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Beashua Spearman ABE Lesson Plan

Adapted from "Learning Activity Organizer," from Dean, G. J. (2002) Designing instruction for adult learners (2nd. ed.) Malabar, FL: Krieger.

Title Time Needed Subject Area Educational Functioning Level(s) Addressed Content Standards to be Addressed (Include state and specific standard.)

How to Vote Part I & Part II 2 class periods ABE Reading/ Reading Comprehension Skills Low-Intermediate Basic Education - 4 to 5.9; High-Intermediate Basic Education - 6 to 8.9 Oklahoma: Level 2: Read With Understanding A. Comprehension

2A1 Read texts for real-life purposes 2A3 Monitor and enhance comprehension by using simple strategies, perhaps one at a time

Description of Learning Activity (Include order and methods to be used to introduce content.)

See How to Vote PowerPoint Presentation Part I. Step One: Introduction How to Vote Part I: (10 minutes) {Show PowerPoint slide 1} A. Welcome and Introduction 1. Brief review of last weeks lesson and assignments. 2. Ask the class if they have any questions about last weeks assignments 3. Introduce this weeks assignment 4. Acknowledge there are two parts of this lesson and will be completed by next week. 5. Lesson example below: Welcome Class! Good morning/ afternoon/ evening, Today/ Tonight we are continuing to learn how to apply our reading skills to real-world situations such as how to vote, how to read and complete a voter registration form, how to read a voter registration card, and what is expected of a person to become a registered voter. This lesson will be taught in two parts, today/ tonight, we are focusing on voting, elections, the 4 voting requirements, we will define the key term candidate, shortly review the U.S. Constitution, view a short how to vote video, complete a short paper, discuss voting, and complete the assigned group assessment. Last week we learned how to apply our reading skills to learning traffic laws. This week our focus is shifting to learning how to vote in an election. The 2012 Presidential Elections are approaching soon and it would be beneficial for you all to understand the U.S. voting process. I. Step Two: How to Vote Part I: Lecture (15 minutes) - What is an 1

election? {Show PowerPoint slides 2-7} A. Lecture (Begin Lesson) 1. Question: Ask the class: What is voting? 2. Explain the U.S. Presidential election and the purpose 3. Define and explain the key term Voting 4. Explain the purpose of voting 5. Define and explain the key term Election 6. List and explain the 4 voting requirements 7. Define and explain the key term Candidate 8. Define and explain the key term U.S. Constitution 9. Explain the purpose of the U.S. Constitution 10. Lesson example below: The Presidential Election in the United States is a national event that is held every four years. Its purpose is to allow the American people to choose their presidential leader by voting at an election-polling place. Voting allows the American people to declare whom they want to serve as the U.S. President. It allows them to declare whom they want to serve in the U.S. congress as well as municipal, county, and state governments. In order to vote we must first understand the United States voting process. The key term vote is defined by Dictionary.com as a formal expression of opinion or choice. It is either positive or negative; it is made by an individual or a body of individuals. For example, if our class were selecting Thomas or Caleb our class president, the entire class would have a voice to choose which person is best for the job as our class president. (Dictionary.com, 2011). The key term election is defined by out textbook as an event in which people choose leaders by voting (Bernstein, 78). In the United States, Americans exercise their voting rights in an election to choose leaders to work together and effectively lead the country. There are 4 voting requirements American citizens must meet to vote in an election. 1. The first requirement is a person must be 18 years or older. 2. The second requirement is a person must be a U.S. citizen 3. The third requirement is a person must be a resident of a state (Each state may have residency requirements, which require resident to live in their state for a certain period. For example, Kelly loved to Oklahoma 5 months ago, but she must live in Oklahoma for a period of 6 months before she is allowed to register to vote.) 4. The final requirement is a person must register to vote within his or her state. The next key term is the word candidate, this is a person who is trying to win an election or become elected to a certain position within a government election (page 79). For example, in 2008, John McCain and Barack Obama were the 2008

presidential election candidates. The third key term is the U.S. Constitution. The candidate who receives the most votes in an election is considered the winner. It is important to vote in an election, do not think your vote does not count because every vote counts in an election! J We previously studied the U.S. Constitution; does anyone remember the purpose of this wonderful document? (Allow volunteers to answer the questionallow 1-3 minutes for the student to answer.) The U.S. Constitution, according to dictionary.com is a document created in 1787, it is a U.S. fundamental law created to define social and political problems. Its purpose is to create solutions for the social and political problems to help law official (leaders) to solve these problems. It serves as a protector that protects the rights of U.S. citizens, including their right to vote. For example, Marie is a U.S. citizen; her right to vote is protected by the U.S. Constitution regardless of her race, age, and gender. On the other hand, if a person goes to prison or has been to prison, he or she will lose their right to vote. A person is allowed to vote in the following elections: federal ( U.S. government), state, for example, the state of Arkansas or Oklahoma, and municipal (local), for example, Poteau, Ok or Fort Smith, Ar. During an election, it is very important to ensure each vote is counted (Bernstein, 78-79). III. Step Three: How to Vote Part I: 5 Minute Paper (5 minutes) Why is learning how to vote important to you? {Show PowerPoint slide 8} A. Instructions: 5 Minute Paper (5 minutes) Why is learning how to vote important to you? We will complete a 5 minute paper that will allow you to voice your opinion about why it is important for you to learn how to vote. You have received 5 minutes to write your opinions down on your paper. B. (After 5 minutes have passed, ask volunteers to read their paper aloud to the class.)

IV. Step Four: How to Vote Part I: Group Discussion (15 minutes) Video & Group discussion {Show PowerPoint slides 9-10} See Group discussion worksheet [The video is 3 minutes]--A. Instructions for teacher: Give each student a discussion handout with the questions before the video begins. B. Instructions for students: We will watch a video titled How to Vote, This video will explain the voting process and what you should expect at the voting poll place. Please answer the questions on your group discussion handout because we will discuss your answers after we have completed the video. [Allow 10 minutes for group discussion] C. Group Discussion: 1. Ask each question (on the handout), one at a time 2. Allow students to volunteer and share their answers 3. Discuss the importance of each question and how it may help voters remain organized. D. Each handout contains the following questions: 1. What are the 6 important items you need according to the How to Vote video? 2. Why is it important to have the correct documents when voting? 3

3. What are 2 documents you need to identify who you are at a voting booth and why? Part II. How to Vote Step One: Introduction (10 minutes) {Show PowerPoint slide 1} See How to Vote PowerPoint Presentation Part I. I. Step One: Introduction How to Vote Part II: (10 minutes) {Show PowerPoint slide 1} B. Welcome and Introduction 6. Brief review of last weeks lesson and assignments. 7. Ask the class if they have any questions about last weeks assignments 8. Introduce this weeks assignment 9. Acknowledge there are two parts of this lesson and will be completed by next week. 10. Lesson example below: Welcome Class! Good morning/ afternoon/ evening, Does anyone remember our topic from last week? {Allow student volunteers 2 minutes to answer the question and allow them 5 minutes to answer the question.} Last week we learned and discussed the topic of how to vote! This week we will complete our how to vote part II lesson! Today/Tonight, we will learn how to become a well-informed voter, how to register to vote, and how to vote in an election. We will learn how to complete a voter registration form, and discuss the importance of becoming a well-informed voter. B. Lecture (Begin Lesson) 1. Becoming a well-informed voter 2. Explain the difference between facts & opinions 3. Define and explain the key term Primary Election 4. Define and explain the key term Ballot 5. Define and explain the key term Election 6. List and explain the 4 voting requirements 7. Define and explain the key term Candidate 8. Define and explain the key term U.S. Constitution 9. Explain the purpose of the U.S. Constitution Lesson example below: II. Step Two: Lecture (15 minutes) How do we register to vote, what are political parties, and how can we become a well-informed voter? {Show PowerPoint slides 15-29} A. How do we register to vote? How do we register to vote? There are currently 49 states, which require voters to register, and each state has individual voting requirements that may require their residents to register in-person, online, or by mail (Bernstein, 80). There are some states that may allow their residents to register at public places such as a library, bank, schools, or a voter registration booth. To learn the voter registration rules in your state you can visit their voter registration website. The League of

Women voters are a wonderful organization for women of all ages to join or contact them for information about voter registration in your area. B. What are political parties? When you register to vote, you are asked which political party you would like to join. A political party is defined by Vivian Bernstein, author of our Life Skills Community & Government textbook as a large group of people who share similar social, economic, and political beliefs about government (Bernstein, 81). The political party works together to help their candidate become an elected government official. The two major political parties in the U.S. are the Democratic and Republican parties. They are the largest and oldest political parties in our nations history. There are twenty minor political parties but majority of U.S. citizens are members of the Democratic or Republican parties (Bernstein, 81). People who belong to political parties work hard to help their candidate win an election. Some people volunteer to help their political party with voter registrations, placing campaign signs, and answering the phones at their local partys office. A volunteer is a person who gives their time, energy, and skills to help without receiving pay. There is no joining fee or registration fee to join a political party. There is no fee to register to vote because it is a free service that is offered to all American citizens. Once you have registered, please remember that you need to update any personal information that may change, for example, contact your local voter registration office when you have a name change or address change. These are very important because it may affect you when you vote in an election. This helps the voting poll committees to ensure you know where to vote in your area and to ensure you receive necessary voting information. C. How can we become a well-informed voter? To become a well-informed voter, we must first learn about the various candidates within the election (Bernstein, 82). It is important for us to learn about the candidates morals, value, ideas, and work. We can use this information to decide whom we choose to vote for. For example, Candidate A wants to improve the economy, add new businesses that will create jobs and help the American economy grow. The key term campaign is a way a candidate can raise money and gather the support of his or her voters (Bernstein, 82). Where do we find information about a candidate? There are various ways to gather information about a candidate. For example, 1. Read the candidates website 2. Watch the news (ABC, CBS, NBC, MSNBC) 3. Listen to radio broadcasts 4. Attend town hall meetings 5. Read magazine articles which feature a candidate 6. Contact your local League of Women Voters 7. Contact your local Project Vote Smart Do not vote for a candidate based upon the persons appearance, race, or 5

gender. Do not vote for a candidate based upon the thoughts or ideas of your family and friends. You vote does count and it is important to vote for a candidate who shares your ideas. Once you have gathered your desired information about a candidate you must wade through the facts and opinions about that person. The key term fact is defined by our textbook as information that has been researched by experience or an observation (Bernstein, 82). For example, a German shepherd is a dog. We know this is a fact because a German shepherd is a dog. An opinion is a belief, judgment, or statement that has not been researched (Bernstein, 82). For example, the German shepherd is the best dogs a man or woman can befriend! We can attest this statement is an opinion to be a well-informed voter; we must remain attentive to campaign ads. This means we need to express caution because some of the campaign ads are opinions (Bernstein, 83). When we take the time to learn the facts about a candidate, we become a well-informed voter (Bernstein, 78-79). D. Primary Elections To vote in a primary election, you must first belong to a political party in your area. A primary election allows you to vote for the person who wants to be the main candidate of a political party (Bernstein, 82). For example, Candidate A and Candidate B are members of the Democratic party, Candidate A and B want to be the main candidate, but it is up to the voters to choose which person will represent the Democratic party (Bernstein, 82). III. Step Three: Group Discussion (15 minutes) How to Vote Video & Group discussion { A. Show PowerPoint slides 21-25}

B. See Group discussion worksheet C. [The video is 3 minutes]--D. [Give each student a discussion handout with the questions before the video
begins.] E. Instructions: We will watch a video titled How to Vote, after we have completed the video I want you to think of the following questions: [Allow 10 minutes for group discussion] 4. What are the 6 important items you need according to the How to Vote video? 5. Why is it important to have the correct documents when voting? 6. What are 2 documents you need to identify who you are at a voting booth and why?

Evaluation or Assessment Procedure(s)

V. Step Five: Group Assessment (10 minutes): How to Vote Part I: Worksheet {Show PowerPoint slide 11} A. Instructions for the teacher: 1. Assign students the How to Vote Part I worksheet. This worksheet contains vocabulary and comprehension skill exercises, which allow the instructor to assess the students strength and skills in vocabulary and comprehension skills.

2. Before the instructor can begin, he or she should pre-assign students to groups of three students and assign each student a number to complete within the assessment. 3. The students will collaborate to complete the assignment, it is best to assign students who are struggling with students who are not struggling. IV. Step Five: Group Assessment (10 minutes): How to Vote II Worksheet {Show PowerPoint slide 11} 1. Assign students the How to Vote Part II worksheet. 2. This worksheet contains vocabulary and comprehension skill exercises, which allow the instructor to assess the students strength and skills in vocabulary and comprehension skills. 3. 3. Before the instructor can begin, he or she should pre-assign students to groups of three students and assign each student a number to complete within the assessment. The students will collaborate to complete the assignment, it is best to assign students who are struggling with students who are not struggling. See How to Vote Worksheet How to Vote Worksheet Part II Worksheet Jane Sample Worksheet Part II Worksheet 2

Reflection and Closure (Describe methods to link this activity to previous knowledge.)

VI. Step Six: Reflection & Closure (15 minutes): Review & Close the Lesson {Show PowerPoint slide 12-14}
A. Reflection: Today, we learned how to vote, we learned the key term vote is a positive or negative action or choice made by an individual or a body of individuals. We learned the purpose of an election is to allow voters to cast their vote for their preferred candidate. 1. We learned the 4 voting requirements {Ask students: Can anyone list the 4 voting requirements please? 2. Allow 2 minutes for students to, think and 2 minutes to volunteer answer to the question.} 3. We learned the key term candidate is a person who works hard to become an elected official to represent our views and concerns in a government position. We discussed the 6 important items we need when voting, why it is important to have the correct documents, and some of the accepted documents we may identify ourselves with when voting. B. Questions: Are there any questions about todays lesson or assignments? Now is the time to ask questions about todays lesson or assignments! J C. Closure: Next week we shall continue our lesson with How to Vote 1. Encourage students and Compliment them on a great job. 2. I appreciate your attentiveness and your willingness to learn today/tonight!

3. You all did a great job and I am very proud of each of you! See you all next week!

Part II: How to Vote


V. VI.

Step Six: Reflection & Closure (15 minutes): Review & Close the Lesson
A. {Show PowerPoint slide 12-14} 1. Reflection: Today, we learned how to vote, we learned the key term vote is a positive or negative action or choice made by an individual or a body of individuals. We learned the purpose of an election is to allow voters to cast their vote for their preferred candidate. We learned the 4 voting requirements {Ask students: Can anyone list the 4 voting requirements please? - Allow 2 minutes for students to, think and 2 minutes to volunteer answer to the question.}

We learned the key term candidate is a person who works hard to become an elected official to represent our views and concerns in a government position. We discussed the 6 important items we need when voting, why it is important to have the correct documents, and some of the accepted documents we may identify ourselves with when voting. 2. Questions: Does anyone have any questions about todays lesson or assignments? Now is the time to ask questions about todays lesson or assignments! J 3. Closure: Next week we shall continue our lesson with How to Vote part II. {Encourage students and Compliment them on a great job.} I appreciate your attentiveness and your willingness to learn today/tonight! You all did a great job and I am very proud of each of you! See you all next week!

Technology, Equipment, Materials and Facilitates Needed Adaptations or Accommodations for Students with Learning Disabilities or Differences

This applies to both lessons: Laptop or desktop computer, Microsoft PowerPoint, High Speed Internet, Projector, Projector Screen, Life Skills for Todays World: Community & Government Workbook- by Vivian Bernstein 1. Students with ADHD, ADD, and Dyslexia will receive an alternate classroom setting that is created for private learning, testing, and is clear of any interruptions and distractions of other students. Classroom behavior rules and guidelines will be enforced but positive behavior will be rewarded. Students will Dyslexia will receive additional help: for example, he or she may receive additional help from a strong reading student during group assessments. Additional time will be given to the student to ensure he or she completes the assignment.

2. Students with Dyslexia, Dysgraphia, Dyscalculia, and other learning disabilities will receive additional time to complete their evaluation/assessment, and assignments. These students will be paired with students who are strong in reading, math, and writing to encourage a positive learning atmosphere. Assistive Technology such as audio books, word prediction, electronic dictionaries, or spell check will be allowed. 3. Students who are visually impaired will receive assistive technology such as a large print text, screen reader, tape recorder (to record the lesson), or a Braille text reader; students who are verbally impaired will receive extra time and the instructor will repeat instructions that are not clear to the student. Students who are hearing impaired will receive a note taker and a sign language interpreter.

Notes and Comments

Notes: References Bernstein, V. (1994). Life Skills for Todays World: Community & Government. (pp. 76-84). Austin, TX: Steck-Vaughn Company. Brady, M. & Lampert, A. (2007). A Handbook for Teachers of Adult Learners (2nd ed.) (pp 63-75). Old Orchard Beach, ME: New Teacher Concepts. Literacy & Learning Disabilities (2006). Adaptations, Accommodations, and Technology. Retrieved June 23, 2012 from http://ldlink.coe.utk.edu/adaptations.htm#what How Cast. (2008, September 18). How to Vote [Video File]. Retrieved June 23, 2012 from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v/AQbr2Y4YUAc Williamson County Elections, 2011. (2011, February 10). How to Register to Vote [Video File]. Retrieved from http://youtube/VVHc2naeR88