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Section

I
1 LPR N Tester Valve

1.1 Description
The LPR N Tester Valve is a full-opening, annulus pressure-operated valve. It permits measuring multiple closed-in pressures in cased holes where pipe manipulation is restricted and a full-opening string is required. The nitrogen chamber is charged at the surface to a selected pressure determined by surface temperature and bottomhole temperature and pressure. If the intended test requires a permanent packer that uses a stinger mandrel or seal nipple, a variety of Halliburton bypass tools are available, depending on field application, to help ensure that the formations and downhole equipment are protected from excessive pressure buildup.

1.2 Features and Benefits


The ball valve operates independently of internal pressure changes, like with acidizing or fracturing operations. Drastic temperature changes, like in acidizing operations, have little affect on the tool. Advanced materials and processes provide a unique metal-to-metal seal for exceptional gas-holding capabilities. The valve has been through an extensive 5-day qualification testing at 400F and 15,000-psi burst and collapse pressures. An open-in feature allows the operator to run the valve in the hole with the ball valve opened or closed. A double nitrogen chamber can be added to the valve for use in deep, hot, highpressure wells to reduce the operating pressure.

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Design Specifications

1.3 Design Specifications


The design specifications for the 3-in, 3 7/8-in., 5-in. and 7-in. LPR N Tester Valves are as follows:
3-in. LPR N Tester Valve (615.41990)
OD ID End Connections Makeup Length Tensile Rating* Working Pressure** 3.06 in. (7.77 cm) 1.12 in. (2.85 cm) 2 1/4 CAS 172.11 in. (437.16 cm) 160,000 lb (72 570 kg) 10,000 psi (687.47 bar)

3 7/8-in. LPR N Tester Valve (615.417 / 100065599)


OD ID End Connections Makeup Length Tensile Rating* Working Pressure** 3.90 in. (9.91 cm) 1.80 in. (4.57 cm) 2 7/8 CAS 197.88 in. (502.62 cm) 219,000 lb (99,000 kg) 10,000 psi (698.47 bar)

* The tensile strength value is calculated with new tool conditions. Stress area calculations are used to calculate tensile strength. ** Pressure rating is defined as differential pressure at the tool. (Differential pressure is the difference in pressure between the casing annulus and tool ID.) These ratings are guidelines only. For more information, consult your local Halliburton representative.

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Design Specifications

5-in. LPR N Tester Valve (615.41950 / 100065648)


OD ID End Connections Makeup Length Tensile Rating* Working Pressure** 5.03 in. (12.78 cm) 2.25 in. (5.72 cm) 3 7/8 CAS 191.30 in. (485.90 cm) 367,000 lb (167,000 kg) 15,000 psi (1034.21 bar)

7-in. LPR N Tester Valve (615.43 / 101012763)


OD ID End Connections Makeup Length Tensile Rating* Working Pressure** 7.00 in. (17.78 cm) 3.50 in. (8.89 cm) 5 1/4 CAS 194.16 in. (493.17 cm) 417,000 lb (189,000 kg) 10,000 psi (698.47 bar)

* The tensile strength value is calculated with new tool conditions. Stress area calculations are used to calculate tensile strength. ** Pressure rating is defined as differential pressure at the tool. (Differential pressure is the difference in pressure between the casing annulus and tool ID.) These ratings are guidelines only. For more information, consult your local Halliburton representative.

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LPR N Operational Guidelines

1.4 LPR N Operational Guidelines


1.4.1 Description
The LPR N Tester Valve is a full-opening annulus pressure-operated valve. It acts as the downhole master valve and allows multiple closed-in pressures to be taken in cased holes where a full-opening test string is required. The tool is composed of three basic sections: Ball Valve Section Power/Nitrogen Section Metering Section

The ball valve section contains the ball valve and related mechanical components that rotate the ball. When the tool is activated, the ball is rotated to the open position, allowing the reservoir to flow into the test string. Depending on how the tool is assembled, it can be run in the hole in the closed or open position. If the tool is set up to run in the hole in the open position, the first time pressure is applied and released the tool will shift back into the normal operating mode. In the normal mode, the ball will open when annulus pressure is applied and will close when the pressure is released. The power/nitrogen section contains the shear pins, operating piston, and nitrogen chamber. In the power section, one side of the piston is exposed to annulus pressure, and the other is exposed to pressurized nitrogen, which acts as a large gaseous spring. After the packer is set, when annulus pump pressure is applied or released, a differential pressure is created across the operating piston, causing movement. This movement is transferred to the ball valve section to rotate the ball open or closed. Initial movement is constrained by the shear pins installed in the section. The metering section of the tool is isolated from the annulus fluid by an oil and floating piston barrier. The metering section controls the rate of pressure change in the nitrogen chamber when annulus pressure is increased or decreased. This creates the differential pressure required by the power section to open and close the ball valve.

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LPR N Operational Guidelines

LPR N Hydraulics
The basic operation of the tool is similar to a hydraulic cylinder as shown in the LPR N Operating System graphic. The hydraulic cylinder has two lines connected to it. The control line on the left is connected directly to the annulus pressure. The other line is also connected to the annulus via the nitrogen chamber and a hydraulic representation of the metering cartridge consisting of an upper and lower flow path out of the nitrogen chamber.

In the above figure, applied annulus pressure has two possible flow paths into the cylinder. Flow can enter the cylinder directly on the top side of the piston, and it can enter through the lower flow path and into the cylinder via the nitrogen chamber. Flow entering the tool through the lower flow path is delayed by the orifice in the metering cartridge. This allows the pressure to build up on the top side of the piston. This pressure, acting on the piston, generates the required force to open the ball valve. Once the operating mechanism has shifted down, the applied annulus pressure is stored in the nitrogen chamber. When the applied annulus pressure is released, there are two possible flow paths for the stored pressure in the cylinder. Flow can exit the cylinder directly out the path on the left, by moving the piston up, and it can exit via the metering cartridge. Flow exiting through the upper flow path in the metering cartridge is delayed by the orifice. This allows the trapped pressure in the nitrogen chamber to act on the bottom side of the piston, moving it back to its original position. Once the cylinder has shifted, excess pressure trapped in the nitrogen chamber is slowly released. The pressure relief valves shown in the hydraulic representation of the metering cartridge help keep the tool from shifting with small pressure fluctuations in the annulus.

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LPR N Operational Guidelines

The tables on the following pages illustrate the affect of the pressure relief valves on the tool during a normal operation. Note For the example below, the hydrostatic pressure = 10,000 psi, operating pressure = 1,300 psi, and the tool is equipped with the acid metering cartridge with 400 psi pressure relief valves going into the nitrogen chamber, and 80 psi pressure relief valves coming out of the nitrogen chamber.

Acid Cartridge N2 Chamber Pressure


9,600 psi

Annulus Pressure
10,000 psi

Comments
Tools at testing depth. Note that the nitrogen pressure is less than the annulus pressure because of the metering cartridge. The shear pins prevent the tool from opening prematurely. Operating pressure is applied. Due to the pressure relief valves in the metering cartridge, the transfer of this pressure into the N2 chamber is delayed. Note the differential pressure to open is 11,300 9,600 = 1,700 psi. After 10 minutes, the N2 chamber should equalize to 10,900 psi. This pressure is still less than the annulus pressure. This ensures the ball stays open. Annulus pressure is released to close the ball. Due to the pressure relief valves in the metering cartridge, higher pressure is trapped in the N2 chamber. This provides the force to close the ball valve. Note the differential pressure to close is 10,900 10,000 = 900 psi. Minimum 10-minute Wait for N2 Chamber to Equalize

9,600 psi

11,300 psi

10,900 psi 10,900 psi

11,300 psi 10,000 psi

10,080 psi 10,080 psi

10,000 psi 11,300 psi

Note higher pressure in N2 chamber as a result of the pressure relief valves in the metering cartridge. This will keep the ball valve closed. Operating pressure applied. Differential pressure required to open the ball valve is 1,220 psi.

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LPR N Operational Guidelines

Note For the example below, the hydrostatic pressure = 10,000 psi, operating pressure = 1,300 psi, and the tool is equipped with the standard metering cartridge with 400 psi pressure relief valves in both directions.

Acid Cartridge N2 Chamber Pressure


9,600 psi

Annulus Pressure
10,000 psi

Comments
Tools at testing depth. Note that the nitrogen pressure is less than the annulus pressure because of the metering cartridge. The shear pins prevent the tool from opening prematurely. Operating pressure is applied. Due to the pressure relief valves in the metering cartridge, the transfer of this pressure into the N2 chamber is delayed. Note the differential pressure to open is 11,300 9,600 = 1,700 psi.

9,600 psi

11,300 psi

Minimum 10-minute Wait for the N2 Chamber to Equalize 10,900 psi 10,900 psi 11,300 psi 10,000 psi After 10 minutes, the N2 chamber should equalize to 10,900 psi. This pressure is still less than the annulus pressure. This makes certain the ball stays open. Annulus pressure is released to close the ball. Due to the pressure relief valves in the metering cartridge, higher pressure is trapped in the N2 chamber. This provides the force to close the ball valve. Note the differential pressure to close is 10,900 10,000 = 900 psi.

Minimum 10-minute Wait for the N2 Chamber to Equalize 10,400 psi 10,400 psi 10,000 psi 11,300 psi Note higher pressure in the N2 chamber is a result of the pressure relief valves in the metering cartridge. This will keep the ball valve closed. Operating pressure is applied. Differential pressure to open the ball valve is 900 psi.

As shown in the tables, the pressure relief valves assist in preventing the ball valve from changing positions due to slight fluctuations in annulus pressure. In these examples, both the acid and standard cartridges were used. The standard cartridge has 400-psi pressure relief valves for flow going in and coming out of the nitrogen chamber. A high-pressure cartridge with a slower metering rate is also available. See "Metering Cartridge Pressure Range" later in this section for correct part numbers. The acid cartridge is recommended for normal operations and should always be used whenever a cold stimulation fluid will be pumped during the job. This cartridge helps prevent the tool from prematurely closing during the flow back. The high-pressure cartridge is for higher hydrostatics. The standard cartridge was the one originally developed for the tool, but experience has shown that it has less utility than the acid cartridge. Note See "Metering Cartridge Pressure Range" for correct usage.

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LPR N Operational Guidelines

General LPR N Operations


As the LPR N Tester Valve is run into the well, the ball valve can either set up to be in the open or closed position. The power section controls the ball valve mechanism. The power section has a moving piston with one side exposed to hydrostatic pressure and the other side exposed to pressurized nitrogen. After the packer has been set, pressure is applied to the annulus, moving the piston downward to pull the ball into the open position. Releasing annulus pressure allows the pressurized nitrogen to return the piston upward to close the ball valve. The nitrogen chamber is charged at the surface to a predetermined pressure depending upon surface temperature, bottomhole temperature, and hydrostatic pressure at testing depth. This charging pressure gives the tool the optimum volume for compression in the nitrogen chamber when the tool arrives at testing depth. These values do not have to be exact because the floating piston compensates for small inaccuracies (less than 10%). Note See the Charging and Operating Pressure Tables in Chapter 2 for the correct method to calculate these pressures. Annulus pressure is transmitted to the nitrogen chamber through the oil chamber and metering cartridge. As the tool is run in the hole, pressure enters the tool through the lower annulus ports below the oil chamber. When the tool reaches the desired testing depth, there will be less pressure in the nitrogen chamber than in the annulus. This creates a pressure differential across the operating piston, which is acting to open the ball valve. For this reason, shear pins are needed to keep the ball valve in the closed position until ready to test. The shear pins in the 5-in. tool have an approximate rating of 280 psi/pin. Normally the tool is set up with four pins. The total shear value of four pins is 1,120 psi. Once at depth, there will be 400 psi less in the nitrogen chamber than in the annulus. With four pins in the tool, the pins will shear at approximately 720 psi differential. We recommend that no fewer than three pins be used in this tool. (The exception to this shear pin recommendation will be covered in "Low Hydrostatic Operations.") Note See "Metering Cartridge Pressure Range" later in this section for more information on the other tool sizes. After the packer is set and pump pressure is applied to the annulus, differential pressure acting across the operating piston becomes great enough to overcome the shear pins and open the ball valve. The first time the tool is activated, the ball valve will open with approximately 800 psi surface applied pressure. However, it is necessary to increase the annulus pressure to the final operating pressure, and hold for 10 minutes to ensure the

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LPR N Operational Guidelines

nitrogen chamber is pressurized. After the pressure has metered through the metering cartridge, the pressure in the nitrogen chamber will still be less than the annulus pressure at this point. This will hold the ball valve in the open position. Note The operating pressure should be applied/released at a safe maximum rate in 30 to 60 seconds. To close the ball valve, the annulus pressure is released at a safe maximum rate. This creates a differential across the operating piston due to the stored pressure in the nitrogen chamber. The differential pressure moves the operating piston upward, rotating the ball to the closed position. After approximately 10 minutes, the nitrogen pressure has dropped to a level slightly higher than annulus hydrostatic, helping keep the ball in the closed position.

Operations With The OMNI Circulating Valve


The basic operating pressure for both the OMNI and the LPR N are the same. The most important difference between the operating characteristics of the LPR N and OMNI is that the LPR N requires a 10-minute minimum waiting period before changing the pressure state of the annulus. When the OMNI has shifted to the blank or circulating positions, the waiting period can be decreased to as little as 1 minute, depending on conditions, to operate the OMNI. The closed ball valve in the OMNI in the blank and circulating positions makes the actions of the ball valve in the LPR N redundant during this time. Note In the 1 1/2 position on the OMNI, prior to entering the well testing section of the ratchet path, wait a full 10 minutes before pressuring up the annulus to shift the tool to the well test position. This will give the metering section in the LPR N time to reach equilibrium. Otherwise, the LPR N may not be capable of being fully closed.

Low Hydrostatic Operations For LPR Ns


With hydrostatic pressures of less than 2,000 psi, normal operating pressures will not trap enough energy in the nitrogen section to reliably operate the ball valve. Consequently, successful tool operation can be best be accomplished by running the tool in an overcharged condition. Overcharging the tool ensures that there is sufficient energy to overcome internal friction in the tool as well as environmental elements that could impair tool operation when it is closing. Nitrogen Charge Commonly, the 500 psi Overcharge Tables (Chapter 2) will be used to select the appropriate nitrogen pressure for the tool. In some cases, more energy may be required to close the ball valve, and in those cases the 1,000 psi Overcharge Tables (Chapter 2) can be used to select the nitrogen charge pressure. Operating Pressure Tables (Chapter 2) for both overcharge situations and the various sizes of LPR Ns are provided.

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LPR N Operational Guidelines

Mechanical Modification In addition to increasing the nitrogen charge in the tool, certain mechanical modifications have to be made to prepare the tool for low hydrostatic operations. The metering function of the hydraulic section of the LPR N must be disabled. The simplest way to disable the hydraulic section is to plug the lower operating ports. In addition, the LPR N must be run without shear pins. The presence of shear pins in an overcharged tool will dramatically increase the initial opening pressure of the tool. Shear pins are not required because the nitrogen chamber pressure is greater than the hydrostatic pressure. Control Line Operation Sometimes circumstances require that pressure to operate the LPR N be transmitted through a control line rather than through the annulus. In such cases the tool should be set up for low hydrostatic operation. If the control-line hydrostatic will be greater than 2,000 psi, contact the Test Tools Team at the DFW Technology Center. Stimulation or Injection and Overcharged LPR Ns In all cases when stimulation is planned using overcharged LPR Ns, contact the Test Tools Team at the DFW Technology Center for guidance.

1.4.2 Pre-Job Preparation


There are several areas in the LPR N that should be checked prior to running in the hole. 1.4.2.1. 1.4.2.2. Make certain that new shear pins have been installed. Check the nitrogen pressure with a calibrated gauge to ensure that no leakage has developed. See General Maintenance Standards for correct nitrogen charging instructions. Check the oil level in the metering section and refill if necessary. The lower floating piston should be in the lowest possible position, it will be visible through the lower operating ports. Check to see if the ball valve is in the correct position (open/closed) for the job. When the bottomhole pressure is greater than 10,000 psi, and/or the bottomhole temperature is greater than 275o F, or on gas wells, the long seat ball valve should be used. 616.01299 - Ball and Seat - SG - 5-in. OMNI 616.01295 - Retainer - Lower Seat - w/3/16 O-ring - 5-in. OMNI

1.4.2.3.

1.4.2.4. 1.4.2.5.

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LPR N Operational Guidelines

1.4.3 Operational Issues


Many operational issues associated with the LPR N Tester Valve relate directly to understanding the metering cartridge function. Some operational issues are related to the operation of the ball valve. The following matters must be considered when planning a job with the tester valve and while the tool is in the hole. 1.4.3.1. Annulus pressure must be applied in 30 to 60 seconds. Failure to apply pressure in this time interval will reduce the differential across the operation piston and may result in difficulty opening the ball in circumstances such as high differentials across the ball valve. Applying pressure more quickly may result in over-running the target pressure, which may affect other tools in the string. Annulus pressure applied to open the ball valve and keep it open during flow periods may deviate +100/-200 psi before being returned to the calculated operating pressure. Pressure increase does not affect the position of the ball valve but may eventually reach a range that can affect other tools. Pressure reductions greater than 200 psi at less than 10-minute intervals may affect the position of the ball valve. If annulus pressure is allowed to rise too high, returning to the calculated operating pressure in 200 psi increments will be time-consuming and tedious. The application or release of operating pressure should not take place at less than 10-minute intervals, or the full closing/opening pressure may not be available, which can interfere with successful tool operation. There are two exceptions to this rule. When the operating conditions have been modeled in the Halliburton Tool Simulator and the metering cartridge is shown to stabilize in less than 10 minutes, the stabilization time shown in the simulator can be used. When the tool has been overcharged, the metering cartridge is disabled or isolated and application or release of operating pressure can take place as rapidly as desired.

1.4.3.2.

1.4.3.3.

1.4.3.4.

If additional closing force is required, annulus pressure can be increased 10 minutes prior to bleeding off the annulus pressure to close the ball valve. The additional pressure will meter into the nitrogen section and increase closing force. This is helpful if a wireline must be cut, when in a sandy environment, or in any other situation that impedes closing the ball valve. When the first attempt is made to operate the tool, the pressure in the nitrogen chamber will be 400 psi less than the hydrostatic pressure. If the first attempt is not successful, on subsequent attempts, the pressure in the nitrogen chamber will be 80 psi greater than hydrostatic pressure (using the acid cartridge) due to the function of the metering cartridge. It will be necessary compensate for the difference by increasing the operating pressure at least 500 psi or more to get enough differential to shear the pins and successfully operate the ball valve. Pressure testing the annulus prior to operating the tool will have a similar affect and is not desirable. The maximum recommended differential pressure below the ball valve when opening is 5,000 psi. Higher differential pressure results in increased operating

1.4.3.5.

1.4.3.6.

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LPR N Operational Guidelines

pressure with possible component damage and/or failure to open the ball valve. Reducing the differential with applied tubing pressure to less than 5,000 psi will make it possible to open the ball. LPR N ball valves have been opened with differentials up to 8,000 psi, but it is not recommended. The Testing Tools Group should be consulted, if while opening, a differential greater than 5,000 psi is needed. 1.4.3.7. The recommended maximum differential pressure above the ball when opening is 1,000 psi. Higher differential pressure will result in failure to open the ball valve. The only way to make it possible to operate the ball valve in these circumstances is to reduce the differential. The differential pressure limitation from above is less than from below because the pressure from above acts across the whole OD area of the seat, forcing it against the ball and producing high levels of friction. The ball valve can be pressure tested to 15,000 psi from above or below. The metering cartridge compensates for typical downhole temperature fluctuations so that pressure and volume changes as the nitrogen attempts to expand and contract do not affect the operation of the tool. As the temperature rises, excess pressure in the nitrogen section is relieved as oil volume meters out. As the tool cools, additional oil volume meters back into the nitrogen section to maintain pressure. This function is to ensure that the ball remains in the desired position regardless of temperature changes. If a high volume, high rate injection is planned with resulting downhole temperature changes in excess of 100o F, the Testing Tools Group at the DFW Technology Center should be consulted. In very severe circumstances, it may be possible that the ability to close the ball valve immediately after the injection may be impaired.

1.4.3.8. 1.4.3.9.

1.4.3.10. Reducing the charging pressure for the tool does not reduce the operating pressure because operating pressure is based on an optimum volume. Reducing or increasing that volume results in a higher operating pressure, and potentially a reduced volume of nitrogen could result in an insufficient volume of oil to successfully operate the tool. 1.4.3.11. The double chamber kit may be used to reduce operating pressure. It is typically used in high-pressure wells, however, it can be used simply to reduce operating pressure. Generally, operating pressure will be reduced by approximately 200 psi. The kit increases nitrogen volume. 5.03-in. Double Chamber Kit 615.2273/101203996 3.90-in. Double Chamber Kit 615.2088/101201854 3.06-in. Double Chamber Kit 615.224

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LPR N Operational Guidelines

1.4.3.12. At higher hydrostatics, the acid and standard cartridges may meter oil so quickly that it is difficult, if not impossible, to apply annulus pressure quickly enough to create the required differential pressure across the operating piston to operate the ball valve. In such instances, it will be necessary to switch to either a highpressure cartridge or double chamber kit. At very high hydrostatics, both the high-pressure cartridge and the double chamber kit may be required. Both volume requirements and the rate that oil meters through the metering cartridge necessitate changing to these components. See guidelines for changing components in "Metering Cartridge Pressure Range" later in this section. 1.4.3.13. The working pressure ratings for LPR Ns are based on differential pressure, not hydrostatic. A tool rated for 15,000 psi working pressure can work at higher hydrostatics as long as the well testing program is designed so that differential pressure remains within the working pressure rating of the tool. With current technology, as hydrostatics reach the 20,000 psi range, fluid volume available in the tool, both oil and gas, may be insufficient. This can cause the floating pistons to bottom out in some circumstances. When hydrostatics exceed working pressure ratings, the Testing Tools Group in the DFW Technology Center should be contacted. 1.4.3.14. Nitrogen charging pressures should be limited to 10,000 psi or less. Double chamber kits can be used to reduce the required charging pressure if it is too high. If more that 10,000 psi charging pressure is required (even with a double chamber kit), contact the Testing Tools Group at the DFW Technology Center.

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Metering Cartridge Pressure Range

1.5 Metering Cartridge Pressure Range


1.5.1 5-in. 15K LPR N (PN 615.41950)
Metering Cartridge PN
626.41729 (obsolete) 626.41736 626.41737

Type
Standard Acid High Pressure

Cartridge/ N2 Chamber
Standard/Acid Cartridge with Single N2 Chamber Standard/Acid Cartridge with Double N2 Chamber High-Pressure Cartridge with Single N2 Chamber High-Pressure Cartridge with Double N2 Chamber

Normal Pressure Range


0 to 9,000 psi 3,000 to 13,000 psi 5,000 to 20,000 psi 8,000 to 20,000 psi

Extended Range*
9,000 to 12,000 psi 13,000 to 17,000 psi

*The metering cartridge and N2 chamber configuration can be used in this range, but the operating pressure needs to be applied in less than 30 seconds.

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Metering Cartridge Pressure Range

1.5.2 3 7/8-in. LPR N (PN 615.417)


Metering Cartridge PN
615.4178 615.4180

Type
Standard/Acid High Pressure

Cartridge/N2 Chamber
Standard Cartridge with Single N2 Chamber Standard Cartridge with Double N2 Chamber High-Pressure Cartridge with Single N2 Chamber High-Pressure Cartridge with Double N2 Chamber

Normal Pressure Range


0 to 5,000 psi 0 to 8,000 psi 3,000 to 20,000 psi 8,000 to 20,000 psi

Extended Range*
5,000 to 7,000 psi 8,000 to 11,000 psi

*The metering cartridge and N2 chamber configuration can be used in this range, but the operating pressure needs to be applied in less than 30 seconds.

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Metering Cartridge Pressure Range

1.5.3 3-in. LPR N (PN 615.41990)


Metering Cartridge PN
615.4176 (obsolete) 615.4177

Type
Standard High Pressure

Cartridge/N2 Chamber
Standard Cartridge with Single N2 Chamber Standard Cartridge with Double N2 Chamber High-Pressure Cartridge with Single N2 Chamber High-Pressure Cartridge with Double N2 Chamber

Normal Pressure Range


0 to 2,000 psi 0 to 4,000 psi 2,000 to 10,000 psi 5,000 to 16,000 psi

Extended Range*
2,000 to 3,000 psi 4,000 to 5,000 psi 10,000 to 18,000 psi 16,000 to 20,000 psi

*The metering cartridge and N2 chamber configuration can be used in this range, but the operating pressure needs to be applied in less than 30 seconds.

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Shear Pin Information

1.6 Shear Pin Information


Tool Assembly
615.41950 615.4171 615.417 615.41990 615.4175

Shear Pin Part Number


615.41133 615.41107 615.41107

Number of Pins Required


4 4 2

Shear Pressure psi/pin


280 310 470

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Meter Cartridge Function Test Instructions

1.7 Meter Cartridge Function Test Instructions


1.7.1 Cartridge Metering 1,000-7,000 psi Hydrostatic 7-in. LPR N Tester Valve
PN: 615.43021 SN: 101002861 Test Fixture PN: (Not available. Metering cartridge must be tested in the tool assembly.)
Instructions Test
1. 2. Install cartridge into test fixture. Pressure cartridge on up set end with water to 2,000 psi and measure flow for 1 minute. Flow should be 430-570 mL. Stop pump. Pressure should bleed down to 450-200 psi. Pressure cartridge on blank end with water to 2,000 psi and measure flow for 1 minute. Flow should be 430-570 mL. Stop pump. Pressure should bleed down to 450-200 psi. If the pressure bleeds down more than the specified amount in Steps 3 and 5, install nitrogen and blow cartridge out with 1,5002,000 psi for 30 seconds. Repeat pressure test per Steps 3 and 5. After testing, place cartridge in a clean plastic bag until ready to use. A copy of this form should be placed in the data book.

Step

Remarks Retest

3. 4.

5. 6.

7.

General Remarks: Date: Tested By:

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Meter Cartridge Function Test Instructions

1.7.2 Cartridge Metering 5 in. OD LPR N Tester Valve All Temp Sour Gas High-Pressure Service

Step

PN: 626.41737 SN: 100066886 Test Fixture PN: 626.41735


Instructions Test Remarks Retest

1. 2.

Install cartridge into test fixture. Pressure cartridge on bottom end with water to 2,000 psi and measure flow for 1 minute. Flow should be 90-120 mL. Stop pump. Pressure should bleed down to 450-200 psi. Pressure cartridge on top end with water to 2,000 psi and measure flow for 1 minute. Flow should be 90-120 mL. Stop pump. Pressure should bleed down to 90-0 psi. If the pressure bleeds down more than the specified amount in Steps 3 and 5, install nitrogen and blow cartridge out with 1,500-2,000 psi for 30 seconds. Repeat pressure test per Steps 3 and 5. After testing, place cartridge in a clean plastic bag until ready to use. A copy of this form should be placed in the data book.

3. 4.

5. 6.

7.

General Remarks: Date: Tested By:

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Meter Cartridge Function Test Instructions

1.7.3 Cartridge Metering 5 in. OD LPR N Tester Valve All Temp Sour Gas Acid Service

Step

PN: 626.41736 SN: 100066885 Test Fixture PN: 626.41735


Instructions Test Remarks Retest

1. 2.

Install cartridge into test fixture. Pressure cartridge on bottom end with water to 2,000 psi and measure flow for 1 minute. Flow should be 200-265 mL. Stop pump. Pressure should bleed down to 450-200 psi. Pressure cartridge on top end with water to 2,000 psi and measure flow for 1 minute. Flow should be 200-265 mL. Stop pump. Pressure should bleed down to 90-0 psi. If the pressure bleeds down more than the specified amount in Steps 3 and 5, install nitrogen and blow cartridge out with 1,500-2,000 psi for 30 seconds. Repeat pressure test per Steps 3 and 5. After testing, place cartridge in a clean plastic bag until ready to use. A copy of this form should be placed in the data book.

3. 4.

5. 6.

7.

General Remarks: Date: Tested By:

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Meter Cartridge Function Test Instructions

1.7.4 Cartridge Metering 5-in. OD LPR N Tester Valve All Temp Sour Gas

Step

PN: 626.41729 SN: __________________ Test Fixture PN: 626.41735


Instructions Test Remarks Retest

1. 2.

Install cartridge into test fixture. Pressure cartridge on bottom end with water to 2,000 psi and measure flow for 1 minute. Flow should be 200-265 ml. Stop pump. Pressure should bleed down to 450-200 psi. Pressure cartridge on top end with water to 2,000 psi and measure flow for 1 minute. Flow should be 200-265 mL. Stop pump. Pressure should bleed down to 450-200 psi. If the pressure bleeds down more than the specified amount in Steps 3 and 5, install nitrogen and blow cartridge out with 1,500-2,000 psi for 30 seconds. Repeat pressure test per Steps 3 and 5. After testing, place cartridge in a clean plastic bag until ready to use. A copy of this form should be placed in the data book.

3. 4.

5. 6.

7.

General Remarks: Date: Tested By:

January 23, 2002

LPR N Tester Valve

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Cased Hole Maintenance Manual

Meter Cartridge Function Test Instructions

1.7.5 Cartridge Metering 3 7/8-in. LPR N Tester Valve



Step

PN: 626.4178 SN: _________________ Test Fixture PN: 615.41801


Instructions Test Remarks Retest

1. 2.

Install cartridge into test fixture. Pressure cartridge on bottom end with water to 2,000 psi and measure flow for 1 minute. Flow should be 200-265 mL. Stop pump. Pressure should bleed down to 450-200 psi. Pressure cartridge on top end with water to 2,000 psi and measure flow for 1 minute. Flow should be 225-300 mL. Stop pump. Pressure should bleed down to 0 psi. If the pressure bleeds down more than the specified amount in Steps 3 and 5, install nitrogen and blow cartridge out with 1,500-2,000 psi for 30 seconds. Repeat pressure test per Steps 3 and 5. After testing, place cartridge in a clean plastic bag until ready to use. A copy of this form should be placed in the data book.

3. 4.

5. 6.

7.

General Remarks: Date: Tested By:

January 23, 2002

LPR N Tester Valve

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Cased Hole Maintenance Manual

Meter Cartridge Function Test Instructions

1.7.6 Cartridge Metering 3 7/8-in. OD LPRN 8,000 to 16,000 psi Acid



Step

PN: 626.4180 SN: __________________ Test Fixture PN: 615.41801


Instructions Test Remarks Retest

1. 2.

Install cartridge into test fixture. Pressure cartridge on bottom end with water to 2,000 psi and measure flow for 1 minute. Flow should be 60-80 mL. Stop pump. Pressure should bleed down to 450-200 psi. Pressure cartridge on top end with water to 2,000 psi and measure flow for 1 minute. Flow should be 65-90 mL. Stop pump. Pressure should bleed down to 0 psi. If the pressure bleeds down more than the specified amount in Steps 3 and 5, install nitrogen and blow cartridge out with 1,500-2,000 psi for 30 seconds. Repeat pressure test per Steps 3 and 5. After testing, place cartridge in a clean plastic bag until ready to use. A copy of this form should be placed in the data book.

3. 4.

5. 6.

7.

General Remarks: Date: Tested By:

January 23, 2002

LPR N Tester Valve

I-23

Cased Hole Maintenance Manual

Meter Cartridge Function Test Instructions

1.7.7 Cartridge Metering 3-in. LPR N Tester Valve



Step

PN: 626.4177 SN: __________________ Test Fixture PN: 615.41797


Instructions Test Remarks Retest

1. 2.

Install cartridge into test fixture. Pressure cartridge on bottom end with water to 2,000 psi and measure flow for 1 minute. Flow should be 30-45 mL. Stop pump. Pressure should bleed down to 450-200 psi. Pressure cartridge on top end with water to 2,000 psi and measure flow for 1 minute. Flow should be 35-50 mL. Stop pump. Pressure should bleed down to 90-0 psi. If the pressure bleeds down more than the specified amount in Steps 3 and 5, install nitrogen and blow cartridge out with 1,500-2,000 psi for 30 seconds. Repeat pressure test per Steps 3 and 5. After testing, place cartridge in a clean plastic bag until ready to use. A copy of this form should be placed in the data book.

3. 4.

5. 6.

7.

General Remarks: Date: Tested By:

January 23, 2002

LPR N Tester Valve

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Cased Hole Maintenance Manual

Fault Tree Analysis

1.8 Fault Tree Analysis


1.8.1 Surface Function Test
1.1
1. 2. Install pressure lines to upper and lower annulus ports. Apply operating pressure.

1.4 1.2
Is ball open?
No

1.3
Has nitrogen pressure increased?

Yes

1. 2. 3.

Release pressure back to and maintain simulated hydrostatic. Wait 10 minutes. Reapply operating pressure.

No

Go to 1.5

1.12
Wait 10 minutes Release pressure back to and maintain simulated hydrostatic

1.11
Check for closed valve in system. Go to Step 1.1

No

1.14
Probable Cause(s): Did not wait long enough for pressure to meter into the nitrogen section. Go to Step 1.14.1.

1.13
Is ball closed?

1.15
Test complete

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Cased Hole Maintenance Manual

Fault Tree Analysis

1.8.1 Surface Function Test (Continued from 1.14)

1.14.1
Did not wait long enough for the operating pressure pressure to meter into the nitrogen section.

1.14.1.1
1. 2. 3. 4. Wait 15 minutes from release of pressure. Apply operating pressure to tool. Wait 15 minutes. Release pressure back to and maintain simulated hydrostatic.

1.4.1.3 Probable Cause(s):


Not applying pressure quickly enough. Go to Step 1.8.1. Fluid bypassing metering cartridge. Go to Step 1.8.2. Mechanical problem in operating operating arms, ball, etc. Go to Step 1.8.3.

1.14.1.2
Is ball closed?

No

1.14.1.4
Continue test. Go to 1.15.

January 23, 2002

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Cased Hole Maintenance Manual

Fault Tree Analysis

1.8.1 Surface Function Test (Continued from 1.14.1.4)


Continued from 1.4

No

Yes

1.5
Is ball open?

1.6
1. Release pressure back to and maintain simulated hydrostatic. Wait 10 minutes. Increase operating pressure by 200 psi.

1.10
Continue test. Go to Step 1.12.

2. 3.

Yes

1.7
Is ball open?

1.9
Gauge may be off. Check calibration and go to Step 1.1.

1.8
Probable Cause(s): Not applying pressure quickly enough. Go to Step 1.8.1. Fluid bypassing metering cartridge. Go to Step 1.8.2. Mechanical problem in operating section, i.e., operating arms, ball, etc. Go to Step 1.8.3.

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Cased Hole Maintenance Manual

Fault Tree Analysis

1.8.1 Surface Function Test (Continued from 1.8)

1.8.1
Not applying pressure quick enough Pressure should be applied within 60 seconds.

1.8.2
Fluid bypassing metering cartridge 1. 2. Apply pressure to lower annulus ports. Monitor nitrogen pressure. If the nitrogen pressure increases at the same or nearly the same rate as the pump pressure, release pressure and redress the oil section.

1.8.3
Mechanical problem in operating section Missing or damaged operating arms locking dogs. Ball installed backwards.

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Cased Hole Maintenance Manual

Fault Tree Analysis

1.8.2 Internal Pressure Test at Surface


2.1
Tool leaks with ball in the open position or with equal pressure above and below a closed ball.

2.3
Disassemble and inspect O-rings and sealing surfaces. Replace as needed. Reassemble and retest.

2.2
Are leaks visible?

Yes

No

2.4
Blank off pump and manifold, and pressure system up.

2.5
Check for a leak in manifold and pump.

2.6
Does pressure leak off?

Yes

2.7
Correct leak in manifold or pump and continue testing.

No Go to Step 2.9.

2.8
Possible leak into nitrogen or oil chamber.

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Cased Hole Maintenance Manual

Fault Tree Analysis

1.8.2 Internal Pressure Test at Surface (Continued from 2.8)

2.9
Release pressure and remove plug above the metering cartridge and pressure system up. (Note: In most 5-in. LPR Ns there is not a plug above the metering cartridge. You can remove the plug just below the metering cartridge.)

2.12
Disassemble and inspect oring and sealing surfaces. Replace as needed. Reassemble and retest.

2.10
Does fluid leak out?

Yes

2.11
Leak is located in the oil section.

2.13
Does nitrogen pressure increase?

2.14
Yes Leak is located in the nitrogen or operating section.

2.15
Disassemble and inspect oring and sealing surfaces. Replace as needed. Reassemble and retest.

No

2.16
Air may be in ID.

2.17
Release pressure, and remove as much air as possible from system. Retest.

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Cased Hole Maintenance Manual

Fault Tree Analysis

1.8.3 Surface Inspection Prior to Running in the Well


3.1
Check ball position.

3.3
Yes Was tool set up for the ball in the open position? No

3.4
Tool was left in the open position.

3.2
Is ball open? Yes

3.5 3.7
No Continue inspection. Go to Step 3.10. 2. 1. Remove ball case and engage locking dogs. Rotate the ball valve to the closed position. Reassemble.

3.8
Was tool set up to be in the closed position? No

3.6
Continue inspection. Go to Step 3.10.

3.9
Yes Tool was left with the ball in the closed position 1. Remove ball case, disengage the locking dogs, rotate the ball to the open position, and reassemble. 2. Go to Step 3.10.

3.10
Check oil floating piston position.

3.11
Is piston visible in lower annulus ports? No

3.12
1. 2. Hook hand pump into fill port in the metering case. Using silicone fluid, pump the oil piston back until it is visible in the lower annulus ports. Go to Step 3.13.

Yes 3.

3.13
Check nitrogen pressure and adjust pressure for downhole conditions.

3.14
Remove any plugs in the upper and lower annulus ports.

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Cased Hole Maintenance Manual

Fault Tree Analysis

1.8.4 Downhole Tool Does not Operate


4.1
Check for mechanical barriers between pump and annulus. If conditions allow, open rams and circulate.

4.2
Is rig manifold closed?

Yes

4.3
Open.

4.4
Operate tool.

No

4.5
Are bottomhole conditions and calculations correct? No

4.6
If conditions have changed and tool will not operate, contact your supervisor or Dallas Engineering for assistance.

Yes

4.7
Excessive differential across ball? Yes

4.8
Decrease differential to <2,000 psi from above and <5,000 psi from below.

4.9
Operate tool.

No

4.13
Possible pressure transmissibility problems with annular fluid.

Yes

4.10
Did tool operate?

4.11
Continue test.

No Go to Step 4.14.

4.12
Go to Step 4.14.

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Fault Tree Analysis

1.8.4 Downhole Tool Does Not Operate (Continued from 4.12)

4.14
Increase pump rate to safe maximum. Increase operating pressure by 100-200 psi.

4.15
Did tool operate?

Yes

4.16
Continue test.

4.17
Increase time interval between pressure cycles.

4.18
No Has maximum surface pressure been applied?

Yes

4.19
1. 2. Open circulating valve. Reverse and pull out of hole.

January 23, 2002

LPR N Tester Valve

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