Sie sind auf Seite 1von 23
wednesday, July 27, 2011 www.kansan.com volume 123, issue 160 once warriors in the transition from
wednesday, July 27, 2011
www.kansan.com
volume 123, issue 160
once
warriors
in the transition from combat theater to college
campus, many veterans carry with them the physical
and mental toll of their combat experiences. some
wounds are visible, tangible reminders. others show
up as mental health issues such as nightmares and
anxiety. For ku’s wounded veterans, relearning how
to be students presents continuous challenges.
news | 12
now
students
THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
UDK

PAGE 2

WEDNESDAY, jULY 27, 2011

thE UNIVERSItY DAILY KANSAN

Today’s

Weather

27, 2011 thE UNIVERSItY DAILY KANSAN Today’s Weather 76 100 Partly Cloudy/Windy — weather.com Good luck

76

100

Partly Cloudy/Windy

— weather.com

Today’s Weather 76 100 Partly Cloudy/Windy — weather.com Good luck with finals this week! Fall classes

Good luck with finals this week! Fall classes begin August 22nd. Make sure to remember—and tell all your friends—that is a Monday. For the first time in many years, Fall classes begin on a Monday.

ChECK

KANSAN.CoM

DAILY foR MoRE

StoRIES & NEWS

YoU CAN USE.

@

DAILY foR MoRE StoRIES & NEWS YoU CAN USE. @   TABLE OF CONTENTS    
 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

   

On the cover

 

Taylor Hultman is one of an increasing number of veterans attending the University of Kansas. Learn more about their challenges on page 12.

15

Meditate your way to sleep

— Photo by Chris Bronson

This and other ways to make sure you get your Zs.

 

Quote of the Week

“Drawing is the honesty of the art.

 

20

 
   

There is no possibility of cheating. It

is either good or bad.”

— Salvador Dali

Go rural, get paid

!

Fact of the Week

Salvador Dali and his older brother,

who died before he was born, had

the same name.

— funtrivia.com

A student loan repayment program will repay 20 percent of your outstanding student loans if you settle on one of the 27 participating rural Kansas counties after you graduate.

 
rural Kansas counties after you graduate.   21   STAFF Alex Garrison Brooke Abney

21

 

STAFF

Alex Garrison

Brooke Abney

Editor-in-Chief

Business Manager

D.M. Scott

Matt LaBuda

Assignment Editor

Sales Manager

Big 12 preview

 

Hannah Wise

Malcolm Gibson

Web Editor

News Adviser

 

General Manager

Stephanie Schulz

KU Football looks toward a season that promises to be a challenge, but the team says it’s ready.

 

Design Chief

Jon Schlitt

Sales Adviser

 

Louise Krug

 

Copy Chief

CONTACT US

 

ET CETERA

 

MEDIA PARTNERS

editor@kansan.com www.kansan.com Newsroom: (785) 864-4810 Twitter: TheKansan_News Become a fan of The University Daily Kansan on Facebook.

www.kansan.com Newsroom: (785) 864-4810 Twitter: TheKansan_News Become a fan of The University Daily Kansan on Facebook.
www.kansan.com Newsroom: (785) 864-4810 Twitter: TheKansan_News Become a fan of The University Daily Kansan on Facebook.

The University Daily Kansan is the student newspaper of the University of Kansas. The first copy is paid through the student activity fee. Additional copies of The Kansan are 50 cents. Subscriptions can be purchased at the Kansan business office, 2051A Dole Human Development Center, 1000 Sunnyside Dr., Lawrence, Kan., 66045.

Check out KUJH-TV on Knology of Kansas Channel 31 in Lawrence for more on what you’ve read in today’s Kansan and other news. Also see KUJH’s website at tv.ku.edu.

KJHK is the student voice in radio. Whether it’s rock ‘n’ roll or reggae, sports or special events, KJHK 90.7FM is for you.

The University Daily Kansan (ISSN 0746-4967) is published daily during the school year except Saturday, Sunday, fall break, spring break and exams and weekly during the summer session excluding holidays. Annual subscriptions by mail are $250 plus tax. Send address changes to The University Daily Kansan, 2051A Dole Human Development Center, 1000 Sunnyside Dr.

plus tax. Send address changes to The University Daily Kansan, 2051A Dole Human Development Center, 1000
plus tax. Send address changes to The University Daily Kansan, 2051A Dole Human Development Center, 1000

2000 Dole Human Development Center 1000 Sunnyside Ave. Lawrence Kan., 66045

Development Center, 1000 Sunnyside Dr. 2000 Dole Human Development Center 1000 Sunnyside Ave. Lawrence Kan., 66045

the UNIVeRSItY DAILY KANSAN

WeDNeSDAY, jULY 27, 2011

PAGe 3

StAte

Scientists say fossil is likely a new dino

AssociAted Press

KANSAS CITY, Mo. — Two Kan- sas fossil hunters say they think they found something new while digging in Montana. Jim Kirkland, a state paleontolo- gist at the Utah Geological Survey, has examined photos of the fossil that Robert and Alan Detrich are uncover- ing and said it looks like a new type of ankylosaur. The low-slung heavily armored dinosaurs lived around 65 million years ago and munched on plants. “This thing is worthy of note. There is no doubt about it,” said Kirkland, who specializes in ankylosaurs. “In my mind it’s clearly a new one.” The brothers have been digging since May in a fossil-rich area near the town of Jordan. They’ve uncovered the ankylosaur fossil’s skull, part of its leg, ribs, armored plates and some vertebrae. Kirkland said it appears the crea- ture measured about 30 feet long be- fore its death, making it the biggest ankylosaur he had ever seen. He said typical ankylosaurs were 16 feet long, with one type, the ankylosaurus, mea-

suring 20 feet. “It’s huge,” said Robert Detrich, who discovered the fossil. “It’s bigger than any of the specialists have seen so far. It’s got everybody pretty excited.” Kirkland and the Detrich broth- ers hope a person or institution will step forward to buy the fossil for a museum, which would allow for fur- ther study to determine if it is indeed unique. The effort would involve cleaning the fossil and comparing it against related animals to make sure it isn’t just a variation of a previously discovered dinosaur. Public display in a museum would also allow the brothers to seek nam- ing rights should the fossil prove to be a first. Robert Detrich said, if given the opportunity, he would like to call it “enormasaurus” in honor of his late mother Norma. “It’s exciting,” Robert Detrich said. “It really is. When he came back and said it’s pretty clearly a new genus, and these guys write papers on ankylo- saurs so they know their stuff.” Robert Detrich, who is from Wichita, and his brother, who lives in Lawrence, plan to return to Kansas in about three weeks.

I-70

Officials defend investigation

AssociAted Press

KANSAS CITY, Mo. — A phoned-in threat to a local motel and anti-government statements scrawled across a pickup truck prompted Kansas officials to shut down a 25-mile stretch of heav- ily traveled Interstate 70 west of Topeka for more than nine hours Monday. Nothing dangerous was found in either the motel or the pickup driv- en by Christopher Spence, 50, of Conway, Ark., but a Kansas High- way Patrol spokesman said investi- gators had no way of knowing that without taking a closer look. “You are in a situation that if it came back negative on both the motel room and the vehicle, it seemed like a waste of time,” said Highway Patrol Capt. Steven Zeller. “On the other side of it, if we had an explosion or release of hazardous materials into the atmosphere and exposed motorists driving by, that would be horrendous. We decided to err on the side of public safety.” The incident began midmorning Monday after someone called 911 and said hazardous materials had been placed in a room at the Rama-

da Inn in Junction City, and that the FBI should be called. The motel was evacuated while fire and hazardous material crews investigated. Soon after police issued a de- scription of a suspect and vehicle,

a Highway Patrol trooper stopped

a pickup truck on I-70 west of To -

peka. Spence, who was driving the truck, was returned to Junction City for questioning, while the in- terstate was closed in both direc- tions to keep other vehicles away as authorities prepared to inspect the vehicle. “We received information, troop- ers made the stop and we went from

there,” Zeller said. “We couldn’t take

a chance on the safety of the motor-

ing public going by that vehicle with the indicators we had.” He said the writing on the pickup truck contributed to the extra cau- tion by investigators. “One comment written on the vehicle led us to believe it could be a deadly situation,” Zeller said, with- out going into further detail. The interstate was closed from around 1:15 p.m. and reopened around 10:30 p.m. after investiga- tors with the Highway Patrol, FBI and other agencies determined

there was nothing dangerous in Spence’s vehicle. He was being held on $100,000 bond after being charged with ag- gravated criminal threat. His case has been assigned to the public

defender’s office in Junction City,

which declined to comment Tues- day when contacted by The Associ- ated Press. Junction City Police Chief Tim Brown said in a news release that no motive for the threat had been determined. Kimberly Qualls, a spokeswom- an for the Kansas Department of Transportation, said there were no major problems associated with de-

touring traffic from the four-lane interstate and onto state highways that in some cases ran through towns with speed limits of 20 mph. She said the detour added about 45 minutes to the average travel time through that section of the state. “If we have citizens look at what is happening across the world, they should appreciate the extra steps taken to ensure the safety of every- one like we did yesterday,” Qualls said.

they should appreciate the extra steps taken to ensure the safety of every- one like we

PAGE 4

WEDNESDAY, jULY 27, 2011

thE UNIVERSItY DAILY KANSAN

NEWS

NEAR

&

Names of at least 76 dead being released

(Oslo, Norway) — The father of a victim of the Norway massacre said Tuesday his son was full of love for people and for the outdoors — and the young man’s last words to him were “Dad, someone is shooting.” Norwegian police on Tuesday be- gan releasing the names of those killed in last week’s bomb blast and

massacre at a Labor Party youth camp, an announcement likely to bring new collective grief to an al- ready reeling nation. Police named the first four of at least 76 people dead. Although only names, ages and hometowns were listed, it will likely bring another shock to friends and acquaintances just learning the names of the vic- tims. A 32-year-old Norwegian man has confessed to the attacks, claim-

Norwegian man has confessed to the attacks, claim- ing he was trying to save Europe from

ing he was trying to save Europe from what he says is Muslim colonization. The first release listed three who were killed in a bomb blast in Oslo’s government quarter and one dead after the rampage at a Labor Party youth camp.

FAR

Annual speech gives few new details on Cuba’s situation

(Ciego de Avila, Cuba) — Cuba marked the 58th

anniversary of Fidel Castro’s failed attack on the Moncada army barracks Tuesday without a speech from President Raul Castro. Instead, Cubans heard from his second in comand, who offered few new details while hitting standard themes such as organization, discipline and eco- nomic reform. The main speaker was 80-year-old Vice Presi- dent Jose Ramon Machado Ventura, who said the country will move forward with economic reforms “without haste, but without pause.” “We must make a definitive break with the men-

tality of inertia

(and) evaluate how much more can

the men- tality of inertia (and) evaluate how much more can Woman strikes attacking kangaroo and
the men- tality of inertia (and) evaluate how much more can Woman strikes attacking kangaroo and
the men- tality of inertia (and) evaluate how much more can Woman strikes attacking kangaroo and

Woman strikes attacking kangaroo and survives

(Canberra, Australia) — A 94-year-old woman struck an attacking kangaroo with a broom and managed to crawl to safety in her house in the Australian Outback before police subdued the animal with pepper spray. Phyllis Johnson said the kangaroo at- tacked her while she was hanging her laundry in her yard Sunday in the Queen- sland state town of Charleville. “I thought it was going to kill me,” Johnson told The Courier Mail from a hos-

pital bed. “It was taller than me, and it just plowed through the clothes on the washing line straight for me.” She said she saw a blur of red fur be- fore the kangaroo knocked her down and kicked her prone body. Johnson told Aus- tralian media she managed to get to her feet and grab the broom to hit the animal enough times to daze it and escape. “She fought it off herself with a bit of help from the family dog,” her son said Tuesday. Rob Johnson said the kangaroo had “a bit of a go” at him when he arrived home from church, then he called police. He said his mother has a large gash on

be done with what is available,” Machado Ventura said, before imploring the crowd and his countrymen to work harder and more efficiently. He repeated that the country was not abandoning socialism even as it embraced limited free market reforms. “Order, discipline and rigor,” he added, echoing the slogan on a billboard at the plaza. The July 26 holiday is often used to make major announcements, and Cubans have a lot of questions on their minds these days.

S ummer T utoring A vailable Please request tutor groups online, www.tutoring.ku.edu Tutoring Services Academic
S ummer
T utoring
A
vailable
Please request tutor groups online,
www.tutoring.ku.edu
Tutoring Services
Academic Achievement and Access Center
22 Strong Hall, (785) 864-4064

Leader vows loyalty to bin- Laden successor

(Sanaa, Yemen) — The leader of al-Qaida’s Yemeni offshoot on Tuesday pledged his group’s allegiance to Osama bin Laden’s successor, and vowed to continue the fight against corrupt Western-backed leaders. In a 10-minute audio message posted on extremist websites, Nasser al-Wahishi said his group — al-Qaida in the Arabian Pen- insula — recognizes Egyptian-born doctor Ayman al-Zawahri as the new chief of al- Qaida. Al-Zawahri took over command of al-Qaida following the death of bin Laden in a U.S. raid in Pakistan in May. Al-Qaida-linked militants have taken advantage of the political turmoil engulfing Yemen to seize control of at least two towns and surrounding territory in the country’s south, forcing more than 100,000 people to flee the area as government forces carry out airstrikes and a ground offensive to regain control. “My soldiers and those soldiers with me

will not give up nor give

in the Arab gulf

in until Islam is ruling by God’s will and strength,” al-Wahishi said. With an estimated 300 members, the United States says it is al-Qaida’s most active branch.

her leg and is recovering from the attack. Senior-Sgt. Stephen Perkins, head of police in Charleville, said the first officer to reach the backyard was forced to spray the kangaroo to avoid being injured. “The animal jumped away, then saw another officer at the back of the police car and went for that officer, and he also had to deploy his capsicum spray — so the roo had to get sprayed twice,” Perkins told The Associated Press. “After that, it hopped away from the scene, but police could still monitor its location — it didn’t go too far.”

“After that, it hopped away from the scene, but police could still monitor its location —
“After that, it hopped away from the scene, but police could still monitor its location —

the UNIVeRSItY DAILY KANSAN

WeDNeSDAY, jULY 27, 2011

PAGe 5

cRIme

Robbery victim recounts night

BY IAN CUMMINGS icummings@kansan.com

The car’s headlights crept up on Matt Johnson and John Allred for about a minute before anything happened. Weeks after the robbery, and after testifying in court, Johnson, a senior from Salina, recalled that and said maybe he could have done something differently. Maybe he could have taken more notice and alerted his friend, and they might have fled. Hindsight is twenty-twenty. Who knew the car’s occupants would jump out on Memorial Drive in the middle of the night, armed and masked, and hold them up for their cash and phones? But that’s what happened at about 1:30 a.m. on June 23, according to Johnson and Allred, another senior from Salina, testifying at the Douglas County District Court July 19, during a preliminary hearing for the two men accused of robbing them.

Stroll on a Dark Street

Johnson said he and Allred had some beers and cocktails that evening at the Jayhawk Cafe, 1340 Ohio St., where Johnson works as a barback, before taking a walk on campus. They’d been friends since first grade, but hadn’t seen each other in a while. They wandered along Memorial Drive, behind Strong Hall, where they were robbed. Johnson and Allred described their attackers as a stocky black man and a taller, leaner white man. Minutes after the robbery, police arrested Brandon Huggins, a 23-year-old soldier sta- tioned at Fort Leavenworth, and Mi- chael Gerald, 21, now charged with four felony counts each, including aggravated robbery. Huggins is white and Gerald is black. During the arrest, police recovered property belonging to Johnson and Allred. They also seized a bag of marijuana and a BB pistol. Johnson said he remembered the robbery well, but there were details that he wasn’t sure of, such as the exact type of pistol used. “If it was a BB gun — whatever,” he said. “It looked real.” Johnson and Allred testified that two men approached from the car, shout- ing at them to get on the ground. The black man approached first, pointing a pistol at them. The students complied immediately.

the Courtroom

Johnson testified that he thought both of the men were armed, and the defense questioned whether he could clearly describe the the white man’s gun. He couldn’t say what it looked like or just when exactly he saw it. He said he was focused on the gun right in front of him, held by the black man with the red bandana covering part of his face.

Geoffery Loftus, a professor of psy- chology at University of Washington in Seattle, has studied eyewitness testi- mony and memory. He said witnesses sometimes affected concentrate on a weapon when one is present and pay attention to it at the expense of other details, such as the appearance of the person holding it. Another issue that the defense spent time on in the hearing was Johnson and Allred’s state of mind. Both stu- dents said they had at least four drinks before leaving the Jayhawk Cafe, and both testified that they were somewhat intoxicated. Johnson said he wasn’t sure anymore if the white man had a gun. He also couldn’t remember details about the robbers’ clothes, except that they both wore white T-shirts. He said the sus- pects in court generally matched the body type of the men who robbed him, but that he wouldn’t be able to identify them by face because of the masks. “Some of it is a bit of a haze,” he said. “It’s frustrating, not being able to re- member more about the white guy.” He said that it was difficult, when being robbed, to take into account all the questions that will be asked later.

“Next time, I’ll make sure to pay at- tention to both of my attackers,” he said.

Loftus said that alcohol, fear and stress can interfere with perception and memory formation. The idea that the details of highly stressful events will be “stamped in” the memory, he said, was a misconception. What may happen is that such events are impor- tant to the person experiencing them, are recalled repeatedly, and become strong memories. But if details were remembered incorrectly, those would be stamped in as well, and witnesses may end up being very confident of incorrect facts. Johnson said that, although some details have escaped him, he believes Huggins and Gerald are probably the men who robbed him. “They had our stuff in the car,” he said. “Does it get any more cut and dry than that?”

the WheelS of JuStiCe

Johnson said he was glad the rob- bers left his cell phone behind. As soon as the two men drove away, leav- ing him and Allred lying in the park- ing lot, he called 911. “I was really impressed with the po- lice,” he said. “They were really prompt and professional.” Seconds after reporting the robbery, Johnson heard sirens from two differ- ent locations. Police arrived minutes later to take their statements. But between that night and Tuesday, Johnson said, he was often left in the dark about the case. He had trouble reaching prosecutors by phone, and

he didn’t learn at what time he was to appear at the courthouse Tuesday until 30 minutes before the hearing started. The suspects are next due in court Aug. 2. “It’s been a little frustrating,” he said. “But they seem to be doing a fine job.” He said testifying was a painless process that, at times, “bordered on enjoyable.” The opportunity to testify against the men who, prosecutors say, held him up at gunpoint has given him some satisfaction. “Oh yeah,” he said. “Big time.”

moving on

Johnson said he isn’t worried about facing the men in court, even though they are charged with felony intimida- tion of a witness and Huggins is free on bond. The robbery hasn’t changed the way he lives, even if it has made him more wary. “I still do the same things,” he said. “I’m just looking over my shoulder all the time.” One night this July, he sensed the glare of headlights creeping up behind him while walking with his girlfriend at night on an empty street in down- town Kansas City. A truck approached and slowed. A man inside leaned over and peered at them as he passed. This time, the vehicle kept rolling and dis- appeared. “It was pretty terrifying,” Johnson said.

dis- appeared. “It was pretty terrifying,” Johnson said. Rachel Cheon Received 5 KC Strip tickets for
Rachel Cheon Received 5 KC Strip tickets for the Ultimate KC Pub Crawl Get caught
Rachel Cheon
Received 5 KC Strip tickets for
the Ultimate KC Pub Crawl
Get caught reading the UDK.
Win awesome prizes.

PAGE 6

WEDNESDAY, jULY 27, 2011

thE UNIVERSItY DAILY KANSAN

tUItIoN

Professional school fees can add up

BY SHUANA BLACKMON sblckmon@kansan.com

In addition to already expen- sive tuition, once in a professional school each student pays an addi- tional fee per credit hour that goes directly to that school. Each program charges a different amount based on needed supplies and programs available to students, such as scholarships and technol- ogy available for student use. Most schools charge approxi- mately $20 or $30 per credit hour. Excluding the two most expensive schools, the School of Business and the School of Law, if you take nine credit hours in a professional school, that can add up to an aver- age of more than $300, according to KU websites. Most schools include student in- put to the use of funds, however not all schools have a formalized pro- cess where students give ongoing

budget input, and many students don’t know where these fees go. All of the money collected by course fees stays within the specific school and are supposed to go di- rectly to the students in some way. Different schools have different needs, but many of the expendi- tures are similar. Most professional schools use allocations such as scholarships, tech support, facil- ity maintenance and other student services. Since 2003, the University as a whole has collected $76.3 million through course fees. The past few years every school has increased their fees by 6 percent while over- all tuition rose by approximately 7 percent, according to the Uni- versity Differential Tuition Report from 2011, from the Office of the Provost’s website. Check out the map on Kansan. com and find your school to see ex- actly where your money is going.

cost by professional school

SCHOOL Of ArCHiteCtUre $38 per hour Total revenue 672,002 Total payroll 160,456

SCHOOL Of tHe ArtS $20 per hour Total revenue $207,659.56 Total payroll expense $67,819.32

SCHOOL Of edUCAtiON $20 per hour Total revenue $953,508 Total payroll expense $294,968

SCHOOL Of eNgiNeeriNg $41 per hour Total revenue $1,397,324 Total payroll expense $421,555

SCHOOL Of fiNe ArtS $20 per hour Total revenue $462,831.94 Total payroll expense

$367,478.37

SCHOOL Of JOUrNALiSM $17 per hour Total revenue $209,183.51 Total payroll expense $68,909.37

SCHOOL Of LAw $212 per hour Total revenue $2,959,131 Total payroll expense

$1,544,515.08

SCHOOL Of MUSiC $20 per hour Total revenue $217,735 Total payroll expense $123,453

SCHOOL Of BUSiNeSS $102 per hour Total revenue $7,150,359 Total payroll expense

$5,690,6999

SCHOOL Of PHArMACY $158 per hour Total revenue $2,224,721 Total payroll expense $2,017,755

SCHOOL Of SOCiAL weLfAre $28 per hour Total revenue $357,412 Total payroll expense $335,729

NOW HIRING BARTENDERS DOOR STAFF SERVERS APPLY IN PERSON, M-F BETWEEN 9 AND 5 (785)-841-5855
NOW
HIRING
BARTENDERS
DOOR STAFF
SERVERS
APPLY IN PERSON, M-F BETWEEN 9 AND 5
(785)-841-5855 | 8 EAST 6TH ST.

the UNIVeRSItY DAILY KANSAN

WeDNeSDAY, jULY 27, 2011

PAGe 7

the UNIVeRSItY DAILY KANSAN WeDNeSDAY, jULY 27, 2011 PAGe 7

PAGE 8

WEDNESDAY, jULY 27, 2011

thE UNIVERSItY DAILY KANSAN

LocAL

Turning trash to treasure is not so simple

BY CHRISTY NUTT cnutt@kansan.com

Like most of the things in Heidi Yoder’s apartment, the antique lamp hanging from her ceiling came from the trash. Yoder originally saved the glass lamp from the dumpster. She later sold the lamp to a neighbor at a garage sale. When Yoder saw the lamp at the neighbor’s trash bin a couple of years later, she couldn’t help but take in as her own one last time. For Lawrence resident Yoder, her lamp represents dumpster diving at its best — community members trading items instead of buying new things. This is not a new concept for Yoder, who said she has been dumpster div- ing her entire life. “I’ve found lots of treasures along the way,” Yoder said. Most times Yoder only picks items of interest but it’s a different story dur- ing move-out season. “I’ll go out hunting if I know that the KU students are leaving because they will leave a whole bunch of stuff

that they don’t want to take back home,” Yoder said. “It’s usually still pretty useful.” Yoder’s best finds include roller skates, records, clothing and furni- ture. However, according to the City of Lawrence, Yoder obtained these “treasures” illegally. A city code prohibits unauthorized individuals from going through or removing other people’s trash. Since January 2010, city officials prosecuted six people for unlawfully removing trash. “Some people feel very strongly against others going through their trash because they consider it an in- vasion of privacy,” Lawrence commu- nications manager Megan Gilliland said. “It is their understanding that the city will dispose of their trash without others going through it.” The threat of identify theft also makes people uneasy about others rummaging through their trash, Gil- liland said. The judge decides the penalty, which can be a fine ranging from $1

to $1,000 and up to 180 days in jail. According to the office of Lawrence supervising prosecutor Jerry Little, most people receive a fine of $100. For first time offenders the jail time is typically suspended, Little said. Yoder said she knows about the or- dinance, but it doesn’t stop her from dumpster diving. She has never re- ceived a ticket. “If there is useful stuff that people can use then by all means they should take it, but they should be respectful of not making a mess or throwing trash around,” Yoder said. AmeriCorps member of the Law- rence Social Service League Kendra Davis said the only people she has known the city to ticket for dumpster diving were homeless or poor. Davis said the Social Service League Thrift Store, 905 Rhode Island St., de- pends on dumpster diving as a way to receive donations of items that would otherwise be thrown out. “There are a lot of people who dumpster dive that are stable people, very active in the community that

that are stable people, very active in the community that Christy Nutt/KANSAN The city says to

Christy Nutt/KANSAN

The city says to let it collect what’s on the curb, but dumpster divers think otherwise.

you would never guess as the type to dumpster dive,” Davis said. “They find things and donate them instead of giving a monetary donation.” Two years ago, the Social Service League began sending its unwanted items to different organizations in- stead of discarding them. Previously, it depended on dumpster divers to clear out its dumpster between sched- uled trash pickups, Davis said.

“The city only picked up the trash once a week, which was not enough for the agency,” she said. The city will make changes to the trash pick-up schedule during move- out season to ensure that this isn’t the case for Lawrence residents. “We are aware of the amount of waste during the move in time,” Gil- liland said. “So we do our best to pick it up as quickly as possible so that aesthetically it is not a problem and because we don’t want people digging through the trash.” The sanitation department restricts vacation time during the season to ensure there is enough staff available, Gilliland said. Trash pickup, which typically runs Monday through Friday, will run an extra day on Saturday, July 30, to ar- eas with several apartment buildings and student residents, such as Oread Drive. If city officials feel there is still an overabundance of trash on Aug. 1, some crew members who typically pick up yard waste will be reassigned to help pick up trash, Gilliland said. Gilliland said that the city wants people to recycle and reuse in order to reduce waste, but that going through other people’s trash is not the way to do it. “There are a lot of ways to recycle and reuse if people are willing to take the time to find out who will take their things,” Gilliland said.

to recycle and reuse if people are willing to take the time to find out who
to recycle and reuse if people are willing to take the time to find out who

the UNIVeRSItY DAILY KANSAN

WeDNeSDAY, jULY 27, 2011

PAGe 9

moNeY

Bartering economy present in Lawrence

BY HANNAH DAVIS hdavis@kansan.com

During the hot Kansas summer, Brady Karlin’s day begins at 4:30 a.m., well before the sun first greets his fields. Karlin spends the 16 hours between the start and end of his workday digging, planting, and tending to his herbs, asparagus and tomatoes. Like most farmers, Karlin doesn’t wage a daily battle with Mother Na- ture for the money. In fact, if cus- tomers cannot give Karlin a piece of artwork, a homemade micro- brew or an original poem Karlin will dispense his homegrown zuc- chini for free. Karlin Family Farms, 3303 Ka- sold Dr., is an experiment in “gift economics.” In gift economies, par- ticipants trade goods and services rather than exchanging currency. “We all have our own unique tal- ents,” Karlin said. “I see those tal-

ents as gifts we can share with each other.” Karlin’s farm is just one example of a bartering economy. As the economy continues to struggle, gift economies are becoming com- monplace in Lawrence, ranging from Craigslist swaps to plans for

a downtown holistic healing collec-

tive. Craigslist is littered with owners looking to part with a dishwasher in exchange for a deep fryer. Zoe Smith, a stay-at-home mom and licensed massage therapist, said her family has been hit hard by the economy. “This past year money has gotten tighter and tighter,” she said. “They say the recession is over but I am just not seeing it. Both Smith and her husband,

a cobbler, have skills they offer in lieu of cash. Smith’s vacuum broke last week and she took to Craigslist to offer massage gift certificates

in exchange for a working bagless vacuum. Smith hasn’t had any of- fers yet but the system worked for her in the past. Smith traded six hours worth of massage gift cer-

tificates for a $300 guitar amp. The amp’s owner surprised his preg- nant wife with the

gift certificates and her pregnant guilty pleasure, Taco Bell. “He called me and told me his

wife started crying when he gave her the gift,” Smith said. “You don’t get that joy from a dollar bill transac- tion.” Brandon Norris recently became

debt free and is determined to stay that way. Norris moved to Law- rence from Oklahoma. His very ex- istence in Lawrence is an example

of bartering. Instead of paying rent,

Norris works on the Karlin Family Farms in exchange for room and board. Norris is a part of World Wild Opportunities for Organic Farms. WWOOF places volunteers with organic farms throughout the world.

Since arriving in Lawrence, Nor- ris has immersed himself in the lo- cal bartering and gift-based econo- mies. In addition to his farm work, Norris spends hours crafting handmade un- usual instruments

that he then gives away. He makes Native American flutes; kalimbas,

a small thumb piano, and tongue

drums. “People can do whatever they wish with the instrument,” Nor-

“He called me and told

me his wife started crying when he gave her the gift. You don’t get that joy from a dollar bill transaction.

Zoe SmitH takes part in bartering

ris said. “But I guess ideally they would feel compelled to share their gifts with others also.” Karlin refers to his organic farm as an overall learning exploration. The construction 100 feet away from his farm on 31st Street is a daily reminder of the money driven world that surrounds his utopian experiment. “It’s a very fine line that I’ve walked and it has been desperate at times,” Karlin said. While Karlin explores the pos- sibilities gift economies offer the bills continue to pile up. Karlin is currently in the middle of negotia- tions to extend his lease. The future of Karlin Farms is not definite. Karlin said he finds inspiration in the promise of long-term goals. “I don’t have all the answers right

now, but I look forward to 10 or 15 years down the road when my hard work pays off and I can truly live off the land,” Karlin said.

look forward to 10 or 15 years down the road when my hard work pays off

PAGE 10

WEDNESDAY, jULY 27, 2011

thE UNIVERSItY DAILY KANSAN

This Hawk Week be ready to free stuff. is hooking you up! Check out our
This Hawk Week
be ready to
free stuff.
is hooking you up!
Check out our special BACK TO SCHOOL ISSUE
hitting stands Aug.18 for all the details!
1 1
1 1
C
C
0
0
e e
2 2
l
l
e e
- -
b b
1 1
r r
2 2
a a
9 9
t t
i i
1 1
n n
g
g
90 90
Years
Years

tHE uNiVERSitY DAilY KANSAN

WEDNESDAY, JulY 27, 2011

PAGE 11

O

KANSAN WEDNESDAY, JulY 27, 2011 P A G E 1 1 O opinion fREE foR All

opinion

fREE foR All

apps.facebook.com/dailykansan

I just made my first trip into the Watson Library stacks. Now I understand why so much sex happens in there.

He laughed. I love it when he laughs; although, the truth is I am not in love with him.

ANimAl lifE

A good pet helps ease the craziness of life

One thing that used to both- er me was when people treated their pets as their children. Dog sweaters, cats with mid- dle names, sleeping with their beta fish and shih tzu strollers. I mean, what was the point? Were they too stiff to make friends with the 25,000 KU students with whom they have so much in common? Or was it that they didn’t enjoy their time alone and needed something to fill the void? Before I adopted a rat from

a local, friendly, nation-wide chain of pet stores, the atti- tude My assumption of dot- ing pet owners was one of snotty annoyance. Your dog is your baby? I’d think, “you’re a

annoyance. Your dog is your baby? I’d think, “you’re a By liz stephens editor@kansan.com slave to
annoyance. Your dog is your baby? I’d think, “you’re a By liz stephens editor@kansan.com slave to

By liz stephens

editor@kansan.com

slave to something smaller than you and it’s not even a human.” Then I would go snuggle myself or count my money. I was fine

alone. Except that I cried a lot and kept the television on so I could pretend that the noise it made was my family. On the suggestion of my mother, I got a rat but I hon-

estly didn’t think anything spec- tacular was going to happen. To my surprise, the tender- ness that I felt toward this scratching, sniffing rodent was immediate and overwhelming. The first thing I did was teach him to come to his name as I held a spoonful of peanut but- ter. Then, I lied on the carpet of my apartment and had the little guy crawl all over me. He clawed his way into my hair and nestled, and I thought, “so this is it.” This is Animal Parenthood. I realized that I would never have to snuggle alone again. Now, just a few days later, I’m so smitten with my new ani- mal that sometimes I wish that

I could have gestated and borne

him myself. Although breast feeding the little critter might prove to be logistically difficult,

I couldn’t decline such an expe- rience. More than anything, I under-

stand how other pet owners feel when they put their maltipoo in a feathered headdress or apply fake eyelashes on their hedgehog. To the rest of us,

it may seem like these animal

owners are crazy, but it’s really the opposite. They aren’t crazy because of the animal. The animal keeps them from going crazy.

Stephens is a junior in English from Dodge City.

PoliticS

When explaining something to the class, every third word should not be “umm.”

Beat the heat… I would rather beat my meat…

Time to enter the Thurs- dimension.

Who is “They?” and who is “You?”

It’s hard to rhyme a word like vagina… Agh, never mind. Just f*ck it.

Lost my dignity at the Ozarks this weekend, once again.

I feel ya, I lost my dignity there last year… and then again last month.

Sounds like the biggest tool in the universe.

You muscles will not stop my bullet.

I am a 200-lb., tool thank you very much.

Meaningful political discourse should begin with civility

I had the opportunity to

visit some of my favorite

historical sites in Virginia last week, including Mount Vernon, Monticello and George Washington’s birthplace.

I learned quite a few history

lessons while I was there and even after having visited multiple times, there always seems to be

a new bit of information that

strikes my interest when learn- ing about the foundation of our country. All that history got me think- ing about the state of politics today. Obviously the founding fathers didn’t always get along, and a few could be quite nasty to

some of the others. There were definitely times when arguments got personal. But in the end, these politi- cians knew they were working toward a common goal, and a prosperous and proud country founded on liberty for all (well, for some — we’re getting there, though!). With this vision on the horizon, these men often set aside their differences, made dif-

these men often set aside their differences, made dif- By Kelly cosBy editor@kansan.com ficult compromises and
these men often set aside their differences, made dif- By Kelly cosBy editor@kansan.com ficult compromises and

By Kelly cosBy

editor@kansan.com

ficult compromises and worked together for what the nation as a whole believed in. Maybe they didn’t always make the right decisions. But based on some of the alterna- tives, I think our nation turned out to be pretty OK. To me it seems that this put- ting aside of certain differences (even wealthy land-owning white males have plenty of differences) was one of the major keys to the early successes of the United States. Now, I’m sure every political generation can point to instances when this hasn’t been the case, this being especially true during times of discrimina- tion and inequality based on

race, gender, etc. But given the major steps we have made in recent years toward a more equal society, shouldn’t the method of our discourse reflect that prog- ress? Instead, those early days of Washington and Adams resem- ble very little to the way politi- cians and citizens handle argu- ments today. Yes, we have many eloquent speakers and intelligent individuals who bring worth- while commentary to the discus- sions on various issues, but we are slowly losing our tradition of civil discourse. At the Robert J. Dole Institute of Politics, the encouragement of civil discourse is a priority. The institute pushes students and community members to discuss issues respectfully while working through the civil and political process to “redirect the course of our nation.” This is an important goal at a time when many of us often use personal attacks and verbal assault to express our “ideas.” I admit I’ve made a snarky com-

ment or two about Sarah Palin’s intelligence, but those kinds of remarks bring nothing to the discussion. I’ve seen people say things to each other (inciden- tally, often under the cover of anonymous comments on the Internet) that almost compete with the rhetoric of Fred Phelps in terms of how hateful and unconstructive they are. There is no place for this kind of argu- mentation in public discourse. Since our University is the home of the Dole Institute, we should take its emphasis on civil discourse to heart. A reclaiming of civility in politics could begin with our student generation. It all begins with self-awareness and encouraging others, and at its core is empathy.

Cosby is a senior in politi- cal science and English from Overland Park. Follow her on Twitter @KellyCosby.

PAGE 12

WEDNESDAY, jULY 27, 2011

thE UNIVERSItY DAILY KANSAN

thE UNIVERSItY DAILY KANSAN

WEDNESDAY, jULY 27, 2011

PAGE 13

UNIVERSItY DAILY KANSAN WEDNESDAY, jULY 27, 2011 PAGE 13 Chris Bronson/KANSAN Boots and some left over
Chris Bronson/KANSAN Boots and some left over gear is all remains from one student veteran’s
Chris Bronson/KANSAN
Boots and some left over gear is all remains from one student veteran’s days in the armed services. With projects like the
Wounded Warrior and the G.I. bill many veterans are turning to college after their time in the military.
Chris Bronson/KANSAN
Chris Bronson/KANSAN
Contributed photo

Contributed photo

Cavalry Scout Taylor Hultman, a sophomore from Maize, stands in full uniform during his first tour of duty in Baghdad.

Hultman studies a textbook at Watson Library. Hultman is one of 300 U.S. veterans attending the University of Kansas. U.S. veterans face many challenges when making the adjustment from military life to civilian life.

@

WOUNDED WARRIORS

go to kansan.com to read the rest of the story

Ethan Harris, now a student at KU, is a veteran of the United States Armed Services. Harris was deployed and served in Iraq in the United States’ most recent conflict.

Combat medic Ethan Harris poses in uniform in Iraq. Harris is pursuing a master’s degree while living with injuries sustained during his service.

BY ALEC TILSON actilson@kansan.com

Taylor Hultman relaxed in the back of the Hum- vee, settled among fellow soldiers, as their four- vehicle convoy returned to base in the Baghdad night. Awaiting them were a warm meal and some much-needed sleep. A flash of light suddenly illuminated the rear view mirrors, shock waves rattled the two-and- a-half-ton truck and they grabbed their rifles. An improvised explosive device, killer of many U.S. soldiers in Iraq, had exploded a few yards away. Although shook up literally and figuratively, they were still alive. Six months later, Hultman, now a KU student, steered his 2002 Hundai Sonata west on the Kan- sas Turnpike, heading for his home in Wichita. As he gazed through the windshield at icy roads and snow-covered ditches, a loud thud jolted and shook the car. He floored the accelerator, swerved across the other lane, and stopped on the shoulder, his knuckles white from squeezing the steering wheel. For one panicked moment, he was back in Iraq, escaping an IED kill zone the way he was trained. He checked each mirror, breathed deeply, and his heart rate calmed. There was no IED. A thick sheet of ice had dislodged from his sunroof and slammed down on the trunk. Hultman, 23, is one of an estimated 300 veterans attending the University of Kansas who brought their combat experiences home with them. Some didn’t escape roadside IEDs or sniper bullets and were left with physical disabilities. Others are af- flicted with horrifying memories that scar them emotionally and reappear as nightmares, anxiety attacks and flashbacks similar to what Hultman ex- perienced on the Kansas Turnpike. An increasing number of veterans are enrolling in universities around the nation. About 800,000 veterans used GI Bill benefits to attend school in 2010, a 40 percent increase over the previous year,

according to Keith Wilson, director of education services for the Department of Veterans Affairs. Making the transition from soldier to student

is a challenging quest to blend back into a society

they once knew. Despite the significant number of service-connected disabilities, no veteran fights the same battle. Hultman was lucky to return without signifi- cant physical injury, but Staff Sgt. Ethan Harris, 41, underwent spinal surgery and is medically retired from the Army. He deals with anxiety along with several other medical diagnoses as he works on a master’s degree from the School of Education. Sgt. Nathan Dehnke, who lost vision in his left eye and suffered nerve damage in his left leg, is also medically retired from the Army and graduated with his master’s in political science this past May. The University’s wounded warriors are here to earn degrees but also to assimilate back into nor- mal lives after the chaos of combat.

Determining the WounDeD

For every one death on the battlefield, there are seven physically wounded service members, ac- cording to a landmark 2008 study by the Research and Development Corporation, an independent nonprofit institution that conducts research and

analysis on domestic issues such as health, educa- tion and national security. Ethan Harris, retired combat medic and current KU student, suffered neck and spinal injuries re- sulting from repeated concussive blasts in combat coupled with hours spent carrying heavy equip- ment. When he returned from Iraq in May 2008, mili- tary doctors discovered extensive damage to his spinal column and three months later performed

a cervical fusion. Titanium rods now link four

vertebrae in the upper region of his spine. Months before surgery, he was diagnosed with multiple ser- vice-connected behavioral health disorders as well, including Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder.

Dehnke’s physical injuries can be traced to a single IED blast that left him blind in his left eye and with nerve damage in his left leg. In addition to physical disabilities, many veter- ans encounter behavioral health issues resulting from combat experience. Two of the most com- mon are PTSD and depression. Having both con- ditions is common. These ailments remain hidden from view but their prevalence is astoundingly evident. An estimated 300,000 veterans of wars in Iraq and Afghanistan suffer from PTSD or major de- pression, according to RAND’s study. For years, mental health disorders went largely unrecognized in the military and many veterans faced with such issues remain undiagnosed. As

during an attack on his platoon in Baghdad. Dehnke underwent facial reconstructive surgery yet still has his visionless left eye, though it will likely need to be removed one day. As a graduate student at the University, Dehnke’s injuries complicated the day- to-day demands of a college student. Without the depth perception he once had, long reading assignments were more challenging. Both eyes grew tired, even ached, and reading on a computer screen or from digital presentations was straining so he preferred a hard copy of articles and assignments. He still walked to class even though the nerve damage in his left leg was quite painful some days. On a busy sidewalk, he could unintentionally bump someone if they were walking on his blind side. It

“the anger, the bitterness of being a totally different person half the time from what I normally would be, trying to adjust and still not being able to would be the hardest part. Knowing what you were before and how you are now is totally different and you’re wondering how you got to that stage.”

Sgt. Zedrick Gilsper

awareness continues to increase, publicly and with- in the military, wounds once considered pseudo- illnesses have become widely accepted as legitimate health concerns. “Behavioral health is a huge thing now compared to when I first got in,” Hultman said. “If you said you were depressed, they said drink some water and move on. Now they take it pretty seriously.”

After the fAct: Long term effects

For those who experienced bodily harm in com- bat, physical limitations present a daily challenge. Dehnke, 36, has viewed the world through one functional right eye since early June 2007, when ex- ploding shrapnel peppered the left side of his body

probably seemed rude, he said, but it’s a part of the process. He refused to make excuses for himself and in- sists he’s just thankful to have all of his limbs. “As long as I have persistence and am willing to work at things a little harder, I can do most every- thing,” he said. “I just can’t do it quite the same or adapt as quickly.” Some wounded veterans face arguably more de- bilitating, even terrifying head wounds. Dehnke has a mild case of TBI, damage to the brain caused by a sudden trauma, and experiences lapses in memory as a result. Sporadic dreams about combat, but rarely about the actual incident he suffered injuries from, keep

him from sleeping as much as he would like. Harris was diagnosed with PTSD, an anxiety dis- order that can develop after exposure to a terrify- ing event or ordeal in which grave physical harm occurred or was threatened, according the National Institute of Mental Health. PTSD occurs in up to 20 percent of veterans who served in Iraq and Afghanistan, according to the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs’ National Cen- ter for PTSD. Veterans experiencing PTSD commonly feel stressed or frightened even when they are no longer in the high intensity environment of combat. Many experience intense anxiety, flashbacks, fits of anger and nightmares. Not everyone who is involved in trauma devel- ops PTSD. Like depression, it operates according to degrees and the severity is unique to each person, said John Wade, licensed counseling psychologist at Counseling and Psychological Services on campus. Onset of stress-induced behavioral health issues such as PTSD typically occurs months after re-en- tering a peacetime setting. Wade said the effects can feel uncontrollable and perplexing. Army Staff Sgt. Zedrick Glisper, combat medic and warrior in transition at Fort Riley’s Warrior Transition Battalion, is a 10-year soldier dealing with PTSD under the care of Army health professionals. He planned on serving 20 years before PTSD set in four to five months into recovery from Hepatitis C and changed his mind. Now, he’s focused on getting well and getting out of the military. “The hardest thing was the nightmares. I didn’t think I was the kind of person to have that type of stuff affect me,” Glisper said. “The anger, the bitter- ness of being a totally different person half the time from what I normally would be, trying to adjust and still not being able to would be the hardest part. Knowing what you were before and how you are now is totally different and you’re wondering how you got to that stage.” Experiencing those intrusive symptoms in a col-

lege setting can be difficult. On a campus filled with more than 30,000 stu- dents, Harris’ tendency to seek isolation — a com- mon symptom of PTSD — is challenged every day. It manifests in irrational decision-making and im- pulsive acts. In class he prefers to sit in a seat where he can observe every one and everything in the room and develop a sense of security through a consistent routine. On days that seat is taken, his reaction is extreme. Anger and disbelief fester and usually he’ll walk back out the door, he said. He knows his behavior might appear inappropri- ate, but for him it feels acceptable. “I can’t help that behavior,” Harris said. “There’s a hyper vigilance needing to know everything in the environment that’s going on. All of that is a disrup- tion of that personal space that is highly valuable to someone who tends to isolate themselves.” The need to observe and feel in control can be challenging in a classroom full of, for the most part, socially active students. For students with PTSD, hyperarousal symptoms such as being easily star- tled can surface. For Hultman, set to begin his second semester this fall, adjusting to life on campus provides simi- lar challenges. He’s never been officially diagnosed with PTSD, but has experienced anxiety attacks in situations that feel threatening, unfamiliar or out of his control. When he gets to class he notes the exit routes and mentally lays plans in the event of a dangerous situ- ation. “You become super, crazy aware,” Hultman said.

“You try to tell yourself: relax, relax, you’re OK, but

I know instantly when I walk through that door I’m

going to figure out the best place to sit. I don’t care if

I can see the board.” When someone walks directly behind him on campus, a vulnerable feeling creeps in his stomach. He crosses the street to assess and avoid any poten- tial threat, assuring himself he’s safe before lowering

his guard. Chances are the 6-foot, 220-pound man with a background in jiu jitsu could defend him- self, but for years in Baghdad he was a target every second of every day. Modifying that mindset is a gradual process. One afternoon, during mid-tour leave, Hultman was napping on the couch in his parents’ home and had a nightmare in which he was back on patrol. He leapt to his feet and ran up and down the hallway, still in a sleep state, yelling at the top of lungs: “turn the lights off! why are the lights on?” He explained that on night patrol in Iraq, having lights on in the truck was a death wish, giving away position and endangering their lives. Hultman’s mother, Karen, was terrified and later told Hultman what had hap- pened. Even after more than a year since combat, where the enemy want you dead and you want the enemy dead, it’s contrary to one’s nature to feel safe even when your life is no longer at risk. Wade said of their situation: “It’s making the transition from living in this heightened state of arousal, from needing to be hyperly aware of the environment, to being in a situation where it’s really not adaptive to that.”

BriDging the gAp

After years of training, months spent traveling half way around the world and a lifetime of memo- ries from the trails of war, the comparatively slow and predictable life of a civilian can present a trou- bling disconnect. A 10-month deployment can feel like a 10-year maturation. While the lives of friends and family moved forward, veterans return feeling out of tune with the world they left. Hultman, now set to begin his second semester, struggled to accept that while his life as a civilian was more or less on hold, peers went about their lives. Most friends his age graduated. “Life was going on without me. It felt like I had to find new friends, which sucks,” he said. “They don’t

understand you, you’re disconnected. It’s not that I don’t want to find new friends but it’s hard.” He said calling old friends felt intrusive. Crowd-

ed bars and public places were overstimulating and

produced anxiety. While he had stories about time

in the Army, his friends shared stories of weekend

benders and classroom mishaps. The experience of service is impossible to empathize with, he said. The age difference might be small, but the ma- turity level feels immense. The life experiences of veterans, especially those with service-connected

disabilities, are not compatible with students a few years removed from high school. For Harris, 41, making friends is not as much

of a concern; he has a wife, five daughters and a

3-month-old son. As an older student, his perspec- tive comes from a different standpoint. “I think an experience like going to Iraq, whether you’re a paper pusher way way back or a trigger puller way way up front, you come back and you’ve been shaped by those experiences, Harris said. “It’s not necessarily war, it’s just that you’ve had a differ- ent experiential path than someone else. It’s hard to relate to those things unless the other person was there.” Wade said perceptions are changed during such

a unique and meaningful experience and that swapping roles from being charged with the task of bombing a village to living among young people on campus can be a hard adjustment. Dehnke is also an older veteran but hasn’t mar- ried or had children. He didn’t know if he would ever be able to relate to people socially the same way. While no one wants to be coddled, especially the disabled, conveying that message is trying. “Yes, you’re changed forever, but you’re still a person, you’re still a human however you want to put it,” Dehnke said. “If you can step back and real- ize not everyone’s had the same life experiences you had, I think you’ll be able to relate to them better.”

thIS StORY cONtINUES @KANSAN.cOm

PAGE 14

WEDNESDAY, jULY 27, 2011

thE UNIVERSItY DAILY KANSAN

PAGE 14 WEDNESDAY, jULY 27, 2011 thE UNIVERSItY DAILY KANSAN

the UNIVeRSItY DAILY KANSAN

WeDNeSDAY, jULY 27, 2011

PAGe 15

heALth

trouble sleeping? you’re not alone.

by brittany nelson bnelson@kansan.com

It’s 2 a.m. on a Tuesday night, and Katie Meserko, a senior from Over- land Park, is wide awake. She knows she has to teach Math 101 at 8 a.m., but she said she doesn’t even try to go to sleep because she knows she won’t be able to. When she finally decides to snooze, Meserko said she cannot go to sleep without the TV flickering in the dark room. “I will not fall asleep unless I’m somewhat focused on something in the background,” Meserko said. “Otherwise, I constantly think in my head things I have to do or need to do, or get creative ideas.” According to the National Com- mission on Sleep Disorders Re- search, at least 40 million adults suffer from chronic, long-term sleep problems and 20 to 30 million suf- fer from occasional sleep problems. So, like many other adults, Meserko needs help getting to sleep. Anne Owen, Lawrence psycholo- gist, said that people need some kind of bedtime routine to go to sleep. “Doing something that’s not com- pelling or interesting can help shift you from thinking about your prob- lems or worries of the day, and you will be more likely to fall asleep,” Owen said. “Most people find that playing video games or surfing the web are activating, so reading qui- etly might be a better choice.” If every time you go to bed and feel anxious, even if you are tired, you will not fall asleep, she said. Joe Sayegh, a graduate from Still- well, said he has to have some sort of distraction to fall asleep, such as having the TV on or playing a game on his cell phone. “Usually, I’m not tired enough to fall asleep by the time I want to,” Sayegh said. “I’m too bored to sit there and I usually think about my busy day or random things. Watch- ing TV gets my mind off things.” But Sayegh said if his girlfriend is with him, he doesn’t need something else to distract him. “If someone is there, I usually fall asleep fine,” Sayegh said. Owen said that if people don’t have a serious sleep problem and falling asleep to a TV works for them, she sees nothing wrong with it. However, she said there are better ways to prepare yourself for sleep. “Mindfulness meditation is a good technique to help ease your mind for better sleeping,” Owen said. According to the medical dic-

tionary, mindfulness meditation is defined as, “a technique of medita- tion in which distracting thoughts and feelings are not ignored but are rather acknowledged and observed nonjudgmentally as they arise to create a detachment from the and gain insight and awareness.” Keith Floyd, a psychologist at Counseling and Psychological Ser- vices, said that the more people get frustrated that they are not asleep, the more their insomnia will wors- en. “Instead of getting angry that you’re awake at 3 a.m. and have to get up in two hours, mindfulness

meditation makes you think in a different way to where you accept your current situation,” Floyd said. “Therefore you will not have anxiety, which leads to falling asleep faster.” There are also many things peo- ple should avoid before hitting the sheets. Owen said that our body temperature decreases throughout the night, and this drop in tem- perature supports the body’s sleep system. “It’s bad to exercise late at night because it raises your core body temperature,” Owen said. “If you are hot inside or outside of your body, you will not fall asleep.”

inside or outside of your body, you will not fall asleep.” Mike Gunnoe/Kansan Reading a book

Mike Gunnoe/Kansan

Reading a book is a bedtime routine that sleep experts recommend.

a book is a bedtime routine that sleep experts recommend. 785.838.3377 2600 W. 6th St. Call
785.838.3377 2600 W. 6th St. Call to hear about our july special! 2 Bedroom, 2

785.838.3377

2600 W. 6th St.

785.838.3377 2600 W. 6th St. Call to hear about our july special! 2 Bedroom, 2 Full

Call to hear about our july special! 2 Bedroom, 2 Full Bath

785.838.3377 2600 W. 6th St. Call to hear about our july special! 2 Bedroom, 2 Full

THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN

WEDNESDAY, jULY 27, 2011

PAGE 16

E

entertainment

HOROSCOPES

ARIES (March 21-April 19) Today is an 8 Think over what you really want, and review the logical steps to make it happen. Review research, and post the most inspiring goal where you can see it.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20) Today is a 9 Imagine the project completed. What would it be like to have that result? Give in to the urgency around a good cause or to help a friend. Let yourself get inspired.

GEMINI (May 21-june 21) Today is an 8 Step up the pace a bit to finish old business. You’re gaining confidence. Use that courage to tackle something previously intimidating. A new per- spective illuminates.

CANCER (june 22-july 22) Today is a 9 Creativity and imagination inspire new ideas that excite. More people are get- ting on board with the plan. Stoke their fires with kind words.

LEO (july 23-Aug. 22) Today is a 9 Step into your own leadership. You have the will and the energy, and oth- ers are happy to follow along. Motivate them to action by inspiring them to contribute. Lead by example.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Today is an 8 Your actions speak louder than words today, and your words have volume already. You can return any ball that comes at you, no matter how fast it comes.

LIbRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) Today is an 8 Everything seems to point you towards adventure. Consider all the possibili- ties and choose your road, even if it happens to be the one less traveled.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21)

Today is a 7 It’s hard to focus on just one thing today as your mind wanders all over the place. Don’t fight the tide. Go with it and enjoy

the ride.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) Today is a 7 It’s easy to get distracted by work today and forget what’s really important. Remember to acknowledge your partner. They need to hear it. Give and you shall receive.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-jan. 19) Today is a 9 Take a ride on the love train. Don’t get distracted texting and miss your stop. Reaffirm a commitment that you’re devot- ed to, and support a partner.

AqUARIUS (jan. 20-Feb. 18)

Today is an 8 All you need is love, now and forever

but

especially now. Use your wit and sparkle to create something beautiful. Have you tried

poetry? Share words of kindness.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20)

Today is a 7 There’s always room for growth at home and with the family. Explore new ways of playing together and creating new pos- sibilities. What fun can you invent?

and creating new pos- sibilities. What fun can you invent? MORE STORIES. MORE ENTERTAINMENT. KANSAN.COM With

MORE STORIES. MORE ENTERTAINMENT. KANSAN.COM

With 5 locations all over town

With 5 locations all over town Eddingham Quail Creek Parkway Townhomes Campus West The Oaks 785-841-5444
With 5 locations all over town Eddingham Quail Creek Parkway Townhomes Campus West The Oaks 785-841-5444
With 5 locations all over town Eddingham Quail Creek Parkway Townhomes Campus West The Oaks 785-841-5444
With 5 locations all over town Eddingham Quail Creek Parkway Townhomes Campus West The Oaks 785-841-5444
With 5 locations all over town Eddingham Quail Creek Parkway Townhomes Campus West The Oaks 785-841-5444
With 5 locations all over town Eddingham Quail Creek Parkway Townhomes Campus West The Oaks 785-841-5444
With 5 locations all over town Eddingham Quail Creek Parkway Townhomes Campus West The Oaks 785-841-5444
With 5 locations all over town Eddingham Quail Creek Parkway Townhomes Campus West The Oaks 785-841-5444
With 5 locations all over town Eddingham Quail Creek Parkway Townhomes Campus West The Oaks 785-841-5444
With 5 locations all over town Eddingham Quail Creek Parkway Townhomes Campus West The Oaks 785-841-5444
With 5 locations all over town Eddingham Quail Creek Parkway Townhomes Campus West The Oaks 785-841-5444
With 5 locations all over town Eddingham Quail Creek Parkway Townhomes Campus West The Oaks 785-841-5444
With 5 locations all over town Eddingham Quail Creek Parkway Townhomes Campus West The Oaks 785-841-5444
With 5 locations all over town Eddingham Quail Creek Parkway Townhomes Campus West The Oaks 785-841-5444
With 5 locations all over town Eddingham Quail Creek Parkway Townhomes Campus West The Oaks 785-841-5444
With 5 locations all over town Eddingham Quail Creek Parkway Townhomes Campus West The Oaks 785-841-5444
With 5 locations all over town Eddingham Quail Creek Parkway Townhomes Campus West The Oaks 785-841-5444
With 5 locations all over town Eddingham Quail Creek Parkway Townhomes Campus West The Oaks 785-841-5444
With 5 locations all over town Eddingham Quail Creek Parkway Townhomes Campus West The Oaks 785-841-5444

Eddingham Quail Creek Parkway Townhomes Campus West The Oaks

all over town Eddingham Quail Creek Parkway Townhomes Campus West The Oaks 785-841-5444 www.ApartmentsLawrence.co m
all over town Eddingham Quail Creek Parkway Townhomes Campus West The Oaks 785-841-5444 www.ApartmentsLawrence.co m
all over town Eddingham Quail Creek Parkway Townhomes Campus West The Oaks 785-841-5444 www.ApartmentsLawrence.co m

785-841-5444

www.ApartmentsLawrence.co m

the UnIVeRSItY DaILY kanSan

WeDneSDaY, jULY 27, 2011

PaGe 17

CROSSWORD

Want tO knOW the anSWeRS? go to kansan.com to see the gallery @
Want tO knOW
the anSWeRS?
go to
kansan.com
to see the gallery
@

the next PaneL

go to kansan.com to see the gallery @ the next PaneL ODD neWS Man steals ambul

ODD neWS

Man steals ambulance during house fire

(Phoenix, Arizona) — Phoenix police say a man tried to steal an ambulance left run- ning outside a house fire but he didn’t get very far. Police spokesman Sgt. Tommy Thomp- son says 28-year-old Travis Ward took the vehicle, which was unlocked and had its keys in the ignition. It had been left run- ning early Sunday to keep cool for anyone seeking medical care. Thompson says Ward drove the ambu- lance for a few blocks, striking a post, a fence and parked cars. He says the man told police he had used marijuana before the incident. Thompson says no injuries were report- ed and he wasn’t aware that anyone at the west Phoenix fire needed medical care. Ward was booked on suspicion of theft and criminal damage. It was not immedi- ately known whether he has a lawyer.

Police looking for young coyote stuck in jar

(Seattle, Washington) — A young coyote is

eluding animal-control officers in Seattle, even though its head is stuck in a jar. The Seattle Times reports that animal shelter officers tried to track down the 3-

to 4-month-old pup Friday in the woods of

the Rainier Beach neighborhood. But even without eating for a while, the pup had enough spunk to scurry away. Seattle Animal Shelter supervisor Ann Graves says officers are concerned for the pup because its head has been stuck in the jar for about a week now. Graves says shooting the coyote with

a tranquilizer remains an option, but it’s dangerous if the animal has not had any food. She says the dose could be too much for a weakened animal.

Nick Sambaluk

dangerous if the animal has not had any food. She says the dose could be too
dangerous if the animal has not had any food. She says the dose could be too

PAGE 18

WEDNESDAY, jULY 27, 2011

thE UNIVERSItY DAILY KANSAN

cAmPUS

Faculty can be buried at historic cemetery

BY MONISHA BRUNER mbruner@kansan.com

Professor Thomas Mulinazzi has been on campus for more than 32 years. If he has it his way, he’ll never leave. A brick plaque at the Pioneer Cemetery opening reads, “Once transplant always a Jayhawk.” Muli- nazzi has taken those words to heart. When he dies, he wants to be bur- ied in Pioneer Cemetery, located on West Campus near the Endowment Center.

“I walked over there and saw some of the people who were buried there and I want to be a part of it,” Muli- nazzi said. According to Pioneer Cemetery records in the Spencer Research Li- brary, a man named Aaron Perry claimed the present site of Pioneer Cemetery and surrounding lands when Lawrence was founded in 1854. The property was later deeded to C.W. Smith, according to the Com- plete Tombstone Census of Douglas County. Smith allowed some friends

to be buried there and it continued to be a gravesite. In 1854, the burial site was uphill from where the citizens lived, accord- ing to Pioneer Cemetery records. Fu- neral processions traveled two miles from Massachusetts street to the then- isolated Pioneer Cemetery. Brittany Keegan, acting curator for the Watkins Community Museum of History, 1047 Massachusetts St., said that flooding in the city was also a problem, so the location was ideal. The Complete Tombstone Cen- sus of Douglas County shows that

The Complete Tombstone Cen- sus of Douglas County shows that burials were without any system and

burials were without any system and many graves were unmarked and un- recorded. Most burials were victims of Quantrill’s Raid. The victim of a tragic murder, Thomas W. Barber, is buried in the cemetery as well. Barber died Dec. 6, 1855, at the hands of pro-slavery militants from Lecompton. According to Pioneer Cemetery records, Barber was on his way home on a Thursday afternoon on horse- back. His brother Robert Barber and his brother-in-law Thomas Pierson were with him. A group of 12 men soon approached them on horse- back. Both brothers and Pierson re- fused orders to surrender and were shot. This was one of the two tragic murders that termed the beginning of the war called Bleeding Kansas. “The interesting thing about the cemetery is that it is so tied in with the territorial period and the Bleed- ing Kansas struggle, especially in Lawrence,” Keegan said.

Lisa Scheller, senior editor for media relations at KU Endowment, said Pioneer Cemetery has about 300 occupants. Because of limited space, there are restrictions on acceptance into the cemetery. Full-time faculty or those with equivalent appointment with at least 15 years at the Universi- ty are eligible, as are individuals who have provided distinguished service. Also, a spouse of any of the eligible members is welcome. A plot size for one person at the cemetery is two feet by two feet. Because this space is too small to bury a person’s body, one has to be cremated. The families or estates of the deceased will be responsible for all costs. Scheller said that KU Endowment has worked with donors to establish a Pioneer Cemetery fund so alumni and friends can provide support to help maintain the cemetery.

friends can provide support to help maintain the cemetery. Mike Gunnoe/KANSAN Thomas W. Barber’s grave at

Mike Gunnoe/KANSAN

Thomas W. Barber’s grave at Pioneer Cemetery on West Campus became a rallying point for fighters in the so-called Bleeding Kansas skirmishes of the 1860s.

Other nOted burials accOrding tO census recOrds

MOSES POMERY The first known burial was a young boy named Moses Pomery, according to the census. Pomery died Oct. 1, 1854, and was buried on the hill west of Lawrence.

CORNElIUS CAMPBEll The first recorded burial was of 56-year-old Cornelius Camp- bell. Campbell died on April 22, 1855.

CARl G. RAU The second-oldest burial was a man named Carl G. Rau. Rau died Nov. 4, 1855. His elaborate grave is inscribed in German. Rau was 58-years-old.

DR. ElMER V. MCCOllUM Ashes of Dr. Elmer V. McCollum were buried in 1968. McCol- lum Hall is named after him.

the UNIVeRSItY DAILY KANSAN

WeDNeSDAY, jULY 27, 2011

PAGe 19

KANSANCLASSIFIEDS

JOBS

Positions Open- KU Endowment is seeking KU students to work 3 nights each week, talking with University of Kansas alumni while earning $9/hr. Excellent communica- tion skills, dedication and a desire to make KU a better university are all a must. Email Emily at evieux@kuendowment.org today to learn more about this exciting opportu- nity to build your resume and have fun in this professional enviornment.

Looking for 25-30 indv. for apt cleaning/ painting. Must be avail. 7/30 to 8/1. Call 785-843-0011

BECOME A BARTENDER. UP TO $300/DAY. NO EXPERIENCE NECES- SARY. TRAINING COURSES AVAIL- ABLE. 800-965-6520 EXT 108.

Full time teacher position for early edu- cation program. Send resume to: Chil- drens Learning Center, 205 N. Michi- gan, Lawrence, KS 66044 or email clc5@sunflower.com. EOE.

Help

wanted.

Home

daycare

hiring

full

or

part

time.

Will

schedule

around

classes.

If

interested

please

call (785)

865-2778.

 

HOUSING

Available August ‘11: Studio Apt. ($315) One BD Apt. ($420). Close to KU. Call Tom @785-550-0426.

Attention seniors & grad students! Real nice, quiet 2 BR Duplex. close to KU. Avail. 8/1. Lots of windows. Carport. W/D No pets or smoking. 331-5209.

Fall Semester Lease: 4 BR or 3 BR, 3 BA, 2 Car Garage, make offer, near KU. Call (785) 841-3849

Renters Needed-Fall 2011-Townhome W. Lawrence $400/mo. w/ util. W/D & Individual BR+Bath. Call 785-443-0810

Avail. Aug 1: 3-4 BR, 2Bath Duplex Close to KU, New Carpet, W/D, Garage $900/mo. Call 785-218-6590

Sublet Needed - January-July 2012 Room in 3BR/3Bath Apt. @ Legends Call Tresa - (913) 710-2669

3BR 2BA condo with W/D near campus. $250/mo. each + 1/3 utilities. Avail Aug 1. Please call 785-550-4544.

Now Leasing for Fall 1-4 Bedroom Houses and Apartments. Great Rates. 785-842-7644. www.gagemgmt.com

1 roomate needed for 3 bd apt above Chipotle at 9th&Mass. Only $400/month + utilities. Call Alex @ 913-484-1444.

Half off August Rent! Luxury 1,2&3 BR Apts. Quiet location, large roms, pool, W/D. 785-842-3280

Reduced Rent. Nice 2 BR 2 Bath Apt. Washer/Dryer Included. $600/month. 512 Rockledge. 785-841-4935

HOUSING

1213 KENTUCKY 6BR/7BA Newly Remodeled, Near KU/Downtown Walk-in closets, Hardwood Floors Energy Efficient Appliances Call 785-843-0011

Roommate Needed for August! 3 BR/1 Bath house located right by the stadium - the biggest room with two awesome roommates could be yours! Call (402) 981-6378 for more details.

could be yours! Call (402) 981-6378 for more details. JOBS NOW HIRING BARTENDERS DOOR STAFF SERVERS

JOBS

NOW HIRING BARTENDERS DOOR STAFF SERVERS APPLY IN PERSON M-F 9AM-5PM 785 - 841 -
NOW
HIRING
BARTENDERS
DOOR STAFF
SERVERS
APPLY IN PERSON
M-F 9AM-5PM
785 - 841 - 5855
8 EAST 6TH ST

HOUSING

PERSON M-F 9AM-5PM 785 - 841 - 5855 8 EAST 6TH ST HOUSING Bob Billings &
Bob Billings & Crestline 785-842-4200 2 and 3 Bedrooms Apts. & Townhomes Available Summer &

Bob Billings & Crestline

785-842-4200

2 and 3 Bedrooms Apts. & Townhomes Available Summer & Fall Close to KU, 3 Bus Stops

Regents Court

19th & Mass Furnished 3 & 4BR Apts Leasing for August 2011 W/D included Ride the Meadowbrook bus to KU

See Current Availability, Photos & Floor Plans on Our Website www.meadowbrookapartments.net

JOBS

Plans on Our Website www.meadowbrookapartments.net JOBS HOUSING Free-of-charge counseling is available at GaDuGi

HOUSING

on Our Website www.meadowbrookapartments.net JOBS HOUSING Free-of-charge counseling is available at GaDuGi

Free-of-charge counseling is available at GaDuGi SafeCenter for anyone who has experienced sexual violence. Services are provided by a licensed clinical professional counselor and trauma specialist.

To schedule an appointment contact Susan Miller, LCPC, (785)843-8985, ext 370 or counselor@sunflower.com

specialist. To schedule an appointment contact Susan Miller, LCPC, (785)843-8985, ext 370 or counselor@sunflower.com
To schedule an appointment contact Susan Miller, LCPC, (785)843-8985, ext 370 or counselor@sunflower.com ANNOUNCEMENTS

ANNOUNCEMENTS

To schedule an appointment contact Susan Miller, LCPC, (785)843-8985, ext 370 or counselor@sunflower.com ANNOUNCEMENTS
To schedule an appointment contact Susan Miller, LCPC, (785)843-8985, ext 370 or counselor@sunflower.com ANNOUNCEMENTS
To schedule an appointment contact Susan Miller, LCPC, (785)843-8985, ext 370 or counselor@sunflower.com ANNOUNCEMENTS

PAGE 20

WEDNESDAY, jULY 27, 2011

thE UNIVERSItY DAILY KANSAN

StAtE

Got loans? Consider moving to rural Kansas

BY MATT GALLOWAY mgalloway@kansan.com

to rural Kansas BY MATT GALLOWAY mgalloway@kansan.com Photo contributed by the Kansas Department of Commerce

Photo contributed by the Kansas Department of Commerce

Twenty-three Kansas counties are now “rural opportunity zones,” areas in which grauduates can get up to $15,000 in student loan repayment for moving into the area.

line. All 50 are now offering an in- come tax exemption for people who move from out-of-state. The number of KU students who have applied will not be released un- til transcripts are verified. But of the 24 people who have applied, 21 are native Kansans, Lara said. Students with loan debt can par- ticipate in the program regardless of the year they graduated. Jay Kom-

brink, a senior from Mission Hills, said he has only seen rural Kansas while driving through I-70 to Colo- rado. He said he would consider ap- plying for the program if a county could show it had potential to grow. “If there is a job opportunity somewhere, that’s kind of more im- portant than the money,” Krombrink said. Community development direc- tor Christy Hopkins said Greeley County is not a typical rural com- munity. “We’re a progressive, forward- looking county,” Hopkins said. “Those are the things we really pride ourselves on. We have a unified gov- ernment, which offers some great advantages as we work on things across the county.” Woodson County is the farthest east of any county participating in the repayment program. Its largest

city, Yates Center, has a population of 1,417 and is about a 100 mile drive southwest from Lawrence. Katy Ludwig, the economic de- velopment representative for Wood- son County, promotes the county to potential residents. She said many of the community’s youth do not re- turn after graduation due to a grim job market. “I know our one dentist in the county came on a program sort of similar to this one,” Ludwig said. “He came and started a new business. So hopefully this will attract people who want to come, live in a small town and start their own business.” Ludwig said part of the benefit of living in a small community is that everyone looks out for one another. “I hope they start a new life here, not just get on their feet and move on,” Ludwig said. “I want them to stay here.”

opportunity zones by the numbers

WOODsOn COunTY Population: 3,309 Closest to Lawrence

KinGMAn COunTY Population: 7,858 Closest to Wichita

PrATT COunTY

Population: 9,656

Most populated

sherMAn COunTY Population: 6,010 Closest to Denver

GreeLeY COunTY

Population: 1,247

Least populated

Chicago. New York. Los Angeles. These are the major metropolitan areas many Kansas students eagerly anticipate relocating to after gradu- ation. But moving to rural Greeley County, Kan., population 1,247, may offer a more immediate reward.

Greeley County lies on the west- ern Kansas border and is one of 27 counties in the state participating in the Rural Opportunity Zones stu- dent loan repayment program. Un- der the provisions of the program, the county and the state will repay

20 percent of outstanding student

loans, up to $3,000 per year, for graduates of any accredited post- secondary university. There is a $15,000 maximum benefit. The program was signed into law by Gov. Sam Brownback on July 1. Online applications became accessi- ble the same day through the Kansas Department of Commerce website. Public information officer Dan Lara

said the department has received

24 applications for the student loan

portion of the program. “We’ve been very encouraged by the response that we’ve received from the program and also the ap- plications that we’ve gotten in,” Lara

said. Lara said he expects most of the other 23 counties in the program to join the 27 in offering the student loan repayment by the Dec. 31 dead-

in offering the student loan repayment by the Dec. 31 dead- NOW ACCEPTING BEAK ‘EM BUCKS!
NOW ACCEPTING BEAK ‘EM BUCKS! BEAK ‘EM BUCKS! 2040 W 31st St # B Lawrence,
NOW ACCEPTING
BEAK ‘EM BUCKS!
BEAK
‘EM
BUCKS!
2040 W 31st St # B
Lawrence, KS 66046

THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN

WEDNESDAY, jULY 27, 2011

PAGE 21

S

sports

Weekly Sports Trivia

A: 1974.

?

wikipedia.com

Q: In what yearwas the last NFL

lockout?

Quote of the Week

“The owners don’t win by having a lockout.

Shutting down your business is not good

for anybody and it’s certainly not good for

the players, it’s certainly not good for the fans. And that’s most important to us.”

— Roger Goodell

Fact of the Week

!

wikipedia.com

The NFL lockout lasted for a total of 135

days.

moRE SPoRTS, UPDATED moRE fREqUENTLY.

Make your voice heard at

Kansan.com or by

engaging with The Kan-

san and Kansan sports

on Twitter. Follow

@TheKansanSports

for more.

@

fooTbALL

on Twitter. Follow @TheKansanSports for more. @ fooTbALL Matt Strasen/ASSoCiATeD PreSS Kansas head coach Tuner Gill

Matt Strasen/ASSoCiATeD PreSS

Kansas head coach Tuner Gill answers questions during NCAA college football Big 12 Media Days on Tuesday, in Dallas.

big hopes for a tough season

by Mike Vernon mvernon@kansan.com

DALLAS — Nobody has said the path to redemption for this year’s Kansas football team will be easy — in fact, it’s set up to be one of the toughest seasons any team will have in college football this year. Based off of last year’s records, college football analyst Phil Steele has ranked the Jayhawks schedule the third toughest in the nation. At the Big 12 Media Days on Tuesday, this year’s Kansas team showed it is aware of the tough odds against it, and instead of dwelling on the nail-filled road to come, the Jayhawks are using that tough path as a motivator of sorts, or a reason to work harder than ever before. “Everybody in the Big 12 is ex- cellent this year,” senior tight end Tim Biere said. “Every week is go- ing to be a challenge and we look forward to that challenge.” The labor the Jayhawks have put in during the spring and sum- mer workouts is most visible when looking at the new, slim appearance

of senior lineman Jeremiah Hatch. Working off over 30 pounds, Hatch believes the lost weight will help his mobility and ability to block down the field. “A lot of running, a lot of sweat- ing, and a lot of Stairmaster,” Hatch said when asked how he lost the weight. “I got with our nutritionist Aaron, and he showed me how to eat the proper way while still main- taining a love for food.” It appears that the entire team has joined Hatch’s newfound work ethic this offseason. Coach Turner Gill seemed to think that the team as a whole has taken a step in the right direction during college foot- ball’s more quiet months, providing potential dividends for the upcom- ing season. “As we went into the winter off- season program and spring football season, I saw a better work ethic,” Gill said. “When you have a better work ethic, you have a better op- portunity to be successful.” Senior linebacker Steven John- son has been working hard as well, leading the defense through their

offseason workouts. Johnson be- lieved that the hard work of the defensive players will help them against well-conditioned Big 12 opponents. “Our defense is a lot more ath-

letic, a lot faster, and for the other teams in the Big 12, it’s going to be hard to get away from us,” Johnson said.

Not only is the defense faster, but also the team as a whole has improved greatly

in the speed de- partment. Every player represent- ing the Jayhawks in Dallas didn’t forget to mention the improved speed they’ve seen on the practice field. The freshman class in particular got the older players to rave about the new turf-burners in Lawrence. “There has been talk from the older guys that this is the best re- cruiting class we’ve seen since we’ve been here,” Biere said. “There’s so

much speed and so much athleti- cism.” Coach Gill brought up the in- creased speed in particular as one of the keys to turning things around with the Kansas program. He said the new quickness will give

the team a better opportunity to be successful and get things going the right way. With all-new

speed and a new hard-working at- titude, stemming from last season’s underwhelm - ing effort and the tough road ahead,

the Kansas team has done a lot this off season to make sure there is no repeat performance from the lack- luster 2009-2010 season. “When you go 3-9 and you don’t want to go workouts, you think about that 3-9,” Hatch said. “When you think your slacking it comes in your mind. 3-9 has a lot to do with what’s coming this season.”

successful.”

“When you have a better

work ethic, you have a

better opportunity to be

TurNer GILL

coach

PAGE 22

WEDNESDAY, jULY 27, 2011

thE UNIVERSItY DAILY KANSAN

bIG 12

Texas network controversial

BY MIKE VERNON mvernon@kansan.com

DALLAS — No coach could es- cape the question. The story that spanned across headlines throughout the confer- ence coming into the Big 12 media days has some coaches upset, some neutral and some supportive: is it acceptable for the Longhorn Net- work to air high school football games? The freshly-inked deal out of Austin with ESPN pays Texas $300 million for the rights to have an all-Texas network. The Longhorns, in hopes to fill time slots and gain viewers, were planning on putting high school football games in the state of Texas on live television. The problem? Allowing a uni- versity-branded network to have that unique access to young players, along with having its name all over a high school football game, could give the University of Texas an un- fair advantage in recruiting.

Missouri coach Gary Pinkel was the most vocal of all of the coaches and players on Monday about his issues with the controversial net- work. “It’s a lack of common sense there to think that the network, the uni- versity network can coach or have high school games on their net- work,” Pinkel said. Even though Pinkel spoke the loudest on the controversial topic, he has not been the leader in rebel- lion on the issue at hand. Texas A&M called a board of regents meeting this past week to discuss the Big 12 conference. As an in-state rival and main recruiting competitor to the Longhorns, the Aggies are heavily rumored to have cried foul on the Longhorn Net- work. As rumor has it, Texas A&M even threatened the livelihood of the conference by apparently threat- ening to move to the Southeastern Conference. Coach Mike Sherman didn’t comment on the network it- self, saying he has enough to worry

about as it is. On the other side of the issue, smooth-talking Texas coach Mack Brown turned the issue around, making it seem like Texas would be helping the rest of the conference by airing the games -- giving exposure to players other schools may have never seen. “I think the part that will affect recruiting is you’ve got a lot more opportunities for young people to be seen,” Brown said. “So there’s no question that the opportunity to show who you are on national TV at every practice, at every ballgame, on a network, is — I mean, it’s a posi- tive.” Brown even went as far as to say that the only people actually being hurt by the network were the high school players and coaches them- selves, for they would not have the opportunity to showcase their pro- grams on national television if it weren’t for the network. The only coach to side with Brown and the Longhorns was Baylor head

coach Art Briles, who turned heads in the room by saying that if the Longhorns can get a network of their own, they deserve it. “Do I worry about it, not a bit.

I mean, they’re pretty hard to re-

cruit against anyway,” Briles said. “If people are going to pay for it, more power to them. Let them have it. If

it helps the Big 12 if we have to re-

cruit harder against Texas, we’ll do a better job, work harder and see if we can get a little better.” The question that no coach could hide from didn’t get too many an- swers Monday. Even though it’s shaken the fragile Big 12 grounds, it proved to be a bit premature for the coaches to come out with final judg- ments on such a hot, ongoing topic. One thing is for sure — the Long- horns will receive their money from the network, providing a bigger budget for recruiting dividends re- gardless of whether the Longhorn Network will show 100 hours of high football or zero.

footbALL

berglund enters plea in pretrial hearing, expected to arrive in Lawrence Aug. 3

Freshman quarterback Brock Berglund will report to the Jayhawks’ training camp next week, after entering a not

guilty plea to a misdemeanor assault charge in Colorado. Berglund entered the plea Monday

in Douglas County, Colo. He is charged

after third-degree assault after allegedly punching a man April 9 during a party in Sedalia, Colo. His attorney issued a statement Mon- day saying Berglund, who had enrolled at KU early but left the campus in the spring, will report to training camp Aug.

3.

His trial is not scheduled until Dec. 13, after the college regular season ends.

— Assoicated Press

camp Aug. 3. His trial is not scheduled until Dec. 13, after the college regular season

the UNIVeRSItY DAILY KANSAN

WeDNeSDAY, jULY 27, 2011

PAGe 23

bIG 12

Sooners favored to win championship

ASSOCIATED PRESS

DALLAS — Before Oklahoma won its first Big 12 title in 2000, and went on to the win the national champion- ship that season, coach Bob Stoops had no idea how good his second year there would be. That was the first of seven confer- ence titles over the last 11 seasons when there were still 12 teams in the league. Now in the new-look Big 12, with 10 teams playing a round-robin schedule instead of in divisions, there would be little surprise if the Sooners quickly add another trophy. The de- fending champions are overwhelming favorite to win the league again — and maybe more. “Our offense is high powered, our defense brings a lot of playmakers back. It’s a good combination,” line- backer Travis Lewis said Tuesday as Big 12 media days wrapped up. “But right now all we are is potential. We’ve got to go out there and play.” The Sooners, who closed last sea- son with a five-game winning streak that included wins over now-departed Nebraska in the Big 12 championship game and a 48-20 victory over Con- necticut in the Fiesta Bowl, got 41 of 43 first-place votes in a preseason poll from media members who cover the league. “This team has had a good attitude and a good chemistry,” Stoops said. “They did a year ago, they carried it through the winter and the spring. We’ll see where it goes with us.” Those feelings, bolstered by Lewis’ sentiment, are good for a coach who in some seasons sensed that his teams felt entitled because of the long-term success at Oklahoma. Stoops went from trying to con- vince his team that it was good enough to win in 2000, after the Sooners had some down seasons before he arrived, to a few years later reminding certain groups they hadn’t done anything to feel that way. “Now going into this season, though, after so many years and with

the number of guys back, we expect

it,” Stoops said. “It’s really convincing

them expect to work

have to have that attitude of some- thing to prove to get it done, to finish it off.” Landry Jones, the starting quarter- back who followed Heisman Trophy winner Sam Bradford at Oklahoma, trumped his impressive freshman season by throwing for a Big 12-high 4,718 yards and 38 touchdowns while setting school records with 405 com- pletions and 617 attempts last year. “He got a couple of years under his belt and I think this is finally his time,” Lewis said. “I definitely think he’s a national championship caliber- winning quarterback and this whole team has faith in him.” When Jones was asked about the perception by many that he took significant steps in his leadership of the team during the closing stretch last season, the quarterback certainly didn’t disagree. “Definitely in that Oklahoma State game, the Big 12 championship game and then the Fiesta Bowl, I was able to take some big strides for me as a play- er,” he said. “I’ve kind of learned from Sam, kind of learned from people be- fore me, talking to coach Heupel, him dealing with those expectations what it takes to lead a team through that.” Josh Heupel, the Sooners quarter- backs coach and co-offensive coordi- nator, was the quarterback for Stoops’ 2000 national championship team. Jones threw for 468 yards and four touchdowns in the regular season fi- nale against Oklahoma State. Then Oklahoma rallied from a 17-point deficit in the Big 12 title game, when he threw for 342 yards and a touch- down and ran for another score while Lewis had an interception in the end zone and recovered two fumbles. Jones also set Oklahoma bowl re- cords with 429 yards and three touch- downs in the Fiesta Bowl. While Stoops’ team is favored to win the conference and possibly con- tend for a national championship, Texas Tech’s Tommy Tuberville and

And you

championship, Texas Tech’s Tommy Tuberville and And you Kansas’ Turner Gill both are trying to establish

Kansas’ Turner Gill both are trying to establish their teams as Big 12 con- tenders. The Red Raiders were picked sev- enth and Kansas was at the bottom of the preseason media poll. Kansas State and Iowa State, the other teams at Tuesday’s sessions, are also picked in the bottom half of the league. Texas Tech won eight games last season, including a bowl over North- western, but Tuberville has a new defensive coordinator after the Red Raiders gave up 456 yards and 31

points a game last season. “It wasn’t a great year, but it was a year that I think we can look back on and say that was the start of something good,” Tuberville said. “Did make one change in our defense this past year, after going through a year and watch- ing what we have to play against, the type of players, the type of coaches.” New defensive coordinator Chad Glasgow spent the past 10 seasons as an assistant at TCU, where the Horned Frogs use a 4-2-5 defense that will now be Tech’s base defense.

Gill lost his Big 12 debut last season to FCS team North Dakota State, and the Jayhawks finished the year losing seven of its last eight games. ‘’Last year at this time, I didn’t re- ally quite understand all the deep de- tails about where we were at and what we need to do as far as a team,” said Gill, who got to Kansas after taking Buffalo to a bowl game. “I had just an open mind and an open hear about what to expect in my first year, par- I’m excited about where we are today.”

er nby How come when you eat one sour patch kid, it's not sour, but
er nby
How come when you eat one sour
patch kid, it's not sour, but when
you eat several at once, you want
to die?
Drop us a line @UDKplay
785-830-8665 $1.99 Domestic Beer biscuits & gravy w/ local sausage Garlic steak sandwich 1/2 lb
785-830-8665
$1.99 Domestic Beer
biscuits & gravy w/ local sausage
Garlic steak sandwich
1/2 lb Ribtips $4.59
1 lb Ribtips $8.27
$1.99 lime margaritas
Breakfast BET - local bacon,
eggs, and tomato
Sweet spinach salad
Spud Bomb $4.59
(Fries covered in your choice
of Da Bomb or Pulled Pork)
$1.99 lime margaritas
$5.99 JUMBO margaritas
Buy 1 small, get a 1
topping small for $4.
Buy 1 medium, get another
medium for $6.
Byu 1 large, get another
large for $8.
Open faced smothered egg
sandwich w/ potatoes, two
over easy eggs, green chile
& cheddar jack cheese
Locally made spanish style
brautwurst sandwich
Sliced Sandwhich $3.67
(Pork, Ham, Chicken,
Turkey, and Beef)
$11.99 pitchers
Medium 12" 2 topping
Pizza & 2 Drinks for $8.99
$3.99 peach, strawberry,
& mango margaritas
2 10" 2 topping Pizzas & 2
Drinks for $12.99
Da Bomb $4.59
(Shredded beef brisket in
BBQ sauce)
$11.99 pitchers
Tuscan Omelet $7.50
Isabella Omelet $7.75
Pulled Pork Green Chile
Burito $7.75
Pulled Pork $4.59
.375 Special
sm. 1Topping Pizza, $3.75
med. 1Topping Pizza, $5.99
lg. 1Topping Pizza, $7.99
Get 1 free side with each
slab (with student ID)
Large 16" 2 Topping Pizza
w/ 2 Drinks, $13.05
Colorado Omelet $7.50
Romana Scramble $7.25
Global Turkey Sandwich $7.25
Get 1 free side with each
slab (with student ID)
Hand Made Veggie Spring
Rolls $4.95
Buy Buy 1 1 small, small, get get a a 1 1
topping small for $4.
topping small for $4.
Ole Scramble $7.50
Muy Rica Omelet $7.75
Tofu Kabob $7.95
Tofu & Mixed vegetables w/
spicy curry sauce
Buy 1 medium, get another
Buy 1 medium, get another
medium for $6.
medium for $6.
Byu 1 large, get another
Byu 1 large, get another
large for $8.
large for $8.
Berry Pancakes
Farmers Market Caprese Salad
Mac & Cheese $7.95
-a creamy three cheese
blend oven roasted &
served with toasted bread
Veggie Burger $8.95
-Hand made black bean
burger with fries
Buy 1 small, get a 1
topping small for $4.
Buy 1 medium, get another
medium for $6.
Byu 1 large, get another
large for $8.
Your Pics,
Your Captions.
Steamed or Fried
Dumplings $5.95
Be a contributor, and send your pics to
weeklyspecials@kansan.com
Shannon & Rachel Gray Around the World