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The student vOice since 1904

The student vOice since 1904 Reed siblings shaRe love foR game, family » PAGE 1B WEDNES

Reed siblings shaRe love foR game, family

» PAGE 1B

WEDNES Day, FEBRUa Ry 27, 2008

family » PAGE 1B WEDNES Day, FEBRUa Ry 27, 2008 WWW.kaNSaN.com men set to battle iowa

WWW.kaNSaN.com

men set to battle iowa state

PAGE 1B WEDNES Day, FEBRUa Ry 27, 2008 WWW.kaNSaN.com men set to battle iowa state »
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» PAGE 6B

volU m E 118 i SSUE 103

volU m E 118 i SSUE 103

» campus

Students gain perspective from volunteer

Michael Barringer-Mills didn’t pur- sue his interest in humanitarian work until seven years after graduating from the University of Kansas. Once he did, Barringer-Mills found his calling work- ing for Doctors Without Borders in Africa. On Monday, he returned to the University to speak to students about his experiences.

full STORy PAgE 6A

» campus

Events shed light on eating habits, disorders

“Celebrate EveryBODY Week” kicked off on Monday to promote healthy body image at the University of Kansas. Student Health Services and other organizations on campus will be host- ing events throughout the week geared toward promoting a healthy lifestyle.

full STORy PAgE 3A

ASSOCIATED PRESS bush says Republican will win Governors see themselves as key in turning their

ASSOCIATED PRESS

bush says Republican will win

Governors see themselves as key in turning their party around

full AP STORy PAgE 3A

weather

44 26 Sunny — weather.com
44 26
Sunny
— weather.com

THURSDAY

51 34

Sunny

FRIDAY

51 32

Patly cloudy

index

 

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All contents, unless stated otherwise, © 2008The University Daily Kansan

Outside the box

© 2008The University Daily Kansan Outside the box Jessie fetterling/KANSAN Jordan Jacobson, Wamego freshman,

Jessie fetterling/KANSAN

Jordan Jacobson, Wamego freshman, observes the faculty art on display in the Art and Design Building Tuesday afternoon. The Art Department Faculty Exhibition continues for the rest of this week.

» BOard Of regenTs

Craving longer summers

Proposal will request shorter school year for Kansas universities

BY FRANCESCA CHAMBERS

fchambers@kansan.com

Kansas universities could have a shorter school year as soon as fall 2009. Hannah Love, Dodge City senior and stu- dent body president, said she would submit

a proposal to the Board of Regents before its

next meeting asking to change the accredita- tion policy that requires Kansas universities to hold school for two 15-week semesters. The Regents next meeting is March 12 and 13. Love said that she thought academics were important, but that students who worked during the summer to pay for tuition would benefit from having a shorter school year. She also said a shorter school year would make students more competitive for internships. The Regents require universities to hold school for 150 days each year. Love, members of University and Faculty Senate, and other students said they would like to see the policy based on the number of hours or minutes students spend in each class. The University would not only have to convince the Regents the policy should be changed, it would also have to convince the other state universities as well. Eric Foss, Overland Park law student and

a member of Student Senate and University Senate, said the University’s school year was a week longer than that of other schools in the Big 12 and many schools in the nation. “When I was an undergrad, I was burnt out by how long the semester was,” Foss said. He said if classes at the University were five minutes longer, students would be attending class for, overall, the same amount of time they were now, but with a shorter semester. Foss said such a change would throw the schedule off because most classes would not be able to start every hour on the hour, but that he thought the University Registrar could plan classes around the new schedule just as easily as it planned the current schedule. He also said he did not think most stu- dents would care if they had to spend five more minutes in class, but that they would appreciate having a shorter semester.

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Bryan Marvin/KANSAN

Student Body President Hannah love plans to send a proposal to the Board of Regents that could shorten future semesters at the University of Kansas by two weeks.

Brittany Cohoon, Overland Park fresh- man, said she wished she could spend five more minutes in her math class each class period. She said it was difficult for teachers to complete their lessons in 50 minutes and that a longer class period would give students more time to complete tests. “And I wouldn’t object to going home two weeks early,” Cohoon said. Cohoon said she would also be inter- ested in seeing the University lengthen spring break. She said it would give out-of-state students more time to visit their families. She also said that the issue was of special importance this year because Easter would be during spring break. Rick Levy, a law professor and the presi- dent of Faculty Senate, said faculty members supported the policy change as well, but he did not think the Regents would consider the change unless students initiated it. “If the faculty or the administration pushes this at the Regents level, it appears to be self- serving because it looks like we want to work

less,” Levy said. In addition, Levy stressed that the other state universities would have to support the policy change for the Regents to consider it. “If KU tries to push this as just a KU initia- tive, it will fail,” Levy said. Love said she first discussed the policy change with the other student body presi- dents from Kansas universities last fall. She said the general response from the presidents and their universities was negative. But, Love said she still thought the issue was important and that she would encourage Kansas State’s student body president, Matt Wagner, to support the initiative during their trip to Washington, D.C., for “Day on the Hill,” which takes place March 10 and 11. Because of this trip, Love will not be able to attend the Regents meeting next month, but she said she would send representatives. Foss said if Love could convince the stu- dent leaders of the state’s other universities to support the policy this spring, the policy could be changed during the summer. But

board of Regents

board of Regents

board of Regents The Board of Regents is in charge of six state universities as well

The Board of Regents is in charge of six state universities as well as one municipal university. Those universities are:

» Emporia State

» Fort Hayes State

» Kansas State, including KSU at Salina

» Pittsburg State

» Kansas and KU Medical Center

» Wichita State

» Washburn (municipal)

he said the schedule change could not be implemented until the fall of 2009 because the Registrar has already begun creating the class timetable for the next school year.

— Edited by Patrick De Oliveira

2A NEWS Wednesday, February 27, 2008 quote of the day “Water, taken in moderation, cannot

2A

NEWS

Wednesday, February 27, 2008

quote of the day

“Water, taken in moderation, cannot hurt anybody.”

—Mark Twain

fact of the day

There are about 100,000 bacteria in one liter of drinking water.

There are about 100,000 bacteria in one liter of drinking water.

— www.nms.on.ca

most e-mailed

Want to know what people

are talking about? Here’s a list of Tuesday’s five most e-mailed stories from Kansan.com:

1. Pskills advance with tight

win against Law Dogs

2. Rains: Referee’s busy

schedule brings new meaning

to “Love of the game”

3. Outlook accounts may

feature Gmail technology

4. Creative, fiction writing

prove adventurous

5. Two Jayhawks experience

family tragedies

et cetera

The University Daily Kansan is the student newspaper of the University of Kansas. The first copy is paid through the student activity fee. Additional copies of The Kansan are 25 cents. Subscriptions can be pur- chased at the Kansan business office, 119 Stauffer-Flint Hall, 1435 Jayhawk Blvd., Lawrence, KS 66045.

The University Daily Kansan (ISSN 0746-4962) is published daily during the school year except Saturday, Sunday, fall break, spring break and exams. Weekly during the summer session excluding holidays. Periodical postage is paid in Lawrence, KS 66044. Annual subscriptions by mail are $120 plus tax. Student subscriptions of are paid through the student activity fee. Postmaster: Send address changes to The University Daily Kansan, 119 Stauffer-Flint Hall, 1435 Jayhawk Blvd., Lawrence, KS 66045

media partners

media partners

For more

news,

turn to

For more news, turn to KUJH-

KUJH-

TV on Sunflower Cablevision Channel 31 in Lawrence. The student-produced news airs at 5:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m., 9:30 p.m. and 11:30 p.m. every Monday through Friday. Also, check out KUJH online at tv.ku.edu.

KJHK is the stu- dent voice in radio. Each day there is news, music, sports,

KJHK is the stu- dent voice in radio. Each day there is news, music, sports, talk shows and other content made for stu- dents, by students. Whether it’s rock n’ roll or reggae, sports or special events, KJHK 90.7 is for you.

i walk alone

sports or special events, KJHK 90.7 is for you. i walk alone Rachel Anne Seymour/KANSAN As

Rachel Anne Seymour/KANSAN

As a man walks westbound on Jayhawk boulevard tuesday evening, winter weather grips the air. cold winds and chilling temperatures have been nip- ping at the noses of students and faculty members this week, but this weekend could bring hope for nicer weather. according to the national oceanic and atmospheric administration, saturday’s temperature will reach 60 degrees with sunny skies.

debate

Clinton, Obama highlight differences

CLEVELAND — Hillary Rod- ham Clinton and Barack Obama clashed over NAFTA, health care and the war in Iraq Tuesday night in a crackling debate at close quarters one week before

a pivotal group of primaries. Charges of negative cam- paign tactics were high on the program, too. “Senator Obama has consis- tently said I would force people to have health care whether

they can afford it or not,” said Clinton, insisting it was not true. Responding quickly, Obama countered that former first lady had consistently claimed his plan “would leave 15 million

people out

think it is inaccurate,” he said.

I dispute that. I

Clinton also said as far as

she knew her campaign had nothing to do with circulating a photograph of Obama wearing

a white turban and a wrap-

around white robe presented to him by elders in Wajir, in Kenya. “I take Senator Clinton at her word that she knew nothing about the photo,” Obama said. The two rivals, the only survivors of a grueling primary season, sat about a foot apart at a table on stage at Cleveland State University. The race was far different in April 2007, Clinton the front-run- ner by far. Now Obama holds that place, in terms of both contests and delegates won. The two rivals also debated NAFTA, the free trade agree- ment with Canada and Mexico that is wildly unpopular with blue-collar workers whose votes are critical in any Demo- cratic primary in Ohio. Neither one said he or she was ready to withdraw from the agreement, although both said they would use the threat of withdrawal to pressure Mexico to make changes. On the war, both candidates denounced President Bush’s record on Iraq, then restated long-held disagreements over which of them was more op- posed.

—Associated Press

on campus

The workshop “Leadership:

Great Leaders, Great Teams, Great Results” (Day 1 of 5) begins at 8 a.m. in 204 Joseph R. Pearson Hall.

The lecture “Ujamaa Brownbag”

begins at 11:30 a.m. in Alcove C in the Kansas Union.

The University Forum “Politi- cal Consequences in Kansas of Latino Immigration” begins at noon in the ECM Center, 1204 Oread Ave.

“Around the World with the Peace Corps” begins at noon in the International Room in the Kansas Union.

“Islam and Muslim Approaches to Modernity” begins at 2 p.m. at Continuing Education, 1515 St. Andrews Drive.

The seminar “American Semi- nar- Ben Chappell” begins at 3:30 p.m. in the Hall Center Seminar Room.

Women’s Basketball plays against Texas at 7 p.m. in Allen Fieldhouse.

The public event “Celebrate EveryBODY Week” begins at 7 p.m. in the Kansas Union Ballroom.

The concert “Jazz Combos” begins at 7:30 p.m. in the Lawrence Arts Center, 940 New Hampshire St.

The Humanities Lecture Series:

Paul Muldoon, “The Eternity of the Poem” begins at 7:30 p.m. in the Woodruff Auditorium in the Kansas Union.

at 7:30 p.m. in the Woodruff Auditorium in the Kansas Union. daily KU info The University

daily KU info

The University of Kansas was named the seventh most popular public university in the country by U.S. News and World Report. The ranking is based on the number of accepted stu- dents who ultimately enrolled.

on the record

A refrigerator, an air condi- tioner and a snow plow were reported stolen from Regency Place Monday.

Two cars were reported sto-

len in Lawrence this weekend:

a Jeep Cherokee and a Toyota Corolla. Total loss was valued at

$23,000.

contact us

Tell us your news Contact Darla Slipke, Matt Erickson, Dianne Smith, Sarah Neff or Erin Sommer at 864-4810 or editor@kansan.com.

Kansan newsroom 111 Stauffer-Flint Hall 1435 Jayhawk Blvd. Lawrence, KS 66045 (785) 864-4810

What do you think?

by Katie Guinn

What do you think of Mike huckabee continuing to stay in the republican candidacy race, even When, statistically, his chances of Winning are alMost iMpossible?

statistically, his chances of Winning are alMost iMpossible? Nate Lata Castle Rock senior “It’s stupid because

Nate Lata Castle Rock senior “It’s stupid because it’s a waste of money. But I’m not voting Republi- can anyways!”

of money. But I’m not voting Republi- can anyways!” aShLey BioNdo Lenexa senior “I think maybe

aShLey BioNdo Lenexa senior “I think maybe he wants to get his name out there for more publicity in the future.”

get his name out there for more publicity in the future.” JeNNifeR mCCaRty Leawood senior “If

JeNNifeR mCCaRty Leawood senior “If he really wanted to support the Republican Party, he would drop out instead of continuing to tear the conservative base away from John McCain.”

to tear the conservative base away from John McCain.” eRiN SamueLSoN overland Park sophomore “I don’t

eRiN SamueLSoN overland Park sophomore

“I don’t know why he would stay

in the race, but at least he can joke about it on Saturday Night Live.”

ePa

Administrator could resign after turning down bill

WASHINGTON — Internal docu- ments from the Environmental Protection Agency indicate staff members believed Administrator

Stephen Johnson might have to consider resigning if he turned down California’s request to reduce vehicle greenhouse gas emissions. Johnson denied the waiver request in December, blocking California and at least 16 other states from implementing the

reductions. Democratic Sen. Barbara Boxer of California, who is investigat- ing the decision, released new transcripts from internal EPA docu- ments Tuesday. Among them is a staff memo prepared for a senior official in the

them is a staff memo prepared for a senior official in the air quality divi- sion

air quality divi- sion to present to Johnson. It urged Johnson to grant the waiver or find

a compromise.

The memo warns Johnson that he “has to find a way to get this done,” adding that if he could not, he would face a decision about whether to step down.

not, he would face a decision about whether to step down. Johnson — Associated Press H

Johnson

— Associated Press

H u m a n i t i e s L e c t u
H u m a n i t i e s
L e c t u r e
s e r i e s
2 0 0 7 – 2 0 0 8
The Eternity
o � the Poem
Paul Muldoon
February 27, 2008 | Woodruff Auditorium | 7:30 p.m.
Winner of the 2003 Pulitzer Prize, Muldoon has been called “the most
significant English-language poet born since the second World War.”
additional event
“A Conversation with Paul Muldoon”
February 28, 10:00 a.m.
Hall Center Conference Hall
This series is co-sponsored by Kansas Public Radio.
Partial funding for the Humanities Lecture Series
is provided by the National Endowment for the
Humanities’ 2000 Challenge Grant.

DON’S AUTO:

[Keeping Kansas students off the streets since 1972] Don’s Auto Center 11th & Haskell 841-4833
[Keeping Kansas students
off the streets
since 1972]
Don’s Auto Center
11th & Haskell
841-4833
wednesday, february 27, 2008 news 3A » campus Creating healthy habits ‘Celebrate EveryBODY Week’ focuses

wednesday, february 27, 2008

news

3A

» campus

Creating healthy habits

‘Celebrate EveryBODY Week’ focuses on body image, lifestyles

BY MARY SORRICK

msorrick@kansan.com

an important event for raising awareness about the prevalence of eating disorders. “The statistics are staggering,” Chapman said.

The NIMH estimates that 20 percent of women struggle with an eat- ing disorder or abnormal eating habits. Of the 24 mil- lion Americans

battling an eat- ing disorder, up to 15 percent are male. Chapman said that obsession

with food and overeating also qual- ified as eating disorders. Lindsey Hirschorn, Overland Park junior and president of From The Inside Out, said negative body

image was also a significant issue on campus. “If you sit in the girls’ bathroom for 10 minutes, you will not hear

one positive thing said,” Hirschorn said. From The Inside Out aimed to encourage a

more positive body image by helping to tape positive mes- sages onto mir- rors in pub- lic restrooms around campus on Monday, she said. Other events

planned for Celebrate EveryBODY Week include bringing Stacey Prussman, a comedian who has struggled with an eating disorder, to campus to talk to students. Hirschorn said Prussman’s experience with an eating disorder would be eye-opening for many students.

“Celebrate EveryBODY Week” is

bringing discounted food, positive and

messages

a comedian

the University of Kansas this

week to promote healthy body image among students.

t

to

this week to promote healthy body image among students. t to “We try to focus on

“We try to focus on body accep- tance — a positive rather than a negative.”

mAi do

Student Health Services marketing coordinator

S t

u

d

e

n

The

Health Services,

From

Inside Out and H.O.M.E.B.A.S.E., organizations that focus on body image and health, are sponsor- ing Celebrate EveryBODY Week to target eating disorders. Of people with eating disorders, 95 percent are younger than 25,

according to the National Institute

of Mental Health.

Events throughout the week will target eating disorders such as anorexia and bulimia, as well

as abnormal eating habits such as

restrictive dieting and binging and

purging.

Mai

a r k e t i n g

Do,

m

c o o r d i n a -

tor

Health Services,

said

events,

coincided

National Eating

D

A

Week, would be

aimed

ing students develop a healthy life- style.

“We try to focus on body accep- tance — a positive rather than a negative,” Do said. Ann Chapman, coordinator of nutritional services at Watkins Memorial Health Center, said Celebrate EveryBODY Week was

Memorial Health Center, said Celebrate EveryBODY Week was “If you sit in the girls’bathroom for 10

“If you sit in the girls’bathroom for 10 minutes, you will not hear one positive thing said.”

LindSEy HirScHorn

From The inside out president

and overland Park junior

for

i s

the

Student

week’s

which

with

o r d e r s

w a r e n e s s

at

help-

eating disorder statistics
eating disorder statistics

eating disorder statistics

»

24 million people in the

United States battle eating disorders

»

86 percent of people with

eating disorders said they started by age 20

»

Eating disorders are the

third most common chronic illness among adolescents

»

25 percent of college

women binge and purge to maintain their weight

»

The ideal body type

promoted in the media is natural in only 5 percent of American women

 

Source: Renfrew Center Foundation for Eating Disorders

Better Bites entrées, available in cafeterias across campus, will also be provided at a 20 to 25 percent discount for lunch on Thursday, Chapman said. BetterBites entrées have fewer calories and less fat than many other food options on campus. Hirschorn said events such as these were important for KU stu- dents. “There’s a huge need for things like this on college campuses,” Hirschorn said. “It’s a place where eating disorders run wild.” Stacey Prussman will speak at 7 tonight in the Kansas Union Ballroom and will be available afterward to answer student ques- tions.

— Edited by Patrick De Oliveira

»

politics

Bush confident Republicans will holdWhite House

BY BEN FELLER

ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — President Bush predicted Monday that vot- ers would replace him with a Republican president who would “keep up the fight” in Iraq. “I’m confident we’ll hold the White House in 2008,” Bush told donors at the Republican Governors Association annual

dinner, which raised a record $10.6 million for GOP gubernato- rial candidates.

Bush has promised to be an active fundraiser, and had no trou- ble slipping into enthusiastic cam- paign mode Monday evening.

He said Republicans still offered the bedrock positions that voters embraced: strong defense, low taxes and personal freedoms.

“When I say I’m confident, I am so because I understand the mentality of the American people,” Bush said. “There’s no question in my mind, with your help, 2008 is

“There’s no question in my mind, with your help, 2008 is AssoCiAted Press President Bush speaks

AssoCiAted Press

President Bush speaks during the 2008 Republican Governors Association gala on Monday in Washington. Bush said he was sure a Republican would replace him in the Oval Office.

going to be a great year.” Democratic governors have a 28-

22 edge nationally, having regained

a majority in 2006 after 12 years of GOP dominance. Eleven seats are up this year.

of

the House and Senate in 2006. Republican governors, as chief

executives and effective fundrais- ers, see themselves as the key to turning around their party.

Democrats

took

control

» crime

Change of venue sought in trial

Sect leader to face charges as an accomplice to rape

BY AMANDA LEE MYERS

ASSOCIATED PRESS

PHOENIX — Polygamist sect leader Warren Jeffs was handed over to Arizona authorities Tuesday to face charges alleging he arranged the marriages of two teenage girls to older men. Deputies from the Mohave County Sheriff ’s Office took cus- tody of Jeffs from Utah officials, sheriff ’s spokeswoman Trish Carter said. Jeffs, 52, the former leader of the Fundamentalist Church of Jesus

Christ of Latter Day Saints, is sched- uled to appear in court to enter a plea Wednesday in Kingman, Ariz. He is charged as an accomplice with four counts of incest and four counts of sexual contact with a minor in an indictment. Defense attorney Mike Piccarreta plans to ask the judge for a change of venue, saying Kingman is too close to St. George, Utah, the site of Jeffs’ first trial, for him to get a fair trial here. “If people want to give Mr. Jeffs

a fair trial, we have to hold it in an area as far away as practical from

the other case in Utah,” he said. Mohave County Attorney Matt Smith said the trial, which will be months from now, should be held in Mohave County because that’s where the alleged crimes occurred. Jeffs was arrested in August 2006 in Nevada and was convicted last year in Utah of rape as an accom- plice in the arranged marriage of a 14-year-old girl and her 19-year-old cousin. The mainstream Mormon church, The Church of Jesus Christ

of Latter-day Saints, renounced polygamy more than a century ago.

The mainstream Mormon church, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, renounced polygamy more than
The mainstream Mormon church, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, renounced polygamy more than
The mainstream Mormon church, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, renounced polygamy more than
The mainstream Mormon church, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, renounced polygamy more than
The mainstream Mormon church, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, renounced polygamy more than
The mainstream Mormon church, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, renounced polygamy more than
The mainstream Mormon church, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, renounced polygamy more than
The mainstream Mormon church, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, renounced polygamy more than
The mainstream Mormon church, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, renounced polygamy more than
The mainstream Mormon church, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, renounced polygamy more than
The mainstream Mormon church, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, renounced polygamy more than
The mainstream Mormon church, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, renounced polygamy more than
The mainstream Mormon church, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, renounced polygamy more than
The mainstream Mormon church, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, renounced polygamy more than
The mainstream Mormon church, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, renounced polygamy more than
The mainstream Mormon church, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, renounced polygamy more than
The mainstream Mormon church, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, renounced polygamy more than
The mainstream Mormon church, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, renounced polygamy more than
The mainstream Mormon church, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, renounced polygamy more than
The mainstream Mormon church, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, renounced polygamy more than
The mainstream Mormon church, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, renounced polygamy more than
The mainstream Mormon church, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, renounced polygamy more than
The mainstream Mormon church, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, renounced polygamy more than
The mainstream Mormon church, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, renounced polygamy more than
The mainstream Mormon church, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, renounced polygamy more than
The mainstream Mormon church, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, renounced polygamy more than
The mainstream Mormon church, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, renounced polygamy more than

4a

enterta inment

wednesday, february 27, 2008

wednesday, february 27, 2008

4a enterta inment wednesday, february 27, 2008 » squirrel » rOFlCOPTer Wes Benson » ChiCkeN sTriP

» squirrel

inment wednesday, february 27, 2008 » squirrel » rOFlCOPTer Wes Benson » ChiCkeN sTriP Emily

» rOFlCOPTer

Wes Benson

february 27, 2008 » squirrel » rOFlCOPTer Wes Benson » ChiCkeN sTriP Emily Sheldon and Katie

» ChiCkeN sTriP

Emily Sheldon and Katie Henderson

Benson » ChiCkeN sTriP Emily Sheldon and Katie Henderson Charlie Hoogner » The ADVeNTures OF Jesus

Charlie Hoogner

» The ADVeNTures OF Jesus AND JOe DiMAGGiO

Hoogner » The ADVeNTures OF Jesus AND JOe DiMAGGiO Max Rinkel celebrity Brazilian doctors remove cyst

Max Rinkel

celebrity

Brazilian doctors remove cyst from Naomi Campbell

SAO PAULO, Brazil — Naomi Campbell was hospitalized in Sao Paulo for the removal of a small cyst, her publicist, Jeff Raymond, said. The 37-year-old British su- permodel, a frequent visitor to

Brazil, was treated at Sirio Libanes Hospital. “Following the successful pro- cedure, she is now resting and is looking forward to getting back to work. She would like to thank the doctors who have kindly looked after her,” her publicist said in a statement Tuesday. Dr. Jose Aristodemo Pinotti, a gynecologist, told The Associated

Press by telephone that Campbell underwent abdominal surgery. “I cannot reveal what Naomi had, nor how serious her condition was, but I can say I operated on her yesterday, that everything went smoothly and that she is complete- ly cured and walking in her room,” Pinotti said.

— Associated Press

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» hOrOsCOPes

10 is the easiest day, 0 the most chal- lenging.

Aries (March 21-April 19) Today is a 5

If you can’t have or do everything

you want at this moment in time, don’t think of it as dreams being shattered. Learn to defer gratifica- tion; it’s a very useful skill.

Taurus (April 20-May 20) Today is an 8 Advise your partner to watch out for tricks. All is not as it appears to be. To win this competition, you will have to be resourceful. Creativity is required.

Gemini (May 21-June 21) Today is a 5

It seems like you’re getting nowhere,

but that’s probably not the case. Check your bearings and persevere. Do the job because you said you would.

Cancer (June 22-July 22) Today is an 8

If you want to make a good impres-

sion, use food instead of toys. You’ll save a lot of money and have much greater success. And you’ll look very good.

leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Today is a 6 You’re still having to deal with a couple of stubborn types. Do your job and remind them of the overall objective, if you must. Otherwise, lay low.

Virgo (Aug. 23-sept. 22) Today is an 8 The more you learn, the more things you’ll find that you’ve been doing the hard way. Carefully assess your situation and put in the corrections.

libra (sept. 23-Oct. 22) Today is a 5

A

review of your budget could lead

to

an ugly clash with reality. Just

because you can’t afford the toy you want now, doesn’t mean you never will. Save up.

scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) Today is a 7 It’s easier for you to see through a silly facade now. Your best choice for romance is someone who never tries to pull any such tricks.

sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) Today is a 6 This day is good for finishing up, tidying up and throwing things out. You’ll be absolutely amazed at how much space you can create. And it’ll be fun.

Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Today is a 7 It’s good to support causes that further your agenda. Just make sure the people to whom you’re sending money aren’t spending it on them- selves, for luxuries.

Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) Today is a 5

It may seem there’s a huge barrier

between you and what you want. This could be a mirage, without real substance. Stay busy with practical matters.

Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20) Today is an 8 The more you learn, the more old as- sumptions are challenged. This is OK. You can let them go. Try out a new perspective.

This is OK. You can let them go. Try out a new perspective. L on to
This is OK. You can let them go. Try out a new perspective. L on to
This is OK. You can let them go. Try out a new perspective. L on to
L on to K Kansan.com to Log answer! ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ KANSAN
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KANSAN
TRIVIA QUESTION
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A
new scholarship will be awarded in Fall 2008
to
women student-athletes in what program?
Need a hint?
studentsforku.org
This week’s prize:
$25 Papa Johns
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in what program? Need a hint? studentsforku.org This week’s prize: $25 Papa Johns ?? Gift Card!

O piniOn

5a

Wednesday, February 27, 2008

O piniOn 5a Wednesday, February 27, 2008 » the editoriaL board Clicker system passes students; fails

» the editoriaL board

Clicker system passes students; fails in its basic function

Despite classroom efficency, students’ test grades too important to be risked by uncertain system

The adage, “If you play with fire, you're gonna get burned” seems to have recently struck the CPS Clicker system at Budig Hall. Last week, lecturer Nancy Holcroft was forced to assign 100 percent grades to every student taking a test in her Biology 100 class after the clicker system being used to administer the test failed to record the answers students were sending in. In this case it appears a problem arose with the lecturer's computer, though nei- ther the company nor the University has identified a specific cause, eight school days after the incident. Susan M. Zvacek, director of Instructional Development & Support, said that the clicker sys- tem is usually very reliable and her department had never before run into a problem such as last Monday’s. Although the system is mainly used for small quizzes, atten- dance or class interaction, IDS does not recommend using the system for “high-stakes testing situations.” It appears technology will continue

to be integrated even more tightly into the class experience, but this raises a question: Is this integration necessarily positive or reliable? eInstruction president Steve Kaye visited the campus Tuesday, meeting with professors and IT staff and finally assembling a company task force to investigate the prob- lem. He assured that the University would be updated within 24 to 48 hours, though he offered no spe- cific details as to the cause of the problem. The greatest concern that has emerged is that the clicker system is too complex to be technically supported on campus, forcing the University to rely on a third-party company. It is positive that the com- pany has taken steps to resolve these problems and communicated with University officials. These good intentions still have not moved the University any closer to resolving the issue, and if pro- fessors are going to rely on this system to administer tests or other

high-stakes usages, more high-level technical support needs to be avail- able on campus. Technology like the CPS click- er system provides some obvious benefits over traditional class inter- action and test making methods, especially in large classes. It facili- tates direct anonymous response to questions a professor might want to ask, and allows this information to be displayed instantly. But convenience aside, the real question appears to be whether these platforms are ready for a test- taking environment, where time and grades are critical. Judging by the information available in research- ing the clicker system, it is not — at least in it’s current form. Scantron surely has it’s share of issues as well, but the real issue is that as technology allows more advanced functions, it becomes more complex and therefore less reliable. Malfunctions with student or teacher hardware could cause a delay, forcing a reschedule or even a

loss of all information, as happened last week. Kaye said his company does thor- ough quality assurance testing on all its products and that a combination of unforeseen circumstances had converged to cause this problem. There are hundreds of different types of computers in use today, thousands of peripherals, count- less configuration options and two major operating systems with five or more versions in use and all of this could cause problems. Basically, the clicker system has to be more complex in order to do what it does best and this is where unreliability comes from. Currently then, the clicker sys- tem is thus inappropriate for testing situations. This is not to say that one day in the future this will not be possible. It will simply require more robust measures to address the com- plexity of the technology. According to Zaveck and Kaye, new training measures and software changes will be integrated to improve reliability.

The clicker system relies on com-

plex technologies to offer what it does, meaning that in order for someone to fix it he or she will need

a technical understanding of the

system. Kaye said that eInstruction

provides a comprehensive training program, but it mainly consists of how to setup a class’s roster or

connect the equipment. As this cir- cumstance has indicated, the clicker system is far more complex than this. When being used for testing,

it is important it have a very high

reliability rate. The system is com- plex and no one is available on campus that can provide high-level support.

If it’s the University’s goal to

use the clickers for such impor- tant tasks, on-campus support and increased robustness in the clicker software would be required.

Alex Doherty for the Editorial Board

» Commentary

Consumer culture: so easy a caveman can do it

Ross stewaRt
Ross stewaRt

I awaken. I open a new stick of deodorant. The top of the deodorant stick reads, “Go all in!” I’m sorry, but the last place I look for advice is from my deodorant, espe- cially since it is applied to underarms, the butt crack or the torso. It saddens me that people forge their lifestyles from phrases like this one that are created by an advertis- ers. It is almost to the liking of taking advice from a cracked-out bum. “You don’t need no school, all you need is some rocks and some porn. You wanna buy some porn? It’ll make you famous.”

Usually wisdom found in power words or phrases — put together by advertising teams or cracked out bums — really isn’t all that great of advice. If it were advice that actually made sense, I probably would take it. If the top of my deodorant read, “You won’t stink!” I would be like “Wow, that is true. Thank you, deodor- ant stick.” What am I supposed to go all in on anyway? What if going all in led to my untimely death? I’d be angry, yet no one would ever know. How sad. I’ve grown weary watching my peers create mantras inspired by an advertisement’s catch phrase. Yes, we all are susceptible to adver- tising. There are signs everywhere tell- ing us what to wear, drink, eat, smell like, look like, taste like and feel like. I’ve seen it all. There’s a sign for every product. I once saw a coupon for douches. I almost bought them but then remem- bered that I don’t have a vagina.

We don’t think to be careful not to center our lives on something that has a main goal of taking our money. If taking it to the extreme is what a group of people wants, for it. I can only pray they don’t make such a decision based off a Mountain Dew commercial. I implore my peers to research culture, read a damn book (gasp). Don’t buy your lifestyle. Find it the way people did before our genera- tion through learning. Understanding your belief sys- tems ultimately forces you to re- evaluate them. If consumer culture created your belief system, the only thing that will be revised are the prod- ucts that clutter your home. I’m going to start taking my deodorant’s advice and go all in. Now where’s that cracked out bum? Poppa needs some porn.

Stewart is a Wichita junior in journalism.

needs some porn. Stewart is a Wichita junior in journalism. Max Rinkel » Commentary Every dog

Max Rinkel

» Commentary

Every dog has its day, even if media don’t recognize it

CoRban Goble
CoRban Goble

You really blew it this time, world- wide media. What you did (or didn’t do) is deplorable. Shame on you, Fox News. Nice going, CNN. Pathetic, Current.tv. Not even an inch of print, The Economist? None of these “respect- ed” media giants ran with the most inspiring news story of our genera- tion. This particular story symbol- ized a defiant victory for the average American, a triumphant fist in the air for our blue-collar, beer-swilling country. I’m referring to the Uno the

Beagle’s cataclysmic Best-Of- Show performance at this year’s Westminster Dog Show, of course. Sure, there’s been some serious press devoted to the story already, but I chalk that up to the hegemonic power of the American Kennel Club. Imagine if the Chicago Cubs won

the World Series this year. The stack

of the press clippings would outweigh

an average Leon Uris novel. Although the Cubs’ Series drought

often is exemplified as one of the lon- gest-lasting losing streaks of our era,

a beagle hadn’t won the nation’s top

dog show in more than 130 years. The last time a beagle won, you couldn’t get on the phone to tell your friends because the phone wasn’t invented yet. The President? Ulysses S. Grant. The favored mode of trans- portation? Horse. I’d like to take a moment to lam- bast the media outlets that haven’t covered this wonderful story with enough scope, perspective or intel-

ligence. When Uno trotted onto that Astroturf, innumerable odds stood between him and this great honor. The skeletal glare of the poodles, both Toy and Standard breeds, judge- mentally traced Uno’s steps. However, none of this mattered to Uno, who flippantly shed the shack-

les of beagledom. Also, he bayed at the judge, a clear shoutout to his like-minded beagle homies across our nation. I realize there’s a war on, and

due journalistic diligence should be pointed in that direction. That’s fine with me. Also, I know this nation of corpo- rate-merger housewives and Miley Cyrus-deifying adolescent girls crave their Britney fixes, and I’ll even grant that. But America witnessed the birth of a great hero that can lead us into our next golden age, a hero that can relate with the masses. He can take

sprawling leaps at catered steaks one moment and win a giant purple rib- bon the next. Is there anything this dog can’t do? No. The tide of the future relies on this brown-headed pooch, who, without any need for argument, is the greatest single life form to ever come out of Missouri. How do I know that? Uno received a standing ovation at Madison Square Garden, some- thing that hasn’t happened much since Willis Reed hung ‘em up. This demonstration of arena-wide approval exhibits the magnetism this hound has. Charisma — you can’t just wave a doggie biscuit over a wet nose and get charisma. You’ve probably seen Uno while scanning through most mainstream newspapers, broad-interest maga- zines and watching the last 10 min- utes of your local news. That’s not enough. We need to

lionize this canine to an extent where

we can finally replace the word “lion- ize” with a superior dog equivalent. “Uno-ize” or creation of the verb “to beagle” are my suggestions.

In the future, when I see a hero

do something great, I want it to be covered in every conceivable fashion.

Until the future comes where we all will have TiVo-like newspapers that filter out the stuff we don’t want to read (i.e. any story about Bono), we must rely on the media stream to cover the important issues. I would call this Uno business the quintessential “important” issue.

A hound dog, a veritable every-

man, came to New York City and clobbered the competition. Imagine if your dad won the Masters. That’s what this is like. Plus, he’s way cooler than Barbaro.

Goble is a Mission Hills senior in English and economics.

Goble is a Mission Hills senior in English and economics. to contribute to Free For all,

to contribute to Free For all, visit kansan.com and add the Facebook applica- tion, or call 785-864-0500. Free For all callers have 20 seconds to talk about any- thing they choose.

Kudos to KU Information Tech- nology for not updating its Web site about the lack of print- ing or wireless connection in Anschutz and having to rely on the PA system to announce it.

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Once again, KU’s IT department is worthless.

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Badgers will devour us all.

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I personally know some engi- neers who would look smokin' hot in a wet T-shirt.

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Nader will rule over all! Be prepared!

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I'm really sad they removed "random play" from Facebook's "interested in" section.

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After two years of hating KU e-mail, this Google thing is get- ting me pretty excited.

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I'm tired of “love.” From now on, I'm taking advantage of my boyfriends.

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The only people who need spots on campus are professors, and they don't even get to park by their buildings.

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Is anybody else out there re- ally tired of seeing those Vera Bradley bags on campus every single day?

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Free for All, I haven't been in you for days now. I just don't know what to say about all of this.

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Jim Marchiony says there isn't a problem with parking, yet the parking department gets calls complaining about parking ev- ery day. Of course Jim doesn't have a problem with parking. There's always a spot for his Mercedes.

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If you think Nader is the best candidate, you are fucking insane.

think Nader is the best candidate, you are fucking insane. Look for us on Wescoe beach

Look for us on Wescoe beach today from 12:30 to 1:30 p.m.

@

Look for us on Wescoe beach today from 12:30 to 1:30 p.m. @ n Want more?

n Want more? Check out

Free For All online.

ContaCt us

taLk to uS

darla Slipke, editor 864-4810 or dslipke@kansan.com

matt erickson, managing editor 864-4810 or merickson@kansan.com

dianne Smith, managing editor 864-4810 or dsmith@kansan.com

bryan dykman, opinion editor 864-4924 or dykman@kansan.com

Lauren keith, associate opinion editor 864-4924 or lkeith@kansan.com

toni bergquist, business manager 864-4358 or tbergquist@kansan.com

katy Pitt, sales manager 864-4477 or kpitt@kansan.com

malcolm Gibson, general manager and news adviser 864-7667 or mgibson@kansan.com

Jon Schlitt, sales and marketing adviser 864-7666 or jschlitt@kansan.com

SubmiSSionS

The Kansan welcomes letters to the editors and guest columns submitted by students, faculty and alumni.

The Kansan reserves the right to edit, cut to length, or reject all submissions.

For questions about submissions, call Bryan Dykman or Lauren Keith at 864-4810 or e- mail dykman@kansan.com.

General questions should be directed to the editor at editor@kansan.com.

Letter GuideLineS

maximum Length: 200 words

the submission must include: Author’s name and telephone number; class, home- town (student); position (faculty member/ staff); phone number (will not be published)

GueSt CoLumn GuideLineS

maximum Length: 500 words

the submission must include: Author’s name and telephone number; class, hometown (student); position (faculty member/staff); phone number (will not be published) The Kansan will not print guest columns or letters that attack a reporter or another columnist.

the editoriaL board

Members of the Kansan Editorial Board are Alex Doherty, Bryan Dykman, Matt Erickson, Kelsey Hayes, Lauren Keith, Darla Slipke, Dianne Smith, Ian Stanford and Zach White.

6A NEWS wednesday, february 27, 2008 If a grad student could chuck wood Jessie Fetterling/KANSAN

6A

NEWS

wednesday, february 27, 2008

If a grad student could chuck wood

february 27, 2008 If a grad student could chuck wood Jessie Fetterling/KANSAN Nicholas Ward, Vermillion, S.D.,

Jessie Fetterling/KANSAN

Nicholas Ward, Vermillion, S.D., graduate student, saws wood for his wood shop class in the Art and Design Building Tuesday afternoon. Ward is one of about 1,200 students in the School of Fine Arts.

ConCert

NY orchestra helps mend U.S. ties with North Korea

PYONGYANG, North Korea — The New York Philharmonic’s unprecedented concert could her- ald warmer ties between North Korea and the United States. After three encores, some musicians

left the stage in tears as the audi- ence waved fondly. Between horn fanfares and the flourishes of the conductor’s baton, the U.S. and North Korea found common ground in a concert Tuesday that spanned American and Korean musical traditions. Whether the feeling lingers

and Korean musical traditions. Whether the feeling lingers after the music will depend on the North’s

after the music will depend on the North’s compliance with an inter- national push to rid it of nuclear weapons. After the New York Philhar- monic played the last notes of the folk song “Arirang,” the adoring audience stood and applauded enthusiastically, waving to the musicians. Orchestra members — some moved to tears — paused with their instruments and waved back, an emotional finale to the concert that was the highlight of the Philharmonic’s 48-hour visit. The concert was broadcast live on North Korean TV, mean- ing it was heard beyond the 2,500 people in the theater. North Korean leader Kim Jong Il did not attend; there was no way to know whether he watched. “We may have been instru- mental in opening a little door,” Maazel said after the perfor- mance.

» campus

Alumnus talks about medical work abroad

BY AnDreW WIeBe

awiebe@kansan.com

“We both saw, in him, a very

bright, well-informed, question- ing and searching sort of person,” Woelfel said. Barringer-Mills said Woelfel and Trulove were integral in bringing him back to visit the University.

decid-

pursue

humanitarian

work, Barringer-

Mills researched

organizations

the

Corps,

Cross

Doctors

Without Borders on the Internet.

eventu-

Michael Barringer-Mills’ inter- est in pursuing a career in humani- tarian work started innocently enough with a college course on

the history

the Holocaust. B a r r i n g e r-

Mills

was a junior at

the University

of Kansas when

he

background

genocide

the

with the human-

itarian catastro-

phes in the former Yugoslavia and

Rwanda in the early 90s. This rev- elation made him consider oppor-

tunities to stop human suffering. “It really struck a chord with

me,” Barringer-Mills said. “I was

really inspired to do that kind of work as a KU undergrad. It just

took me a few years to figure out

how to do that.”

After graduating from the

U n i v e r s i t y

in 1997 with

a bachelor’s

degree in history,

Barringer-Mills

said he bounced

from

job. He eventu-

ally worked in

construction in

Minnesota, but

his dream of

helping others

wasn’t over. As

it turned out, his experience in

construction helped him land a

logistical position with the interna- tional humanitarian organization Doctors Without Borders. “I felt I had been working for

a few years and was interested in the idea of engaging in a wider world,” Barringer-Mills said. “That was something that had been a goal of mine before graduating from undergrad. To me, it felt like a now or never type of thing because I finally had the skills necessary.” Monday evening, Barringer- Mills spoke to students about his experiences in Doctors Without Borders in his lecture, “Mèdicins Sans Frontières and Shrinking Humanitarian Space,” and dis- cussed the health care situations in developing countries he visited. Humanities and Western Civilization director James Woelfel and his wife, Sarah Trulove, trav-

eled abroad with Barringer-Mills

when he was a student. Woelfel

said he and his wife saw Barringer- Mills’ fascination with finding out

more about the world and his place

in the world.

of

he

the

of

and

After

ing

to

such

Peace

Red

and

He

as

of he the of and After ing to such Peace Red and He as “I was

“I was really inspired to do that kind of work as a KU undergrad. It just took me a few years to figure out how to do that.”

MIchAel BArrINGer-MIllS

University alumnus

said

learned

parallels

ally settled on Doctors Without Borders because of the complex- ity and importance of the work the organization undertakes in countries with unique situations, internal conflict and, many times, civil war. Barringer-Mills began his

Doctors Without Borders career in

2004 as a logistician in Darfur, and has also served in Sudan, Congo, Uganda and

Nigeria. His duties included c o ord i n at i n g supplies for the organization in Sudan, coordi- nating a vac- cination cam- paign during a meningitis out- break in north-

ern Nigeria and serving as a 72-

bed trauma center director in the midst of urban violence in the Niger Delta in Nigeria. “I think we are in a unique posi- tion to get to places where nobody else is,” he said. “Frequently we are

the only ones around so we are able to make a real, physical and imme- diate difference in the lives of our patients.” Barringer-Mills said that work- ing in such volatile situations could be dangerous, but that Doctors Without Borders relies on impartial treatment and steadfast neutral- ity to avoid violent conflict among warring factions. Doctors Without Borders workers are unarmed and are not accompanied by guards, he said. Barringer-Mills said one of the most dangerous situations he had experienced was during his time in the Niger Delta when the urban violence surrounding them restrained the organizations ability to exit their compound. “The danger was in traveling,” he said. “Nobody can anticipate a stray bullet. We had to stay within

the confines of our hospital for four days. Our biggest concern, frankly, was not for our own safety than it was for the ability of our patients to reach us.” Barringer-Mills said the demands of working in the field with Doctors Without Borders attracted committed health profes- sionals and humanitarian workers from all over the globe. He said he met his wife while working with the organization. Barringer-Mills is attending graduate school at the University of Minnesota, with plans to return to work with Doctors Without Borders upon graduation. He said that although he had to take breaks from the field to stay motivated, his previous work with Doctors Without Borders and the work that he will do in the future continued to motivate him to help others. “It’s work that I really believe matters,” he said. “It makes a con- crete, real difference in people’s lives.”

makes a con- crete, real difference in people’s lives.” “We both saw, in him, a very

“We both saw, in him, a very bright, well-informed, ques- tioning and searching sort of person.”

JAMeS WOelfel

Director of humanities

and Western civilization

job to

— Edited by Matt Hirschfeld

— Associated Press

JAMeS WOelfel Director of humanities and Western civilization job to — Edited by Matt Hirschfeld —
JAMeS WOelfel Director of humanities and Western civilization job to — Edited by Matt Hirschfeld —

S portS

hawks try out at NFL combiNe

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S portS hawks try out at NFL combiNe PAGE 2B Aqib Talib kaNsas womeN take oN

Aqib Talib

kaNsas womeN take oN LoNghorNs

PAGE 3B

The universiTy daily kansan

www.kansan.com

wednesday, February 27, 2008

page 1b

all in the family

wednesday, February 27, 2008 page 1b all in the family Jon Goering/KANSAN Tyrel Reed, freshman guard,

Jon Goering/KANSAN

Tyrel Reed, freshman guard, and his sister Lacie, Burlington sophomore and men’s basketball student manager, have more than just a last name in common. basketball has run in the reed family. Lacie played in her younger years until a knee injury took her out of the game and their father, stacy, coached basketball while tyrel played in high school.

Like brother, like sister

a passion for kansas basketball runs deep for the reed siblings

BY RUSTIN DODD

dodd@kansan.com

Lacie Reed does her little brother’s laun- dry. Sure, she wants to be a good older sis- ter, but Lacie, Burlington sophomore, isn’t exactly doing it for free. Lacie and younger brother Tyrel have a deal. “We trade laundry for food,” Tyrel said. Tyrel brings his older sister a mountain of dirty of laundry, and in exchange, he takes his sister out to eat. Older sister washes and younger brother pays. Sometimes it’s Subway, sometimes it’s Quiznos, or any other sandwich shop they haven’t tired of. “Something fast,” Tyrel said. When you’re Tyrel Reed and you’re a freshman guard for the No. 6-ranked college basketball team, you don’t have a lot of spare time to enjoy a sit- down lunch with your older sister. Especially when your sister is a sophomore student manager for the team and holds down a schedule almost as busy as yours. It’s not hard to tell that Tyrel and Lacie Reed are related. Tyrel, with his 6-foot-3- inch frame, towers above his sister. And you won’t mistake Lacie’s blonde hair with Tyrel’s patch of closely cropped brown hair. But put the two in the same room and people can just tell. “I get the twin thing a lot,” Lacie said. “We

have a lot of the same mannerisms.” Walk into Allen Fieldhouse an hour before

a Kansas basketball game, and you can see examples of those mannerisms. Tyrel is the one on the floor in the No. 14 jersey, shooting jump shots, and Lacie is the one sitting on the sideline, supervising the game’s ball boys. “I do behind-the- scenes type of stuff,”

Lacie said. But spending time in

the gym together is noth-

ing new for the

siblings. They’ve been doing it their whole lives. The ball, the basket, the wood floor — that’s just who the Reeds are.

It’s not that Tyrel and Lacie have trouble remembering their child- hoods. That’s easy. But ask them about the memories that don’t involve a round leather ball and an iron rim, and it gets a little tougher. “It seems to always come back to basket- ball,” Tyrel said. Growing up in Eureka, the daily routine was pretty simple. Go to the elementary school where their mother, Debbie, taught; hang out in the gym after school and play basketball; then, head to the Eureka High

School team’s practice where their dad, Stacy,

coached. Stacy Reed coached at Eureka High School for 14 years and at nearly every practice, Tyrel and Lacie occupied the sideline. “You know as a coach that you’re not going to have as much home time during the season,” Stacy Reed said. “So that time in the gym had to make up for that.”

Sometimes the Reeds would take a break from watching practice and play one-on-one. “Third and fourth grade it was very com- petitive, because I was still taller than he was,” Lacie said. Tyrel then hit a growth spurt during the fifth grade.

“Then it wasn’t as fun to play,” she said.

If there’s one place Tyrel pays the price

for having his sister as a team manager, it’s at practice. His teammates, well, they can’t help themselves. “We always joke with him,” freshman cen- ter Cole Aldrich said. “‘Tyrel, where’s your sister at?’”

If Aldrich is comfortable making jokes at

sister at?’” If Aldrich is comfortable making jokes at “I get the twin thing a lot.

“I get the twin thing a lot. We have a lot of the same manner- isms.”

LACIE REED

Men’s basketball student manager

Reed

SEE reed oN PAGE 4B

» commentary

NBA-level Jayhawks not seeing success

Former players don’t fare well as professionals

BY THOR NYSTROm TNYSTROm@kANSAN.cOm
BY THOR NYSTROm
TNYSTROm@kANSAN.cOm

Cleveland traded Drew Gooden to Chicago on the NBA’s trading deadline last week. By most accounts, his inclusion in the trade was as much attributable to bal-

ancing salaries as it was to the Bulls actu- ally wanting him. His mental lapses and defensive inadequacies had grown to the point that the Cavaliers felt that they had

to give him away in a trade. They acquired

an increasingly ineffective center who has

a terrible contract and can’t play offense

(Ben Wallace) and a vastly overpaid wing who can shoot and do nothing else (Wally Sczerbiak). Most NBA experts believed Cleveland upgraded at the power forward position simply by getting Chicago to toss Joe Smith into the deal. For me, this further increases the dis- appointment of current Jayhawks in the NBA. We have one of the premier pro- grams in college basketball, but only one player who is currently a key player on a good NBA team. And even Paul Pierce was merely a good player on a terrible team until Boston imported Ray Allen and Kevin Garnett before the season. Is anyone else slightly disappointed? My buddy C.J., a former Kansan sports columnist, is a huge basketball fan and Jayhawk fanatic. As a Kansas native with- out a local NBA squad to support, he roots for teams based on former Jayhawks that the franchise employs. He has been a Bulls advocate for the last few years because of Kirk Hinrich and he has also rooted for the Celtics because of Pierce. I am from Minnesota and therefore am

a diehard Timberwolves fan. Because my

team decided to trade Garnett before the season and tank to acquire a high draft pick, I knew I had to root for losses for the good of the team. So I decided to try a form

of the “C.J. Method” of NBA fandom. Instead of rooting for teams, which

would have amounted to sports bigamy and

a form of cheating on my Timberwolves,

I threw my allegiances behind Hinrich,

Pierce, Gooden, Nick Collison, Raef LaFrentz, Scot Pollard, Jacque Vaughn, Wayne Simien and Julian Wright. What a disappointing year it has been for C.J. and me. Outside of Pierce and the Celtics, it hasn’t been pretty. And if the T-Wolves haven’t been stupid enough to botch KG’s prime by surrounding him with mediocre players before giving him away bargain-

style, it would be a lost season for Jayhawk NBA fans. Cleveland has grown tired of Gooden and it is far from certain that he will fit in with the defensive-minded Bulls. Hinrich has inex- plicably turned into a below average player on the NBA’s most disappointing team. His points per game are at their lowest since his rookie year, his assist numbers are the lowest of his career and his outside shooting has been bad, 32 percent from beyond the arc, by far the worst of his career. The rest is merely mediocrity, or worse:

Nick Collison is a decent backup post player on one of the NBA’s worst teams, Seattle, and hasn’t shown many signs of being able to turn the corner into a good starter. LaFrentz showed evidence early in his career with Denver that he could be devel- oped into an All-Star player, but injuries robbed him of his athleticism and stamina and he hasn’t been an effective player in six years. The former Jayhawk star hasn’t seen the court much as an oft-hurt backup center on Portland the last two years. Vaughn and Pollard are longtime backups. Pollard, an NBA journeyman, cheers Pierce on from the bench with the Celtics. Nobody knows what kind of player Julian Wright will turn into, but he will have to significantly improve his shooting and ball-handling to turn into an effective player. Simien was released by the Timberwolves, the second-worst team in the league, after being a throw-in on a trade from Miami right before the season started. He is unemployed and his NBA future looks bleak. I doubt this trend will reverse soon. The odds seem high that Darrell Arthur, Brandon Rush, Sherron Collins and other NBA hopefuls on the Jayhawk roster will eventually become nothing more than role players in “The League.” Until Bill Self starts heavily recruiting those “one and done” type prospects such as Kevin Durant, Greg Oden or Michael Beasley, I would expect that to continue. I suppose it is selfish to be disappointed in the current crop of professionals. We do, after all, have Pierce and the Celtics to root for. Boston is 43-12; the best record in the NBA. But I can’t help but feel a bit of indigna- tion that the other Jayhawks haven’t come through in my time of need. With Hinrich and Gooden’s regressions, Wright’s inabil- ity to crack the Hornets rotation, and the others’ mediocrity, it has been a long year for Jayhawk NBA fans. Hawk Nation now has only one hope for its professional basketball fix: a lengthy playoff run by the Celtics that pushes Pierce further into the NBA spotlight.

—Edited by Madeline Hyden

» BaseBall

Heading to Arkansas

BY SHAWN SHROYER

shroyer@kansan.com

The sunny weather hasn’t followed Kansas home from Hawaii. However, the Jayhawks will consider it an even trade, so long as their poor play doesn’t carry over from the Big Island to the mainland. After losing a series with Hawaii-Hilo for the first time in program history over the weekend, Kansas (2-3) heads to SEC country today for a midweek clash with Arkansas (3-0). The undefeated and uncharacteristi- cally unranked Razorbacks reached the NCAA tournament last season, hosting a regional, which has added even more luster to Kansas’ match up with the SEC powerhouse for. “That’s a huge RPI game any time you get to play an SEC game,” coach Ritch Price said. “We’ve been there four times since I’ve been here and we’ve lost (two) one-run games.” That has Kansas looking for a bit of pay- back. One of those one-run losses came last season during a three-game Arkansas sweep. Of course, Kansas has had some bad luck with one-run games more recently. In the process of losing three of five games to Hawaii-Hilo to open its season, Kansas suf- fered two one-run, extra-inning losses. “Obviously we’re extremely disappointed in the win-loss record coming home, but every- thing we didn’t do well we can fix,” Price said. Kansas had 40 strikeouts and 10 errors in the series, so the Jayhawks will need to find quick fixes to hang with the Razorbacks.

However, after a 16-4 shellacking of the Vulcans in game five, the Jayhawks may have started hitting their stride. Most notably, junior first baseman Preston Land capped off his weekend with a 2-for-3 performance, scoring two runs and hitting a three-run home run. Looking to keep the Kansas bats cool will be Arkansas freshman right-hander James Mahler (0-0). Mahler pitched 1.1 innings of relief in Arkansas’ three-game sweep of Wright State over the weekend, allowing four runs on five hits and a walk, and striking out none. Arkansas outscored Wright State 21-11 in the series with the help of junior third baseman Logan Forsythe, freshman first baseman Andy Wilkins and senior outfielder Aaron Murphree. Forsythe hit .500 in the series and led the team with five runs. Wilkins and Murphree each hit a home run and knocked in six runs as Murphree led the team with a .600 average. Kansas sophomore left-hander Wally Marciel (1-0) will try to harness the Arkansas offense after a strong start on Friday. Throwing on a pitch count to make sure he’d be fresh for today, Marciel struck out four in six innings, allowing just one run. Today will mark Marciel’s first start in an SEC venue, but the youngest starter in Kansas’ rotation isn’t intimidated. “The SEC has a lot of good teams and Arkansas is a very good team,” Marciel said. “I watched them, I didn’t get to pitch against them last year, but hopefully I’ll have a good game against them and just show them a new thing.”

—Edited by Russell Davies

» women’s BasketBall

Team enters final stretch with concerns

BY TAYLOR BERN

tbern@kansan.com

particularly to start the second half. In the last two games, the Jayhawks’ opponents used runs of 12-2 and 18-4 out

of halftime to either erase or lengthen leads. What Henrickson can’t figure out is why her team continues to come out flat. “That’s the million-dollar question; that’s the one that’s been

agonizing the staff all year,” Henrickson said. “Unfortunately I don’t have an answer and I don’t think these kids have an answer, either, but it’s something we’ve got to fix right away.” It’s not all bad news for the Jayhawks. They only lost by three in

Columbia, Mo., with freshman center Krysten Boogaard accounting for just six points. The colossal Canadian won’t get shut out like that at home, and backup point guard LaChelda Jacobs tends to play better against teams from her home state, Texas. This has been one of the most competi- tive seasons in Big 12 history, according to Henrickson, and its inevitable end means it is gut check time for every team. That mentality has been passed down to her players, who, despite the recent setbacks, understand what’s still ahead of them. “The reality is that we still have a chance

The starter’s gun for the marathon that is

a college basketball season went off on Nov. 11 for Kansas. Now the Jayhawks are in a dead sprint to the finish line as they

wrap up their regu- lar season with three games in the next eight days. The first of those three is tonight’s clash with Texas at 7 in Allen Fieldhouse. Afterlosingtwogames in a row to the 11th and 12th place teams in the conference (Texas Tech

and Missouri), Kansas has a laundry list of problems to fix before the game. “We’ve got to limit our turnovers and do the small things that really matter,” sopho- more guard Danielle McCray said. Senior forward Taylor McIntosh added, “Around this time of year defense is win- ning games because the competition steps up. It’s important for us to stay focused defensively and let our offense come to us.” Coach Bonnie Henrickson admitted that turnovers had been a problem for her team, win or lose, all year. She said she was more disappointed in Kansas’ lackluster defense,

she was more disappointed in Kansas’ lackluster defense, “We need to just play as hard as

“We need to just play as hard as we can in these last few games in hopes of going to the tournament.”

TAyLoR MCInTosh

senior forward

going to the tournament.” TAyLoR MCInTosh senior forward Weston White / KANSAN Freshman center Krysten Boogaard

Weston White / KANSAN

Freshman center Krysten Boogaard puts up a shot that was blocked by missouri guard alyssa hollins. boogaard finished with just six points in 33 minutes during a 59-62 loss sunday at mizzou arena.

to reach our goals,” McCray said. “Everyone knows what’s at stake right now,” McIntosh said. “We need to just play as hard as we can in these last few games in hopes of going to the tournament.”

—Edited by Matt Hirschfeld

2B sports wednesday, february 27, 2008 trivia of the day Q: Who is the only

2B

sports

wednesday, february 27, 2008

trivia of the day

Q: Who is the only Iowa State

basketball player to be named a Consensus First Team All-Ameri-

can?

A: Marcus Fizer in the 1999- 2000 season. Fizer averaged 22.8 points and 7.7 rebounds and led the Cyclones to an Elite Eight berth that season before declaring for the NBA Draft.

— nba.com

fact of the day

Fizer plays for Maccabi Tel Aviv Basketball Club, a team that has won five Euroleague Championships in Tel Aviv, Israel. He is teammates with fel- low American Will Bynum, who led Georgia Tech to the national championship game in 2004.

— maccabi.co.il

quote of the day

“This is the biggest shot I ever took in my life. I mean, it’s like a dream come true, making

a

shot like this at this high level.

mean, words can’t describe how I feel right now.”

I

— Will Bynum, after making a game- winning basket against Oklahoma State in the 2004 Final Four

on tv tonight

Men’s College Basketball:

Kansas at Iowa State,

6

p.m., ESPN

Georgia Tech at Duke,

8

p.m., ESPN

West Virginia at DePaul,

8

p.m., ESPN2

Women’s College Basketball:

Iowa State at Missouri, 6:30 p.m., FSN

Kansas calendar

Kansas calendar

Kansas calendar
Kansas calendar

TODAY

Swimming & Diving, Big

12 Championships, All day,

Austin, Texas Baseball vs. Arkansas, 3 p.m., Fayetteville, Ark. Men’s basketball vs. Iowa State, 6 p.m., Ames, Iowa Women’s basketball vs. Texas, 7 p.m., Lawrence

THURSDAY

Swimming & Diving, Big

12 Championships, All day,

Austin, Texas

Big 12 men

Big 12 men
 
   
 

Big 12

Overall

Texas

11-2

24-4

Kansas

9-3

24-3

Kansas State

8-5

18-9

Texas A&M

6-6

20-7

Baylor

6-6

18-8

Oklahoma

6-6

18-9

Texas Tech

6-6

15-11

Nebraska

5-7

16-9

Missouri

5-7

15-12

Okla. State

5-7

14-12

Iowa State

4-8

14-13

Colorado

2-10

10-16

Big 12 women

Big 12 women

Big 12 women
 

Big 12

Overall

Baylor

11-2

23-3

Oklahoma

10-3

20-5

Kansas State

10-3

18-8

Okla. State

9-4

21-5

Texas A&M

8-5

20-7

Nebraska

7-6

18-9

Iowa State

5-8

16-10

Texas

4-9

16-11

Texas Tech

4-9

16-11

Colorado

4-9

15-11

Kansas

4-9

15-11

Missouri

2-11

9-17

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your academic advisor before enrolling. Cold, fast finish ASSOCIATED PRESS Maria Riesch of Germany, pumps her

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Maria Riesch of Germany, pumps her fist after crossing the finish line while skiing in the Super G run of the Women’s Super Combined in Whistler, British Columbia, on Sunday.

FOOTBALL

Former Kansas players finish NFL Combine tryouts

Two former Jayhawks completed NFL Combine workouts this week. Cornerback Aqib Talib fared well across the board. Talib finished in the top three at his position in the vertical jump, broad jump and three-cone drill,

and clocked a

4.47 second 40-yard dash. Talib weighed in at 202 pounds and was just over 6-foot, making him the second-tall- est and fifth-heaviest cornerback in the 2008 draft class. Defensive tackle James McClin- ton didn’t find as much success as Talib. McClinton performed just 23 bench press repetitions and ran his 40-yard dash in 5.49 seconds, more than a second slower than the top defensive lineman.

more than a second slower than the top defensive lineman. Talib — Asher Fusco » NBA

Talib

— Asher Fusco

» NBA

Yao Ming out for the season

ASSOCIATED PRESS

HOUSTON — All-Star center Yao Ming is out for the season with a stress fracture in his left foot, a stunning blow to the surging Houston Rockets. General manager Daryl Morey made the announcement Tuesday, hours before the Rockets put their 12-game winning streak on the line against the Washington Wizards. Yao was having a terrific sea- son, averaging 22 points and 10.8 rebounds per game. “It is not an injury we feel he can play with,” Rockets team doctor Tom Clanton said. “I’ve made the recommendation that it be treated surgically and we are working with him to get other opinions just to be certain that that is indeed what should be done.” If Yao chooses surgery, Clanton said, it would involve placing screws

across the bone to hold it together. The second option would be to treat it with a cast and crutches. Both options involve a healing time of about four months. Clanton would not say when Yao could play again, but said he didn’t expect the center to miss the Beijing Olympics in August. Morey told the team before Tuesday’s shootaround and added that he didn’t believe the injury compromised Houston’s playoff hopes. The Rockets were 36-20 entering Tuesday’s game. “We’ve been playing exceptional ball and Yao’s been a huge part of that,” Morey said. “We feel very con- fident about our playoff push. We’ve managed to step up and play well without Yao in the past and coaches and players feel confident that we’re going to continue to play well and make the playoffs this year.” Morey acknowledged that it was

difficult news to receive when the team has been playing so well. “It’s a pretty big swing from a high to a low, with how we were playing,” Morey said. “We feel like our supporting cast is superior to when we played without Yao in the past. We remain ready for the chal- lenge ahead.” Clanton said there was no spe- cific event that led to the injury, but rather an “accumulation of stresses on the bone. Yao first experienced soreness and pain in his ankle before the All-Star game and tests were done Monday. This is Yao’s fourth major injury in the last two years. He missed 32 games last season with a fracture in his right leg and 21 games in late 2006 with a toe infection that required sur- gery. He missed four games in April 2006 after breaking his foot. Houston went 20-12 when Yao was injured last season.

missed four games in April 2006 after breaking his foot. Houston went 20-12 when Yao was
TONIGHT @ 7
TONIGHT
@ 7
Wednesday, February 27, 2008 sports 3b ku tipoff at a glance Last week Kansas was

Wednesday, February 27, 2008

sports

3b

ku

tipoff

at a glance

Last week Kansas was on fire and playing for a possible NCAA berth. Fast-forward seven days and the Jayhawks are losers of two in a row to the two worst teams in the Big 12. Their road woes are something to behold as they’re now 0-7 in conference games away from Allen Fieldhouse. There is still a chance for Kansas to impress the selection committee, but right now it’s about putting those losses behind them. No one likes to end another team’s 10-game losing streak (Mis- souri), and the Jayhawks should be eager to get that taste out of their mouths.

question mark

Can Kansas answer a Texas run in the second half?

Coming out of halftime flat has been the kiss of death for the Jayhawks lately. It’s the reason both Missouri and Texas Tech opened up large leads late in the game. Not only is it crush- ing for Kansas to see its opposi- tion score at will for a period of five to eight minutes, but it also has a lasting effect on its play the rest of the game, too. It’ll be interesting to see how Hen- rickson’s team performs in the first four to six minutes of the second half. That period of time, more than any other stretch in the game, will give an indica- tion as to whether the Jayhawks can come out with a win.

basketball points guard Jayhawk allen fieldhouse rebounds center ref free throw forward ball three pointers
basketball points guard Jayhawk allen
fieldhouse rebounds center ref free throw
forward ball three pointers final four
basketball points guard Jayhawk allen
fieldhouse rebounds center ref free throw
forward ball three pointers final four
basketball points guard Jayhawk allen
fieldhouse rebounds center ref free throw
forward ball three pointers final four
basketball points guard Jayhawk

longhorns visit Jayhawks

Strong finish could help a postseason bid for Kansas

Kansas Vs. Texas, 7 p.m. , allen fieldhouse

Kansas (15-11, 4-9)

texas

(16-11, 4-9)

Kansas (15-11, 4-9) texas (16-11, 4-9) McCray Danielle McCray, 5-foot-11 sophomore guard — 14.8 ppg, 7.3

McCray

Danielle McCray, 5-foot-11 sophomore guard

— 14.8 ppg, 7.3 rpg

McCray went to another level in the second half on Sunday; too bad she needed to go up a couple of levels. McCray’s stellar play for about five straight possessions late in the game wasn’t enough to make up for the entire team’s uninspired play.

enough to make up for the entire team’s uninspired play. Brittainey Raven, 6-foot-0 sophomore guard —

Brittainey Raven, 6-foot-0 sophomore guard

— 15.1 ppg, 4.7 rpg

After having so much trouble guarding Alyssa Hol- lins Sunday, Raven could have a similar performance against the Jayhawks. She doesn’t shoot the three nearly as well as Hollins does, but Raven is a physi- cal perimeter player who is shooting more than five free throws per contest. Texas’ chances will hinge on whether Raven can get into the paint and finish.

hinge on whether Raven can get into the paint and finish. Raven Boogaard Krysten Boogaard, 6-foot-5
hinge on whether Raven can get into the paint and finish. Raven Boogaard Krysten Boogaard, 6-foot-5

Raven

on whether Raven can get into the paint and finish. Raven Boogaard Krysten Boogaard, 6-foot-5 freshman

Boogaard

Krysten Boogaard, 6-foot-5 freshman center

— 9.7 ppg, 5.7 rpg

Boogaard had a heck of a time trying to get posi- tion against the Missouri defense and never re- ally found her groove. Despite the defensive pressure down low, the Kansas guards kept feeding her the ball and it led to several of the team’s 19 turnovers.

Ashley Lindsey, 6-foot-4 junior forward

— 11.6 ppg, 6.9 rpg

Lindsey is having a productive season, and her numbers are even higher in Big 12 Conference play. What is so surprising about her production in the post is that the talented junior has only 32 free throw attempts in 27 games. That number is extremely low, but by shooting better than 50 percent from the field she makes up for that shortcoming.

50 percent from the field she makes up for that shortcoming. Lindsey Cortijo McIntosh Taylor McIn-

Lindsey

from the field she makes up for that shortcoming. Lindsey Cortijo McIntosh Taylor McIn- tosh, 5-foot-11

Cortijo

the field she makes up for that shortcoming. Lindsey Cortijo McIntosh Taylor McIn- tosh, 5-foot-11 senior
the field she makes up for that shortcoming. Lindsey Cortijo McIntosh Taylor McIn- tosh, 5-foot-11 senior
the field she makes up for that shortcoming. Lindsey Cortijo McIntosh Taylor McIn- tosh, 5-foot-11 senior

McIntosh

she makes up for that shortcoming. Lindsey Cortijo McIntosh Taylor McIn- tosh, 5-foot-11 senior forward —

Taylor McIn- tosh, 5-foot-11 senior forward — 6.5 ppg, 6.5 rpg

Carla Cortijo, 5-foot-7 junior guard — 9.6 ppg, 4.7 apg Kansas will have to be sure to limit Cortijo’s freedom with the ball because if she gets free, Raven and Lindsey will get plenty of open looks. If the Jayhawks can force her to make mistakes (she has 128 assists to 96 turnovers), the Longhorns will be in for a long night. Cortijo doesn’t make a high percentage of her shots from the field, but she gets to the free-throw line, and quick guards have troubled Kansas in the past.

With just three games left in her career at Kansas, McIntosh should start playing every game like it’s her last — because that’s not far from the truth. She plays some of the best defense on the team and a couple of those big blocks would be huge for mo- mentum against Texas.

on the team and a couple of those big blocks would be huge for mo- mentum

— Taylor Bern

on the team and a couple of those big blocks would be huge for mo- mentum

— Andrew Wiebe

ut

tipoff

at a glance

The Longhorns are in exactly the same Big 12 position as the Jayhawks, at 4-9, and neither team is showing many signs of progress as of late. Coach Gail Goestenkors will eventually get things turned around in Texas, but it has been a tough year for her team. But Longhorn fans shouldn’t be concerned, be- cause Goestenkors has the third highest winning percentage in NCAA women’s basketball his- tory among active coaches.

question mark

Can Texas force Kansas to continue to turn the ball over 20 times per contest?

On the season, Texas is forcing opponents into 20.1 turnovers per game. That number is right in line with the Jayhawks turnover average, and if the Longhorns can play to their potential defensively, they shouldn’t have a problem dispatching their struggling op- ponent. Raven and Cortijo will play critical roles defensively as Kansas perimeter players can be bullied into making question- able passes.

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4B sports wednesday, february 27, 2008 reed (continued from 1b) Tyrel’s expense, it may be

4B

sports

wednesday, february 27, 2008

reed (continued from 1b)

Tyrel’s expense, it may be because he knows him so well. Aldrich is Tyrel’s roommate, and he’s seen a different side of his fellow freshman — the side most people don’t see. Most people know the quiet Tyrel, the polite Tyrel, the determined gym rat who’s dedicated his life to bas- ketball. But Aldrich said Tyrel had anoth- er side. “He’s like a little kid who once in a while has too much sugar,” Aldrich said. “I’ll be like, ‘Tyrel, just calm down, I’m going to bed pretty soon— just mellow out.’ ” That side of Tyrel didn’t always show up when the Reeds were grow- ing up in Eureka, or when the fam- ily moved to Burlington before Tyrel entered high school, Stacy Reed said. “Tyrel is more of an introvert,” Stacy said. Tyrel did most of his talking on the basketball court. With Stacy coach- ing and Tyrel playing, Burlington High School won the 3A State bas- ketball championship in 2004.

Tyrel, a four-year letter winner, had all the hallmarks of a coach’s son. “They’re just around it so much, they get a better feel for the game,” Stacy said. “Tyrel kind of took the ball and ran with it.” Lacie graduated from Burlington High School

in 2006. While Lacie went to the University and began work volunteering as a basketball man- ager, Tyrel was still deciding on

what college to attend. Lacie said she didn’t want her new job to affect Tyrel’s decision. Stacy said it might have anyway. “I think it’s one of the things that made Tyrel pick KU,” Stacy said. “Not only his love for KU, but being close with family.” Lacie sat under the basket in her usual spot as Kansas played Eastern Washington on Dec. 5, watching as a

play developed. Tyrel came towards her basket, jumped — and landed awkwardly on his left ankle. “He fell right in front of me,” Lacie

said. “I expected him to get up right away, and he didn’t.” Tyrel, who rolled his right ankle

a week before

against Arizona,

had sprained his

left

“I thought, ‘Oh gosh, anoth- er ankle,’ ” Lacie said. The season

hasn’t gone exact- ly how Tyrel envi- sioned. Tyrel, the 2007 Gatorade High School Player of the Year in Kansas, said he didn’t have any expectations about playing time. He saw Russell Robinson, Mario Chalmers and Sherron Collins, the talented threesome of guards ahead of him. But the ankle problems — that was something different. “It was kind of demoralizing,”

was something different. “It was kind of demoralizing,” “He’s like a little kid who once in

“He’s like a little kid who once in a while has too much sugar.”

coLe aLdRich

Freshman center

ankle.

Tyrel said. “You just want to play so bad, and then you can’t.” Tyrel couldn’t jump, cut or play at the speed he was accustomed to.

It was a feeling Lacie could relate to. Growing up, Tyrel wasn’t the only basketball standout in the family.

Lacie could play a little bit, too. “I don’t know many people that could beat Lacie in a game of horse,” Stacey Reed said. But when Lacie was in

sixth grade, her basketball career came to a tem- porary halt when she dislocated her left knee. One year later, she had knee surgery. By the time Lacie was done play- ing basketball, she had dislocated her left knee 14 times and her right knee four times. “I tore everything except my ACL,” Lacie said.

Lacie’s knee injuries were a con- stant source of frustration, but Lacie still played, if for no other reason than that playing basketball is what Reeds do. Even if that meant just standing around the three-point line and calling for the ball.

“I would say I loved basketball, maybe just not as much as he did,” Lacie said, looking at Tyrel. Tyrel’s inju- ries — and the guards ahead of him — have cut

into Reed’s play- ing time He’s playing only 7.3 minutes per game, and in nine games this sea- son, he hasn’t played a minute. “I’ve still been able to practice,” Tyrel said. Practices for Tyrel have meant daily matchups with Robinson, Chalmers and Collins. Tyrel normally has the honor of guarding one of them.

Tyrel normally has the honor of guarding one of them. “i don’t know many people that

“i don’t know many people that could beat Lacie in a game of horse.”

Stacy Reed

Father of tyrel and Lacie Reed

“At different times, they can teach you different things about the game, because they’re all so different,” Tyrel said. “I think even when you’re not playing and you’re injured, you can still develop by just watching the game and seeing it played at the col- lege level.” Lacie still gets the same reaction when she tells people she’s from Burlington. “They’re like, ‘Burlington, Kansas? That kid that plays basketball, he’s from there,’ ” Lacie said. “I’ll say, ‘Yeah, that’s my brother.’ ” It’s not a bad thing, Lacie said. “With some people you might think they’d have jealousy,” Stacy Reed said, “but Lacie never did.” For Lacie and Tyrel, the town and the routine may have changed, but some things stay the same. Lacie washes the clothes; Tyrel buys the food. Tyrel is in the spot- light; Lacie is behind the scenes. “Our family loves basketball,” Lacie said. “It’s just a part of our life.”

—Edited by Matt Hirschfeld

KANSANCLASSIFIEDS

AUTO
AUTO
STUFF
STUFF
JOBS
JOBS
LOST & FOUND
LOST & FOUND
FOR RENT
FOR RENT
ROOMMATE/ SUBLEASE
ROOMMATE/
SUBLEASE
SERVICES
SERVICES
CHILD CARE
CHILD CARE
TICKETS
TICKETS
TRAVEL
TRAVEL

PHONE 785.864.4358

AUTO

2004 Dodge Neon SXT Just Reduced to

$6,750 OBO 44K Miles 2.0L, 4Cyl, AT, PW, PL, AC, CD player Remainder of 8year/80K mile warranty. CALL 785- 865-6461 hawkchalk.com/803

New green/white Honda Metropolitan for sale. Less than 500 miles on it. $1300 or best offer. Perfect for Lawrence (90miles/- gal). Interested? Message dani06ku@ku.- edu hawkchalk.com/852

STUFF

2 - Boston Acoustics 8” subwoofers (model RS8). 4 ohm, 300W peak power. Amazing bass! $45 each 913-707-5225 kevin hawkchalk.com/854

Brand new, out of box 52” Philips Ambi- light 2 52PFL7432/37D 1080p LCD flat panel TV. 3d party warranty avail. SAVE $750 off local retail price!! Call Drew 913.271.5342. hawkchalk.com/844

Great pair of Boston Acoustic A40 book-

shelf speakers.

707-5225 hawkchalk.com/857

Asking $20 OBO. 913-

Great pair of Pioneer 2-way coaxial midrange/tweeter car speakers (model:

TS-A878). Great sound! Asking $20 for the pair. 913-707-5225 hawkchalk.-

com/856

Great pair of Pioneer 6x9 4-way coaxial speakers (model: TS-A6970). Great sound! Asking $25 for the pair. 913-707-

5225 hawkchalk.com/855

Not exactly the same as the iPhone but pretty darn close. Has many of the same features. Interested email ggleason@ku.- edu. Asking $200. hawkchalk.com/827

Used 30GB video iPod. Works perfectly, minor scratches on the back (typical). Ask- ing $175 obo. Email ggleason@ku.edu.

hawkchalk.com/828

Wanted, used laptop. Wireless internet ready. Nothing too advanced needed. I am thinking in the $200 range. - jtquin- n@ku.edu hawkchalk.com/784

JOBS

Camp Counselors needed for great overnight camps in NE Pennsylvania. Gain valuable experience while working with children in the outdoors. Teach/assist with waterfront, outdoor recreation, ropes course, gymnastics, A&C, athletics, and much more. Office & Nanny positions also available. Please apply on-line at www.pineforestcamp.com

HEY STUDENTS!! Secure your spring and summer job now. Shadow Glen the Golf Club is about to start training for server and bartender positions. Enjoy free meals and earn golf privileges in a fun atmosphere. Flexible scheduling for students, 15 min. from campus off K-10. Will train. Call 913-764-2299

JOBS

Group Daycare needs morning/afternoon helpers. Must be reliable. 3 or 5 morn- ings/wk. Good pay. 842-2088

Alvamar Golf Course is now accepting ap- plicants for beverage cart and outside ser- vices positions. Apply at 1800 Crossgate Dr. or call David at 785-842-1907.

Bambino’s at the Grove has openings for Kitchen Help & Delivery Drivers. Train- ing available. Equal Opportunity Em- ployer. Please apply at 1801 Mass Street.

BARTENDING. UP TO $300/DAY. NO EXPERIENCE NECESSARY. TRAINING PROVIDED. 800-965-6520 EXT 108

Landmark National Bank of Lawrence has an immediate opening for a Part-time Teller. Excellent communication, cus- tomer service, and computer skills re- quired. Landmark National Bank offers a competitive salary and benefits package, and is an equal opportunity employer. Please submit resume to Erica Souter, Landmark National Bank, 2710 Iowa St., Lawrence, KS 66046.

F OO D SE RVI C E W O R KE R S P ar
F OO D SE RVI C E
W O R KE R S
P ar t Time
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a v a i l a b l e
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t h e
H u m a n
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O f f i c e , 3 r d F l o o r , K a n s a s
Unio n , 1301 J a y h a w k Bl v d .,
L a w r e n c e , KS . E O E .

HAWKCHALK.COM

JOBS

Hiring PT front desk and weekend room attendants. Front desk $7.50/hr, Cleaners $8.50/hr. Apply at the Hampton Inn.

Attention College Students! We pay up to $75 per survey. www.GetPaidToThink.com

JohnsonCo Dermatology front ofc. Re-

sponsible

&

bright

person

who enjoys

helping

others.

Fax

resume

913-451-3292.

Part Time Babysitting. Looking for caring person to babysit for 18-month-old girl. Tues & Thurs morning to early afternoon. Hours can be somewhat flexible. Must have toddler experience and references. Call Karen for more info 542-9358.

PLAY SPORTS! HAVE FUN! SAVE MONEY! Maine camp needs fun loving counselors to teach All land, adventure & water sports.? Great summer! Call 888-844-8080, apply: campcedar.com

Servers Wanted!

Can’t find a job in Lawrence? Lake Quivira Country Club is NOW Hir-

ing

FT

and PT Wait Staff. Located just

off of 435 between K10 and I-70. GREAT

PAY! Meal provided. Call 913-631-4821

K10 and I-70. GREAT PAY! Meal provided. Call 913-631-4821 JOBS JAYHAWKSNEEDJOBS.COM Paid Survey Takers Needed in
K10 and I-70. GREAT PAY! Meal provided. Call 913-631-4821 JOBS JAYHAWKSNEEDJOBS.COM Paid Survey Takers Needed in

JOBS

JAYHAWKSNEEDJOBS.COM Paid Survey Takers Needed in Lawrence. 100% FREE to Join! Click on Surveys.

Get Paid To Play Video Games! Earn $20-$100 to test and play new video games. www.videogamepay.com

SOFTBALL UMPIRES Lawrence Parks/Recreation has openings for summer adult sports softball umpires. Excellent pay/flexible schedule. Appli- cants must be at least 18 years old, pos- sess background/experience in softball. Training provided/required. Work avail- able April thru October. Contact Adult Sports office, 832-7920 ASAP if inter- ested; training starts immediately.

Sushi House in Olathe New restaurant opening. 30 minute commute. Great money and work environment. Hiring servers, bartenders, servers assis- tants, chefs, cooks. Apply in person Mon-Sat. 10-5pm. 14178 W. 119th St.

913-780-1777

Undercover Shoppers Earn up to $70 per day. Undercover Shoppers needed to judge retail and dining establishments EXP. Not RE. CALL 800-722-4791

Web Programmer Assistant .NET,php,JavaScript, SQL, Photoshop, Flash. 20-25 hr/WK, flexible schedule

hr@microtechcomp.com or fax (785)841-

1809

Earn $800-$3200 a month to drive brand new cars with ads placed on them. www.AdCarClub.com

brand new cars with ads placed on them. www.AdCarClub.com CLASSIFIEDS@KANSAN.COM JOBS Now hiring for positions in
brand new cars with ads placed on them. www.AdCarClub.com CLASSIFIEDS@KANSAN.COM JOBS Now hiring for positions in
brand new cars with ads placed on them. www.AdCarClub.com CLASSIFIEDS@KANSAN.COM JOBS Now hiring for positions in

CLASSIFIEDS@KANSAN.COM

JOBS

Now hiring for positions in our nursery and preschool rooms. Weekly Thursday mornings from 8:45AM-12:- 00PM. $6.50-$7.00/hour. Please call Liz at 785-843-2005 ext. 201 to schedule in- terview.

LOST & FOUND

ATTN: person(s) who hit a brown Kia Sportange or persons with info., please contact mimitot@att.net. Hit b/t 930pm 2/23 and 10am 2/24. Parked in eastbound lane. hawkchalk.com/850

FOR RENT

2/24. Parked in eastbound lane. hawkchalk.com/850 FOR RENT FOR RENT 2 bedroom, 2 bath, 2-car garage
2/24. Parked in eastbound lane. hawkchalk.com/850 FOR RENT FOR RENT 2 bedroom, 2 bath, 2-car garage

FOR RENT

2 bedroom, 2 bath, 2-car garage

washer/dryer, fenced yard, pets ok. Available Mar 1, 2008. 550-9319 $825

1 BR for rent. Very nice. Fireplace, sky-

lights, one car gar, all appliances, W/D hook-up, no smoking. $500/mo. 2901 Uni- versity Dr. Call 748-9807 or 766-0244.

1BR in a 2BR 1BA for rent until the 31st of July. Located at Highpointe. March and April rent paid. If interested contact 913- 226-1834 or cook887@gmail.com

hawkchalk.com/861

2 and 3 BRs, avail. now and in Aug. For

more info, visit www.lawrencepm.com or call (785) 832-8728.

2 BR Duplex. Quiet, clean, no smoking, W/D, 19th & Naismith Area. Lease $600/mo. Avail NOW! Call 843-8643.

2-3 BR house, 1012 Illinois St. Next to campus. Hardwood floors, W/D, no pets. Avail. August. $1050. 913-683-8198.

2BR 1BA available for August. One car garage, wood floors, walk to KU campus. Pets okay. Please Call 785-841-3849.

2BR, 1BA 1310 Kentucky. Close to KU and Downtown. CA, DW, Parking. Avail- able NOW. $500/mo 785-842-7644

2BR, in Northwinds Apts. Near hospital, on KU bus route. Move-in Special: 1st month FREE. 785-842-1943

Come home to 749-1288 Aberdeen 2300 Wakarusa Dr. & Apple Lane Close to KU on
Come home to
749-1288
Aberdeen
2300 Wakarusa Dr.
& Apple Lane
Close to KU on 15th
1 & 2 Bedrooms Available
1 & 2 Bedrooms Available
All electric, no gas bills
All electric, no gas bills
Great Floorplans
Great Floorplans
On KU bus route
On KU bus route
Pets allowed in select units
Pets allowed in select units
1
1
Bedrooms
Bedrooms
$
$
starting at only
starting at only
465
465
2
2
Bedrooms
Bedrooms
starting at only
starting at only
$
$ 345
345
Stop by any time
for an open house
/person/person
Call today!
Call today!
Weekdays
9 a.m. - 6 p.m.
Sa turdays
10 a.m. -
3 p.m.
m. -
p.m.
749-1288
749-1288
We love
We love
our our pets! pets!
Take a virtual tour at
LawrenceApartments.com
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 2008 CLASS IF IEDS 5B KANSAN CLASSIFIEDS AUTO STUFF JOBS LOST &

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 2008

CLASS IF IEDS

5B

KANSANCLASSIFIEDS

AUTO
AUTO
STUFF
STUFF
JOBS
JOBS
LOST & FOUND
LOST & FOUND
FOR RENT
FOR RENT
ROOMMATE/ SUBLEASE
ROOMMATE/
SUBLEASE
SERVICES
SERVICES
CHILD CARE
CHILD CARE
TICKETS
TICKETS
TRAVEL
TRAVEL

PHONE 785.864.4358

HAWKCHALK.COM

FOR RENT

3BR 2BA 5th & Colorado Off-street park- ing. Close to campus. W/D. $750/mo. Patio. Small pets ok. Call 785-832-2258.

4 BR 3BA avail. June 1 & Aug 1 @ LeannaMar Townhomes, Open House WThF 3-7 & Sat 11-2, internet & cable paid, W/D, new appliances, freshly remod- eled. Move-In Specials $1160 no pets, call 312-7942

5 - 7 BR Victorian Houses close to cam-

pus Available August. All amenities. rain- bowworks1@yahoo.com 785-842-6618

7 BR 2 BA house 2 blocks from campus &

downtown. Hardwood & tile floors. Newly remodeled bathrooms & kitchen. Large deck. CA. Ample parking. Avail. in Aug. $2,975/mo. Please call 785-550-0426

Avail Aug 1st. Nice 3 BR house w/ large back yard, two large living rooms, dish- washer, w/d, a/c, pets ok, $925. Close to Campus & KU Bus route. Call Tom 785- 727-8640. hawkchalk.com/860

Leasing for Summer & Fall 2, 3 & 4 BDR apartments & townhomes. Walk-in clos- ets, swimming pool, KU & Lawrence bus route, patio/balcony cats ok. Call 785-843- 0011 or view www.holiday-apts.com

785-841-4935
785-841-4935
Call 785-843- 0011 or view www.holiday-apts.com 785-841-4935 firstmanagementinc.com FOR RENT 3BR 2.5BA avail. Aug. 1 @
Call 785-843- 0011 or view www.holiday-apts.com 785-841-4935 firstmanagementinc.com FOR RENT 3BR 2.5BA avail. Aug. 1 @
Call 785-843- 0011 or view www.holiday-apts.com 785-841-4935 firstmanagementinc.com FOR RENT 3BR 2.5BA avail. Aug. 1 @
Call 785-843- 0011 or view www.holiday-apts.com 785-841-4935 firstmanagementinc.com FOR RENT 3BR 2.5BA avail. Aug. 1 @
Call 785-843- 0011 or view www.holiday-apts.com 785-841-4935 firstmanagementinc.com FOR RENT 3BR 2.5BA avail. Aug. 1 @
Call 785-843- 0011 or view www.holiday-apts.com 785-841-4935 firstmanagementinc.com FOR RENT 3BR 2.5BA avail. Aug. 1 @
Call 785-843- 0011 or view www.holiday-apts.com 785-841-4935 firstmanagementinc.com FOR RENT 3BR 2.5BA avail. Aug. 1 @
Call 785-843- 0011 or view www.holiday-apts.com 785-841-4935 firstmanagementinc.com FOR RENT 3BR 2.5BA avail. Aug. 1 @
Call 785-843- 0011 or view www.holiday-apts.com 785-841-4935 firstmanagementinc.com FOR RENT 3BR 2.5BA avail. Aug. 1 @
firstmanagementinc.com
firstmanagementinc.com

FOR RENT

3BR 2.5BA avail. Aug. 1 @ Williams Pointe Townhomes $1050 cable & inter-

net paid, gym, rec room, no pets, call 312-

7942

Available August renovated older house with 3 bedrooms on 1500 block New Hampshire, 1 1/2 baths, wood floors, dishwasher, washer/dryer, cen- tral air, fenced yard, small dogs under 10 pounds and cats ok, $1150 call Jim & Lois 785-841-1074

3BR 2BA W/D Lg. Living Space. Walk to Allen Feild House. 1436 19th Terr. $1050/mo Aug 1 785-760-0144

3BR Townhome special, Lorimar Town- homes. For August. $270/month/person. ($810/month) 785-841-7849

3BR, 1.5BA Townhome, 2301 Ranch Way. Garage, DW, CA, MW, W/D, Pets

Okay, Available NOW. $770/mo. 785-842-

7644

FREE FEB/MARCH RENT! Female room- mate needed asap to share a 3BR 2BA apt. $278/mo, 1/3 utilities, WD, pool, fire- place, patio, and more! Call 316-734-4769

hawkchalk.com/858

3 BR 2 BA. Near downtown & KU. 916 Indiana. $870/mo. Remodeled. 785-

830-8008.

3-6 BR Houses, 1-3 BR Apts, Rooms all near KU. Possible rent reduction for labor. Please call 785-841-6254

3bed/2.5bath 3 yr old townhome. Open flr plan w/ loft 1504 sq ft. w/appliances. 149,900 call David 785-218-7792

First Management is Proud to Announce We Are Now Managing the following Campus Locations: Briarstone
First Management is
Proud to Announce
We Are Now Managing
the following Campus
Locations:
Briarstone
1010 Emery Rd.
832.8200
Mackenzie Place
1133 Kentucky
841.8486
Coldwater Flats
413 W. 14th Street
841.8468
Arkansas Villas
911-941 Arkansas
841.8468
NOW LEASING FOR FALL!

FOR RENT

Beautiful 2, 3 & 4 BR homes. Available immediately. We love pets. Call for details. 816-729-7513

Brand new 10 BR house ready for Aug lease. Other houses available for May. Close to Downtown/KU Campus. Call 816.686.8868 for more info.

Great House! 6-8 BR 1221 Tennessee. Hardwood floors, W/D included, front porch and large deck! Rick 913-634-3757

Large 4BR Townhomes available for Au- gust, include dishwasher, microwave, washer/dryer, fireplace, back patio, two car garage. Range from $320-$400 per person. Please call 785-766-6302.

Range from $320-$400 per person. Please call 785-766-6302. FOR RENT Avail. Aug. nice 2 BR apartment

FOR RENT

Avail. Aug. nice 2 BR apartment in ren- ovated older house on 1300 block Ver- mont, wood floors, dishwasher, w/d, a/c, dogs under 10 pounds and cats ok, $799 call Jim & Lois 785-841-1074

4BR 2BA House W/D Must See! Circle Drive. 1941 Kentucky St. $1300/mo Aug 1 785-760-0144

NOW LEASING FALL 2008 ?Downtown Lofts & Campus Locations ?785-841-8468? www.firstmanagementinc.com

Tuckaway Management now leasing for spring and fall. Call 785-838-3377 or check us out online at www.tuck- awaymgmt.com for coupon.

check us out online at www.tuck- awaymgmt.com for coupon. Dublin Up Next Year? Campus Court at
check us out online at www.tuck- awaymgmt.com for coupon. Dublin Up Next Year? Campus Court at
Dublin Up Next Year? Campus Court at Naismith has a two bedroom just for you!
Dublin Up Next Year?
Campus Court
at Naismith
has a two bedroom just for you!
Everyone’s after our Lucky
Charms!
Lease with us by 3/17/08 & you
Lease with us by 3/16/08 & you
could win a Wii!
could win a Wii!
FREE Wireless Internet
FREE DVD Rental
FREE Fitness Center
FREE Tanning Bed
FREE Business Center
NEW Clubhouse
Indoor 1/2 Court Basketball Court
Gated Community
Wood Laminate Flooring
Total Electric
KU Bus Runs Every 8 Minutes
Credit Cards Accepted
24/7 Emergency Maintenance
On-Site Management
NEW in 2008 Continental Breakfast Monday — Friday
Newly Remodeled Lawrence Luxury Sunrise Village & Sunrise Place Located on KU Bus Route, Pool,
Newly Remodeled Lawrence Luxury
Sunrise Village & Sunrise Place
Located on KU Bus Route, Pool, Tennis,
and some with Paid Internet
Sunrise Village
Sunrise Place
660 Gateway Ct.
3 & 4 bedroom
townhomes
and apartments
Sunrise
Apartments
Rent Now!

CLASSIFIEDS@KANSAN.COM

FOR RENT

Avail. in late May cute 1 BR apartment in renovated older house, wood floors, dishwasher, front porch, window a/c, off street parking, 9th & Mississippi,

$480, cats ok call Jim & Lois 785-841-

1074

Ironwood Court Apartments 1& 2 BR Units Pool/Fitness 1501 George Williams Way ******* Park West
Ironwood Court Apartments
1& 2 BR Units
Pool/Fitness
1501 George Williams Way
*******
Park West Town Homes
2 & 3 bedrooms
Washer/dryer included
2-car garage
Eisenhower Terrace
*******
Park West Gardens
BRAND NEW!
1 & 2 BR luxury apartments
1 car garage included in each
Washer/dryer included
445 Eisenhower Drive
*******
For a showing call:
(785)840-9467

ROOMMATE/SUBLEASE

2-3 roomates to share 4 BR 2 BA town- home close to KU & bus system. $450/mo includes util. W/D, DW, CA, patio & 2 car garage. 816-807-9493 or 785-979-4740.

2BD/1BA $770 W/D Free internet and ca- ble. Somone to sublease starting March or April. Call 913-731-5971 hawkchalk.-

com/809

2BR, 1.5bath Townhome at 23rd & Al- abama. $570/month. Sublease May 23- July 31. All inquiries please call 785. 841. 5797 Mon-Fri before 5pm. Or call 785. 248.8300. hawkchalk.com/800

3 Bed 2 Bath Townhouse available for the

summer. Starting the end of May possibly

before. Call 816-729-2041 for details. W/D, Garage hawkchalk.com/817

3BR,1BA,Nice,close to campus,big yard w/shed,driveway,W/D, frig & more. pets under 30 lbs ok with dep., availmarch, $850/mo+utilities&deposit.2031 Kentucky. 816-853-8968 hawkchalk.com/796

No rent until April! Need roommate for our 2bd/1ba apt. Free business & fitness cen- ter, pool & tanning. On KU bus route. $365/mo incl. all util. Call Kelly @ 620- 546-3037 hawkchalk.com/815

Roommate needed for 08-09 school year. Great location, next to the rec cen- ter. Contact Kirsten at (913)709-7187 or amblek@ku.edu hawkchalk.com/849

Sublease as soon as May 20th. Only pay rent for June and July for $379/month. Have your own bathroom/bedroom and

w/d. At the Reserve on W 31st. 913-710-

9625 hawkchalk.com/847

Sublease, one bedroom w/bath at the Re- serve. $385/month, covered parking. Utili- ties paid minus electricity. Fully furnished. Starting May 15th. Questions, dani06ku@ku.edu hawkchalk.com/851

Sublet at “The Reserve” available ASAP through July 2008. $315 includes fully fur- nished apartment,cable TV, Internet, washer/dryer, Contact at (913) 220-6070.

hawkchalk.com/816

$220 Female Roommate wanted for spa-

cious 2 Bedroom Apt. Large kitchen, living room, bedrooms, and bathroom. Washer and dryer in the apt. Call Blair 785-218-

4175 hawkchalk.com/846

1 Bedroom apartment for lease over the summer at Tuckaway apartments. Con- tact Tuckaway at 785-838-3377.

hawkchalk.com/805

2 BR Sublease in 4 BR w/loft $329 mo.

low util. 1145 Louisiana Great Location

and Spacious Available June thru Dec 2008 Contact scottieb@ku.edu 9139080274 hawkchalk.com/797

2 sublets for summer, 1 for fall, & a lease for entire year. can walk to campus, $610/mo, 3BR, 2Bath, parking, laundry. Call 701-741-5593 if interested.

hawkchalk.com/824

ROOMMATE/SUBLEASE

sublet larger room w/balcony Apr -Aug apt. between Main/Mizz on 11th w/ M fine-art undergrad park off-street heat/ac $50rless w/d on site Call Clark at 785 840 6688 hawkchalk.com/823

Summer Rommated NEEDED!! June-

July

utilities. Call 316-207-8344 if interested

to campus and Mass. $225+

Close

hawkchalk.com/848

Summer sublease in a 3Br& 2Ba appt. to share with 2 awesome roomies. 9th& Emery $290/mo + 1/3 electric and internet available right after finals! (913)961-8735

hawkchalk.com/841

SERVICES

after finals! (913)961-8735 hawkchalk.com/841 SERVICES CHILD CARE Licensed daycare has openings for chil- dren. PT
after finals! (913)961-8735 hawkchalk.com/841 SERVICES CHILD CARE Licensed daycare has openings for chil- dren. PT
after finals! (913)961-8735 hawkchalk.com/841 SERVICES CHILD CARE Licensed daycare has openings for chil- dren. PT
after finals! (913)961-8735 hawkchalk.com/841 SERVICES CHILD CARE Licensed daycare has openings for chil- dren. PT
after finals! (913)961-8735 hawkchalk.com/841 SERVICES CHILD CARE Licensed daycare has openings for chil- dren. PT

CHILD CARE

Licensed daycare has openings for chil- dren. PT or FT, infants/toddlers. For more info, Call 785-856-1940/785-317-7450.

TICKETS

KU v KState Student Ticket! $40 (OBO). Text or call me with offer before 2/29/08 at 620-255-3021. Leave a message if I don’t answer. hawkchalk.com/825

Student ticket needed for K-State men’s basketball game. Will pay $10. Contact

blush@ku.edu. hawkchalk.com/795

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6B game day wednesday, february 27, 2008 Ku tipoff at a GLance Kansas tries to

6B

game day

wednesday, february 27, 2008

6B game day wednesday, february 27, 2008 Ku tipoff at a GLance Kansas tries to bounce

Ku

tipoff

at a GLance

Kansas tries to bounce bacK

Jayhawks to battle Cyclones, attempt season sweep

Kansas vs. iowa state, 3 p.m., Hilton coliseum, ames, iowa, cbs

This is an important game for the Jayhawks. No one would have thought a matchup against Iowa State would matter too much at the beginning of conference play, but now Kansas is desperate for a road victory. The Jayhawks have

lost three of four away from home, and Hilton Coliseum is one of the toughest gyms in the league. A Big

12 title might be impossible at this

point, but Kansas badly needs this victory for a confidence boost.

wHo to watcH

Darrell Arthur, sophomore forward

All the players need to bounce back after a poor effort against Oklahoma State, but Arthur was probably the worst. He’d been playing great the past two weeks, but Saturday was a major setback. For this team to play great again,

was a major setback. For this team to play great again, Arthur someone is going to

Arthur

someone is

going to have to become a threat to score on every offensive possession. Arthur might not be able to do that, but he’s the only Jayhawk who has the chance.

question marK

Can Kansas still earn a No. 1 seed in the NCAA Tournament? Probably not. Texas is almost a lock to get the highest seed of any Big 12 team, and if the Longhorns win out in their league games, they’ll be almost assured of a No. 1. The Big 12 will not likely get two No. 1 seeds. To have a chance at a No. 1 seed, the Jayhawks will have to win the rest of their regular season games and the Big 12 Tour- nament. Even then, Kansas would still probably be behind Texas, not to mention Tennessee, Memphis, North Carolina, UCLA and possibly Duke.

hear ye, hear ye

“We played miserably on Saturday, but I do think that health is a part of the intangible equa- tion. When you don’t have health that is when everyone else needs to rally around (each other). Our other players need to play a little bit better and pull the rope a little harder. There are some guys that are distracted for real reasons. Playing well through tough times is a sign of leadership and players coming together. We didn’t have that on Saturday.”

— Kansas coach Bill Self

“It is like comparing apples and oranges because Florida had already won a national champion- ship last year. Our guys should not have the mindset that we know what to do and when the time is right we are going to do it. That should not be the mindset of any team that hasn’t done it yet. We haven’t been down that road yet. It would be giving our guys and our team way too much credit to compare us to a team that has already done it.”

— Self comparing his team to Florida last season

Kansas

(24-3, 9-3)

tHe projected startinG 5

Iowa state (14-13, 4-8)

tHe projected startinG 5

startinG 5 Iowa state (14-13, 4-8) tHe projected startinG 5 Russell Robinson, 6-foot-1 senior guard Robinson
startinG 5 Iowa state (14-13, 4-8) tHe projected startinG 5 Russell Robinson, 6-foot-1 senior guard Robinson
startinG 5 Iowa state (14-13, 4-8) tHe projected startinG 5 Russell Robinson, 6-foot-1 senior guard Robinson
startinG 5 Iowa state (14-13, 4-8) tHe projected startinG 5 Russell Robinson, 6-foot-1 senior guard Robinson
startinG 5 Iowa state (14-13, 4-8) tHe projected startinG 5 Russell Robinson, 6-foot-1 senior guard Robinson
startinG 5 Iowa state (14-13, 4-8) tHe projected startinG 5 Russell Robinson, 6-foot-1 senior guard Robinson

Russell Robinson, 6-foot-1 senior guard Robinson needs to rediscover his defensive stopper ways. Remember when he held O.J. Mayo in check in Los Angeles? He needs to be that dominant on-the-ball defender he was earlier this season.

dominant on-the-ball defender he was earlier this season. mario Chalmers, 6-foot-1 junior guard The last play

mario Chalmers, 6-foot-1 junior guard The last play against Oklahoma State was supposedly designed for Chalmers. Maybe the outcome would have been different if Chalmers, who’s been clutch in the past, got the ball.

if Chalmers, who’s been clutch in the past, got the ball. Brandon Rush, 6-foot-6 junior guard

Brandon Rush, 6-foot-6 junior guard Rush’s inconsistencies are starting to really hurt the team. He played well at the end against Okla- homa State, but where was he before then?

HHIII

Darnell Jackson, 6-foot-8 senior forward Jackson did a tremendous job of stay- ing focused on the game Saturday despite the family tragedy that occurred three days earlier. He could have a big game against Iowa State’s smaller front line.

have a big game against Iowa State’s smaller front line. Darrell Arthur, 6-foot-9 sophomore forward At

Darrell Arthur, 6-foot-9 sophomore forward At least he’d been playing well in the games before Oklahoma State. Otherwise his one-for- three field goal stat line would be almost unfor- givable. It will be interesting to see whether Self has Arthur guard Iowa State’s Wesley Johnson tonight.

HHIII

tHe sixtH man

Sasha Kaun, 6-foot-11 senior center Don’t expect Sherron Collins to get much playing time tonight because of his bad knee. Kaun will likely get the most minutes off the bench. He’ll need to be more aggressive on offense if Arthur doesn’t find many shots again.

HHIII

Bryan Petersen, 6-foot-1 freshman guard Peterson, a junior college transfer, has handled the point guard duties all season for the Cylclones. His 14 points against Texas Tech on Saturday was one of his best offensive performances of the season.

HHIII

wesley Johnson, 6-foot-7 sophomore forward Johnson scored 21 points against Kansas earlier this season, but he’s struggled lately. The sopho- more from Corsicana, Texas has scored six total points in Iowa State’s last two games.

scored six total points in Iowa State’s last two games. Rahshon Clark, 6-foot-6 senior forward The

Rahshon Clark, 6-foot-6 senior forward The Queens, NY, native has only two more home games left at Hilton Coliseum. Clarke, who averaged 13.1 points per game as a sophomore, is a role player on this team, giving Iowa State a mix of points, rebounds and blocks.

giving Iowa State a mix of points, rebounds and blocks. Tyrel Reed Jiri Hubalek, 6-foot- 11
giving Iowa State a mix of points, rebounds and blocks. Tyrel Reed Jiri Hubalek, 6-foot- 11
giving Iowa State a mix of points, rebounds and blocks. Tyrel Reed Jiri Hubalek, 6-foot- 11

Tyrel Reed

Iowa State a mix of points, rebounds and blocks. Tyrel Reed Jiri Hubalek, 6-foot- 11 senior
Iowa State a mix of points, rebounds and blocks. Tyrel Reed Jiri Hubalek, 6-foot- 11 senior

Jiri Hubalek, 6-foot- 11 senior center The 25-year-old center from the Czech Republic had 17 points in Iowa State’s loss to Texas Tech on Saturday.

17 points in Iowa State’s loss to Texas Tech on Saturday. Craig Brackins, 6-foot-10 freshman forward

Craig Brackins, 6-foot-10 freshman forward Brackins may have hit the fresh- man wall. He’s scoring fewer than five points per during Iowa State’s last five games.

than five points per during Iowa State’s last five games. tHe sixtH man Sean Haluska, 6-foot-3
than five points per during Iowa State’s last five games. tHe sixtH man Sean Haluska, 6-foot-3
than five points per during Iowa State’s last five games. tHe sixtH man Sean Haluska, 6-foot-3

tHe sixtH man

Sean Haluska, 6-foot-3 junior guard Haluska scored a career-high 15 points against Texas Tech. Pretty good considering Haluska started the season 0-for-26 from the three-point line.

HHIII

Mark Dent

— Rustin Dodd

HilToN ColiSeum will Be movie THeATeR SileNT iF…

Kansas finds a way to get a spark on offense. The Jayhawks were too predictable on Saturday. Rush and Chalmers could shoot from the outside. Arthur wasn’t getting open down low. No one could step up and create his own shot. Against good teams, one of the players has to find a way to make a move that will get him open and take the defense out of its comfort zone. The Jayhawks can probably still win against Iowa State with a somewhat stale offense, but some more drives to the hoop wouldn’t hurt.

PHog AlleN will Roll oveR iN HiS gRAve iF…

Kansas loses its third straight road game. It could happen. The Jay- hawks needed overtime last year to win in Ames and that was against an inferior Iowa State team. This is going to be a tough game. Kansas should win if it plays up to its potential but that might not happen because of its recent struggles and injury problems. It will also be key for Kansas to execute well at the end. At Texas and at Oklahoma State, the Jayhawks struggled to score in the last few minutes.

isu

tipoff

at a GLance

Second-year Coach Greg McDermott’s Iowa State team has taken its lumps during the past month. The Cyclones’ loss to Kansas on Jan. 23 began a

skid in which they’ve lost seven of nine. But both of those vic- tories came at home, and Iowa State nearly knocked off Texas at home, losing 71-65 in over- time on Feb. 9. Kansas should be weary of playing in Hilton Coliseum. Last season Kansas barely escaped Ames, Iowa with

a victory, beating the Cyclones 68-64 in overtime. Iowa State

-- which is 12-4 at home this

season -- is always dangerous at

Hilton Coliseum, and an upset victory would be the signature victory of McDermott’s tenure.

wHo to watcH

Jiri Hubalek, senior center

Nebraska’s Aleks Maric isn’t the only international center making noise in the Big 12. Jiri Hubalek, a native of the Czech Repub- lic, is leading Iowa State with 13.2 points per game. He

has heated

up in the past three weeks, scoring 17.4 points per game in Iowa State’s last seven games. He can stretch

the defense with his ability to hit a 15-foot jump shot. The Cyclones need a big game from

their big man. If Darnell Jackson and Darrell Arthur can contain Hubalek, Iowa State will have

a tough time keeping up with Kansas on the scoreboard.

have a tough time keeping up with Kansas on the scoreboard. Hubalek question marK Does Hilton

Hubalek

question marK

Does Hilton magic still exist?

In 1989, Des Moines Register columnist Buck Turnbull used the phrase “Hilton Magic” to describe the Cyclone’s ability to gain special victories at Hilton Coliseum — the home of the Cyclones. The building has consistently been one of the toughest places to play — Iowa State’s 39-game home win- ning streak that was snapped in 2002 is a prime example. Iowa State has made a habit of sending visiting teams home unhappy. But does Hilton Magic still exist? One thing is certain. If the game is close in the second half, ESPN’s broadcast team will undoubtedly bring up the term Hilton Magic.

Hear ye, Hear ye

“It probably needs to start with me because we don’t have

a vocal leader on the team.

We’ve been talking about this for four years and its not going to happen. I’ve got to do a bet- ter job of providing leadership for our guys. I can’t talk on the court. Our staff and I can’t do some things. But from a vocal standpoint, the vocal leader needs to be me.”

— Bill Self on Kansas’ leadership

jayHawK stats

prediction

cycLone stats

Player

mins

Fg-FgA

3Fg-3FgA

Rebs

Pts

00

Arthur, Darrell

23.1

150-282

2-12

5.8

13.5

32

Jackson, Darnell

25.1

131-202

2-6

6.8

12.5

25

Rush, Brandon

27.9

108-255

47-118

5.2

12.1

15

Chalmers, Mario

29.0

102-198

42-94

2.9

12.1

04

Collins, Sherron

22.4

70-153

24-69

2.0

8.7

24

Kaun, Sasha

17.5

75-119

0-0

3.8

7.3

03

Robinson, Russell

27.9

55-137

24-77

2.7

7.3

05

Stewart, Rodrick

12.9

32-66

3-14