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Types of Short Stories.

Science fiction
A genre of fiction dealing with imaginary but more or less plausible (or at least nonsupernatural) content such as future settings, futuristic science and technology, space travel, aliens, and paranormal abilities. Exploring the consequences of scientific innovations is one purpose of science fiction, making it a "literature of ideas".[1] Science fiction is largely based on writing rationally about alternative possible worlds or futures.[2] It is similar to, but differs from fantasy in that, within the context of the story, its imaginary elements are largely possible within scientifically established or scientifically postulated laws of nature (though some elements in a story might still be pure imaginative speculation). The settings for science fiction are often contrary to known reality, but most science fiction relies on a considerable degree of suspension of disbelief, which is facilitated in the reader's mind by potential scientific explanations or solutions to various fictional elements. Science fiction elements include: A time setting in the future, in alternative timelines, or in a historical past that contradicts known facts of history or the archaeological record. A spatial setting or scenes in outer space (e.g., spaceflight), on other worlds, or on subterranean earth.[3] Characters that include aliens, mutants, androids, or humanoid robots. Technology that is futuristic (e.g., ray guns, teleportation machines, humanoid computers).[4] Scientific principles that are new or that contradict known laws of nature, for example time travel, wormholes, or faster-than-light travel. New and different political or social systems (e.g. dystopia, post-scarcity, or a postapocalyptic situation where organized society has collapsed).[5] Paranormal abilities such as mind control, telepathy, telekinesis, and teleportation. Other universes or dimensions and travel between them.

Fantasy
A genre of fiction that commonly uses magic and other supernatural phenomena as a primary element of plot, theme, or setting. Many works within the genre take place in imaginary worlds where magic is common. Fantasy is generally distinguished from the genre of science fiction by the expectation that it steers clear of scientific themes, though there is a great deal of overlap between the two, both of which are subgenres of speculative fiction.
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Types of Short Stories.


In popular culture, the genre of fantasy is dominated by its medievalist form, especially since the worldwide success of The Lord of the Rings and related books by J. R. R. Tolkien. Fantasy has also included wizards, sorcerers, witchcraft, etc., in events which avoid horror. In its broadest sense, however, fantasy comprises works by many writers, artists, filmmakers, and musicians, from ancient myths and legends to many recent works embraced by a wide audience today. Fantasy is a vibrant area of academic study in a number of disciplines (English, cultural studies, comparative literature, history, medieval studies). Work in this area ranges widely, from the structuralist theory of Tzvetan Todorov, which emphasizes the fantastic as a liminal space, to work on the connections (political, historical, literary) between medievalism and popular culture.[1]

Thriller
is a broad genre of literature, film, and television programming that uses suspense, tension and excitement as the main elements.[2] Thrillers heavily stimulate the viewer's moods giving them a high level of anticipation, ultra-heightened expectation, uncertainty, surprise, anxiety and/or terror. Thriller films tend to be adrenaline-rushing, gritty, rousing and fast-paced. Literary devices such as red herrings, plot twists and cliffhangers are used extensively. A thriller is villain-driven plot, whereby he or she presents obstacles that the hero must overcome.[3][4] The aim for thrillers is to keep the audience alert and on the edge of their seats. The protagonist in these films is set against a problem an escape, a mission, or a mystery. No matter what sub-genre a thriller film falls into, it will emphasize the danger that the protagonist faces. The tension with the main problem is built on throughout the film and leads to a highly stressful climax. The cover-up of important information from the viewer, and fight and chase scenes are common methods in all of the thriller subgenres, although each subgenre has its own unique characteristics and methods.[5] Common subgenres are psychological thrillers, crime thrillers and mystery thrillers.[6] After the assassination of President Kennedy, the political thriller and the paranoid thriller genre became very popular.[7] Another common subgenre of thriller is the spy genre which deals with fictional espionage. Successful examples of thrillers are the films of Alfred Hitchcock. The horror and action genres often overlap with the thriller genre.[8]

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In 2001, the American Film Institute in Los Angeles made its definitive selection of the top 100 greatest American "heart-pounding" and "adrenaline-inducing" films of all time. To be eligible,

Types of Short Stories.


the 400 nominated films had to be American-made films, whose thrills have "enlivened and enriched America's film heritage". AFI also asked jurors to consider "the total adrenalineinducing impact of a film's artistry and craft".[9][10]

Homer's Odyssey is one of the oldest stories in the Western world and is regarded as an early prototype of the thriller. One of the earliest thriller movies was Harold Lloyd's comic Safety Last! (1923), with a character performing a daredevil stunt on the side of a skyscraper. Alfred Hitchcock and Fritz Lang helped to shape the modern-day thriller genre beginning with The Lodger (1926) and M (1931), respectively.[3]

Definition of Thriller
A thriller provides the sudden rush of emotions, excitement, sense of suspense and exhilaration that drive the narrative, sometimes subtly with peaks and lulls, sometimes at a constant, breakneck pace thrills. In this genre, the objective is to deliver a story with sustained tension, surprise, and a constant sense of impending doom. It keeps the audience cliff-hanging at the "edge of their seats" as the plot builds towards a climax. Thrillers tend to be fast-moving, psychological and threatening, mysterious and at times involve larger-scale villainy such as espionage, terrorism and conspiracy. Thrillers may be defined by the primary mood that they elicit: fearful excitement. In short, if it "thrills", it is a thriller. As the introduction to a major anthology explains: ...Thrillers provide such a rich literary feast. There are all kinds. The legal thriller, spy thriller, action-adventure thriller, medical thriller, police thriller, romantic thriller, historical thriller, political thriller, religious thriller, high-tech thriller, military thriller. The list goes on and on, with new variations constantly being invented. In fact, this openness to expansion is one of the genre's most enduring characteristics. But what gives the variety of thrillers a common ground is the intensity of emotions they create, particularly those of apprehension and exhilaration, of excitement and breathlessness, all designed to generate that all-important thrill. By definition, if a thriller doesn't thrill, it's not doing its job. James Patterson, June 2006, "Introduction," Thriller[11] Writer Vladimir Nabokov, in his lectures at Cornell University, said: "In an Anglo-Saxon thriller, the villain is generally punished, and the strong silent man generally wins the weak babbling girl, but there is no governmental law in Western countries to ban a story that does not comply with a fond tradition, so that we always hope that the wicked but romantic fellow will escape scot-free and the good but dull chap will be finally snubbed by the moody heroine."[12]

Adventure
Page The adventure novel is a genre of novels that have adventure, an exciting undertaking involving risk and physical danger, as its main storyline. Researched by RINLACER 2012

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Types of Short Stories. Various Types of Short Stories


By Rakesh Ramubhai Patel As there are varieties of subjects, themes and art, there are various types of a short story. Some of the types are ancient tales, humor, satire, fantasy, biography, education, local color, and history. Lets us have a glimpse on each one of them in this article.

1. Ancient Tales
It is the power of the utilization of the ancient form of the tale in the modern short story. Italian writer Giovanni Verga's The She-Wolf (1880), and Chinese writer Yeh Shao-Chun's Mrs. Li's Hair are remarkable examples.

2. Fantasy
Fantasy stories are nothing but the fair combination of the old tales tradition and the supernatural details. The fine examples of such stories are British writer John Collier's horror fantasy Bottle Party (1939), Irish author Elizabeth Bowen's The Demon Lover (1941), and British author Saki's Tobermory (1911).

3. Humor
These types of stories are meant for producing surprise and delight. You will see that the most famous humorous tales and fables were written by the Americans. Mark Twain's The Celebrated Jumping Frog of Calaveras County (1865), and Joel Chandler Harris's The Wonderful Tar-Baby Story (1894) are remarkable. There is serious humor in the works of Americans like Eudora Welty's Petrified Man (1939) and Dorothy Parker's The Custard Heart (1939).

4. Satire
The main purpose of satire is to attack the evils of society. There are writers who wrote stories of sober satire. Austrian author Arthur Schnitzler's Fate of the Baron (1923), and American Mary McCarthy's The Man in the Brooks Brothers Shirt (1941) are known for their somber satire.

5. Education Story
Such stories revolve around the education of the main character. The good example is American educator Lionel Trilling's Of This Time, of That Place (1944).

6. History
History types deal with a life story or historical event. Welty's A Still Moment (a 1943 story about naturalist John James Audubon) is fine example of story dealing with history event.

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Types of Short Stories.


7. Local Color
These types of stories deal with the customs and traditions of rural and small-town life. You can enjoy the local color in the stories of George Washington Cable, Maria Edgeworth, Sarah Orne Jewett, and Mary Wilkins Freeman. These are some of the types you may find in sort story genre. In recent times, stories have more local color, diversities in the representations, making use of dialects, and vernacular impressions. The story writes have been taking somewhat flexibility in writing stories as they wish.
Rakesh Patel is an aspiring poet, freelance writer, self-published author and teacher. To learn about various types of poetry and English literature, read my blog http://EnglishLiterature99.wordpress.com Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Rakesh_Ramubhai_Patel

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