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for Specialty Teachers: Health and Lifetime Wellness, Languages other than English (LOTE), ESL, Arts: Visual

Art, Dance, Theatre, Orff Music, Instrumental/Vocal Music Purpose- To allow observers to consider specific content delivery methods that go beyond the TEM Gen Ed Rubric

TEM Rubric Notes Addendum

Arts: Visual Arts, Dance, Theatre, Orff Music, Instrumental/Vocal Music

T1 ObjectiveDriven Lessons

In performancebased Arts classes, not all parts of the lesson may encompass the objective. For example, a particular lesson might note objectives for a project/performance rather than a specific objective for each day. In these cases, there should be an evident structure to the lesson that enables an observer to assess whether the lesson was well organized. If students are working on an ongoing project, an arts teacher would likely not explain the importance of what students are doing at the beginning of each period. Instead, observers should assess whether students understand the importance of their work through observing the level of student engagement in the work and through conversations with students.

T2 Explain Content

In some cases, an Arts teacher may only be asking questions, rather than explaining content. For example, when working on a longterm project, the teacher may be circulating around the room and asking questions but not engaging in any wholeclass discussion. An Arts teacher should be assessed on the extent to which the questions guide and facilitate students understanding. In performance-based Arts classes, the teacher may use one or a combination of the following strategies to make the lesson assessable to all learners: one-on-one instruction, grouping, learning buddies, independent study, learning centers with task sheets, mini-lessons/focus groups, models/modeling of process and product, student self assessment, tiered assignments, and/or tip sheets. Same as T3 Observers will often see Arts teachers developing higherlevel understanding through presenting students with more challenging tasks and complex skills/activities. In an Arts class, students higherlevel understanding may be evident through their performance rather than through their verbal responses. Students in an Arts class may demonstrate that they understand the content at a higher level through their performance, rather than by asking questions.

T3Challenging Work T4 Engagement Strategies T5 Higher-Level Thinking Skills

T6 Check for Understanding

In some Arts lessons, a teacher may be checking for understanding on an ongoing basis through observing student performance, rather than stopping the class to conduct distinct wholeclass checks for understanding. An Arts teacher does not necessarily need to receive verbal feedback from students in order to assess their understanding; instead, their understanding might be most evident though their performance/product. Observers would likely see more wholeclass checks for understanding during the introduction of a new project or skill. There are clear cases in an Art class in which a teacher should respond to a student misunderstanding: for example, in cases involving safety and appropriate use of materials, if the teacher has just introduced a new procedure or skill, or if students are struggling to the point of frustration. It may also be necessary to address a student whose work significantly departs from the focus of the lesson.

T7 Instructional Time

Same as General Education Rubric

for Specialty Teachers: Health and Lifetime Wellness, Languages other than English (LOTE), ESL, Arts: Visual Art, Dance, Theatre, Orff Music, Instrumental/Vocal Music

TEM Rubric Notes Addendum

ESL (English as a Second Language)


T1 ObjectiveDriven Lessons

ESL and Bilingual teachers are often responsible for ensuring that in addition to a content objective, a lesson also has a specific language objective. Given that in coteaching situations, the ESL or bilingual teacher may not be the teacher responsible for discussing the objective with the whole group, the ESL or bilingual teacher should work to develop the clarity of the objective for the students with whom he or she is working. For example, the ESL teacher might have clearly reframed the objective within the context of the students individual interests or strengths and at a level appropriate given the students English language proficiency. The ESL teacher might also use a variety of strategies such as the visuals, graphic organizers, previewing vocabulary, and examples of work to ensure that the students understand the importance of the objective.

T2 Explain Content T3 Challenging Work

Same as General Education Rubric In general, codeswitching (immediately translating from one language to another or providing a word or concept in the students native language) is not an appropriate technique to use as a first strategy for making content accessible. Teachers should first use other techniques, such as demonstrating or modeling, speaking more slowly, or using a visual. An ESL or bilingual teacher might, however, engage students in a purposeful bridging language activity at strategic points. ESL teachers frequently need to differentiate instruction for their students based on factors such as proficiency in the target language and past school experiences. For example, some English Language Learners may have had extensive schooling in another country, whereas others may have had limited experience in formal education. If appropriate, observers should assess the effectiveness of the ways in which students are engaged with content based on how well these ways are promoting mastery of the language objective as well as the content objective. In coteaching settings, the ESL or bilingual teacher should work effectively to support the co teachers efforts to provide students with multiple ways to engage with the content and should be assessed on the effectiveness of this work. When appropriate, the ESL teacher may need to provide a student or students an additional way to access the social language, academic language or content of the lesson. For example, if the class is learning to add with regrouping and the co teacher has provided the visual support of having directions written out with examples, the bilingual teacher might have some students also use base ten blocks in order to better access the content. Students with low levels of proficiency in the target language can still be engaged in developing higherlevel understanding. Lack of verbal responses from students may not mean that the questioning was ineffective in developing higherlevel understanding; it might reflect students language proficiency. Students who do not respond verbally might respond through their work instead. In a coteaching setting, an ESL or bilingual teacher may need to check for understanding independently to supplement checks by his or her coteacher. These checks are likely to occur with individual students or during small group instruction. In a coteaching setting, when the coteacher is leading instruction, an ESL teacher might respond to the misunderstandings of students the teacher is working with either by immediately pulling a small group of students or by waiting until planned small group instruction or the independent practice. These are both appropriate ways to address misunderstandings and should be assessed based on the effectiveness of the scaffolds. Even if a student expresses a misunderstanding in the native language, a bilingual teacher should generally respond in the target language. Same as General Education Rubric

T4 Engagement Strategies

T5 Higher-Level Thinking Skills

T6 Check for Understanding

T7 Instructional Time

for Specialty Teachers: Health and Lifetime Wellness, Languages other than English (LOTE), ESL, Arts: Visual Art, Dance, Theatre, Orff Music, Instrumental/Vocal Music

TEM Rubric Notes Addendum

LOTE (Languages other than English)


T1 ObjectiveDriven Lessons

Lesson objectives should be stated in communicative terms that show what the student will be able to do with their language at the end of the lesson. For example, an objective should be stated, Students will talk about what they do after school. Objectives should be clearly stated, posted for the duration of the lesson, intentionally referred to throughout the lesson and used to assess learning throughout the lesson. In addition to performance objectives, LOTE teachers share the sequence of learning activities with their students to help their students see connections between and among instructional activities and the daily performance objectives. This sequence is also posted for the duration of the lesson. When explaining content, it is expected that LOTE teachers provide at least 90% of the lessons input in the target language. The use of English is minimized by carefully and deliberately determining when and if English is used in the classroom. Students in the LOTE classroom experience and practice language within a meaningful context. The teacher carefully monitors teacher talk to purposefully maximize student opportunities to produce language in every class. In every class session pair and/or small group activities that engage the students in communication for real world purposes should be observed. Teacher talk should be minimized so that students have many opportunities to produce language in each lesson. If grammar is explicitly taught, it is based on the performance objectives and consistent with the proficiency target. The teacher uses a variety of strategies to ensure the target language is comprehensible to all learners. Some of these strategies (e.g. visuals, concrete objects and hands-on experiences) will be used during the lesson to ensure student comprehension. Students acquire new vocabulary within a meaningful context and through the use of cultural products and practices. Therefore, the teacher should be observed using a variety of activities to meet the needs of multiple learning styles to ensure that input is not only comprehensible but engaging for the students. In the early years of learning a new language, students higherlevel understanding may be evident through their performance rather than through their verbal responses. It is also important for observers to understand that when students create in the language (e.g. asking or answering questions without a script) this is functioning at the highest level of Blooms taxonomy. Their comprehension will be much greater than their ability to produce the language. Checks for understanding will be in the target language at all levels. The teacher may be observed redirecting a student to a correct response to a question by either repeating a classmates correct answer or answering the question him or herself in the target language. Visual clues may also be used. The teacher would then ask the question again to obtain an appropriate response from the student. Only after careful consideration would English be used. To ensure comprehension of the target language, the teacher frequently checks for understanding throughout the lesson. Input is modified through a variety of techniques (e.g. simplification, restating, adjusting the speed) to clarify meaning as needed. When learning another language, it is expected that students will make mistakes. Students will not understand everything the teacher is saying. Therefore, it is not always appropriate or necessary to immediately respond to a misunderstanding, particularly if this would disrupt the lesson.

T2 Explain Content

T3 Challenging Work

T4 Engagement Strategies

T5 Higher-Level Thinking Skills

T6 Check for Understanding

T7 Instructional Time

After a teacher employs the gradual release model of instruction (I do, we do, you do), if a majority of the class is observed making the same mistakes, it is appropriate to use whole-group interventions for clarification purposes. For smaller groups or individuals, one-on-one or small group clarification is best. Same as General Education Rubric

for Specialty Teachers: Health and Lifetime Wellness, Languages other than English (LOTE), ESL, Arts: Visual Art, Dance, Theatre, Orff Music, Instrumental/Vocal Music

TEM Rubric Notes Addendum

Below needs revisions for format consistency with other content. Evaluation Measurement Rubric Teach & CLE Look-Fors Health, Physical Education and Lifetime Wellness Rubric Notes
Indicator

Teacher Actions
Asking students to talk about objective
Classroom talk about the performance task 1. More student-talk than teacher-talk 2. Respectful, supportive and productive talk

T1
Objective-Driven Lessons

Said or seen objective(s) Lesson objectives should be stated in communicative terms that show what the student will be able to at the end of the lesson. For example, an objective should be stated, Students will be able to dribble a soccer ball between three sets of cones. Objectives should be clearly stated, posted (where possible) for the duration of the lesson, intentionally referred to throughout the lesson and used to assess learning throughout the lesson. Examples illustrating mastery based on objective (students will know and be able to) In addition to performance objectives, HPELW teachers share the psychomotor and nonpsychomotor learning activities with their students to help their students see connections between and among instructional activities and the daily performance objectives. This sequence is also posted for the duration of the lesson.

Teacher adjusts to explain concept 1. Teacher redirects lesson 2. Teacher provides examples and demonstrations (videos, peer, pictures) Clear explanation for student understanding
1. 2. When explaining content, it is expected that HPELW teachers explain in age-appropriate language. Learning expectations (What we will learn? How will we learn it? How will we know we have learned it? How will we use it? Posted, Understood or Partial). Performance condition & criteria are clear, measurable (i.e. how many times is mastery 3 out of 4 times) observable and developmentally appropriate for diverse learners. The purpose of the lesson relates to all 3 objectives of the lesson, is age appropriate and is linked to NASPE Standards. The lesson is structured logically Demonstrations are planned to show critical elements of the skills and organization of the activity. A reasonable number of cues (1-3) that are meaningful, action-oriented and appropriate are evident for each task. An attention getter is suitable in gaining learners attention. The stated purpose/objective, safety signals are considerate of the lesson and the learners. Content and tasks are presented concisely and clearly, emphasizing key elements

3.
1.

Precise specific academic language


2.

T2
Explain Content

Emphasizes key points


1. 2.

Developmentally appropriate language


1.

2. Cross-curricular connection or student interest/current events


There is evidence of Cross-Curricular Connection(s) Math Language Arts Social Studies Music World Languages 6. Other 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Teachers knows students level/needs and adjusts


1. 2. An accurate task analysis of each skill is used in the lesson and is described and demonstrated in detail. Engages students in learning by enabling all learners to participate through multiple modalities

T3
Challenging Work

Rigor for all


1. 2. All activities have the potential for maximum participation of learners and minimum wait time. The objective is written and explained in age-appropriate language and is linked to the NASP Standards.

for Specialty Teachers: Health and Lifetime Wellness, Languages other than English (LOTE), ESL, Arts: Visual Art, Dance, Theatre, Orff Music, Instrumental/Vocal Music 3. Lesson presentation is changed in response to observation of student performance and/or information
from formative assessment.

TEM Rubric Notes Addendum

Strategies/activities aligned to objective


Students are engaged in relevant, meaningful physical activity a minimum of 60 % of the instructional time. Stages of the gradual release model: 1. Introduction and Awareness 2. Modeling 3. Guided Practice 4. Independent Application

Activities are purposeful [not busy work]


Student engagement (After attendance has been taken, students engaged in activity 1. 100% 2. 75-99% 3. 50-74% 4. 25-49% 5. <25% Projected student engagement in moderate to vigorous activities Efficient use of class start time

T4
Engagement Strategies

Appropriate differentiation
1. 2. Content and activities are developmentally appropriate Appropriate accommodations or modifications are in place Accommodations Modifications Alternative Activity The teacher uses a variety of strategies to ensure the activity/skill is comprehensible to all learners. Some of these strategies (e.g. visuals, concrete objects and hands-on experiences) will be used during the lesson to ensure student comprehension. Students acquire new vocabulary within a meaningful context and through the use of products and practices. Therefore, the teacher should be observed using a variety of skill building activities to meet the needs of multiple learning/developmental styles to ensure that input is not only comprehensible but engaging for the students.

Balance between teacher-directed & student-centered learning


1.

2.

for Specialty Teachers: Health and Lifetime Wellness, Languages other than English (LOTE), ESL, Arts: Visual Art, Dance, Theatre, Orff Music, Instrumental/Vocal Music Teacher builds student knowledge
1. 2. Performance condition and criteria are clear, meaningful and appropriate for diverse populations. Meaningful content is followed in all activities with appropriate progression. Specific, meaningful and timely feedback is provided to students. Previous knowledge utilized and/or reviewed from prior lesson

TEM Rubric Notes Addendum

3.
4.

Analytical thinking
Problem solving or demonstrating creativity 1. Teacher allowed for individual problem solving 2. Teacher allows for group problem solving 3. Students create a game or task 4. Biochemical analysis of a skill

High level questioning (Why questions)


Classroom talk about the performance task 3. More student-talk than teacher-talk 4. Respectful, supportive and productive talk Questioning techniques 1. Multiple forms of questioning are used 2. Open 3. Closed 4. High 5. Low

T5
Higher-Level Thinking Skills

Teacher models thinking process 1. Teacher demonstration 2. Peer demonstration 3. Teacher probing for answers
4. 5. 6. Students will learn to develop patterns and combinations of movements using locomotor and nonlocomotor skills. Students will to learn to manipulate objects with a partner (throwing, catching, striking, and kicking . Teacher focuses student attention on decisions necessary for successful skill performance In the early years of learning a new language, students higherlevel understanding may be evident through their verbal rather than through their performance responses. It is also important for observers to understand that when students create in HPELW (e.g. accurate application of sport skills, rules and activities) this is functioning at the highest level of Blooms taxonomy. Repetitive movement and modified game situation allows for transfer of knowledge and internalization.

Lead student to own answers (doesnt provide answer)


1.

2.

3. Content is linked to and promotes the transfer of learning within physical education units and among
other subject content areas

Check for understanding and adjusts instruction


Performance feedback is provided to students 1. Specific 2. Meaningful 3. Timely

Helps student understand content w/o just re-explaining


1. 2. 3. Encourage questions and comments. Acknowledge difficult concepts and anticipate difficulties Provide a variety of examples

T6
Check for Understanding

Clarification of content when necessary


Check for Understanding: Open ended questions for learners are planned that clarify content lesson and management of activity.

Constant assessment
1. Checks for understanding will be in HPELW all levels. The teacher may be observed redirecting a student to a correct responses, psychomotor, non-psychomotor skills, to a question by either repeating the direction, a classmates correct answer or demonstration, or answering the question him/r herself. Visual and performance clues may also be used. The teacher would then ask the question again to obtain an appropriate response from the student.

for Specialty Teachers: Health and Lifetime Wellness, Languages other than English (LOTE), ESL, Arts: Visual Art, Dance, Theatre, Orff Music, Instrumental/Vocal Music
2. To ensure comprehension of the rules, directions or psychomotor expectations, the teacher frequently checks for understanding throughout the lesson. Input is modified through a variety of techniques (e.g. simplification, restating, adjusting the speed, modeling, manipulation, peer demonstration) to clarify meaning as needed. When learning a new skill, it is expected that students will make mistakes. Students will not understand everything the teacher is saying or perform demonstrated skills at the same level at the same time. Therefore, it is not always appropriate or necessary to immediately respond to a misunderstanding, particularly if this would disrupt the lesson. After a teacher employs the gradual release model of instruction (I do, we do, you do), if a majority of the class is observed making the same mistakes, it is appropriate to use whole-group interventions for clarification purposes. For smaller groups or individuals, one-on-one or small group clarification is best.

TEM Rubric Notes Addendum

3.

4.

5. Check for Understanding: Open ended questions for learners are planned that clarify content lesson
6. 7. and management of activity Performance feedback is provided to students Student performance strategies are used: Current and/or previous data posted Shared expectations by class Students personal goals Use of rubrics and performance assessments Focused on effort and improvement

Teacher materials/equipment ready


Distribution and collection of material and equipment is planned for throughout the lesson

Time management and pacing good


Time allotment for stating the lesson objective, transitions, activities and closure are evident and appropriate.

T7
Instructional Time

Good transitions
All transitions are written/or explained in dialogue form & effectively plan to move learners and material.

Good rapport and relationships knows students interests


Are students having fun yet?

Reinforces positive behavior


Appropriate behaviors are reinforced consistently

CLE1

Promotes work ethic and risk-taking Learning centered and safe environment
Students are actively monitored and closely supervised

Routines and procedures efficient


1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. Lesson pace is appropriate Students are actively monitored and supervised Teacher is circulating through the space Teacher is in front of class Teacher positions self for optimal view of students Teachers proximity is relevant to activity Students in one large group Students on spots Students in pairs Students in small groups (3-5) Class split into 2-4 groups (teams) Efficient use of transition, start time and student engagement Facilitate movement. Develop plans in advance for how students can best enter and exit the classroom

CLE2

Good transitions
1. 2.

Good use of instructional time


Time allotment for stating the lesson objective, transitions, activities, and closure are evident and appropriate.

Room/area is conducive to learning


Instructional area including materials and equipment are: 1. Safe 2. Orderly 3. Support learning activities 4. Makes students feel comfortable and want to

CLE3

for Specialty Teachers: Health and Lifetime Wellness, Languages other than English (LOTE), ESL, Arts: Visual Art, Dance, Theatre, Orff Music, Instrumental/Vocal Music
5. enter into a discussion or group situation. Use space outside of the classroom. School grounds can be a rich resource for learning, and they can serve as an enjoyable complement to crowded classrooms.

TEM Rubric Notes Addendum

There is room to move around the room


1. 2. Appropriate number and type of equipment is clearly stated and observed. Information from previous lesson shows progression. Description and diagram of space, equipment, learners and teacher is evident and useful.

Resources support activities


Identified and/or used appropriate resources and materials. (i.e. physical resources or human resources)

Materials use
1. 2. 3. Materials were shared by several students Materials were grade and age appropriate Materials used were in good working condition

Resources differentiated Appropriate accommodations or modifications are in place 1. Accommodations 2. Modifications 3. Alternative Activity 4. Not applicable

Resources available to all students


Adequate resources and supplies needed for instruction

Behavior expectations evident


High expectations for learning and behavior are evident Students understands and adhere to posted class rules

Teacher reinforces positively (warm fuzzies)


Knows students match names with faces. Conducts interactive getting to know you activities Catch them being good; praise them when they are not seeking attention and misbehaving. Off-task behavior redirected 1. Ignore the behavior when possible, giving the student positive attention during pleasant times. 2. Taught student to ask for attention (for instance, make notice me, please cards that they raise when they have a question). 3. Give students a stern eye (look), but do not speak. 4. Stand close by rather than far away (theres no need for attention-getting behaviors if you are standing next to them). 5. Teacher de-escalates disruptive behavior 1. 2. 3.

CLE4