan shall recognize the value of having a more effective and systematic impact assessment procedure to bridge evidence-based data with sound decision-making. 7. There should be recognition of the need to develop the capabilities at the local level for identifying and assessing environmental health problems, planning for interventions and implementing and monitoring these. Appropriate institutional support structures should likewise be provided. 8. There shall be awareness raising on health and environment issues through communication strategies for effective health and environment decision-making and effective social action. 9. There shall be recognition of the important role of the community in managing their environment and health. In health, the Primary Health Care approach should be utilized. 10. Environmental Health being an inter- sectoral concern, initiatives such as the Inter-Local Health Zones (IHZ) shall be utilized as avenues to mobilize the communities to act in concerted fashion.

F. REGIONAL FORUMS ON ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH


The Philippines have been actively participating in the different regional initiatives on environment and health jointly organized by the World Health Organization (WHO) and the United National Environment Program (UNEP). The First High Level Officials meeting was held in Manila in November 2004 where the Regional Initiative on Environment and Health was launched. The Second High Level Meeting on Health and Environment held in 12-13 of December 2005 in Bangkok, Thailand resulted in the adoption of the charter on Health and Environment and a decision to hold joint ministerial meetings between the Health and Environment Ministers. The Third High level Officials Meeting was held in August, 2007 prior to the First Ministerial Meeting to review progress made in national and regional actions since the Second High Level Officials meeting and to endorse the draft charter composition and work plans of the regional Thematic Working Groups ( TWGS) on six priorities for submission to the Ministerial meeting. The 2nd Ministerial Regional Forum for Environmental Health was recently held in Korea on July 1415, 2010 where the updated NEHAPs were discussed to determine progress, identify new issues and concerns in the light of current developments in environmental health at the global, regional and country levels. During this meeting some of the important highlights are as follows: Emergency concerns were incorporated in the 2010-2013 NEHAP The Forum expects that the Philippine government would endorse/sign the NEHAP document for uploading later to the Forum website The contents of NEHAP should be acceptable to all partners The DOH could decide a mechanism on how IACEH would endorse NEHAP There was a new Thematic Working group created, i.e. Health Impact assessment, and the Philippines should have a response on this, such as who would compose the corresponding TWG under IACEH, if there is a need. Climate change and emergency concerns are new initiatives for integration to NEHAP and the IACEH should decide on the leadership and composition of the TWG. 8

G. THE 2007 NEHAP


The IACEH met in June 2007 to re-validate the goals and strategies of the Philippine NEHAP and to identify priority key actions per sector involving inter-agency collaboration. The following Sectoral Goals and Key Actions were agreed on:

Sector
Solid Waste

Goal
To strengthen the institutional mechanism/linkages to ensure a healthy environment through sustained implementation of the Ecological Solid Waste Management Program

Key Actions
Review of RA 9003 Stronger Advocacy to LGUs to implement RA 9003 e.g landfills and Materials Recovery Facility Resource Mapping and Needs Assessments in the regions/LGUs Establishment of Regional Ecology Centers

Water

To reduce/eradicate the incidence of water-borne and other water-related diseases

Development of the Water Supply Roadmap Develop drinking water technology options Adoption of Integrated Water Resources Management Develop innovative/acceptable financing mechanisms Operationalization of the Knowledge Management Portal on Water and Sanitation Stronger advocacy for the ff. at LGU level: implementation of the PNSDW; establishment of LDWQMC and to establish more drinking water laboratories.

Air

To achieve the quality of air that will protect the public health safety and welfare

Conduct of studies re LPG/CNG health risks Strengthen monitoring of Bio Fuels Act Advocacy for use of cleaner/alternative technology

Toxic Substances and Hazardous Wastes

To reduce the incidence of diseases and injuries brought about by exposure to toxic and hazardous substances

Implement the globally harmonized system ( GHS) for classification and labeling of chemicals; Harmonize risk assessment and risk management methodologies Establish poison control centers at the regional level Harmonize and update information databases Capacity/capability building on toxicology

Strengthen enforcement strategies at the local level. Occupational Health To reduce the incidence of environmental and occupational health-related diseases and injuries. Capability building of industries for self-regulation Enforcement of OH/EH laws by LGUs Involvement of employers and workers group in the conduct of EH/OH activities Establishment of OH/EH laboratories Food Safety To ensure supply of safe food from farm to plate and be globally competitive. Development of Food Safety legislation Strengthen Food safety system Develop rapid alert system Sanitation To accelerate the development and implementation of effectual programs of sustainable sanitation and wastewater management. Develop national sanitation master plan Stronger advocacy for the clean water act implementation by the LGUs and increased LGU investment /enhance involvement of private sector ( public-private partnership) Dissemination of sanitation technology options.

A few cross -cutting issues have been identified: Policy Policy review and strengthening of regulation and enforcement ( specifically on the Clean Water Act, RA 9003, the Sanitation Code); review of existing penalties and sanctions; review of bilateral agreements in the entry of e-wastes and the development of incentive schemes to attract investors in solid and liquid waste treatment facility. Information System The need to establish a comprehensive EOH information system/databank and to harmonize all data on EOH from different sources ( FHSIS,NSCB, NDHS, NSO) Logistics The need to establish food laboratories that are compliant to international standards; development of financing, investment and incentive schemes for EOH initiative. Enforcement, Monitoring and Evaluation The need to capacitate the LGUs to enforce laws/policies on EOH. The need to reiterate the CHDs mandate to monitor EOH programs and projects at LGU levels through mutual cooperation.

Standards

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The need to harmonize international and local standards (such as in food trade) and the development of health standards for chemical exposure.

H. THE 2009 NEHAP


In the NEHAP 2009 report on accomplishments and plans, the DOH, through its Undersecretary reported to the Fourth High level meeting on Environment and Health last March 2009 in Beijing, China. The report was essentially an update of the progress made on the 2007 priority areas and next steps. It provided an overview of the programs and projects implemented per sector to address the different EH hazards: EH Hazards
Solid Waste

Programs and Project Implemented


Advocacy campaigns on Republic Act 9003-Solid Waste Management Act Technical guidelines on closure of controlled dump facilities and establishment of sanitary landfills Preparation of Citizens Suits against non-complying local government units (LGUs) for cases in Environmental Ombudsman Implementation of Presidents Priority Water Supply Project for Waterless Municipalities Provision of community-managed water supply and sanitation services in 910 barangays ( 6 provinces) Adoption of low-cost water treatment facilities for public market and residential areas in five LGUs Harmonization of water and sanitation indicators (ongoing) Development of Water Supply Roadmap Review and updating of air emissions standards Conduct of regular ambient air emissions in different airsheds Enactment of Bio-Fuels Act (2006) Approval of Policy on Gradual Phase-Out of Mercury in all Philippine Health Care Facilities and Institutions Small-Scale Grant for the Quick Start Program under the Strategic Assessment for International Chemicals Management (SAICM -$250,000) Establishment of Poison Control Center at Davao Regional Health Office and East Avenue Medical Center Implementation of Comprehensive and Integrated National Occupational Safety and Health Plan 2006-2010 Established mechanism for industries self-regulation Implementation of the Work Improvement for Small Establishment (WISE) National Annual Awarding for Establishments and Individuals (Gawad Kalusugan at Kaligtasan sa Industriya) Review and updating of Implementing Rules and Regulations on Food Establishments Updating of laboratory capacity of Bureau of Food and Drugs Program for Sustainable Sanitation for East Asia Philippine Component, SIDA/WB Project Development of Sustainable Sanitation Roadmap (ongoing) Conduct of National Sanitation Summit (every 2 years) Construction of sewerage facilities in Metro Manila (urban) and Saranggani Province (rural) Creation of the Presidential Task Force on Climate Change

Water

Air

Toxic and Hazardous Waste

Occupational Health

Food

Sanitation

Climate Change

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(2007) Multi-sectoral Forum on Climate Change (June 2008) Preparation for 2nd National Communication /Report to UN Framework Convention on Climate Change ( for submission in 2010) Secured Spanish MDG-F support for Strengthening the Philippines Institutional Capacity to Adapt Climate Change with the following objectives: 1. Determine vulnerability of critical sectors to climate change; 2. Strengthen countrys adaptive capacity by enhancing the planning, programming, and implementation capacities of key stakeholders; 3. Undertake the adaptation demonstration projects for potential up scaling /replication

I. THE PHILIPPINE NEHAP 2010 UPDATING PROCESS


The NEHAP is considered a very important document in the Philippine environmental health sector. It is an integrated plan to guide the policy and program development and implementation for improving environmental health of the country. As such, a multi stakeholder and participatory approach was adopted in the updating of the said plan. The multi-stakeholder approach is anchored on the recognition of the different roles and participation of concerned stakeholders in developing and implementing the NEHAP. These meant the active involvement and participation of various stakeholders ranging from national government agencies with mandates pertinent to the different thematic areas covered under NEHAP, the academe, the NGOs and civil society group, and more importantly the local government units represented by the different leagues. The DOH, with technical and financial support from WHO have engaged the services of consultants to facilitate the updating of the plan. The updating process consist of the following activities: Review of the current NEHAP including a rapid scan and desk review of related literatures Interview with key informants from the sector including conduct of meeting with key stakeholders Conduct of the first multi-stakeholder NEHAP writeshop/workshop the main agenda of which was to review past accomplishment and the updates that need to be reflected in NEHAP 2010-1013. Preparation of the Draft NEHAP 2010 to 2013 plan. Conduct of the final multi stakeholder workshop/writeshop for the consolidated review, assessment and updating of the NEHAP Refinement and packaging of the updated NEHAP for presentation to concerned agencies and 2nd Ministerial Forum to be held in July, 2010 in the Republic of Korea. Finalization of the NEHAP taking into account agreements reached during the 2nd Ministerial Forum 12

II. SECTOR SITUATION, ACCOMPLISHMENT REPORT AND 2010-2013 PLANS


In preparing for the update of the NEHAP plan, the IACEH Sectoral Task Force met to report on their progress and to prepare their sectoral priorities for the 2010-2013 NEHAP plan. It was also an opportunity to redefine the composition of their Sectoral Task Force. The following section is an overview of each sectors situation and major accomplishments from 2005 to 2010 and an overview of their proposed plans for 2010-2013. The proposed composition of each sectoral task force is attached in Annex 3 for final approval by the IACEH.

A. TOXIC AND HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES


1) Sector Situationer and Accomplishments, 2005-2010
The Philippine Inventory of Chemicals and Chemical substances (PICCS) count 44,600 chemicals that it needs to monitor. Out of these, there is a priority list of 48 regulated chemicals. (called PCL or Priority Chemical List). There are also 5 controlled chemicals under the Chemical Control Order ( CCO). This includes asbestos, cyanide, mercury, PCBs and Ozone Depleting Substances. The country has only 7 poison control centers nationwide. This is already an improvement from 2005 when there was only one poison control center. The centers report a total of 1,286 poisoning cases in 2009. Top causes of poisons are the following Jewelry cleaners Mixed pesticides Button batteries Watusi firecracker Jathropha seeds Multi-vitamins Malathion and xylene Camphor with Methyl ASA and turpentine

In terms of hazardous waste, the DENR has recognized 108 privately owned hazardous waste treatment facilities. It has also accredited a total of 265 hazardous waste transporters. They cater to about 11,162 hazardous waste generators. Current issues that the sector are concerned with are as follows: a. The need to harmonize approaches on risk management methodologies; 13

b. Insufficient number of technical experts on toxicology at different levels ( national, regional and local) c. Lack of proper labeling for household chemicals except for pesticides; d. Weak/inappropriate legislation on penal provisions and prohibited acts e. Overlapping of legislation on chemical safety; f. Lack of infrastructure support for laboratory/disposal facilities

g. Inadequate capacity to detect hazardous waste and transboundary smuggling h. Inadequate capacity and insufficient technology in the treatment and disposal of hazardous health care wastes (HCW).

2) Issues and Concerns


The issues and concerns identified under this thematic areas were divided into different areas as follows: On the expansion and acceleration of chemical risks, two issues were identified: inadequate harmonized approach for risk management methodologies and insufficient technical experts on toxicology at different levels. Under harmonization and labeling of chemicals, there is the issue on the absence of proper labeling for household chemicals except for pesticides. With respect to strengthening national capabilities and capacities to manage chemicals, identified issues were: inappropriate action plans/legislations on penal provisions and prohibited acts; overlapping of legislation on chemical safety; and the lack of infrastructure support. Furthermore, there was the issue on the inadequacy to detect hazardous waste/transboundary smuggling with regards to the prevention of international traffic of toxic and dangerous products. There was also the issue of limited awareness and concern on chemicals and HCW. Under technology update, issues identified were: insufficient technology in the treatment and disposal of hazardous HCW and the limitation set forth under the Clean Air Act.

3) Developing the Action Plan The Toxic and Hazardous Waste Sector has developed their action plan based on six (6) programmed areas:

a. Expanding and accelerating assessment of chemical risks b. Harmonization of Chemicals and Labeling of Chemicals c. Strengthening national capabilities and capacities for management of chemicals 14

d. Prevention of illegal international traffic in toxic and dangerous products e. Information Exchange f. Technology Update

Plan implementation is to be carried with the active participation of national government agencies, the academe and the non government organization. Lead agencies include DOH. DENR, DA and DILG.
Detailed Sector Action Plan is in Annex 2.

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B. AIR
1) Sector Situationer and Accomplishments
The Air Quality Management Section Environmental Management Bureau of the DENR is monitoring ambient air through 42 monitoring stations nationwide. However, these monitoring equipments only monitor the TSPs (Total Suspended Particulates) which should not exceed 90 micrograms/cubic meter. Air pollution in the country is currently being caused primarily by mobile sources, followed by area sources then stationary sources. The increasing number of motor vehicles is the main culprit accounting for 65% of air pollution. It is important that monitoring stations be established in highly urbanizing cities and that the country should build its technical capacity to monitor PM 10 and PM 2.5 ( Particulate matter with 10 diamicrons and 2.5 diamicrons affect the lungs and is a concern of the DOH and the DENR.) The DENR has designated air sheds to better monitor the compliance to the National Air Quality Guideline Values.

DESIGNATION OF AIRSHEDS

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It has also initiated several programs to address air pollution: A. BANTAY TSIMENEYA PROGRAM (Monitoring of Chimneys) Under this program, total monitored industries is 6,643 ( 2009). Out of these, 334 were found to be non-compliant and have been issued notices of violation. B. BANTAY TAMBUTSO PROGRAM ( Vehicle Emission Monitoring) Of the 4,867 vehicles e flagged down in 2009, 46% found passing the emission standards. Those who failed were penalized. C. IMPROVED FUEL QUALITY PROGRAM Industrial Fuel: 0.3% sulfur content for Industrial diesel Regulated sulfur content of bunker fuel: Regular BFO, 3%; Special BFO, 1% & 2% or upon industry order Automotive Fuel: Phased-out leaded gasoline nationwide in December 2000 Regulated the 2% benzene and 35% aromatics content in gasoline Implemented the limit of .05% sulfur content in auto-diesel Biofuels Act of 2006 (RA 9367) Promoted the use of 2% bio-diesel blend; and ethanol-gasoline blend (E10) D. STANDARD SETTINGS Adoption of Euro II Emission Standards for Motor Vehicles per DENR Administrative Order No. 2007-27 (Emission Limits for CO,HC+NOx & PM per category and type of Engine) Adoption of Euro 4 (In progress) E. PUBLIC AWARENESS BUILDING

Through the regular reporting of the National Air Quality Status Report that is disseminated to the public Mass media have also assisted in raising public awareness on the need to keep motored vehicles in good condition and should always pass the vehicle emission test which is now mandatory for the renewal of motor vehicle registration.

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2) Issues and Concerns


Based on the type or source of air pollution, issues and concerns besetting the sector were identified. Under the category mobile/transport emission of gaseous pollutants, the issues included were: lack of emission standards for airline and sea going vessel who were emitting gaseous pollutants; poor compliance to emission standards ; excessive noise emission; enforcement of noise ambient standards; inadequate capacity to monitor fuel quality; lack of national inspection and maintenance program for motor vehicles. With regards to stationary sources, concerns identified were: inefficient operation of facilities; outdated technology for control of emissions; and insufficient monitoring station and its location. Under area source, problems identified were: implementation and enforcement on the ban for open burning; uncontrolled agricultural and forest fires; non- compliance to policies on smoking in public places and indoor air pollution; uncontrolled emission of VOC; and increase in road dust. On systems development aspect, the problems included were: the need for a harmonized health information for air pollution and research gaps on health impact/evaluation of mitigating measures in term of health costs.

3) Developing the Action Plan


The Action Plan for the air sector was developed with the goal to achieve quality of air that will protect the public health, safety and welfare. The plan calls for the implementation of strategic activities and the active involvement of agencies such as Department of Environment and Natural Resources (DENR) through the EMB; the Department of Transportation and Communication (DOTC) specifically the LTO, PPA, and ATO; the Department of Interior and Local Government (DILG); the Department of Trade and Industry (DTI) particularly BPS; the Department of Energy (DOE); the Department of Finance (DOF); the Public Information Agency (PIA); the Metro Manila Development Authority (MMDA); as well as the LGUs and Non-Government Organizations. With the strategies formulated to address issues identified, the expected outputs include: integration of the RA 9003 into the comprehensive land use plan (CLUP) and the physical framework plan of LGUs; building the capacity of LGU staff in the area of solid waste management; and the mainstreaming of the informal waste sector in the national and local government plans and programs. Detailed Sector Action Plan is in Annex 2.

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C.
1)

WATER SECTOR
Sector Situationer and Accomplishments

The Office of the President allocated PhP500 Million per year from 2005 to 2008 for the Presidents Priority Program on Water (P3W). In late 2009, the fund was even increased to Php1.5 Billion. The fund was primarily for grants to serve waterless municipalities defined as those whose households have less than 50% access coverage. 331 municipalities have been served out of the target of 432 waterless municipalities. As of December 2009 it is reported that 118 of these municipalities have now graduated- meaning they have more than 50% access coverage or total households with access to potable water. In August 2007, the Philippine Water Supply Sector Roadmap (PWSSR) was completed and approved by the National Economic and Development Authority Infrastructure Committee and this has now become the basis for coordination of the countrys projects and programs on water supply. NEDA is leading the updating of the PWSSR and the second edition is now undergoing discussion for approval. Task Forces on the three key result areas of the PWSSR are regularly meeting to monitor plan implementation. These are in the areas of institution building, strategic alliances and capacity development. Five major projects are now on-going nationwide that are aligned with the PWSSR targets: a. Enhancing Access to and Provision of Water Services with the Active participation of the Poor ( MDG 1919 Funded by the Spanish Achievement Fund, Project duration: 2009-2012 ) targeting 36 waterless municipalities in 5 regions all over the country. b. Philippine Water Supply and Sanitation Sector Assessment and Monitoring Project c. Development of the Capacity Building Framework for Water and Sanitation d. Ring-Fencing of Water Utility accounts of Local Government Units and water cooperatives e. The Philippine Portal for the Water Supply & Sanitation Sector (http://philwatsan.org.ph) was created in 2008 containing the policies, projects/programs, research/publications and statistics on WATSAN. It is maintained and operated by the National Water Resources Board. Increased access to safe drinking water increased through these projects. These definitely contributed to the improvement of water quality in priority areas and reduced the incidence of water borne diseases.

2)

Issues and Concerns

The issues and concerns affecting the water sector were identified based on source, supply, investment and regulations aspects. Under source, the following issues were identified: fragmented water source development; pollution of water sources from agricultural and industrial sources; over extraction of groundwater leading to saltwater intrusion;

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Supply related issues identified included disparity in the provision of safe water supply ( urban vs. rural, rich vs. poor) and the significant increase in the population with no access to safe water supply. In terms of investment, the main issue was the low level of investment, both for capital and operating investments. With respect to regulations, the issues pointed out were: weak enforcement of water-related policies and laws; inadequate mechanism for preparedness and response during emergencies and climate change such as drought, floods and spills. The issue of uncoordinated/scattered information about the sector and the need for updated sector data including partial implementation of the water supply roadmap were also part of the issues identified affecting the sector.

3) Developing the Action Plan


The action plan was developed with the outcome goal To provide adequate water supply and reduce/eradicate waterborne and water-related diseases. Specific goals, strategies and outputs were subsequently identified together with the lead and partner agencies who are expected to facilitate the implementation of the Plan. Some of the major outputs identified include: formulation of a national framework for water source development; implementation of the Clean Water Act, particularly the water safety plans; mapping of high risk areas and preparation of groundwater vulnerability map; local ordinances for water supply management; and robust private sector participation to increase sector investments. Multi agency participation approach including the LGUs, the academe and the civil society is crucial to plan implementation. Detailed Sector Action Plan is in Annex 2.

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D.

SANITATION SECTOR

1) Sector Situationer and Accomplishments


The latest data on Philippine Sanitation reveals that in 2008, about one quarter of the population is still not served with individual sanitary types of sanitation facilities. Open defecation is still practiced by 14% of the rural population and 4% of the urban population respectively. This means that every single day probably 10 million Philippine citizens defecate in the open, with serious consequences to the health, dignity and human development of this equally important part of the national population. While the country is said to be on track in meeting its MDGs on sanitation it still means 1 in every 5 people in the Philippines will be unserved and that achieving universal coverage figures (100% of households with sanitary toilets) is highly uncertain. The uncertainty is aggravated by the recent disasters that hit the country and probably damaged substantively existing sanitation facilities. While sanitation has traditionally lagged behind water supply, it has recently been energized by the high priority accorded to it internationally. The Philippines supported the global community by organizing a number of milestone events to raise the profile of sanitation in the country and to recognize the best practices being done at local level. These special events include the following: a) The First Sanitation Summit - July 31, 2006 in Heritage Hotel with the theme A Call for Improved Access to Sustainable Sanitation. b) The Second Sanitation Summit - July 9-10, 2008 in ADB with the theme Better Water Quality and Safety through Improved Sanitation. c) International Year of Sanitation (2008) launching in Mandaluyong City on February 18, 2008. d) The DOH launched the National Search for Barangay with Best Sanitation Practices (NSBBSP) in 2008. e) The First Philippine Symposium on Sustainable Sanitation and Global Handwashing Day Celebration held in Mandarin Hotel, Makati City last October 15-16, 2009 f) Hosting of the 2nd East Asia Ministerial Conference on Sanitation and Hygiene (EASAN2) on January 26-28, 2010 at Sofitel Philippine Plaza Hotel, Manila g) The awarding of the 2nd NSBBSP was held at Sofitel Philippine Plaza Hotel, Manila last January 29, 2010 with 3 Barangays as the Grand National Winners (1st, 2nd & 3rd) The most important milestone for the sanitation sector is the preparation of the Philippine Sustainable Sanitation Roadmap (PSSR) led by the Department of Health. The PSSR is the basic framework document that will serve as the guide for the development of sustainable sanitation in the country. It has recently been approved by the NEDA inter-agency Sub-committee on Water Resources and is now being disseminated so that national and local agencies can develop their plans and programs aligned with the roadmap framework.

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The recent preparation of the National Sewerage and Septage Management Plan ( NSSMP) under the Department of Public Works and Highways is consistent with the Roadmap and has also been recently approved by the NEDA. Furthermore, the Philippines is also one of the countries participating in the program for Sustainable Sanitation in East Asia where the following were developed: a) b) c) d) National Sustainable Sanitation Plan of the Department of Health National sustainable sanitation health promotion plan Sanitation program packages for different types of sanitation challenges Sustainable Sanitation Education Program

Many Local Government Units (LGUs) are now embarking on wastewater treatment projects for public markets, slaughterhouses and hospitals. A few have also piloted the Community Led Total Sanitation approach ( CLTS) , the Decentralized Wastewater Treatment ( DEWATS) facilities and Ecological Sanitation (ECOSAN) approaches using urine diverting and composting toilets. But these are still in the pilot stage and there is still a need to scale up and replicate best practices.

2) Issues and Concerns There were 3 major category of issues affecting the sanitation sector namely: a) governance, regulation and enforcement, b) service delivery, and c) financing. Under the first category, the issues identified were: the need to update the Sanitation Code; weak and fragmented institutional framework and policies and low LGU awareness and political will to improve sanitation. With regards to service delivery aspect, the issues included: inadequate capacity to facilitate sustainable sanitation; lack of sanitation-focused skilled human resources; absence of guidelines to develop/strengthen LGU initiatives on policy formulation, planning and managing sanitation programs; front liners such as sanitary inspectors and some sanitation service providers lack adequate sanitation education, knowledge and skills and; low level of knowledge and know how on planning and implementation of sustainable sanitation programs/projects, In the area of financing, the issues were very low level of investment for sanitation, investment was more focused on large scale infrastructure, clear absence of policy and program on pro poor sanitation and private and public utilities such as water districts hesitate to invest in sanitation due to insufficient incentives and efficiency issues. Other issues identified affecting the sector included: low public awareness and demand for sanitation services and low multi stakeholder involvement in sanitation.

3. Developing the Action Plan


The overall goal of the Sanitation Action Plan is to accelerate the development and implementation of effectual programs for sustainable sanitation. The plans envisions to improve institutional and regulatory framework, improve the capacity of sanitation service providers, increase sector investments and increase level of awareness and involvement of different stakeholders on sustainable sanitation. Strategies were developed to address the goal and outputs identified. Major outputs identified include: a national sustainable sanitation program for the Department of Health including the development of programs for those agencies with sanitation mandates; capacity 22

building of different stakeholders; increased in level of sanitation sector investment including development of sanitation as an enterprise with an enhanced PPP as one of the approaches and building a strong sector coordination mechanism that promotes sustainable sanitation. With DOH as the lead agency, a multi agency approach to plan implementation is being adopted with the active participation of the LGUs, the academe, the civil society and the private sector. Detailed Sector Action Plan is in Annex 2.

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E. FOOD SAFETY
1) Sector Situationer and Accomplishments
Ensuring food safety is the assurance that food will not cause harm to the consumer when it is prepared and eaten according to its intended use. Assurance of food safety requires concerted cooperation at all levels in the continuum in order to achieve maximum consumer protection. This would include government, food manufacturers/producers, academia, research institution and the consumers. The Department of Health formed an inter-agency food safety committee led by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) that is geared towards the guarantee of adequate, safe, quality and affordable food for public health protection as well trade development through the following: Provide directions to the TWGs in coordinating and communicating food safety issues Facilitate the coordination of all agencies involve in food safety and build strong linkage with other agencies especially in time of emergencies Takes the lead within the Department on food safety issues and recommends solution Very recently, the Food and Drug Administration Act of 2009 ( Republic Act 9711) was enacted that paved the way for strengthening the Food and Drug Administration in ensuring the safety, efficacy, purity and quality of processed foods, drugs, diagnostic reagents, medical devices, cosmetics, household hazardous substances thru state of the art technologies as well as the scientific soundness and truthfulness of product information for the protection of public health.

2) Issues and Concerns


The major issue identified besetting the food safety sector was the lack of an integrated system for food safety. The challenge of keeping the public informed to prevent and reduce the incidence of food-borne diseases and strengthening the integrated system for food safety and quality in the Philippines remain to be the priority of the food safety sector.

3) Developing the Action Plan


The development of the Food Safety Plan was anchored on 3 goals namely: 1)To establish an integrated system for food safety and quality in the Philippines aligned with international standards; 2) to prevent and reduce the incidence of food-borne disease and 3) to update existing rules and regulations on food safety responsive to the current situation. With the strategies developed, the Plan identified the following major outputs: establishment of an inter-agency national body, the National Food Safety Coordinating Council through a joint adminis24

trative order; adoption of Codex Standards; updating of food safety standards and regulations and; enactment of the Food Safety Bill into a law. A multi agency approach to plan implementation is envisioned including the participation of the academe, the civil society and the private sector. Detailed Sector Action Plan is in Annex 2.

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F. OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH
1) Sector Situationer and Accomplishments
One of the biggest asset of the Philippines is its labor force. The Department of Labor and Employment estimates that there is about 35.95 million labor force. Total employed is 31.623 Million. To gender disaggregate, there is an estimate of 19. 551 million males and 12.072 million female in the labor force. This would include the 8.2 Million Filipinos working overseas and 3.8Million contract workers. The Occupational Health and Safety Office is the DOLE unit responsible in ensuring safety standards for Filipino workers. Based on the latest OHS data, highest distribution of work accidents by industry is topped by the manufacturing industry and followed closely by the agriculture industry.

Construction, 2.72 Others, 9.27 Wholesale/Ret ail, 5.27 Agriculture, 4 0.69 Manufacturing , 42.07

Figure 1 Distribution of Work Accidents by Industry, 2005

The top three occupational illnesses include musculo-skeletal disorders infections and bronchial asthma. The top three work-related Employees Compensation Claim( EC Claim) are renal disorders eye disorders and cardio-vascular disease. While OSH standards have been established, there remains to be low compliance due to the limited scope of OSH, absence of strict penalties fragmented OSH administration and outdated OSH standards. There is still public apathy on OSH concerns compounded by inadequate number of OSH personnel and facilities to fully enforce occupational safety and health standards. Relative to the maintenance of safety and health conditions at the workplace, the top 5 programs/services implemented in establishments were the following: 26

a. b. c. d. e.

Availability of first aid kits Regular conduct of inspection and maintenance of equipment Regular monitoring of hazards such as fumes dust, noise and heat level in work areas Accident prevention program Drug-free workplace policy/program

2) Issues and Concerns


Under the Occupational Health, the major issues identified affecting the sector were: non-compliance of small and medium scale industries to existing occupational health (OH) standards; limited government resources resulting in weak enforcement of OH services; lack of awareness among the informal sectors of OH services and programs; lack of common OH standards ; lack of coordinated response on public health issues to be to be implemented in the workplace and limited response to emerging OH issues such as AIDs, asbestos, AH1N1.

3) Developing the Action Plan


The over aching goal for Occupational Health sector is to reduce the incidence of occupational-health related diseases and injuries. Related goals are: to capacitate small and medium scale industries comply with OH standards; to optimize the presence of current resources and networks on OH services; to advocate for OH service provision to informal sector/health workers; to harmonize OH standards among DOLE, CSC, DOH and other concerned agencies and; to unify approach in case of public health issues. Several strategies were developed with the following as expected outputs: at least 10% annual increase in the number of small and medium industries complying with OH standards; a MOA or MOU among network partners in support of OH services implementation; a strong OH advocacy program that promotes OH services within the informal sector; an OHS database developed that can be readily accessed by stakeholders and; development of protocol in public health/emergency response teams. DOLE, DOH and DILG were identified as lead agencies with DPWH, NEDA, PIA, SSS, GSIS , PhlHealth, LGUs and workers unions as partners or support agencies. Detailed Sector Action Plan is in Annex 2.

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G. SOLID WASTE
1) Sector Situationer and Accomplishments
The Solid Waste sector is one of the most active sectors that has managed to get the national policies on the following: a) guidelines on the closure and rehabilitation of Open and Controlled Dump Facilities ( DAO 2006-09); b) guidelines on the categorized final disposal facility ( DAO 2006-10); the National Government-Local Government Cost Sharing Framework and the National Framework Plan on the Informal Sector in Solid Waste Management. Some of the accomplishments reported by the National Commission on Solid Waste are the following:
Strategies Increase awareness of LGUs on need to formulate the SWMP (orientation/training on the formulation, appreciation and replication of good practices) Dissemination of success stories on SWM - information exchange among LGUs Output Simplified annotated outline and technical assistance provided to LGU Lead Agency NSWMCS Partners SWM Sector, LGUs League

Good Practices were replicated (through REC)

NSWMC

SWM Sector, LGUs League

Technical training on the components of SWM (include info on conversion of OD to CD to sanitary landfill &/or residual containment area) Technical information on Safe closure of disposal sites Information dissemination to LGUs re. staged compliance for SLF Mobilization of Natl Ecology center under RA 9003

Documented and disseminated success stories on SWM

NSWMC

SWM Sector

Published guidelines Policy issuance

NSWMC NSWMC

SWM Sector, DILG, Leagues SWM Sector, DILG, Leagues SWM Sector

EMB Regional Offices established the Regional Ecology Centers

NSWMC

The National Solid Waste Commission reports that 30,000 tons of waste are generated daily. 675 tons per day of methane is produced (which is more potent than carbon dioxide). While the Sector has campaigned for reduction of wastes, to date, there are only 6750 materials recovery facility serving 7,680 barangays or only 18.22% of the 42,142 barangays in the country. For residual waste, there are only 30 sanitary landfills which is slowly replacing the open and controlled dumpsites that is considered unsanitary. 28

The country has a long way to go in the promotion of waste avoidance and in the promotion of the 3 Rs Reduce Re-use and Recycle. There is still a need for raising public awareness, citizens participation and behaviour change. Everybody must be involved and it is necessary to build partnerships through alliance building.

2) Issues and Concerns


The issues identified affecting the solid waste management sector were as follows: low level of LGU compliance to RA 9003, in particular on solid waste disposal; lack of technical capability to develop and operate disposal facility and the lack of harmonized plans and programs for the informal sector in solid waste management.

3) Developing the Action Plan


The overall goal of the solid waste management sector is to effectively enforce the provisions of RA 9003 at the national and local levels. Strategies developed were directed towards the achievement of high LGU compliance to RA 9003, in particular on waste disposal. Major outputs identified include: integration of RA 9003 to the Comprehensive Land Use Plan (CLUP) and the Physical Framework Plan implementation of the national government-LGU cost sharing framework in selected LGUs; capacity building of LGU staff in the area of solid waste management and; mainstreaming of the informal waste sector in the national and local government plans and programs. Plan implementation is envisioned with DENR as lead agency supported multi-government agencies with mandate related to solid waste management including the LGUs, the academe, NGOs and the civil society.

Detailed Sector Plan is in Annex 2.

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G. Climate Change and Health 1) Sector Situationer and Accomplishments


The growing international concern over climate change and the countrys current experience on the impacts of extreme weather changes, heat waves, changes in temperature and precipitation have caused serious health concerns such as the growing number of temperature-related illness and death air pollution-related health effects, water and food borne diseases, vector-borne and rodent-borne diseases food and water shortages and other mental, nutritional and infectious diseases. Previous health plans such as the National Objectives for Health (NOH -2005-2010) does not specifically mention climate change as the NOH tend to look at diseases more from the perspective of an infectious nature and does not consider the climate sensitivity of the disease. However, each year, the unabated number of under-nutrition, diarrhea and malaria related morbidity reflect the silent but growing impacts of climate on health. On the other hand, when deaths and illnesses are caused by flooding, heat waves and other calamities, then the direct impact of climate change is realized. The health sector have identified a number of efforts to facilitate adaptation to climate change. This would include disease surveillance and early warning systems, integrated vector management, healthy policy development, environmental health capacity building, increasing access to safe drinking water and sanitation and the health action in emergencies. However, it must be noted that climate change adaptation strategies are not yet developed and integrated in the DOH strategy framework and to date, there is still no climate change plans in health. The country have not yet fully appreciated the strategies to mitigate climate change related health impacts. Roles and responsibilities need to be further defined and resources have to be allocated to support climate change related initiatives. More studies have to be made specially on emerging diseases and to provide evidence based policy advocacy on the burden of health impacts of climate change. The disease surveillance mechanisms and data collection systems need to be enhanced to factor in the correlation between climate change and health. Capacity building for disease surveillance training, vulnerability assessments (personnel and infrastructure) and project management have to be in place. The climate change sector have recently developed the National Framework of Action to support the Health Sector Reform Agenda. It has aligned the framework to DOHs Formula 1 strategy: Service Delivery, Governance Financing and Regulation. It has formed strategy clusters to coordinate efforts to raise the profile of climate change and health linkages. It is developing partnerships among private sector, academe, NGOs and LGUs. A current project funded under the Spanish-Philippines MDG project is underway and through this project pilot initiatives such as the Early Warning and Surveillance Systems for Climate Change diseases in Metro Manila and Albay, hospital preparedness and response, awareness building and advocacy work, and capacity building are supported.

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2) Issues and Concerns


There were a number of issues identified affecting the newest sector, climate change and health, in NEHAP. These included the following: health is not a priority in climate change efforts; inadequate internal and external coordination and clarity on climate change adaptation functional roles; need to enhance disease surveillance mechanism and data collection system related to climate change; inadequate preparedness and vulnerability of health facilities on the impacts of climate change; limited IEC and advocacy materials on climate change; absence of public-private partnership for climate change and health activities and the lack of local studies on climate change and health, its impacts to human population and other sector.

3) Developing the Plan


The overall goal under the sector Climate Change and Health is to adapt to the possible health consequences brought about by climate change. Related goals include integration of health issues in climate change policies and programs; strengthened coordination among related agencies on climate change initiatives; a strong IEC and advocacy program on climate change and health; encourage research and development on climate change and health and; promotion of public-private partnerships in support of climate change and health programs. Outputs include: IRR on climate change and health; strategic plans and programs for climate change and health including a competency development plan; health surveillance mechanism and data collection system in place to help establish baseline data; IEC and advocacy materials available including a web portal and ; a compendium of researches and best practices on climate change and health. A multi agency approach is to be adopted in the implementation of the plan of action involving different government agencies, the academe and NGOs with DOH taking the lead role. Detailed Sector Plan is in Annex 2.

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III. NEXT STEPS: CONCLUSIONS, CROSS CUTTING ISSUES AND RECOMMENDATIONS


The health and environment-linked institutions in the Philippines have successfully implemented a number of noteworthy projects and programs and have recently instituted important milestone policy and framework documents to serve as guide for the concerned sectors. The challenge, however, remains on how to strengthen policy implementation at the local level and how best to engage local governments and the general public in the process. Given recent developments, the proposal is for local governments to legislate local policies and appropriate ordinances related to the safeguarding of public health through the environmental health concerns and to incorporate the EH plans and budgets in their investment plans for health. The public has to be involved through awareness building and empowerment strategies so that they themselves can be active participants in promoting public health. The Inter-Agency Committee on Environmental Health (IACEH) is a strategic platform for coordination and stronger collaboration has not been fully utilized. The Department Personnel Order of the DOH in 2005 identifying the members of the Sectoral Working Groups have to be updated and revised based on the recommended re-organization from each of the sectors. This now have to include the new sectors of climate change and contingency planning. A new sectoral concern has been added in the Jeju meeting which is on Health Impact Assessments. The IACEHs mandate of providing oversight over the plans and programs should be supported further by a regular secretariat. However, with the increasing demands on the limited staff of the DOH, particularly its EOHO team, it might be necessary and practical to increase the number of personnel with the needed capacity to support the IACEH in the performance of its oversight function. An idea being proposed that may necessitate legislation is the creation of the Bureau of Environmental Health under the Department of Health. The Philippines continue to support the Regional Thematic Groups in Environmental Health and is strongly committed to finalize and implement its plans to support and contribute to the identified regional priorities and action plans.

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ANNEX 1. FRAMEWORK FOR THE DRAFTING OF THE NEHAP


FRAMEWORK FOR THE DRAFTING OF THE PHILIPPINE NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH ACTION PLAN (NEHAP) CONVERGENCE UN MILLENIUM DEVELOPMENT GOALS International agreements Stockholm, Kyoto , Basel ,Rotterdam Agenda 21 ,Johannesburg Plan of Implementation of 2002 EH National Laws, Philippine MTDP, National Objectives for Health

ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH COUNTRY PROFILE (EHCP) ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH DATA SHEET (EHDS)

PHILIPPINE NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH ACTION PLAN (NEHAP)

SWATOFS ISSUES CHALLENGES And STRATEGIES

STAKEHOLDERS (DOH, DENR, DA, DILG, DOST, DTI, DILG, DPWH, DOLE, DOE, DepED,NEDA, PIA, MWSS, LWUA, Academe, NGOs, POs,etc) (WHO,UNEP, ADB, WB,UNDP, GTZ)

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ANNEX 2: ACTION PLAN 2010-2013 BY SECTOR


Toxic and Hazardous Wastes Action Plan, 2010-2013
PROGRAM FOR ACTION / ISSUES GOAL STRATEGIES/ACTIVITIES Output Lead Agency Partner Agencies

Programme Area A: Expanding and accelerating assessment of chemical risks


1. Inadequate harmonized approach for risk management methodologies To develop harmonized approaches on risk management; (Review/consult International Organizations International Agency Research Council, WHO, FAO, USEPA, etc) Inventory of existing technical experts Create a pool of experts Conduct relevant training programmes Establish/upgrade PCCs Submit SAICM proposal to UNEP Guidelines on harmonized DENR/DA/ approaches DOH Technical guidelines on aerial spraying List of technical experts Curriculum/training program Functional Poison control and information centers Approved SAICM proposal for the strengthening of PCCs DOH/ Academe DTI/DOLE/D OST/ UP

2. Insufficient technical experts on toxicology at different levels

To develop/strengthen training programs for capacity building (regulatory/clinical toxicology, preparedness, risk mapping-GIS, etc) - national, regional, local, etc. Strengthen poison control centers

DENR/DA/DO ST/

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Programme Area B: Harmonization and labeling of chemicals 1. No proper labeling for houseTo adopt the harmonized standards hold chemicals except for pestifor labeling of household chemicals cides

Adopt GHS/ international harmonized standards for labeling, symbols and markings/ MSDS

Legislation/ guidelines adopting GHS

FDADOH/DTI

DTI, DA

Programme Area C: Strengthening national capabilities and capacities for management of chemicals
1. Inappropriate action plans/ legislation on penal provisions and prohibited acts To provide/propose to Congress proposed legislation on amendments and revisions on penal provisions and prohibited acts. Provide amendments/revisions to Congress Issuance of Department Circulars from DILG Formulate counterpart local ordinance for implementation Revised/amended legislation Circular issued and disseminated Local ordinance developed Collaborate with other organizations e.g. LMP Legislation on chemical safety DA/ DENR DILG/DA/ DENR DOH/DOLE DOH/ DOLE

2. Overlapping of legislation on chemical safety

To harmonize legislation on chemical safety

3. Lack of infrastructure support

To improve chemical safety management programmes

Inventory of existing legislation on chemical safety Propose comprehensive/integrated legislation on chemical safety Provide funding for the establishment of laboratory/disposal facilities (obsolete agricultural, health care waste and industrial chemicals)

DENR/DA

DENR/DA/ DOH/DTI/ DOLE DOLE, DTI, Bureau of Customs

Technical proposals submitted to SAICMUNEP

DENR/DA/ DOH

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Program Area D: Prevention of illegal international traffic in toxic and dangerous products
1. Inadequate capacity to detect hazardous waste/transboundary smuggling To improve enforcement of laws on the prevention of illegal international traffic of toxic chemicals and hazardous waste Upgrade capability of the Bureau of Customs to detect/monitor toxic chemicals and hazardous wastes Trained and equipped manpower Bureau of Customs/DENR DA/ NBI/ Interpol

Programme Area E:Information exchange


Limited awareness and concern on chemicals and HCW. To improve dissemination of information on chemicals and HCW at the local level Increase awareness among LGUs thru dialogues/meetings/collaboration IEC campaign on chemicals and HCW Information on chemicals and HCW disseminated to LGUs Tri-media/information materials developed/distributed DENR/DILG DOH,

Programme Area F: Technology update

Health Care Waste Management Insufficient technology in the treatment and disposal of hazardous HCW

To ensure proper treatment and disposal of HCW

Provide appropriate and acceptable technology Submit technical proposal for funding support

Limitation set forth under CAA

To clarify pertinent provision on the use of incinerator

Review provision under CAA regarding treatment and disposal of HCW

Environment-friendly technology Approved proposal for HCWM alternatives using non-burn technology (UNDP-GEF) Policy statement on the disposal of HCW

DOH/DENR /DOST

PHA/PMA/Pri vate service provider

DENR

DOH

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Action Plan for Air, 2010-2013


Issues I. Mobile / Transport Emission of gaseous pollutants 1. LACK OF LOCAL EMISSION standards Airlines Sea Going Vessel Goal To achieve quality of air that will protect the public health, safety and welfare Strategies/ Activities Adaptation of Individual Standards. emission standards for air/sea if available. Formulate Rules & Regulations guidelines Strengthening and enhancement of monitoring through creation of an independent body to monitor activities of. concerned enforcement agencies - deputation of enforcers Output Establish emission standards for air/sea Lead ATO DOTC/DENR Partner DOTC PPA, Remarks For LTO Comments. Enforceability of emission licensing

Long-term

2. POOR COMPLIANCE TO Emission STANDARDS Land Transport

Impose higher penalties (Ceiling within the Clean Air Act encourage and promotion of alternative fuels/additives Promotion of nonmotorized mode of transport/mass transport system Strengthen roadside apprehension on polluting & non-roadworthy vehicles (intensify organization of Anti Smoke Belching Units under CENRO office Enhancement of LGU capability/enact local or-

Independent body created Strengthened system for deputization increased the no. of vehicles using of alternative fuels increased no. of people using bikes/mass transport

DOTC/LTO

DENR/LGU/M MDA/etc.

fuel efficiency standards for public transport

Number of operational LGU Anti Smoke Belching Units

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dinances on ASBU (including ambient and source. Establish motor vehicles standards on 3. Excessive Noise Emission Airlines Land Transport To achieve quality of air that will protect the public health, safety and welfare Strict implementation of ICAO-Annex 16) ATO std Establish / Formulate NOISE emission standards, Or strict enforcement of MV noise regulation

No. of LGU with local Ordinance

Noise emission standards for land transport

LTO DILG

LGUs, MMDA

4. Enforcement of Noise Ambient Standards

strengthen LGU capability through: zoning traffic management non-motorized vehicle

LGU capability relative to zoning, traffic mgt strengthened LGU advocating/providing support to nonmotorized modes of transport DOE

All agencies LGUs

DENR

5. Inadequate capability to monitor fuel quality

To achieve quality of air that will protect the public health, safety and welfare To achieve quality of air that will protect the public

Capacity building through: Deputization of additional inspectors Strengthening/enhancing the capacity of DOE

DTI-BPS, LGUs

All agencies

6. Lack of National Inspection and Maintenance program for MOTOR VEHICLE

intensify information campaign by all CONCERNED agencies: maintenance of vehicles Driving habits

development of a comprehensive IEC program addressing such issues and concerns

PIA, DOH, DENR, DTI/DOE DTI

LGU/MMDA DOTC & DENR

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health, safety and welfare

Quality of fuels used/appropriate fuels Penalties for violation of applied rules Health effects of air pollution licensing/permitting/ registration procedures Establish MVIM program pursuant to Sec 21 Promotion on the use of cleaner product technology.

MVIM program establish/ formulated

II. Stationary Sources 1.Inefficient operation of facilities

-do-

Increase no. of industries with cleaner production technology implemented.

DTI DENR

DOST DTI

2.Outdated technology for the control of emission 3. Insuficient monitoring station located at strategic place

Provide incentives for new technologies

strengthened system for incentives

DTI DOF

All agencies

DENR Expand monitoring station of PM 10/2.5 Formulation of 2.5 guidelines values INCREASE NO. OF MONITORING STATION IN PLACE EMISSION STANDARDSS FOR P.M. 2.5 LGU/Pos PIA/DOH/DE NR/MMDA

LGU PB NGO OTHER AGECIES

III. Area sources 1. Law enforcement on the ban of open burning

-doStrict enforcement on the: Prohibition of open burning Enhance advocacy and information campaign Strict implementation of related regulations by the LGUs strict prohibition of open burning massive Info campaign on health impact tech assistance to LGU provided to enforce regulations

All agencies

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C. AREA SOURCES Agricultural and forest fires (uncontrolled)

-doStrict monitoring of forest for uncontrolled fires/slash and burn farmers (kaingin) encourage agricultural farmers to practice ecological solid waste mgt practices -dostrict implementation of the policies relative to smoking in public places assist LGUs in establishing ordinances relative to smoking policies strengthen IEC campaign relative to the health effects of smoking and ETS -dostrict enforcement of VOC emission standards encourage self regulation IEC/advocacy programs relative to health effects of VOCs -dopublic places strictly monitored prototype ordinances developed IEC program developed/implemented Regular/strict monitoring of forest advocacy programs developed for ESM LGU ordinances/policies formulated relative to burning of waste

LGU/DILG/PI A

All agencies

Non compliance to policies prohibiting Smoking in Public Places and Indoor air pollution

DOH/PIA/LG Us/MMDA

All agencies

C. AREA SOURCES Uncontrolled emission of Volatile Organic Conpounds ( VOC)

increase road dust

road and drainage improvement -dostrengthen existing health information system for air pollution

Standards strictly enforced Increase in the number of in adopting self regulations Increase in awareness relative to VOC and its effect Road system /traffic flow improved

DENR/LGUs DENR DOH/ DENR/DOE

DENR DOE All agencies

DPWH/LGUs/ MMDA

All agencies

D. SYSTEMS DEVELOPMENT harmonize health information generated for

Relevant health information generated

DOH/LGUs, MMDA

All agencies

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air pollution

enhance capability of LGUs to monitor health information for air pollution related illnesses -doHealth research agenda formulated Systems developed/streamlined to facilitate access to financial, technical and relevant support DOH/DOST/D ENR All agencies

research gaps on the health impact/evaluation of mitigating measures in terms of health costs

establishment of health research agenda focusing on health impact/valuation of mitigating measures as to health costs (health economics) encourage research individuals/organization to conduct related research activities through funding and technical support

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Water Supply Action Plan for 2010-2013


Sector Outcome Goal: To provide adequate water supply and reduce/eradicate waterborne and water-related diseases
Issues Source: -Fragmented water source development for water supply Specific Goals Strategies -Use IWRM framework -Amendments of the Water Code -Issuance of NEDA resolution/ policy, etc. Outputs National framework on water source development Lead Agency -NWRB Partners/Support Agencies -DENR -LWUA -MWSS -LLDA -DOH -NEDA DA DOH LWUA

- Develop an integrated framework for water source development

-Pollution of water sources from agricultural and industrial establishments

-Protect water resources from all types of pollutions

-Implementation of Clean Water Act -implement water safety plan

-Over extraction of groundwater leading to saltwater intrusion

-Protection of groundwater

Supply: Disparity (urban/rural, rich and poor) in the provision of safe water supply Significant population with no access to safe water supply

Ensure equitable water supply provision among population

Increase access to safe water supply

Regulate groundwater extraction Preparation of vulnerability map -Prioritize provision of water supply to high risk population groups - Sector assessment and monitoring - formulation of water safety plans

All required permits complied (e.g. discharge permits) -Penalties for violators -Water safety plan per water utilities Vulnerability Map on the entire country -Map of high risk areas

DENR/ LLDA/ NWRB LWUA NAWASA

NWRB, MWSS, LWUA

DA, DILG

- DILG - DOH

-LWUA -MWSS -NEDA -LLDA -DENR LGU WSPs

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Investment: Low investment for Capex/Opex Regulation: Weak enforcement of water related policies and laws

Increase investment

-Financing mechanisms -Private sector participation -Localizing the national policies to adopt to LGU conditions -Amendment of outdated laws and IRRs (e.g. Water Code, Sanitation Code) Development of tools and mechanisms for emergency preparedness and response addressing water concerns -Scale up sector assessment and monitoring

Strengthen policy enforcement at LGU levels

Water supply during emergencies and climate change: Inadequate mechanism for preparedness and response (drought, floods, spills): Information system: - Uncoordinated/scattered, not updated sector data

Minimize adverse impacts from water related emergencies

-Investors participating in water projects -Local ordinances for water supply management -Amended water code and sanitation code -Guidelines for preparedness on response mechanisms -Sector assessment and monitoring system LGU adaptation

DOF DBM

NEDA, MWSS

DILG DOH NWRB

DOH EMB LLDA

NDCC WASH CLUSTER

DOH LWUA MWSS CCC DOH EMB LWUA MWSS NAWASA LGU, WSPs OTHER AGENCIES

- Consolidate and coordinate availability of sector data.

DILG

Partial implementation of water supply roadmap

Full implementation of roadmap

Updating and wide Dissemination

NEDA, DILG

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Sustainable Sanitation Action Plan 2010-2013


Overall Goal: To accelerate the development and implementation of effectual programs of sustainable sanitation

ISSUES Governance, Regulation and Enforcement Sanitation Code of 1976 needs to be updated (advocacy towards a National Sanitation Act) Weak and fragmented institutional framework and policies Weak, fragmented and inadequate regulatory arrangements on sanitation Low LGU awareness and political will to improve sanitation

GOALS To improve institutional and regulatory framework on sanitation

STRATEGIES Review and updating of existing sanitation laws, rules and regulations. Strengthening of DOH as lead sector driver providing policy and technical assistance at national and local levels. Strengthening of LGUs awareness on sustainable sanitation

OUTPUT National Sustainable Sanitation Program of DOH NGAs with sanitation related mandates develop their own sanitation strategy, plans and programs A clear and sustainable implementation of sanitation policies.

LEAD DOH

PARTNER DILG, DENR, DPWH, NEDA, LWUA, LLDA,MWSS, DepEd, DOT, LGU, Congress, MMDA PIA LEAGUE OF CITIES AND MUNICIPALITIES, PROVINCES, BARANGAYS

LGUs develop and implementing their policies, plans and programs on sustainable sanitation

Service Delivery Inadequate capacity to facilitate sustainable sanitation Lack of sanitation focused skilled human resources No guidelines to develop/strengthen LGU initiatives on policy formulation, planning and managing sanitation programs

To improve capacity of sanitation service providers

Development of integrated and decentralized capacity development system for different service providers

Empowerment of different stakeholders towards active involvement for capacity development in sustainable sanitation Training programs on sustainable sanitation Functional training

DOH, DILG

Academe, DPWH, NEDA, LWUA, LLDA,MWSS, DepED, DOT, DENR, LGU, MMDA

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Front liners such as sanitary inspectors and some sanitation service providers lack adequate sanitation education, knowledge and skills Low level of knowledge and know-how on planning and implementing sustainable sanitation programs/projects Financing To increase investments for sustainable sanitation programs and projects Development of financing strategies and incentive schemes for sustainable infrastructure development.

/resource centers at all regions

Very low investments for sanitation More focus on large scale infrastructure Clear absence of policy and program for pro-poor sanitation Private sector/water districts hesitate to invest in sanitation due to insufficient incentives and efficiency issues Other Issues Low public awareness and demand for sanitation services Low multi stakeholder involvement in sanitation

Investment requirements to MDG and MTPDP targets identified and secured Established/Enhanced PPPs and sanitation entrepreneurship

DOH, DOF, NEDA,

DBM, MWSS, Development Partners, DPWH, LLDA GFIs, LGUs, MMDA

To increase level of awareness and involvement of different stakeholders on sustainable sanitation

Establishment of broad based alliance of multi sectoral and multi-level stakeholders geared towards increased support for the promotion of sustainable sanitation and strengthening of the sanitation sector

Inventory of champions and stakeholder groups in sanitation

DOH

Academe. LGU, DILG, Civil society, MMDA

Rationalized/ strengthened sector coordination mechanism.

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Food Safety Action Plan 2010-2013


ISSUES GOAL/S
STRATEGIES

OUTPUT/S

LEAD AGENCY

SUPPORT AGENCY

Lack of an integrated system for food safety.

Goal No. 1 To establish an integrated system for food safety and quality in the Philippines aligned with international standards

Organize an inter-agency national Food Safety Body

National Food Safety Coordinating Council (NFSCC) established through Joint AO

DOH FDA

DOH Agencies (NCDPC- EOHO, HEMS, BOQ, NCHP, NEC, RITM)

Upgrade, strengthen and establish support systems, infrastructure and logistics on food safety

DA Attached Agencies (BFAR,BPI, BAI, NMIS, PCA, SRA, NDA, BAFPS, NFA, FDC, FPA)

Effective food safety mechanism

Collaborate and establish linkages with international organizations i.e. INFOSAN

DTI Closer coordination with international organization DILG - LGUs DOST DepEd

Goal No. 2 To prevent and reduce the incidence of food-borne diseases Participate actively in the CACs standard setting process and to adopt Codex standards, when-

BOC Adoption of Codex standards

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ever appropriate BAFPS Continue to develop and maintain sustainable preventive measures, including food safety education programs aimed at reducing the burden of food-borne diseases through a systems approach encompassing the complete food production chain from farm to consumption Decreased incidence of food-borne diseases NCDPC. NEC, HEMS, BFAR,BPI, BAI, NMIS, PCA, SRA, NDA, FPA,

Goal No. 3 To update existing rules and regulations on food safety responsive to the current situation

IEC materials developed All DOH and DA Agencies, LGUs, Efficient response to food safety problems NCHP Dep Ed, All DOH and DA Agencies, LGUs, FDA and BAFPS Food safety standards and regulations updated FDA and BAFPS Dep Ed DOST, DTI, BOC Academe, DENR - EMB

Strengthen and enhance the capability of food safety key players to properly address new and emerging issues Review and update all food safety standards and regulations including the proper disposal of condemned food products without affecting the human health and environment Collegial review of the food safety bill to harmonize all existing food safety rules and regulations

Passage of the Food Safety bill into a law

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Occupational Health Action Plan, 2010-2013 Sector Goal: To reduce incidence of occupational health-related diseases and injuries. Issues Goals Strategies Outputs Lead Agency Partners/support agencies
DPWH, PIA, NEDA, SSS, GSIS, PhilHealth, Industry Associations, Employers Group, Labor/Trade Unions, LGUs, NGOs ex. PATAMABA.. etc, developmental partners

Small and medium scale Industries non-compliance to existing OH standards

Goal 1: To capacitate small and medium scale industries to comply with OH standards

a. Encourage self-regulation and voluntary compliance b. Advocacy, IEC and training c. Adopts small brother-big brother partnership d. Provide technical assistance for industry regulation e. Encourage LGUs to passed Ordinances regarding compliance with OH standards f. Provide incentives to compliant industries and prescribed penalties for non-compliance

a.

Increased number of small and medium industries complying with OH standards (at least 10% increase annually based on data to be established)

DOLE including its regional offices, DOH and DILG

Limited government resources resulting in weak enforcement of OH services

Goal 2: To optimize the presence of existing resources/networks on OH services

a. Identify or map-out resources (i.e. funds, experts for research and infrastructures for technical services such as OH laboratories) in existing networks b. Establish coordination and coalition among stakeholders.

Forged Memorandum of Agreement/Understanding (MOA/U) among network partners to support in the implementation of OH programs and Services

DOLE, DOH, DILG

DPWH, PIA, NEDA, SSS, GSIS, PhilHealth, Industry Associations, Employers Group, Labor/Trade Unions, LGUs, NGOs ex. PATAMABA.. etc, developmental partners

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Lack of awareness among informal sectors of OH services and programs

Goal 3: To advocate OH service provision to informal sector/health workers

a. Advocacy -IEC -BCC

a.

b. - universal health insurance coverage awareness b. Identify and involve informal sector associations (ex. Representation anti-poverty program, BMBE etc) c. Work Improvement in Small Enterprises (WISE) d. Establish OH services in Rural Health Units (RHU) e. Lobby for the passage of OH bill for health workers f. Ensure the implementation of the Magna Carta for health workers c.

d.

Number of IEC materials developed and distributed Organize cooperatives/association s RHU units with OH service package Number of informal sector utilizing OH services of the RHUs

DOLE, DOH, DILG

DPWH, PIA, NEDA, SSS, GSIS, PhilHealth, Industry Associations, Employers Group, Labor/Trade Unions, LGUs, NGOs ex. PATAMABA.. etc, developmental partners

Lack of common OHS standards

Goal 4: Harmonize OHS standards between DOLE, CSC, DOH and other concerned agencies

a. Ensure MIS linkage on standards

a.

Data base that can be accessed by the stakeholders

DOLE-BWC, DOH

PCOM, OHNAP, IACEH-OH sector

Lack of coordinated response on public health issue to be implemented in the workplace/

Goal 5: Unified approach in case of public health issues

a. Establish alert system on public health and OSH issues b. Identify focal agency during public health and OSH issue

a.

Establish protocol in public health/ emergency response team

DOH, HEMS,

DILG, DOLE, PIA, PNP,AFP, BFP, OCD, NDCC

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Solid Waste Action Plan, 2010-2013

PROGRAM FOR ACTION / ISSUES

GOAL

STRATEGIES/ ACTIVITIES

Output

Lead Agency

Partner Agencies
LGU

1. Low level of LGU com- LGUs complying with the provipliance to RA 9003 particu- sions of the RA 9003. larly on waste disposal Maximum utilization of LGPMS results to solid waste planning and budgeting among LGUs.

Stronger advocacy to LGU to implement RA 9003 Resource mapping and needs assessment in the regions/LGUs Need to implement the revised NG-LGU Cost Sharing Framework Review gray area of RA 9003

RA 9003 integrated to DENR/ LGU Comprehensive NSWMC Development Plan /Physical Framework Plan Implementation of the NG-LGU Cost Sharing Framework in selected LGUs

2. Lack of technical capability Enhanced capability of LGUs to develop and operate disposal facility

Provide LGUs

technical

assistance

to LGU personnel trained DENR/ NSWMC

DILG LGU

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3. Lack of harmonized plans and programs for the informal sector in solid waste management

Empowered informal waste sector that is recognized as a partner of the public and private institutions, organizations and corporations in the promotion and implementation of the 3Rs (reduce, reuse and recycle) of solid waste management in the Philippines with the end in view of alleviating poverty.

Implementation of the National Framework Plan for the Informal Waste Sector in Solid Waste Management

Mainstreaming of the NSWMC/ informal waste sector in the National and local government plans and programs

DSWD/ PCUP/ DOLE LGU

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Climate Change Action Plan 2010-2013


SECTOR GOAL: To adapt to the possible health consequences brought about by climate change
ISSUES Health is not a priority GOALS To integrate health issues in all mitigation and adaptation measures and policies of government offices and concerned sectors. STRATEGY` Develop IRR for Health (CCA 2009) Develop Strategic Plan for CC and Health Forging of alliance/ linkages to government offices and concerned sectors OUTPUTS IRR (CCA) for health developed Strategic Plan for CC and Health developed and implemented Health issues integrated to all Climate change program/projects of government offices and other concerned sectors System developed Competency Development Plan LEAD AGENCY CCC and DOH PARTNERS DA, DOST, DENR, DILG, DOLE, DND-OCD, DOE, NEDA , MMDA, Other government agencies/offices, LPP, NGOs and Academe

Inadequate internal and external coordination and clarity on CC Adaptation functional roles

To strengthen internal and external coordination and clarity on CC adaptation functional roles.

Roles ID and clarification Forging of alliance/ linkages to government offices and concerned sectors Competency assessment for health developed

CCC and DOH

DA, DOST, DENR, DILG, DOLE, DND-OCD, DOE, NEDA, MMDA, Other government agencies/offices, LPP,NGOs and Academe

Disease Surveillance Mechanism and Data Collection System related to CC still to be enhanced (NEISS and FHSIS) Inadequate pre-

To develop and strengthen early surveillance and preparedness system for extreme weather events and disease outbreaks

Systems Development

Health Surveillance Mechanism and Data Collection System of DOH enhanced and integrated with other sectors V and A Tools for CC Diseases developed

CCC and DOH

DA, DOST, DENR, DILG, DOLE, DND-OCD, DOE, NEDA, MMDA, Other government agencies/offices, LPP, NGOs and Academe

NEDA/UP-NIH To establish safe hospital to ad Safe hospitals capable of providing quality health

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paredness and vulnerability of health facilities on the effects of CC. e.g., hospital infrastructure, emerging diseases

dress the health needs and medical care of possible victims brought about by climate change

Conduct of vulnerability assessment of DOH hospitals in Metro Manila Provision of capital outlay for building infrastructure and procurement of equipment and other medical supplies and training of qualified hospital staff IEC development Conduct advocacy activities CC

services CCC and DOH

DA, DOST, DENR, DILG, DOLE, DND-OCD, DOE, NEDA, MMDA, LPP, Other government agencies/offices, NGOs and Academe

Limited IEC materials and advocacy on CC

To develop IEC materials on CC and conduct of advocacy activities on the health consequences of CC To encourage private-public partnerships for climate change and health activities

Advocacy tools/IEC materials developed and integrated with other sectors Web portal (MDGF project)

DA, DOST, DENR, DILG, DOLE, DND-OCD, DOE,, Other government agencies/offices, NGOs and Academe CCC and DOH

Absence of private-public partnerships for climate change and health activities

Forge alliance and Partnerships to private entities

Technical Assistance Capability Building Funding Support

DENR

DA, DOST, DENR, DILG, DOLE, DND-OCD, DOE,, Other government agencies/offices, NGOs and Academe

Lack of local studies on climate change and health, its impacts to human pop. and other sectors i.e. agriculture, environment, energy, housing, etc.

.To encourage research and development on CC and Health

Conduct of Integrated Research Compendium of Researches and Best Practices Established Baseline Data

CCC and DOH DA, DOST, DENR, DILG, DOLE, DND-OCD, DOE,, Other government agencies/offices, NGOs and Academe

CCC, DOH, and DOST

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ANNEX 3. PROPOSED REORGANIZATION OF THE SECTORAL TASK FORCE


COMPOSITION
A. Sectoral Task Force for Toxic and Hazardous Substances Chairperson Chairperson Members: Bureau of Plant Industry (BPI) Industrial Technology Development Institute (ITDI-DOST) Bureau of Local Government Supervision (BLGS-DILG) Laguna Lake Development Authority ( LLDA) Environmental and Occupational Health Office (EOHO-DOH) Food and Drug Authority ( FDA- DOH) League of Municipalities (LMP) Fertilizers and Pesticides Authority (FDA) Occupational Safety and Health Center ( OSCHDOLE) Bureau of Workers Conditions (BWC-DOLE) Philippine Nuclear Research Institute-DOST Bureau of Health Devices and Technology(BHDT-DOH) Bureau of Investments ( BOI -DTI Bureau of Customs (BoC) : Environmental Management Bureau (EMB), DENR : Department of Agriculture (DA)

UP National Poison Management Control Center Non-government Organizations (NGOs) (UP-NPMCC) B. Sectoral Task Force for Air Chairperson Vice Chairperson Members: : EMB- DENR : Department of Transportation and Communication (DOTC)

Department of Energy (DOE) ( for fuel quality) DILG-BLGS ( for airsheds) Department of Education (DepEd) Department of Health (DOH) Department of Science and Technology (DOST)

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C. Sectoral Task Force for Water Supply

Chairperson Vice Chairperson Members:

: Department of Interior and Local Government : Department of Agriculture

Bureau of Local Government Supervision (BLGS_DILG) Laguna Lake Development Authority (LLDA) Metro Manila Water and Sewerage System (MWSS) National Economic and Development Authority (NEDA) Bureau of Fisheries and Aquatic Resources (BFAR) National Irrigation Authority ( NIA) Proposed Additional Members:

Environmental and Occupational Health Office (EOHODOH) League of Municipalities (LMP) Non-government Organizations (NGOs) National Water Resources Board ( NWRB) Environmental Management Bureau (EMBDENR)

Philippine Association of Water Districts Leagues of Province, League of Municipalities (PWAD) League of Cities Philippine Water Works Association ( PWWA) National Water and Sanitation Association of the Philippines (NAWASA) Philippine Water Partnership (PWP)

D. Sectoral Task Force for Sanitation


Chairperson Vice Chairperson Members: Metropolitan Waterworks and Sewerage System (MWSS) Laguna Lake Development Authority (LLDA) Department of Tourism (DOT) Department of Public Highways (DPWH) Department of Agrarian Reform (DAR) Environmental Management Bureau (EMBDENR) Department of Education (DepEd) National Economic and Development Authority (NEDA) Local Water Utilities Administration (LWUA) Metro Manila Development Authority (MMDA) Streams of Knowledge (NGO) Philippine Ecosan Network (PEN) : Department of Health (DOH) : DILG

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E. Sectoral Task Force for Food and Safety


Chairperson Vice Chairperson Members: Attached Agencies under the Department of Health (DOH) such as: EOHO, HEMS, BOQ, NCHP, NEC, NNC, RITM Attached agencies under the Department of Agriculture such as BFAR, BPI, BAI, NMIS, PCA, SRA, NDA, BAFPS, NFA, FDC, BAR, FPA Bureau of Product Standards, Department of Trade and Industry (DTI) Bureau of Customs LGUs through the different Leagues Department of Education (DepEd) : Department of Health : Department of Agriculture

BLGS- DILG

PCHRD and NFRI , DOST

Academe

F. Sectoral Task Force on Occupational Health


Chairperson Vice Chairperson Members:
DPWH PIA DILG Regional Offices PCOM OHNAP NEDA IHAP BWC CSC SOPI ECC SSS GSIS PhilHealth ULAP ECOP LGUs

: Department of Labor and Employment : Department of Health

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G. Sectoral Task Force on Solid Waste


Chair Vice Chair Members: Industrial Technology Development Institute (ITDI-DOST) Board of Investments (BOI-DTI) Environment and Occupational Health Office (EOHO-DOH) Department of Public Highways (DPWH) National Economic and Development Authority (NEDA) Metro Manila Development Authority (MMDA) Philippine Information Authority (PIA) Academe :Bureau of Local Government Services, DILG :Environmental Management Bureau DENR

NGOs

H. Task Force on Climate Change and Health


Chairperson Vice Chair Members: Department of Environment and Natural Resources (DENR) Department of Agriculture (DA) Department of Interior and Local Government (DILG) Department of Energy (DOE) Department of Labor and Employment (DOLE) Department of Science and Technology (DOST) Office of the Civil Defense (OCD-DND) National Economic and Development Authority (NEDA) Metro Manila Development Authority (MMDA) League of Provinces Other government agencies Academe NGOs : Climate Change Commission (CCC) : Department of Health (DOH)

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ANNEX 3. REPORT TO THE 5TH HIGH LEVEL MEETING

PowerPoint Presentation of the Philippines to the 5th High Level Meeting of the Regional Forum on Environment and Health in South-East and East Asian Countries in Jeju, Republic of Korea, July 14, 2010 by Director Myrna C. Cabotaje, MD, MPH of the Department of Health.

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