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DESIGNER'S REFERENCE HANDBOOK

Automatic Genset Controller, AGC-4


Functional description Display unit and menu structure PID-controller Procedure for parameter setup Parameter list

DEIF A/S Frisenborgvej 33 DK-7800 Skive Tel.: +45 9614 9614 Fax: +45 9614 9615 info@deif.com www.deif.com

isenborgvej 33 DK-7800 Skive Tel.: +45 9614 9614 Fax: +45 9614 9615 info@deif.com www.deif.com 14 9614 Fax: +45 9614 9615 info@deif.com www.deif.com

Document no.: 4189340686A SW version: 4.0x.x or later

AGC-4 manual, November 2011, UK

1. General information
1.1. Warnings, legal information and safety................................................................................................13 1.1.1. Warnings and notes ....................................................................................................................13 1.1.2. Legal information and disclaimer ................................................................................................13 1.1.3. Safety issues ..............................................................................................................................13 1.1.4. Electrostatic discharge awareness .............................................................................................13 1.1.5. Factory settings ..........................................................................................................................13 1.2. About the Designer's Reference Handbook.........................................................................................14 1.2.1. General purpose .........................................................................................................................14 1.2.2. Intended users ............................................................................................................................14 1.2.3. Contents and overall structure ....................................................................................................14

2. General product information


2.1. Introduction...........................................................................................................................................15 2.2. Type of product....................................................................................................................................15 2.3. Options.................................................................................................................................................15 2.4. PC utility software warning...................................................................................................................15

3. Functional descriptions
3.1. Standard functions...............................................................................................................................16 3.1.1. Operation modes.........................................................................................................................16 3.1.2. Engine control..............................................................................................................................16 3.1.3. Generator protection (ANSI)........................................................................................................16 3.1.4. Busbar protection (ANSI).............................................................................................................16 3.1.5. Display.........................................................................................................................................16 3.1.6. M-Logic........................................................................................................................................16 3.2. Terminal strip overview........................................................................................................................17 3.2.1. Slot #1, #2, #5 and #6..................................................................................................................18 3.2.2. Slot #3, #4, #7 and #8..................................................................................................................19 3.3. Applications..........................................................................................................................................20 3.3.1. Applications and genset modes...................................................................................................20 3.3.2. AMF (no back synchronisation)...................................................................................................20 3.3.3. AMF (with back synchronisation).................................................................................................21 3.3.4. Island operation...........................................................................................................................22 3.3.5. Fixed power/base load.................................................................................................................22 3.3.6. Ramp up with load steps.............................................................................................................23 3.3.7. Freeze power ramp......................................................................................................................23 3.3.8. Peak shaving...............................................................................................................................24 3.3.9. Load takeover..............................................................................................................................26 3.3.10. Mains power export (fixed power to mains)...............................................................................27 3.4. Running mode description....................................................................................................................28 3.4.1. Semi-auto mode..........................................................................................................................28 3.4.2. Test mode....................................................................................................................................29 3.4.3. Simple test...................................................................................................................................30 3.4.4. Load test......................................................................................................................................30 3.4.5. Full test........................................................................................................................................30 3.4.6. Manual mode...............................................................................................................................30 3.4.7. Block mode..................................................................................................................................31 3.5. Single-line diagrams.............................................................................................................................32 3.5.1. Application illustration .................................................................................................................32 3.5.2. Automatic Mains Failure..............................................................................................................32 3.5.3. Island operation...........................................................................................................................32 3.5.4. Fixed power/base load.................................................................................................................33 3.5.5. Peak shaving...............................................................................................................................33 3.5.6. Load takeover..............................................................................................................................34 3.5.7. Mains power export.....................................................................................................................34 3.5.8. Multiple gensets, load sharing (option G3 required)....................................................................35 3.5.9. Multiple gensets, power management (option G5 required)........................................................35

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3.6. Flowcharts............................................................................................................................................39 3.6.1. Mode shift....................................................................................................................................40 3.6.2. MB open sequence......................................................................................................................41 3.6.3. GB open sequence......................................................................................................................42 3.6.4. Stop sequence.............................................................................................................................43 3.6.5. Start sequence.............................................................................................................................44 3.6.6. MB close sequence.....................................................................................................................45 3.6.7. GB close sequence......................................................................................................................46 3.6.8. Fixed power.................................................................................................................................47 3.6.9. Load takeover..............................................................................................................................48 3.6.10. Island operation.........................................................................................................................49 3.6.11. Peak shaving.............................................................................................................................50 3.6.12. Mains power export...................................................................................................................51 3.6.13. Automatic Mains Failure............................................................................................................52 3.6.14. Test sequence...........................................................................................................................53 3.7. Sequences...........................................................................................................................................54 3.7.1. Start sequence.............................................................................................................................54 3.7.2. Start sequence conditions...........................................................................................................56 3.7.3. Running feedback........................................................................................................................57 3.7.4. Stop sequence.............................................................................................................................60 3.7.5. Breaker sequences......................................................................................................................62 3.7.6. AMF timers..................................................................................................................................63

4. Display unit and menu structure


4.1. Presentation.........................................................................................................................................65 4.2. Display unit (DU-2)...............................................................................................................................65 4.2.1. Push-button functions..................................................................................................................65 4.2.2. LED functions..............................................................................................................................66 4.3. Menu structure.....................................................................................................................................67 4.3.1. Entry window...............................................................................................................................67 4.3.2. View menu...................................................................................................................................68 4.3.3. Setup menu.................................................................................................................................69 4.4. Mode overview.....................................................................................................................................72 4.5. Mode selection.....................................................................................................................................73 4.6. Password..............................................................................................................................................74 4.6.1. Parameter access........................................................................................................................76

5. Additional functions
5.1. Start functions......................................................................................................................................77 5.1.1. Digital feedbacks.........................................................................................................................77 5.1.2. Analogue tacho feedback............................................................................................................78 5.1.3. Oil pressure.................................................................................................................................79 5.2. Breaker types.......................................................................................................................................80 5.3. Breaker spring load time......................................................................................................................81 5.3.1. Principle.......................................................................................................................................82 5.4. Alarm inhibit..........................................................................................................................................83 5.4.1. Run status (6160)........................................................................................................................85 5.5. Access lock..........................................................................................................................................85 5.6. Overlap.................................................................................................................................................87 5.7. Digital mains breaker control................................................................................................................88 5.8. Command timers..................................................................................................................................89 5.9. Running output.....................................................................................................................................89 5.10. Frequency-dependent droop..............................................................................................................90 5.11. Power and cos phi offsets..................................................................................................................92 5.11.1. Power offsets.............................................................................................................................92 5.11.2. Cos phi offsets...........................................................................................................................92 5.12. Derate genset.....................................................................................................................................92 5.12.1. Input selection............................................................................................................................92 5.12.2. Derate parameters.....................................................................................................................93

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5.12.3. Derate characteristic..................................................................................................................93 5.13. Idle running.........................................................................................................................................94 5.13.1. Description.................................................................................................................................94 5.13.2. Examples...................................................................................................................................95 5.13.3. Configuration of digital input......................................................................................................96 5.13.4. Inhibit.........................................................................................................................................97 5.13.5. Running signal...........................................................................................................................97 5.13.6. Idle speed flowcharts.................................................................................................................97 5.13.7. Start...........................................................................................................................................98 5.13.8. Stop...........................................................................................................................................99 5.14. Engine heater.....................................................................................................................................99 5.14.1. Engine heater alarm................................................................................................................100 5.15. Master clock.....................................................................................................................................100 5.15.1. Compensation time..................................................................................................................101 5.16. Battery test.......................................................................................................................................101 5.16.1. Input configuration...................................................................................................................102 5.16.2. Auto configuration....................................................................................................................102 5.16.3. Battery asymmetry (6430 Batt. asymmetry)............................................................................103 5.17. Ventilation.........................................................................................................................................105 5.17.1. Max. ventilation alarm..............................................................................................................106 5.18. Summer/winter time.........................................................................................................................106 5.19. Switchboard error.............................................................................................................................106 5.19.1. Block swbd error (menu 6500).................................................................................................106 5.19.2. Stop swbd error (menu 6510)..................................................................................................107 5.20. Not in auto........................................................................................................................................107 5.21. Fuel pump logic................................................................................................................................107 5.21.1. Fuel fill check...........................................................................................................................108 5.22. Fail class..........................................................................................................................................109 5.22.1. Engine running.........................................................................................................................109 5.22.2. Engine stopped........................................................................................................................110 5.22.3. Fail class configuration............................................................................................................110 5.23. Trip of non-essential load (NEL).......................................................................................................111 5.24. Service timers...................................................................................................................................111 5.25. Wire fail detection.............................................................................................................................112 5.26. Digital inputs.....................................................................................................................................114 5.26.1. Functional description..............................................................................................................115 5.27. Outputs.............................................................................................................................................120 5.27.1. Functional description..............................................................................................................120 5.28. Multi-inputs.......................................................................................................................................120 5.28.1. 4-20 mA...................................................................................................................................121 5.28.2. 0-40V DC.................................................................................................................................121 5.28.3. Pt100/1000..............................................................................................................................121 5.28.4. VDO inputs..............................................................................................................................121 5.28.5. VDO oil....................................................................................................................................122 5.28.6. VDO water...............................................................................................................................122 5.28.7. VDO fuel..................................................................................................................................123 5.28.8. Illustration of configurable inputs.............................................................................................124 5.28.9. Configuration...........................................................................................................................125 5.28.10. Digital.....................................................................................................................................125 5.29. Manual governor and AVR control...................................................................................................125 5.29.1. Manual mode...........................................................................................................................125 5.29.2. Semi-auto mode......................................................................................................................125 5.29.3. Auto and test mode..................................................................................................................126 5.30. Input function selection.....................................................................................................................126 5.31. Language selection..........................................................................................................................127 5.32. Texts in status line............................................................................................................................127 5.32.1. Standard texts..........................................................................................................................128 5.32.2. Texts only related to power management (option G5).............................................................131 5.33. Service menu...................................................................................................................................132

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5.34. Event log..........................................................................................................................................133 5.34.1. Display.....................................................................................................................................133 5.35. Counters...........................................................................................................................................133 5.36. Pulse input counters.........................................................................................................................134 5.37. kWh/kVArh counters.........................................................................................................................134 5.38. Quick setup......................................................................................................................................135 5.39. Parameter ID....................................................................................................................................136 5.40. M-Logic.............................................................................................................................................136 5.41. GSM communication........................................................................................................................137 5.42. USW communication........................................................................................................................138 5.43. Nominal settings...............................................................................................................................138 5.44. Step-up transformer.........................................................................................................................140 5.44.1. Applications.............................................................................................................................140 5.45. Demand of peak currents.................................................................................................................141 5.45.1. I thermal demand.....................................................................................................................141 5.45.2. I max. demand.........................................................................................................................142 5.46. Fan logic...........................................................................................................................................142 5.46.1. Fan parameters.......................................................................................................................143 5.46.2. Input for fan control..................................................................................................................143 5.46.3. Fan start/stop...........................................................................................................................144 5.46.4. Fan output................................................................................................................................144 5.46.5. Fan start delay.........................................................................................................................145 5.46.6. Fan failure................................................................................................................................145 5.46.7. Fan priority (running hours).....................................................................................................146 5.46.8. Fan priority update...................................................................................................................147 5.47. Oil renewal function..........................................................................................................................147 5.48. Differential measurement.................................................................................................................148

6. Protections
6.1. General...............................................................................................................................................150 6.2. Voltage-dependent (restraint) overcurrent.........................................................................................151

7. PID controller
7.1. Description of PID controller...............................................................................................................153 7.2. Controllers..........................................................................................................................................153 7.3. Principle drawing................................................................................................................................154 7.4. Proportional regulator.........................................................................................................................154 7.4.1. Speed range..............................................................................................................................155 7.4.2. Dynamic regulation area............................................................................................................155 7.4.3. Integral regulator........................................................................................................................156 7.4.4. Differential regulator..................................................................................................................156 7.5. Load share controller..........................................................................................................................158 7.6. Synchronising controller.....................................................................................................................158 7.7. Relay control......................................................................................................................................158 7.7.1. Relay adjustments.....................................................................................................................160 7.7.2. Signal length..............................................................................................................................160

8. Synchronisation
8.1. Synchronisation principles..................................................................................................................162 8.2. Dynamic synchronisation...................................................................................................................162 8.2.1. Close signal...............................................................................................................................163 8.2.2. Load picture after synchronising................................................................................................163 8.2.3. Adjustments...............................................................................................................................164 8.3. Static synchronisation........................................................................................................................165 8.3.1. Phase controller.........................................................................................................................165 8.3.2. Close signal...............................................................................................................................166 8.3.3. Load picture after synchronisation.............................................................................................166 8.3.4. Adjustments...............................................................................................................................166 8.4. GB closing before excitation...............................................................................................................167

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8.4.1. Flowchart 1, GB handling..........................................................................................................169 8.4.2. Flowchart 2, TB handling (option G5)........................................................................................170 8.4.3. Genset start actions...................................................................................................................171 8.4.4. Breaker sequence......................................................................................................................171 8.4.5. "Close before excitation" failure.................................................................................................172 8.5. Separate synchronising relay.............................................................................................................172

9. Parameter list
9.1. Related parameters............................................................................................................................174

10. Voltage/VAr/PF control


10.1. Description of option, ANSI numbers...............................................................................................175 10.2. Description of option, Option D1......................................................................................................175 10.3. Functional description, Running mode selection, AGC/PPM...........................................................175 10.3.1. Automatic selection..................................................................................................................175 10.3.2. Manual selection......................................................................................................................176 10.3.3. Input selection..........................................................................................................................176 10.4. Functional description, Regulation mode selecetion, GPC/PPU......................................................176 10.4.1. Input selection..........................................................................................................................177 10.4.2. Regulators...............................................................................................................................178 10.4.3. External setpoint......................................................................................................................178 10.4.4. AVR mode undefined (menu 2750).........................................................................................178 10.5. Functional description, Regulation mode selection, GPU................................................................178 10.6. Functional description, AVR regulation failure.................................................................................179 10.7. Functional description, Manual AVR control....................................................................................179 10.8. Functional description, Voltage-dependent PF/Q control (y2(x2) droop..........................................179 10.9. Parameters, Further information......................................................................................................181

11. Load sharing


11.1. Description of option, ANSI numbers...............................................................................................182 11.2. Description of option, Option G3......................................................................................................182 11.2.1. AGC.........................................................................................................................................182 11.3. Description of option, Terminal description......................................................................................182 11.4. Functional description, Load sharing................................................................................................182 11.4.1. Working principle.....................................................................................................................183 11.5. Functional description, Island ramp up with load steps....................................................................185 11.6. Functional description, Freeze power ramp.....................................................................................185 11.7. Functional description, External analogue setpoints........................................................................186 11.8. Functional description, Load sharing type........................................................................................186 11.8.1. Load sharing modules.............................................................................................................187 11.8.2. Selco T4800 load sharer..........................................................................................................187 11.8.3. Cummins PCC 3100................................................................................................................187 11.9. Parameters, Further information......................................................................................................189

12. Power management


12.1. Description of options, ANSI numbers.............................................................................................190 12.2. Description of options, Options G4, G5 and G8...............................................................................190 12.3. Description of options, Terminal description....................................................................................192 12.4. Description of options, Breaker feedbacks.......................................................................................193 12.4.1. Generator breaker...................................................................................................................193 12.4.2. Mains breaker (MB) feedback..................................................................................................193 12.4.3. Tie breaker (TB).......................................................................................................................193 12.5. Description of options, Wiring diagram.............................................................................................194 12.6. Functional description, Power management functions.....................................................................194 12.7. Functional description, Terminal strip overview...............................................................................196 12.7.1. AGC generator unit..................................................................................................................196 12.7.2. AGC mains unit........................................................................................................................198 12.7.3. AGC bus tie unit.......................................................................................................................200 12.8. Functional description, Applications.................................................................................................202

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12.8.1. Island operation plant..............................................................................................................203 12.8.2. Parallel with mains plant..........................................................................................................204 12.8.3. Dual mains plant......................................................................................................................205 12.8.4. ATS plant.................................................................................................................................206 12.8.5. ATS plant, multiple start...........................................................................................................206 12.8.6. ATS plant, mains unit...............................................................................................................207 12.8.7. Multiple mains..........................................................................................................................207 12.9. Display units, DU for option G5........................................................................................................208 12.10. Display units, Generator unit display..............................................................................................208 12.11. Display units, Mains unit display....................................................................................................208 12.12. Display units, BTB unit display.......................................................................................................209 12.13. Power management setup, Initial power management setup........................................................209 12.13.1. Display setup.........................................................................................................................209 12.13.2. PC software setup.................................................................................................................209 12.13.3. Application design..................................................................................................................210 12.14. Power management setup, Remove unit from PM.........................................................................212 12.14.1. Auxiliary supply OFF..............................................................................................................212 12.14.2. Quick setup............................................................................................................................213 12.14.3. Auxiliary supply ON...............................................................................................................213 12.15. Power management setup, CANbus failure handling.....................................................................213 12.15.1. CAN failure mode..................................................................................................................213 12.15.2. Redundant CANbus communication......................................................................................215 12.15.3. CANbus alarms......................................................................................................................215 12.15.4. CANbus fail class...................................................................................................................216 12.16. Power management setup, Quick setup........................................................................................216 12.16.1. Limitations..............................................................................................................................217 12.17. Power management setup, 9180 Quick setup...............................................................................218 12.17.1. 9190 Application broadcast...................................................................................................219 12.18. Power management functions, Command unit..............................................................................220 12.19. Power management functions, Load-dependent starting and stopping.........................................220 12.19.1. Terminology...........................................................................................................................221 12.19.2. Principle available power method.......................................................................................223 12.19.3. Principle percentage method..............................................................................................223 12.19.4. Adjusting load-dependent start..............................................................................................224 12.19.5. Adjusting load-dependent stop..............................................................................................225 12.19.6. Power window........................................................................................................................226 12.20. Power management functions, Load management........................................................................226 12.20.1. Functionality description (refer to the diagram below)...........................................................227 12.21. Power management functions, Load sharing.................................................................................228 12.22. Power management functions, Island ramp up with load steps.....................................................229 12.23. Power management functions, Fixed power ramp up with load steps...........................................229 12.24. Power management functions, freeze power ramp........................................................................230 12.25. Power management functions, ATS applications...........................................................................230 12.25.1. AGC mains installed..............................................................................................................230 12.25.2. ATS island mode...................................................................................................................231 12.26. Power management functions, Fail class.......................................................................................231 12.27. Power management functions, Local/remote/timer operation........................................................231 12.27.1. Local selection.......................................................................................................................232 12.27.2. Remote selection...................................................................................................................232 12.27.3. Plant operation.......................................................................................................................232 12.27.4. Timer selection......................................................................................................................233 12.27.5. Principle.................................................................................................................................233 12.28. Power management functions, Multi-starting gensets....................................................................234 12.28.1. Multi-start configuration.........................................................................................................234 12.28.2. Numbers to start....................................................................................................................235 12.28.3. Minimum numbers running....................................................................................................235 12.29. Power management functions, Priority selection...........................................................................236 12.29.1. Manual...................................................................................................................................236 12.29.2. Running hours.......................................................................................................................238

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12.29.3. Fuel optimisation....................................................................................................................239 12.30. Power management functions, Conditional connection of heavy consumers................................242 12.30.1. Power feedback from the heavy consumer...........................................................................243 12.30.2. Engagement sequence for HCs with fixed load.....................................................................244 12.31. Power management functions, Ground relay.................................................................................244 12.32. Power management functions, Stop of non-connected gensets....................................................245 12.33. Power management functions, Secured mode..............................................................................245 12.34. Power management functions, Base load......................................................................................245 12.35. Power management functions, Asymmetric load sharing (LS).......................................................246 12.36. Power management functions, Tie breaker configuration..............................................................246 12.36.1. Tie breaker selection.............................................................................................................246 12.36.2. Tie breaker control.................................................................................................................247 12.36.3. Tie breaker open point...........................................................................................................247 12.36.4. Power capacity......................................................................................................................247 12.37. Power management functions, Island application with TB.............................................................248 12.38. Power management functions, Multiple mains...............................................................................249 12.38.1. Definitions..............................................................................................................................250 12.38.2. Configuration.........................................................................................................................252 12.38.3. Plant mode handling..............................................................................................................253 12.39. Power management functions, Dual mains....................................................................................254 12.39.1. Configuration.........................................................................................................................255 12.39.2. Plant mode handling..............................................................................................................256 12.39.3. Internal CAN ID......................................................................................................................258 12.39.4. AGC mains unit redundancy..................................................................................................258 12.39.5. Tie breaker configuration.......................................................................................................259 12.40. Power management functions, Configurable CAN IDs..................................................................260 12.41. Power management functions, CAN flags......................................................................................260 12.42. Power management functions, Common PF control......................................................................261 12.43. Parameter lists, Common settings.................................................................................................262

13. Plant management


13.1. Description of option, Option G7......................................................................................................263 13.2. Functional description, Plant management......................................................................................263 13.2.1. Unit definitions.........................................................................................................................264 13.2.2. Applications.............................................................................................................................265 13.3. Functional description, Plant mode descriptions..............................................................................269 13.4. Functional description, Plant management functions.......................................................................273 13.4.1. Group controller start and stop................................................................................................273 13.4.2. Power reference scaling..........................................................................................................274 13.4.3. Cos phi-controlled export.........................................................................................................274 13.4.4. Voltage support........................................................................................................................277 13.4.5. Priority routine, load profile......................................................................................................281 13.4.6. Offset of setpoints....................................................................................................................284 13.4.7. Asymmetrical load sharing.......................................................................................................286 13.5. Functional description, Plant management toolbox..........................................................................287 13.5.1. CAN flags.................................................................................................................................287 13.5.2. Common settings.....................................................................................................................291 13.5.3. Modbus addresses..................................................................................................................293 13.5.4. AOP design..............................................................................................................................294 13.6. Parameters, Further information......................................................................................................296 13.7. Appendix, Operating settings...........................................................................................................296 13.7.1. Fixed power operation.............................................................................................................296 13.7.2. AMF operation.........................................................................................................................298 13.7.3. Island mode operation with plant unit......................................................................................299 13.7.4. Island mode operation without plant unit.................................................................................301 13.7.5. Load takeover mode................................................................................................................303 13.7.6. Mains power export mode.......................................................................................................304 13.7.7. Peak shaving mode.................................................................................................................306

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14. Analogue controller and transducer outputs


14.1. Description of option, ANSI numbers...............................................................................................308 14.2. Description of option, Option EF6....................................................................................................308 14.2.1. Terminal description................................................................................................................308 14.3. Functional description, Analogue outputs........................................................................................308 14.4. Functional description, Duty cycle....................................................................................................309 14.4.1. Principle of duty cycles............................................................................................................309 14.5. Functional description, Analogue controller offset............................................................................310 14.6. Functional description, Output limits................................................................................................311 14.7. Parameters, further information........................................................................................................312

15. Configurable I/O extension cards, four 4-20 mA inputs


15.1. Description of option, Option M15.x.................................................................................................313 15.1.1. Terminal description, M15.6....................................................................................................313 15.1.2. Terminal description, M15.8....................................................................................................313 15.2. Functional description, Analogue input configuration.......................................................................313 15.3. Functional description, Inverse proportional.....................................................................................314 15.4. Functional description, PC utility software........................................................................................315 15.5. Functional description, Wire failure detection...................................................................................315 15.5.1. Principle...................................................................................................................................315 15.6. Parameters, Further information......................................................................................................316

16. Configurable I/O extension cards, 13 binary inputs, 4 relay outputs


16.1. Description of option, Option M12....................................................................................................317 16.2. Description of option, ANSI numbers...............................................................................................317 16.3. Description of option, Terminal descriptions....................................................................................318 16.3.1. Terminal description, AGC.......................................................................................................318 16.3.2. Terminal description, GPU/GPU Hydro...................................................................................319 16.4. Functional description, Digital inputs................................................................................................319 16.5. Functional description, Protection/alarm inputs................................................................................320 16.5.1. Function input..........................................................................................................................320 16.6. Functional description, Relay setup.................................................................................................321 16.7. Functional description, External analogue setpoints........................................................................321 16.7.1. AGC.........................................................................................................................................321 16.8. Parameters, Further information......................................................................................................322

17. Ethernet hardware


17.1. Description of option, Hardware.......................................................................................................323 17.2. Description of option, Option N configuration software....................................................................323 17.3. Network configuration of the option N board, Network settings.......................................................324 17.4. Network configuration of the option N board, Option N board setup................................................325 17.4.1. Modifying the network configuration from the option N configuration software.......................326 17.5. TCP/IP Modbus communication, Further information......................................................................328 17.6. SMS or e-mail alarms transfer..........................................................................................................329 17.7. SMS or e-mail alarms transfer, SMS or e-mail alarms configuration...............................................330 17.8. SMS or e-mail alarms transfer, Received message format..............................................................336 17.8.1. Alarm transfer function selection from the option N configuration software............................337 17.9. Option N firmware upgrade..............................................................................................................338 17.9.1. Obtain the option N firmware from DEIF..................................................................................338 17.9.2. How to write the option N firmware..........................................................................................340 17.10. Parameters, further information......................................................................................................342

18. Additional display and operator's panel


18.1. Description of option, Option X2.......................................................................................................343 18.1.1. Rear side view.........................................................................................................................343 18.1.2. Connectors..............................................................................................................................343 18.2. Description of option, Option X3.......................................................................................................343 18.2.1. Rear side view.........................................................................................................................344

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18.2.2. Connectors..............................................................................................................................344 18.3. Description of option, Option X4.......................................................................................................344 18.3.1. Rear side view.........................................................................................................................344 18.3.2. Connectors..............................................................................................................................344 18.4. Functional description, Additional displays and operator's panels...................................................344 18.5. Functional description, Display unit - DU-2......................................................................................346 18.5.1. Wiring.......................................................................................................................................346 18.5.2. End resistor..............................................................................................................................347 18.5.3. CAN ID configuration...............................................................................................................347 18.5.4. Protocol selection....................................................................................................................347 18.6. Functional description, Additional operator's panel - AOP-1............................................................348 18.6.1. Front side view.........................................................................................................................348 18.6.2. Wiring.......................................................................................................................................348 18.6.3. CAN ID configuration...............................................................................................................348 18.6.4. Programming...........................................................................................................................348 18.7. Functional description, Additional operator's panel - AOP-2............................................................349 18.7.1. Front side view.........................................................................................................................349 18.7.2. Wiring.......................................................................................................................................350 18.7.3. End resistor..............................................................................................................................351 18.7.4. CAN ID configuration...............................................................................................................351 18.7.5. Status relay..............................................................................................................................351 18.7.6. Programming...........................................................................................................................351 18.7.7. Lamp test/dimmer....................................................................................................................351 18.8. Functional description, Error handling..............................................................................................351 18.8.1. Duplicate CAN ID.....................................................................................................................351

19. Installation instructions


19.1. General product information, AGC-3 product information................................................................353 19.1.1. Introduction..............................................................................................................................353 19.1.2. Type of product........................................................................................................................353 19.1.3. Options....................................................................................................................................353 19.2. General product information, Standard functions.............................................................................353 19.2.1. Operation modes.....................................................................................................................353 19.2.2. Engine control..........................................................................................................................353 19.2.3. Generator protection (ANSI)....................................................................................................353 19.2.4. Busbar protection (ANSI).........................................................................................................354 19.2.5. Display.....................................................................................................................................354 19.2.6. M-Logic....................................................................................................................................354 19.3. General product information, Standard and optional applications....................................................354 19.3.1. Automatic Mains Failure, AMF.................................................................................................354 19.3.2. Island operation.......................................................................................................................355 19.3.3. Fixed power/base load.............................................................................................................355 19.3.4. Peak shaving...........................................................................................................................355 19.3.5. Load takeover..........................................................................................................................356 19.3.6. Mains power export (fixed power to mains).............................................................................356 19.3.7. Multiple gensets, load sharing.................................................................................................356 19.3.8. Multiple gensets, power management.....................................................................................357 19.4. Mounting, AGC-3 mounting..............................................................................................................357 19.4.1. Mounting of the unit.................................................................................................................357 19.4.2. Panel cut-out............................................................................................................................357 19.4.3. Mounting instructions...............................................................................................................357 19.5. Hardware, Board slot positions........................................................................................................357 19.5.1. Unit top side overview..............................................................................................................358 19.5.2. Terminal strip overviews..........................................................................................................359 19.5.3. Input/output lists.......................................................................................................................364 19.5.4. Slot #1, power supply PCB......................................................................................................365 19.5.5. Slot #1, power supply PCB - AGC mains unit..........................................................................366 19.5.6. Slot #2, serial communication (option H).................................................................................366 19.5.7. Slot #2, external I/O module (option H8.2)..............................................................................368

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19.5.8. Slot #3, load sharing control (option G3).................................................................................369 19.5.9. Slot #3, 13 binary inputs and 4 relay outputs (option M12).....................................................370 19.5.10. Slot #4, relay outputs (option M14.4, standard).....................................................................371 19.5.11. Slot #4, analogue outputs for GOV/AVR or transducer (option E1)......................................371 19.5.12. Slot #4, analogue outputs for GOV/AVR or transducer (option EF2)....................................371 19.5.13. Slot #4, combination outputs for GOV/AVR or transducer (option EF4)................................372 19.5.14. Slot #4, PWM output for GOV and combination output for AVR (option EF5).......................372 19.5.15. Slot #4, PWM output for GOV and combination output for AVR (option EF6).......................372 19.5.16. Slot #4, analogue outputs for GOV/AVR or transducer (option E2)......................................373 19.5.17. Slot #5, AC measuring...........................................................................................................373 19.5.18. Slot #5, AC measuring - AGC mains unit..............................................................................374 19.5.19. Slot #5, AC measuring - AGC BTB unit.................................................................................375 19.5.20. Slot #6, 7 digital inputs (option M13.6)..................................................................................375 19.5.21. Slot #6, 4 relay outputs (option M14.6)..................................................................................376 19.5.22. Slot #6, 4 analogue inputs (option M15.6).............................................................................376 19.5.23. Slot #6, analogue outputs for GOV/AVR or transducer (option F1).......................................376 19.5.24. Slot #7, engine interface card (standard)...............................................................................377 19.5.25. Slot #7, engine interface card (standard) AGC mains/BTB...................................................378 19.5.26. Slot #8, engine interface communication (option H5)............................................................379 19.5.27. Slot #8, Cummins engine interface communication (option H6)............................................379 19.5.28. Slot #8, 7 digital inputs (option M13.8)..................................................................................379 19.5.29. Slot #8, 4 relay outputs (option M14.8)..................................................................................380 19.5.30. Slot #8, external I/O module (option H8.8)............................................................................380 19.6. Wirings, AC connections..................................................................................................................380 19.6.1. Neutral line (N).........................................................................................................................380 19.6.2. Current transformer grounding................................................................................................380 19.6.3. Fuses.......................................................................................................................................381 19.6.4. Breaker wiring..........................................................................................................................381 19.6.5. 3-phase....................................................................................................................................381 19.6.6. Single phase............................................................................................................................382 19.6.7. 2-phase L1L2...........................................................................................................................383 19.6.8. 2-phase L1L3 (split phase)......................................................................................................384 19.6.9. Island mode and power management (option G4/G5/G8).......................................................385 19.6.10. Power management (option G5), AGC mains.......................................................................386 19.6.11. Power management (option G5), dual mains - AGC mains...................................................387 19.6.12. Power management (option G5), AGC BTB..........................................................................388 19.7. Wirings, DC connections..................................................................................................................388 19.7.1. Load sharing lines (option G3).................................................................................................388 19.7.2. Digital inputs............................................................................................................................389 19.7.3. Analogue inputs.......................................................................................................................389 19.7.4. Multi-inputs..............................................................................................................................390 19.7.5. Digital inputs............................................................................................................................391 19.7.6. Pt100/Pt1000...........................................................................................................................391 19.7.7. VDO.........................................................................................................................................391 19.7.8. 0-40V DC.................................................................................................................................392 19.7.9. RPM input................................................................................................................................392 19.7.10. Stop coil.................................................................................................................................393 19.7.11. Transistor outputs (open collector outputs)...........................................................................393 19.8. Wirings, Communication..................................................................................................................394 19.8.1. CANbus (option G4/G5/G8).....................................................................................................394 19.8.2. Modbus (option H2).................................................................................................................395 19.8.3. Profibus DP (option H3)...........................................................................................................397 19.8.4. CANbus engine communication (option H5)............................................................................397 19.8.5. Cummins GCS (option H6)......................................................................................................399 19.8.6. CANbus engine communication (option H7)............................................................................400 19.8.7. External I/O module (option H8)..............................................................................................400 19.8.8. Display cable (option J)...........................................................................................................401 19.9. Technical information, AGC-3..........................................................................................................402 19.9.1. Technical specifications ..........................................................................................................402

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19.10. Technical information, Unit dimensions..........................................................................................405 19.11. Technical information, Panel cut-out..............................................................................................405

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General information

1. General information
1.1 Warnings, legal information and safety 1.1.1 Warnings and notes Throughout this document, a number of warnings and notes with helpful user information will be presented. To ensure that these are noticed, they will be highlighted as follows in order to separate them from the general text. Warnings Warnings indicate a potentially dangerous situation, which could result in death, personal injury or damaged equipment, if certain guidelines are not followed. Notes

Notes provide general information, which will be helpful for the reader to bear in mind.

1.1.2 Legal information and disclaimer DEIF takes no responsibility for installation or operation of the generator set. If there is any doubt about how to install or operate the engine/generator controlled by the Multi-line 2 unit, the company responsible for the installation or the operation of the set must be contacted. The Multi-line 2 unit is not to be opened by unauthorised personnel. If opened anyway, the warranty will be lost. Disclaimer DEIF A/S reserves the right to change any of the contents of this document without prior notice. 1.1.3 Safety issues Installing and operating the Multi-line 2 unit may imply work with dangerous currents and voltages. Therefore, the installation should only be carried out by authorised personnel who understand the risks involved in working with live electrical equipment. Be aware of the hazardous live currents and voltages. Do not touch any AC measurement inputs as this could lead to injury or death.

1.1.4 Electrostatic discharge awareness Sufficient care must be taken to protect the terminal against static discharges during the installation. Once the unit is installed and connected, these precautions are no longer necessary. 1.1.5 Factory settings The Multi-line 2 unit is delivered from factory with certain factory settings. These are based on average values and are not necessarily the correct settings for matching the engine/generator set in question. Precautions must be taken to check the settings before running the engine/generator set.

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General information

1.2 About the Designer's Reference Handbook 1.2.1 General purpose This Designer's Reference Handbook mainly includes functional descriptions, presentation of display unit and menu structure, information about the PID controller, the procedure for parameter setup and reference to parameter lists. The general purpose of this document is to provide useful overall information about the functionality of the unit and its applications. This document also offers the user the information he needs in order to successfully set up the parameters needed in his specific application. Please make sure to read this document before starting to work with the Multi-line 2 unit and the genset to be controlled. Failure to do this could result in human injury or damage to the equipment.

1.2.2 Intended users This Designer's Reference Handbook is mainly intended for the panel builder designer in charge. On the basis of this document, the panel builder designer will give the electrician the information he needs in order to install the Multi-line 2 unit, e.g. detailed electrical drawings. In some cases, the electrician may use these installation instructions himself. 1.2.3 Contents and overall structure This document is divided into chapters, and in order to make the structure simple and easy to use, each chapter will begin from the top of a new page.

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General product information

2. General product information


2.1 Introduction This chapter will deal with the unit in general and its place in the DEIF product range. The AGC is part of the DEIF Multi-line 2 product family. Multi-line 2 is a complete range of multi-function generator protection and control products integrating all the functions you need into one compact and attractive solution. The concept of the AGC is to offer a cost-effective solution to genset builders, who need a flexible generator protection and control unit for medium to large genset applications. Being part of the Multi-line product family, the standard functions can be supplemented with a variety of optional functions. 2.2 Type of product The Automatic Genset Controller is a micro-processor based control unit containing all necessary functions for protection and control of a genset. It contains all necessary 3-phase measuring circuits, and all values and alarms are presented on the LCD display. 2.3 Options The Multi-line 2 product range consists of different basic versions which can be supplemented with the flexible options needed to provide the optimum solution. The options cover e.g. various protections for generator, busbar and mains, voltage/VAr/PF control, various outputs, power management, serial communication, additional operator display, etc. A full options list is included in the data sheet, document no. 4921240396. Please see www.deif.com 2.4 PC utility software warning

It is possible to remote control the genset from the PC utility software or M-Vision by use of a modem. To avoid personal injury, make sure that it is safe to remote control the genset.

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Functional descriptions

3. Functional descriptions
3.1 Standard functions This chapter includes functional descriptions of standard functions as well as illustrations of the relevant application types. Flowcharts and single-line diagrams will be used in order to simplify the information. In the following paragraphs the standard functions are listed. 3.1.1 Operation modes Automatic Mains Failure Island operation Fixed power/base load Peak shaving Load takeover Mains power export 3.1.2 Engine control Start/stop sequences Run and stop coil Relay outputs for governor control 3.1.3 Generator protection (ANSI) 2 x reverse power (32) 5 x overload (32) 6 x overcurrent (50/51) 2 x overvoltage (59) 3 x undervoltage (27) 3 x over-/underfrequency (81) Voltage-dependent overcurrent (51V) Current/voltage unbalance (60) Loss of excitation/overexcitation (40/32RV) Non-essential load/load shedding, 3 levels (I, Hz, P>, P>>) Multi-inputs (digital, 4-20 mA, 0-40V DC, Pt100, Pt1000 or VDO) Digital inputs 3.1.4 Busbar protection (ANSI) 3 x overvoltage (59) 4 x undervoltage (27) 3 x overfrequency (81) 4 x underfrequency (81) Voltage unbalance (60) 3.1.5 Display Prepared for remote mounting Push-buttons for start and stop Push-buttons for breaker operations Status texts 3.1.6 M-Logic Simple logic configuration tool Selectable input events Selectable output commands

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Functional descriptions

3.2 Terminal strip overview

The terminal strip overview shows I/Os for selectable standard and optional hardware. Refer to the data sheet for accurate information about possible configurations for the AGC. Refer to the input/output lists in the installation instructions for detailed information about the I/Os of the specific options.

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Functional descriptions

3.2.1 Slot #1, #2, #5 and #6

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3.2.2 Slot #3, #4, #7 and #8

The hardware shown in slot #3 is option M12 and G3. For a detailed description of these options, please refer to the option descriptions.

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Functional descriptions

3.3 Applications 3.3.1 Applications and genset modes This section about applications is to be used for reference using the particular genset mode as starting point. It is not suitable for reading from beginning to end. The unit can be used for the applications listed in the table below. Application Automatic Mains Failure (no back sync.) Automatic Mains Failure (with back sync.) Island operation Fixed power/base load Peak shaving Load takeover Mains power export (fixed power to mains) Multiple gensets, load sharing Multiple gensets, power management Remote maintenance Standard Standard Standard Standard Standard Standard Standard Requires option G3 Requires option G5 Requires option H8.x and a remote maintenance box from DEIF A/S Comment

Genset mode Auto Automatic Mains Failure (no back sync.) Automatic Mains Failure (with back sync.) Island operation Fixed power/base load Peak shaving Load takeover Mains power export Multiple gensets, load sharing (G3) Multiple gensets, power management Remote maintenance X X X X X X X X X Semi X X X X X X X X X X

Running mode Test X X X X X X X X (X) Man X X X X X X X X X Block X X X X X X X X X X

For a general description of the available running modes, please refer to the chapter "Running mode description".

3.3.2 AMF (no back synchronisation) Auto mode description The unit automatically starts the genset and switches to generator supply at a mains failure after an adjustable delay time. It is possible to adjust the unit to change to genset operation in two different ways.

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1. The mains breaker will be opened at genset start-up. 2. The mains breaker will remain closed until the genset is running, and the genset voltage and frequency is OK. In both cases, the generator breaker will be closed when the generator voltage and frequency is OK, and the mains breaker is open. When the mains returns, the unit will switch back to mains supply and cool down and stop the genset. The switching back to mains supply is done without back synchronisation when the adjusted "Mains OK delay" has expired. Semi-auto mode description When the generator breaker is closed, the unit will use the nominal frequency as the setpoint for the speed governor. If AVR control (option D1) is selected, then the nominal voltage is used as setpoint. For a general description of the available running modes, please refer to the chapter "Running mode description".

3.3.3 AMF (with back synchronisation) Auto mode description The unit automatically starts the genset and switches to generator supply at a mains failure after an adjustable delay time. It is possible to adjust the unit to change to genset operation in two different ways: 1. The mains breaker will be opened at genset start-up. 2. The mains breaker will remain closed until the genset is running, and the genset voltage and frequency is OK. In both cases, the generator breaker will be closed when the generator voltage and frequency is OK, and the mains breaker is open. When the mains returns, the unit will synchronise the mains breaker to the busbar when the "Mains OK delay" has expired. Then the genset cools down and stops. The automatic mains failure mode can be combined with the "Overlap" function. In that case, the generator breaker and the mains breaker will never be closed at the same time for a longer period than the adjusted "Overlap" time. Semi-auto mode description When the generator breaker is closed and the mains breaker is opened, the unit will use the nominal frequency as the setpoint for the speed governor. If AVR control (option D1) is selected, the nominal voltage is used as the setpoint. When the generator is paralleled to the mains, the governor regulation will no longer be active. If AVR control (option D1) is selected, then the setpoint will be the adjusted power factor (7050 Fixed power set). For a general description of the available running modes, please refer to the chapter "Running mode description".

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Functional descriptions

3.3.4 Island operation Auto mode description The unit automatically starts the genset and closes the generator breaker at a digital start command. When the stop command is given, the generator breaker is tripped, and the genset will be stopped after a cooling down period. The start and stop commands are used by activating and deactivating a digital input or with the time-dependent start/stop commands. If the time-dependent start/stop commands are to be used, then the auto mode must also be used. Semi-auto mode description When the generator breaker is closed, the unit will use the nominal frequency as setpoint for the speed governor. If AVR control (option D1) is selected, the nominal voltage is used as setpoint. For a general description of the available running modes, please refer to the chapter "Running mode description".

3.3.5 Fixed power/base load Auto mode description The unit automatically starts the genset and synchronises to the mains when the digital input "auto start/stop" is activated. After the generator breaker closure, the unit ramps up the load to the setpoint level. When the stop command is given, the genset is deloaded and stopped after the cooling down period. The start and stop commands are used by activating and deactivating a digital input or with the time-dependent start/stop commands. If the time-dependent start/stop commands are to be used, then the auto mode must also be used.

kW

t
Start signal tRAMP-UP Stop signal

Diagram, fixed power - principle Semi-auto mode description When the generator breaker is closed and the mains breaker is opened, the unit will use the nominal frequency as the setpoint for the speed governor. If AVR control (option D1) is selected, the nominal voltage is used as setpoint. When the generator is paralleled to the mains, the generator power will be increased to the fixed power setpoint. If AVR control (option D1) is selected, then the setpoint will be the adjusted power (7050 Fixed power set).

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Functional descriptions

Setpoints related to fixed power 2610 Power ramp up Ramp speed: Defines the slope of the ramp up. Delay point: At this point, the ramp up is cancelled until the delay has expired. Delay: When this delay has expired, the ramp up is continued from the delay point. Enable: Enable load ramp steps. Steps: Defines the number of steps related to the delay point setting.

Delay, step 1

Delay, step 2

Delay, step 3

Delay, step 4

Delay, step 5

Stop signal

Power [kWh]

Power Set point

Power ramp [%/s] GB closed Time [sec] Ramp up, read From load share line Ramp down

3.3.6 Ramp up with load steps When the GB is closed, the power setpoint continues to rise in ramp up steps, determined by the number of steps in menu 2615. If the delay point is set to 20% and the number of load steps is set to 3, the genset will ramp to 20%, wait the configured delay time, ramp to 40%, wait, ramp to 60%, wait and then ramp to the present power setpoint. 3.3.7 Freeze power ramp A way to define the ramp up steps is to use the freeze power ramp command in M-logic. Freeze power ramp active: 1. The power ramp will stop at any point of the power ramp, and this setpoint will be maintained as long as the function is active. 2. If the function is activated while ramping from one delay point to another, the ramp will be fixed until the function is deactivated again.

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Functional descriptions

3. If the function is activated while the delay timer is timing out, the timer will be stopped and will not continue until the function is deactivated again.

The delay starts running when the GB has been closed.

2620 Power ramp down Ramp speed: Defines the slope of the ramp down. Breaker open: The amount of power accepted when opening the breaker. 7050 Fixed power set Power set: The amount of power the genset will produce. For a general description of the available running modes, please refer to the chapter "Running mode description".

3.3.8 Peak shaving Auto mode description The genset will start at a predefined mains import level and run at a fixed minimum load, e.g. 10%. When the mains import increases above the maximum mains import setpoint, the genset will supply the extra load in order to maintain the mains import at the maximum import level. When the load drops below the maximum mains import setpoint, the genset will run at min. load again. When the mains import and the generator load decrease below the stop setpoint, the genset will cool down and stop. A 4-20 mA transducer is used for indication of the power imported from the mains.

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Functional descriptions

kW Peak/total power

Max. mains import level Mains power Gen-set start level

Gen-set stop level

Generator power

Gen-set minimum load t tSTOP

Diagram, peak shaving example Semi-auto mode description When the generator breaker is closed and the mains breaker is opened, the unit will use the nominal frequency as setpoint for the speed governor. If AVR control (option D1) is selected, the nominal voltage is used as setpoint. When the generator is paralleled to the mains, the generator will be controlled according to the peak shaving setpoint. So the maximum mains import will not be exceeded in spite of the semi- auto mode. If AVR control (option D1) is selected, the setpoint is the adjusted power factor (7050 Fixed power set). Setpoints related to peak shaving 7000 Mains power Day and night: The mains power import limits for the peak shaving. Tmax and Tmin: The transducer range in kW which corresponds to the 4-20 mA transducer signal connected on multi-input 102. 7010 Daytime period These settings define the daytime period. The hours outside the daytime period are considered to be the night-time period. 7020 Start generator Start setpoint: The start setpoint is in percent of the day and night settings in menu 7000 Mains power. Delay: The genset will start when the start setpoint has been exceeded and this delay has expired.

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Functional descriptions

7020 Start generator Load: The minimum load the genset will produce when parallel to mains. 7030 Stop generator Stop setpoint: The stop setpoint is in percent of the day and night settings in menu 7000 Mains power. Delay: The genset will stop when the stop setpoint has been exceeded and this delay has expired. For a general description of the available running modes, please refer to the chapter "Running mode description".

3.3.9 Load takeover Auto mode description - Back synchronising ON The purpose of the load takeover mode is to transfer the load imported from the mains to the genset for operation on generator supply only. When the start command is given, the genset will start and synchronise the generator breaker to the busbar that is being supplied by the mains. When the generator breaker is closed, the imported load is decreased (the power is being transferred to the genset) until the load is at the open breaker point. Then the mains breaker opens. When the stop command is given, the mains breaker is synchronised to the busbar and after closure the genset is deloaded, cooled down and stopped. A 4-20 mA transducer is used for indication of the power imported from the mains.

kW
Mains power Generator power

t
Start signal Stop signal MB opens GB opens

Diagram, load takeover - example The load takeover mode can be combined with the overlap function. In that case, the generator and the mains breakers will never be closed at the same time for a longer period than the adjusted "overlap" time.

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Functional descriptions

If the imported load is higher than the nominal genset power, an alarm appears and the load takeover sequence is paused. - Back synchronising OFF When the start command is given, the genset will start. When the frequency and voltage is OK, the mains breaker is opened and the generator breaker is closed. Now, the generator supplies the load until the stop command is given. Then, the generator breaker opens and the mains breaker closes. The genset cools down and stops. A 4-20 mA transducer is used for indication of the power imported from the mains. If the imported load is higher than the nominal genset, an alarm appears and the load takeover sequence is paused. Semi-auto mode When the generator breaker is closed and the mains breaker is opened, the unit will use the nominal frequency as setpoint for the speed governor. If AVR control (option D1) is selected, the nominal voltage is used as setpoint. When the generator is paralleled to the mains, it will be controlled so the imported power from the mains will be kept at 0 kW. If AVR control (option D1) is selected, the setpoint is the adjusted power factor (7050 Fixed power set). For a general description of the available running modes, please refer to the chapter "Running mode description".

3.3.10 Mains power export (fixed power to mains) Auto mode description The mains power export mode can be used to maintain a constant level of power through the mains breaker. The power can be exported to the mains or imported from the mains, but always at a constant level. If a fixed level of imported power must be used, it is still the mains power export mode that must be selected! This mode covers import as well as export. The genset starts as a result of a digital start command. It synchronises to the mains and will start to export power to the mains. The amount of power exported will be kept at a fixed level regardless of the load on the busbar (the factory). The stop command will cause the genset to deload and trip the generator breaker. Afterwards, it will cool down and stop. A 4-20 mA transducer is used for indication of the power exported from the mains.

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Functional descriptions

Start signal

Stop signal

Ramp up Ramp down

Mains power export setpoint

kW

Diagram, mains power export - example Please notice that the setpoint of the mains power export can be adjusted to 0 kW. This means that the genset will be parallel to the mains but no power import or export. Semi-auto mode description When the generator breaker is closed and the mains breaker is opened, the unit will use the nominal frequency as setpoint for the speed governor. If AVR control (option D1) is selected, the nominal voltage is used as setpoint. When the generator is paralleled to the mains, it will be controlled according to the mains power export setpoint. If AVR control (option D1) is selected, the setpoint is the adjusted power factor (7050 Fixed power set). For a general description of the available running modes, please refer to the chapter "Running mode description". 3.4 Running mode description 3.4.1 Semi-auto mode The unit can be operated in semi-auto mode. Semi-auto means that the unit will not initiate any sequences automatically, as is the case with the auto mode. It will only initiate sequences, if external signals are given. An external signal may be given in three ways: 1. Push-buttons on the display are used 2. Digital inputs are used 3. Modbus command The standard AGC is only equipped with a limited number of digital inputs, please refer to "Digital inputs" in this document and the data sheet for additional information about availability.

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Functional descriptions

When the genset is running in semi-auto mode, the unit will control the speed governor and the AVR, if option D1 is selected. The following sequences can be activated in semi-auto: Command Start Description The start sequence is initiated and continues until the genset starts or the maximum number of start attempts has been reached. The frequency (and voltage) will be regulated to make the GB ready to close. The genset will be stopped. After disappearance of the running signal, the stop sequence will continue to be active in the "extended stop time" period. The genset is stopped with cooling down time. The cooling down time is cancelled if the stop button is activated twice. When AMF mode is selected, the unit will not regulate after breaker closure. Comment

Stop

Close GB

The unit will close the generator breaker if the mains breaker is open, synchronise and close the generator breaker if the mains breaker is closed.

Open GB

The unit will ramp down and open the generator breaker at the breaker open point if the mains breaker is closed. The unit will open the generator breaker instantly if the mains breaker is open or the genset mode is island mode. The unit will close the mains breaker if the generator breaker is open, synchronise and close the mains breaker if the generator breaker is closed. The unit opens the mains breaker instantly. The regulator is deactivated and the governor output is activated as long as the GOV input is ON. The regulator is deactivated and the governor output is activated as long as the GOV input is ON. The regulator is deactivated and the governor output is activated as long as the AVR input is ON. The regulator is deactivated and the governor output is activated as long as the AVR input is ON. Option D1 is required. Option D1 is required.

Close MB

Open MB Manual GOV UP Manual GOV DOWN Manual AVR UP Manual AVR DOWN

3.4.2 Test mode The test mode function is activated by selecting test with the MODE push-button on the display or by activating a digital input. The settings for the test function are set up in menu 7040 Test Setpoint: Load setpoint when paralleling to mains.

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7040 Test Timer: Return: Type: Engine run time during the test period. When the test is completed, the unit will return to the selected mode (semi-auto or auto). Selection of one of the three types of tests: Simple, Load or Full.

If the timer is set to 0.0 min., the test sequence will be infinite.

If the DG unit is in the stop sequence in test mode and the mode is changed to semi-auto, the DG will continue to run. Test mode in island operation (genset mode selected to island mode) can only run "Simple" and "Full" test.

3.4.3 Simple test The simple test will only start the genset and run it at nominal frequency with the generator breaker open. The test will run until the timer expires. 3.4.4 Load test The load test will start the genset and run it at nominal frequency, synchronise the generator breaker and produce the power typed in the setpoint in menu 7041. The test will run until the timer expires.

To run the load test, it is required that "Sync to Mains" is enabled in menu 7084.

When running a load test sequence, the overlap function is ignored.

3.4.5 Full test The full test will start the genset and run it at nominal frequency, synchronise the generator breaker and transfer the load to the generator before opening the mains breaker. When the test timer expires, the mains breaker will be synchronised and the load is transferred back to the mains before the generator breaker is opened and the generator is stopped.

To run the full test, it is required that "Sync to Mains" is enabled in menu 7084.

3.4.6 Manual mode When manual mode is selected, the genset can be controlled from the display and with digital inputs. The following commands are possible:

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Functional descriptions

Command Start Stop

Description The start sequence is initiated and continues until the genset starts or the maximum number of start attempts has been reached. The genset will be stopped. After disappearance of the running signal, the stop sequence will continue to be active in the "extended stop time" period. The genset is stopped with cooling down time. The unit will close the generator breaker if the mains breaker is open, and synchronise and close the generator breaker if the mains breaker is closed. The unit will open the generator breaker instantly. The unit will close the mains breaker if the generator breaker is open, and synchronise and close the mains breaker if the generator breaker is closed. The unit will open the mains breaker instantly. The unit gives increase signal to the speed governor. The unit gives decrease signal to the speed governor. The unit gives increase signal to the AVR. The unit gives decrease signal to the AVR.

Comment No regulation.

Close GB

No regulation. Sync. failure is deactivated.

Open GB Close MB

No regulation. Sync. failure is deactivated.

Open MB Manual GOV UP Manual GOV DOWN Manual AVR UP Manual AVR DOWN

Option D1 is required. Option D1 is required.

It is possible to open and close both the generator breaker and the mains breaker in manual mode.

3.4.7 Block mode When the block mode is selected, the unit is locked for certain actions. This means that it cannot start the genset or perform any breaker operations. To change the running mode from the display, the user will be asked for a password before the change can be made. It is not possible to select "block mode" when running feedback is present. The purpose of the block mode is to make sure that the genset does not start for instance during maintenance work. If the digital inputs are used to change the mode, then it is important to know that the input configured to block mode is a constant signal. So, when it is ON, the unit is in a blocked state, and when it is OFF, it returns to the mode it was in before block mode was selected. If block mode is selected using the display after the digital block input is activated, the AGC will stay in block mode after the block input is deactivated. The block mode must now be changed using the display. The block mode can only be changed locally by display or digital input. Before the running mode is changed, it is important to check that persons are clear of the genset and that the genset is ready for operation.

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Functional descriptions

Alarms are not influenced by block mode selection.

The genset can be started from the local engine control panel, if such is installed. Therefore, DEIF recommends avoiding local cranking and starting of the genset. The genset will shut down if block mode is selected while the genset is running. 3.5 Single-line diagrams 3.5.1 Application illustration In the following, the various applications are illustrated in single-line diagrams. 3.5.2 Automatic Mains Failure

Load Controller

3.5.3 Island operation


Load

Controller

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Functional descriptions

3.5.4 Fixed power/base load

Load Controller

3.5.5 Peak shaving


TRANSDUCER P/4-20 mA

Load Controller

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Functional descriptions

3.5.6 Load takeover


TRANSDUCER P/4-20 mA

Load Controller

3.5.7 Mains power export


TRANSDUCER P/4-20 mA

Load Controller

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Functional descriptions

3.5.8 Multiple gensets, load sharing (option G3 required)


Load

Controller

Controller

3.5.9 Multiple gensets, power management (option G5 required) - Island mode application
Display 1 Display 2

Busbar CANbus

Generator breaker (GB 1)

Controller

Generator breaker (GB 2)

Controller

G
Diesel generator set 1

G
Diesel generator set 2

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Functional descriptions

- Parallel to mains application


Display mains

Mains

Mains breaker (MB)

Controller

Consumers Tie Breaker (GB) Display 1 Display 2

Busbar CANbus

Generator breaker (GB 1)

Controller

Generator breaker (GB 2)

Controller

G
Diesel generator set 1

G
Diesel generator set 2

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Functional descriptions

- Parallel with two mains with a tie breaker (the tie breaker is optional)
Optional Display mains 1A Display mains 1B Display mains 2A Optional Display mains 2B

Mains 1

Mains 2

Mains breaker (MB 1)

Controller

Controller

Mains breaker (MB 2)

Controller

Controller

Consumers Tie Breaker (GB) Display 1 Display 2

Busbar CANbus

Generator breaker (GB 1)

Controller

Generator breaker (GB 2)

Controller

G
Diesel generator set 1

G
Diesel generator set 2

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Functional descriptions

- Multi mains with two mains, two tie breakers, one bus tie breaker and four gensets
Optional Optional AOP 1 AOP 2 AOP 1 AOP 2

Display Mains 17

Display Mains 18

Display

Display

CANbus CANbus

Mains breaker (MB 17)

Controller

Mains breaker (MB 18)

Controller

CANbus Load Tie Breaker (TB 17) Display 1 Display 2 Display BTB 33 Load Tie Breaker (TB 18) Display 3 Display 4

BTB 33 Busbar CANbus CANbus Busbar

Generator breaker (GB 1)

Controller

Generator breaker (GB 2)

Controller

Controller

Generator breaker (GB 3)

Controller

Generator breaker (GB 4)

Controller

G
Diesel generator set 1

G
Diesel generator set 2

G
Diesel generator set 3

G
Diesel generator set 4

The diagram shows four generators, but the system supports up to 16 generators. Please refer to the option G5 manual for further description of multi mains.

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Functional descriptions

- ATS plant, mains unit


Display Mains

Mains okay

Controller Consumers ATS ON/OFF

Tie Breaker (TB) Display 1 Display 2 Display 3

Busbar CANbus

Controller

Controller

Controller

G
Diesel generator set 1

G
Diesel generator set 2

G
Diesel generator set 3

- Remote maintenance

Controller LOAD

Relay

The diagram shows a setup using the remote maintenance box. Please refer to the operators manual of the remote maintenance box for further description. 3.6 Flowcharts Using flowcharts, the principles of the most important functions will be illustrated in the next sections. The functions included are: Mode shift MB open sequence GB open sequence Stop sequence Start sequence MB close sequence

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Functional descriptions

GB close sequence Fixed power Load takeover Island operation Peak shaving Mains power export Automatic Mains Failure Test sequence The flowcharts on the following pages are for guidance only. For illustrative purposes, the flowcharts are simplified in some extent.

3.6.1 Mode shift

Start

Mode shift enabled Yes

No

Plant mode not Island and AMF Yes No

No

Mains failure Yes Initiate AMF sequence

No

Mains OK timer timed out

Yes

Initiate mains return sequence

MB close sequence

Continue in selected mode

End

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Functional descriptions

3.6.2 MB open sequence

Start

MB closed Yes Load take over Yes

No

No

Mains failure

Deload MB

No Load = 0 Yes No Load too high Yes Alarm

Open MB

MB opened Yes

No

Alarm MB open failure

End

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Functional descriptions

3.6.3 GB open sequence

Start

Stop conditions OK Yes Is GB closed Yes Soft open Yes

No

No

No

Failclas shutdown

Deload DG No Load < open set point Yes Yes Open GB No Ramp down timer expired

GB opened Yes End

No

Alarm

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Functional descriptions

3.6.4 Stop sequence

Start

Stop conditions OK Yes GB open seq OK Yes AUTO mode Yes No

No

No

No

Cooldown timer run out Yes No

Run coil Yes Deactivate stop relay

Stop relay

Activate stop relay

Genset stopped Yes End

No

Alarm

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Functional descriptions

3.6.5 Start sequence

Start

Start condition OK Yes Start prepare timer Yes

No

No

Start relay ON

Start relay timer timeout Yes Off relay ON

No

Genset started Yes

No

Run feedback detected

No

Alarm

Yes Stop relay timer timed out Yes No Max start attempts Yes Start failure alarm End No No

F/U OK

Yes Ready to close GB

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Functional descriptions

3.6.6 MB close sequence


Start

Is MB open Yes

No

Voltage on mains/bus Yes

No

Voltage on gen Yes

No

GB closed Yes Back sync ON Yes

No

Direct close OK No GB open sequence No Sync timer runout Yes Yes Alarm sync. failure Alarm GB open failure No

Sync MB

Synchronised Yes

No

Close MB

MB closed Yes End

No

Close failure alarm

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Functional descriptions

3.6.7 GB close sequence


Start

Is GB open Yes

No

Start seq OK Yes Single DG application Yes Island mode Yes Voltage on bus Yes

No

No No No All GBs OFF Yes No MB close No Yes TB Present Yes TB open No No No Voltage on busbar Yes

Yes

Yes

MB open No No

Direct closing OK

Sync GB

Time runout

Yes

DG freq match BB freq Yes Close GB

No Alarm sync failure

GB closed Yes End

No

Alarm

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Functional descriptions

3.6.8 Fixed power

Start

Activate start input

Start sequence

GB close sequence

Ramp-up to load set-point

Operation

Deactivate start input

GB open sequence

Stop sequence

End

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Functional descriptions

3.6.9 Load takeover

Start

Activate start input

Start sequence

GB close sequence

Mains load = 0 kW Yes MB open sequence

No

Ramp-up genset load

Genset operation

Deactivate start input

MB close sequence

GB open sequence

Stop sequence

End

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Functional descriptions

3.6.10 Island operation

Start

Start input active

Start sequence

GB close sequence

Operation

Start input deactivated

GB open sequence

Stop sequence

End

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Functional descriptions

3.6.11 Peak shaving

Start

Mains power above start set point

Start sequence

GB close sequence

Operation: produce power above set point

Mains power below stop set point

GB open sequence

Stop sequence

End

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Functional descriptions

3.6.12 Mains power export

Start

Activate start input

Start sequence

Close GB sequence

Ramp up to MPE set point

operation

Deactivate start input

GB open sequence

Stop sequence

End

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Functional descriptions

3.6.13 Automatic Mains Failure

Start

Mains failure Yes

No

#7065: start eng + open MB Yes

No

Open MB

Start sequence

Start sequence

Open MB

GB close sequence

GB close sequence

Mains ok Yes

No

Time out

MB close sequence

End

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Functional descriptions

3.6.14 Test sequence

Start

Select test mode

Start sequnce

Test timer

Timer run out Yes Stop sequnce

No

Engine running No Yes No

Freq/voltage OK Yes Sync of GB allowed Yes Sync GB

Engine stopped No Return to running mode, menu 7043

No

Opening og MB allowed Yes

No Ramp up to P set point

End

No

P Mains = 0kW

Yes

Open MB

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Functional descriptions

3.7 Sequences The following contains information about the sequences of the engine, the generator breaker and, if installed, the mains breaker. These sequences are automatically initiated if the auto mode is selected, or if the commands are selected in the semi-auto mode. In the semi-auto mode, the selected sequence is the only sequence initiated (e.g. press the START pushbutton: The engine will start, but no subsequent synchronising is initiated). The following sequences will be illustrated below: START sequence STOP sequence Breaker sequences

If island operation is selected, the digital input "MB closed" must NOT be activated with a 12/24 volt input signal. A "mains breaker failure" will occur if the wiring of the mains breaker feedback inputs is wrong. Refer to our application notes or installation instructions for information about the required breaker wiring. We recommend not using small relays for stop coil output. If small relays are used, a resistor must be mounted across the relay coil to prevent undesirable closing of the relay. This is caused by the wirebreak function.

3.7.1 Start sequence The following drawings illustrate the start sequences of the genset with normal start prepare and extended start prepare.

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Functional descriptions

No matter the choice of start prepare function, the running coil is activated 1 sec. before the start relay (starter).
Start sequence: Normal start prepare

Start prepare

Crank (starter)

tOFF

tOFF

Run coil 1 sec.

Stop coil

Running feedback

1st start attempt

2nd start attempt

3rd start attempt

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Functional descriptions

Start sequence: Extended start prepare

Start prepare

Crank (starter)

tOFF

tOFF

Run coil 1 sec.

Stop coil

Running feedback

1st start attempt

2nd start attempt

3rd start attempt

Run coil can be activated from 1...600 sec. before crank (starter) will be executed. In the above example, the timer is set to 1 sec. (menu 6150).

3.7.2 Start sequence conditions The start sequence initiation can be controlled by the following conditions: VDO 102 (oil pressure) VDO 105 (water temperature) VDO 108 (fuel level)

This means that if e.g. the oil pressure is not primed to the sufficient value, then the crank relay will not engage the starter motor. The selection is made in setting 6185. For each of the VDO settings, the rule is that the value (oil pressure, fuel level or water temperature) must exceed the setpoint of setting 6186 before starting is initiated.

If the value in 6186 is set to 0.0, the start sequence is initiated as soon as it is requested.

The diagram below shows an example where the VDO signal builds up slowly and starting is initiated at the end of the third start attempt.

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Functional descriptions

Start sequence Cranking depends on VDO

Start prepare (3 start attempts)

Stop relay

Crank relay

Run coil

Running feedback

VDO measurement OK VDO value

Cranking starts

3.7.3 Running feedback Different types of running feedback can be used to detect if the motor is running. Refer to menu 6170 for selection of the running feedback type. The running detection is made with a built-in safety routine. The running feedback selected is the primary feedback. At all times all the types of running feedback is used for running detection. If, for some reason, the primary choice is not detecting any running feedback, the starter relay will stay activated for 1 additional second. If a running feedback is detected based on one of the secondary choices, the genset will start. This way, the genset will still be functional even though a tacho sensor is damaged or dirty. As soon as the genset is running, no matter if the genset is started based on the primary or secondary feedback, the running detection will be made based on all available types. The sequence is shown in the diagram below.

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Functional descriptions

Running feedback failure

Primary running feedback

Secondary running feedback 1sec Start relay (crank) tAlarm Alarm

Interruption of start sequence The start sequence is interrupted in the following situations: Event Stop signal Start failure Remove starter feedback Running feedback Running feedback Running feedback Tacho setpoint. Digital input. Tacho setpoint. Frequency measurement above 32 Hz. The frequency measurement requires a voltage measurement of 30% of UNOM. The running detection based on the frequency measurement can replace the running feedback based on tacho or digital input or engine communication. Oil pressure setpoint (menu 6175). EIC (engine communication) (option H5 or H7). Comment

Running feedback Running feedback Emergency stop Alarm Stop push-button on display Modbus stop command Binary stop input Deactivate the "auto start/ stop" Running mode

Alarms with shutdown" or "trip and stop" fail class. Only in semi-auto or manual mode. Semi-auto or manual mode. Semi-auto or manual mode. Auto mode in the following genset modes: Island operation, fixed power, load takeover or mains power export mode. It is not possible to change the running mode to "block" as long as the genset is running.

If the MPU input is to be used to remove the starter, it has to be set up in menu 6174.

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Functional descriptions

The only protections that can stop the genset/interrupt the start sequence when the "shutdown override" input is activated, are the digital input "emergency stop" and the alarm "overspeed 2". Both of these must have the fail class "shut down". Setpoints related to the start sequence - Crank failure alarm (4530 Crank failure) If MPU is chosen as the primary running feedback, this alarm will be raised if the specified rpm is not reached before the delay has expired. - Run feedback failure (4540 Run feedb. fail) If running is detected on the frequency (secondary), but the primary running feedback, e.g. digital input, has not detected running, this alarm will be raised. The delay to be set is the time from the secondary running detection and until the alarm is raised. - Hz/V failure (4550 Hz/V failure) If the frequency and voltage are not within the limits set in menu 2110 after the running feedback is received, this alarm is raised when the delay has expired. - Start failure alarm (4570 Start failure) The start failure alarm occurs, if the genset has not started after the number of start attempts set in menu 6190. - Start prepare (6180 Starter) Normal prepare: The start prepare timer can be used for start preparation purposes, e.g. prelubrication or preglowing. The start prepare relay is activated when the start sequence is initiated and deactivated when the start relay is activated. If the timer is set to 0.0 s, the start prepare function is deactivated. Extended prepare: The extended prepare will activate the start prepare relay when the start sequence is initiated and keep it activated when the start relay activates until the specified time has expired. If the ext. prepare time exceeds the start ON time, the start prepare relay is deactivated when the start relay deactivates. If the timer is set to 0.0 s, the extended prepare function is deactivated. Start ON time: The starter will be activated for this period when cranking. Start OFF time: The pause between two start attempts.

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Functional descriptions

3.7.4 Stop sequence The drawings illustrate the stop sequence. Stop sequence Run coil

Cooling down time

tCOOL

Run coil

text

Running feedback

Sequence initiated

Stop sequence Stop coil

Cooling down time

tCOOL

Stop coil

text

Running feedback

Sequence initiated

The stop sequence will be activated if a stop command is given. The stop sequence includes the cooling down time if the stop is a normal or controlled stop.

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Functional descriptions

Description Auto mode stop Trip and stop alarm Stop button on display Remove "auto start/stop" Emergency stop X X

Cooling down

Stop X X X X X

Comment

(X) X

Semi-auto or manual. Cooling down is interrupted if the stop button is activated twice. Auto mode: Island operation, fixed power, load takeover, mains power export. Engine shuts down and GB opens.

The stop sequence can only be interrupted during the cooling down period. Interruptions can occur in these situations: Event Mains failure Start button is pressed Binary start input Exceeding setpoint GB close button is pressed Comment AMF mode selected (or mode shift selected ON) and auto mode selected. Semi-auto mode: Engine will run in idle speed. Auto mode: Island operation and fixed power, load takeover or mains power export. Auto mode: Peak shaving. Semi-auto mode only.

The stop sequence can only be interrupted during the cooling down period.

When the engine is stopped, the analogue speed governor output is reset to the offset value. Please refer to the mentioned option descriptions. Setpoints related to the stop sequence - Stop failure (4580 Stop failure) A stop failure alarm will appear if the primary running feedback or the generator voltage and frequency are still present after the delay in this menu has expired. - Stop (6210 Stop) Cooling down: The length of the cooling down period. Extended stop: The delay after the running feedback has disappeared until a new start sequence is allowed. The extended stop sequence is activated any time the Stop button is pressed. Cool down controlled by engine temperature: The engine temperature-controlled cool down is to ensure that the engine is cooled down below the setpoint in menu 6214 "Cool down temperature" before the engine is stopped. This is particularly beneficial if the engine has been running for a short period of time and therefore not reached normal cooling water temperature, as the cool down period will be very short or none at all. If the engine has been running for a long period, it will have reached normal running temperature, and the cool down period will be the exact time it takes to get the temperature below the temperature setpoint in menu 6214.

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Functional descriptions

If, for some reason, the engine cannot get the temperature below the temperature setpoint in 6214 within the time limit in parameter 6211, the engine will be shut down by this timer. The reason for this could be high ambient temperature.

If the cooling down timer is set to 0.0 s, the cooling down sequence will be infinite.

If the cooling down temperature is set to 0 deg., the cooling down sequence will be entirely controlled by the timer.

3.7.5 Breaker sequences The breaker sequences will be activated depending on the selected mode: Mode Auto Semi-auto Manual Block All All All All Genset mode Breaker control Controlled by the unit Push-button Push-button None

Before closing the breakers it must be checked that the voltage and frequency are OK. The limits are adjusted in menu 2110 Sync. blackout. Setpoints related to MB control 7080 MB control Mode shift:

When enabled, the AGC will perform the AMF sequence in case of a mains failure regardless of the actual genset mode. The time from GB OFF to MB ON when back synchronisation is OFF. Enables synchronisation from mains to generator. Enables synchronisation from generator to mains. After opening of the breaker, the MB ON sequence will not be initiated before this delay has expired. Please refer to the description of "Breaker spring load time".

MB close delay: Back sync.: Sync. to mains: Load time:

If no MB is represented, then the relays and inputs normally used for MB control become configurable. The power plant constructor (USW) is used for configuration of the plant design if the application does not include an MB. AGC without back synchronisation: The GB can only be closed if the mains breaker is open. The MB can only be closed if the generator breaker is open. AGC with back synchronisation: If the GB or MB push-button is activated, the AGC will start synchronising if the generator or mains voltage is present. The GB can close directly if the MB is open. The MB can close directly if the GB is open.

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Functional descriptions

- AMF MB opening (7060 U mains failure) It is possible to select the functionality of the mains breaker closing function. This is necessary if the unit operates in Automatic Mains Failure (AMF). The possibilities are: Selection Start engine and open mains breaker Start engine Description When a mains failure occurs, the mains breaker opens, and the engine starts at the same time. When a mains failure occurs, the engine starts. When the generator is running and the frequency and voltage are OK, the MB opens and the GB closes.

3.7.6 AMF timers The time charts describe the functionality at a mains failure and at mains return. Back synchronisation is deactivated. The timers used by the AMF function are indicated in the table below: Timer tFD tFU tFOD tGBC tMBC Description Mains failure delay Frequency/voltage OK Mains failure OK delay GB ON delay MB ON delay Menu number 7070 f mains failure 7060 U mains failure 6220 Hz/V OK 7070 f mains failure 7060 U mains failure 6230 GB control 7080 MB control

The timer tMBC is only active if back synchronisation is deactivated. Example 1: 7065 Mains fail control: Start engine and open MB

Mains OK tMBC MB On GB On Gen start seq tFD Gen stop seq Gen running Gen f/U OK Mains failure detected tFU Mains OK tFOD

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Functional descriptions

Example 2: 7065 Mains fail control: Start engine

Mains OK MB On tMBC GB On tGBC Gen start seq tFD Gen stop seq tFOD Gen running Gen f/U OK Mains failure detected tFU Mains OK

Conditions for breaker operations The breaker sequences react depending on the breaker positions and the frequency/voltage measurements. The conditions for the ON and OFF sequences are described in the table below: Conditions for breaker operations Sequence GB ON, direct closing Condition Running feedback Generator frequency/voltage OK MB open Mains frequency/voltage OK GB open

MB ON, direct closing

GB ON, synchronising

Running feedback Generator frequency/voltage OK MB closed No generator failure alarms Mains frequency/voltage OK GB closed No generator failure alarms

MB ON, synchronising

GB OFF, direct opening MB OFF, direct opening GB OFF, deloading MB OFF, deloading

MB open Alarms with fail classes: Shut down or Trip MB alarms MB closed Alarms with fail class: Trip and stop

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Display unit and menu structure

4. Display unit and menu structure


4.1 Presentation This chapter deals with the display unit including the push-button and LED functions. In addition, the unit menu structure will be presented. 4.2 Display unit (DU-2) The display has four different lines, each with 20 characters, and holds a number of push-button functions.

Display dimensions are H x W = 115 x 220 mm (4.528 x 9.055).

4.2.1 Push-button functions The display unit holds a number of push-button functions which are described below:
1 2 3 4

Alarm

Automatic Gen-set Controller

Power Self check ok

Alarm

multi-line AGC

15

INFO

AMF
G-L1 50.0 Hz G 0.90I PF
SETUP
Run

SEMI-AUTO
400V 150kW
V2
On Load

Alarm Inh.
VIEW

SEL

14

JUMP

V1
On

V3

LOG

6
Auto

13

START BACK

12

STOP

MODE

11

10

1. Shifts the first line displaying in the setup menus. Push 2 sec. to switch to master display in case more than one display is connected. 2. Moves the cursor left for manoeuvring in the menus. 3. Inreases the value of the selected setpoint (in the setup menu). In the daily use display, this button function is used for scrolling the View lines in V1 or the second line (in the setup menu) displaying of generator values. 4. Selects the underscored entry in the fourth line of the display. 5. Moves the cursor right for manoeuvring in the menus. 6. Decreases the value of the selected setpoint (in the setup menu). In the daily use display, this button function is used for scrolling the second line displaying of generator values. 7. Changes the menu line (line four) in the display to mode selection. 8. Jumps one step backwards in the menu (to previous display or to the entry window).

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9. Displays the LOG SETUP window where you can choose between the Event, Alarm and Battery logs. The logs are not deleted when the auxiliary supply is switched off. 10. Manual activation of close breaker and open breaker sequence if "SEMI-AUTO" is selected. 11. Manual activation of close breaker and open breaker sequence if "SEMI-AUTO" is selected. 12. Stop of the genset if "SEMI-AUTO" or "MANUAL" is selected. 13. Start of the genset if "SEMI-AUTO" or "MANUAL" is selected. 14. Enters a specific menu number selection. All settings have a specific number attached to them. The JUMP button enables the user to select and display any setting without having to navigate through the menus (see later). 15. Shifts the display three lower lines to show the alarm list.

4.2.2 LED functions The display unit holds 10 LED functions. The colour is green or red or a combination in different situations. The display LEDs are indicating as follows:

Alarm

Automatic Gen-set Controller

Power Self check ok

1 2 3

10
Alarm
INFO

multi-line AGC

AMF
G-L1 50.0 Hz G 0.90I PF
SETUP
Run

SEMI-AUTO
400V 150kW
V2
On Load

Alarm Inh.
VIEW

SEL

JUMP

V1
On

V3

LOG

Auto

START BACK STOP

MODE

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

8. 9. 10.

LED indicates that the auxiliary supply is switched on. LED indicates that the unit is OK. Please refer to "Alarm inhibit" in the chapter "Additional functions". LED indicates that auto mode is selected. LED is green if the mains is present and OK. LED is red at a measured mains failure. LED is flashing green when the mains returns during the "mains OK delay" time. LED indicates that the mains breaker is closed. LED is flashing yellow if the "MB spring loaded" signal from the breaker is missing or the MB load time has not expired. LED green light indicates that the generator breaker is closed. LED yellow light indicates that the generator breaker has received a command to close on a black bus, but the breaker is not yet closed due to interlocking of the GB. LED is flashing yellow if the "Enable GB black close" or the "GB spring loaded" signal is missing or the GB load time has not expired. LED green light indicates that the voltage/frequency is present and OK. LED indicates that the generator is running. LED flashing indicates that unacknowledged alarms are present. LED fixed light indicates that ALL alarms are acknowledged, but some are still present.

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4.3 Menu structure The display includes two menu systems which can be used without password entry: View menu system This is the commonly used menu system. 15 windows are configurable and can be entered by using the arrow push-buttons. Setup menu system This menu system is used for setting up the unit, and if the user needs detailed information that is not available in the view menu system. Changing of parameter settings is password protected.

4.3.1 Entry window When the unit is powered up, an entry window appears. The entry window is the turning point in the menu structure and as such the gateway to the other menus. It can always be reached by pressing the BACK pushbutton three times.

The event and alarm list will appear at power up if an alarm is present.

The priority "P00", shown in the lower right corner, is related to the power management option G4 and G5.

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4.3.2 View menu The view menus (V1, V2 and V3) are the most commonly used menus of the unit.
Automatic Gen-set Controller

multi-line AGC

1 2 3 4

400
V3

400
V2

400V
V1

G-L1 50 Hz G-L1 50 Hz
SETUP

440V 440V

1. 2. 3. 4.

First display line: Operational status or measurements Second display line: Measurements relating to operational status Third display line: Measurements relating to operational status Fourth display line: Selection of setup and view menus

In the view menus various measured values are on display. The menu navigating starts from the fourth display line in the entry window and is carried out using the

and

push-buttons.

The entry window displays view 3 (in the illustration above the window where "manual" is displayed). Moving the cursor left or right offers the following possibilities. Setup menu access to the following sub-menus: Protection setup Control setup I/O setup System setup View 3 window displays operational status and selectable measurements View 2 window displays selectable measurements. The same as view 1 View 1 access to up to 15 selectable windows displaying selectable measurements

The factory settings for view 1 and view 2 are identical.

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4.3.3 Setup menu The setup menu system is used for parameter setup of the unit, and if the user needs detailed information that is not available in the view menu system. So, this menu can be used for both daily use and setup purposes. The menu is entered from the entry window by selecting the entry SETUP in the fourth display line.
Automatic Gen-set Controller

multi-line AGC

1 2 3 4

400

400

400V

f-L1 50.00HZ

PROTECTION SETUP
PROT CTRL I/O SYST

1.First display line (Daily use)

The first line is used to display generator and bus values

2.Second display line (Daily use) Various values can be displayed (Menu system) Information about the selected channel number (Alarm/event list) The latest alarm/event is displayed 3.Third display line (Daily use) (Setup menu)

Explanation for the fourth line cursor selection Presents setting of the selected function, and, if changes are made, the possible max. and min. values for the setting

4.Fourth display line (Daily use) Entry selection for the setup menu. Press SEL to enter the underscored menu (Setup menu) Sub-functions for the individual parameters, e.g. limit

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Possible values in second display line View line/second display line configuration For generator G f-L1 frequency L1 (Hz) G f-L2 frequency L2 (Hz) G f-L3 frequency L3 (Hz) Gen. active power (kW) Gen. reactive power (kVAr) Gen. apparent power (kVA) Power factor Voltage angle between L1-L2 (deg.) Voltage angle between L2-L3 (deg.) Voltage angle between L3-L1 (deg.) BB U-L1N BB U-L2N BB U-L3N BB U-L1L2 BB U-L2L3 BB U-L3L1 BB U-MAX BB U-Min BB f-L1 BB AngL1L2-180.0deg BB-G Ang -180.0deg U-Supply (power supply V DC) Energy counter, total (kWh) Energy counter, daily (kWh) Energy counter, weekly (kWh) Energy counter, monthly (kWh) G U-L1N (voltage L1-N) G U-L2N (voltage L2-N) G U-L3N (voltage L3-N) G U-L1L2 (voltage L1-L2) G U-L2L3 (voltage L2-L3) G U-L3L1 (voltage L3-L1) G U-Max (voltage max.) G U-Min (voltage min.) G I-L1 (current L1) For bus/mains M f-L1 frequency L1 (Hz) M f-L2 frequency L2 (Hz) M f-L3 frequency L3 (Hz) Mains active power (kW) Mains reactive power (kVAr) Mains apparent power (kVA) Power factor Voltage angle between L1-L2 (deg.) Voltage angle between L2-L3 (deg.) Voltage angle between L3-L1 (deg.) BB U-L1N BB U-L2N BB U-L3N BB U-L1L2 BB U-L2L3 BB U-L3L1 BB U-MAX BB U-Min BB f-L1 BB AngL1L2-180.0deg BB-M Ang -180.0deg U-Supply (power supply V DC) Energy counter, total (kWh) Energy counter, daily (kWh) Energy counter, weekly (kWh) Energy counter, monthly (kWh) M U-L1N (voltage L1-N) M U-L2N (voltage L2-N) M U-L3N (voltage L3-N) M U-L1L2 (voltage L1-L2) M U-L2L3 (voltage L2-L3) M U-L3L1 (voltage L3-L1) M U-Max (voltage max.) M U-Min (voltage min.) M I-L1 (current L1)

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View line/second display line configuration G I-L2 (current L2) G I-L3 (current L3) Run abs. (absolute run time) Run rel. (relative run time) Next prio (next priority shift) Run ShtD O (shutdown override run time) Mains power A102 Number of GB operations Start attempts P available P mains P DGs tot Number of MB operations Service timer 1 Service timer 2 MPU Multi-input 1 Multi-input 2 Multi-input 3 Battery asym 1 Battery asym 2 Power factor Cos Phi Cos Phi reference (current) Power reference (actual) Power reference (current) Power reference (current) Multi-input 1 Multi-input 2 Multi-input 3 Battery asym 1 Battery asym 2 Power factor Cos Phi Cos Phi reference (current) P available P mains P DGs tot Number of MB operations P TB A105 Number of TB operations M I-L2 (current L2) M I-L3 (current L3)

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Setup structure
AGC V.4.00.0

2010-01-02 09.35.54
SETUP V3 V2 V1

BACK

SEL

G 400 400 400V f-L1 50.00HZ


PROTECTION SETUP
PROT CTRL I/O SYST

G 400 400 400V f-L1 50.00HZ


CONTROL SETUP
PROT CTRL I/O SYST

G 400 400 400V f-L1 50.00HZ


INPUT/OUTPUT SETUP
PROT CTRL I/O SYST

G 400 400 400V f-L1 50.00HZ


SYSTEM SETUP
PROT CTRL I/O SYST

BACK

SEL

BACK

SEL

BACK

SEL

BACK

SEL

G 400 400 400V 1000 G -P> 1


Setpoint -5.0%
SP DEL OA OB ENA FC

G 400 400 400V


CONTROL SETUP SYNCHRONISE SETUP
SYNC REG

G 400 400 400V


INPUT/OUTPUT SETUP BINARY INPUT SETUP
BIN AIN OUT

G 400 400 400V


SYSTEM SETUP GENERAL SETUP
GEN MAINS COMM PM

Setup example The following example illustrates how a specific setting is changed in the setup menu. In this case Reverse power is the selected parameter.

G 400 400 400V G f-L1 50.00HZ


PROTECTION SETUP
PROT CTRL I/O SYST

BACK

G 400 400 400V 1000 G -P> 1


Setpoint -5.0%
SP DEL OA OB ENA FC

G 400 400 400V 1010 G -P> 2


Setpoint -5.0%
SP DEL OA OB ENA FC

BACK

First entry
NO

YES

G 400 400 400V Enter passw. 2010


ENTER

Increase no. Decrease no.

G 400 400 400V 1001 G -P> 1


-50.0
RESET

Increases setting Decreases setting Moves the cursor

-5.0

0.0%
SAVE

4.4 Mode overview The unit has four different running modes and one block mode. For detailed information see chapter "Application". Auto In auto mode the unit will operate automatically, and the operator cannot initiate any sequences manually.

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Semi-auto In semi-auto mode the operator has to initiate all sequences. This can be done via the push-button functions, Modbus commands or digital inputs. When started in semi-automatic mode, the genset will run at nominal values. Test The test sequence will start when the test mode is selected. Manual When manual mode is selected, the binary increase/decrease inputs can be used (if they have been configured) as well as the start and stop push-buttons. When starting in manual mode, the genset will start without any subsequent regulation. Block When the block mode is selected, the unit is not able to initiate any sequences, e.g. the start sequence.

Block mode must be selected when maintenance work is carried out on the genset.

The genset will shut down if block mode is selected while the genset is running. 4.5 Mode selection The following drawings illustrate how the mode selection is carried out. Pushing the MODE push-button will change the displayed text. After pushing "MODE", the fourth display line indicates the selectable modes. In the third display line, the underscored (fourth line) selection will be displayed. Two possibilities are now available: If "BACK" is pushed, the display returns to the original text without changing the mode.

1. push

2. push

AGC
2010-01-02 SETUP MENU
SETUP V3 V2

V 4.00.0
13:45:18
V1

MODE

AGC
SEMI TST AUT

V 4.00.0
BACK

2010-01-02 13:45:18 SEMI-AUTO MODE


MAN BLK

or

1. push

2. push

0V

MODE

G
SEMI

0
TST

0
AUT

0V
BACK

F-L1 0.00HZ PROTECTION SETUP


PROT CTRL I/O SYST

F-L1 0.00HZ SEMI-AUTO MODE


MAN BLK

If "SEL" is pushed, the underlined mode is selected, and the display returns to the original text. In this example the SEMI-AUTO mode is selected.

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Display unit and menu structure

3. push

4. push

AGC
2010-01-02 SETUP MENU
SETUP V3 V2

V 4.00.0
13:45:18
V1

MODE

AGC
SEMI TST AUT

V 4.00.0
MAN BLK

2010-01-02 13:45:18 SEMI-AUTO MODE

SEL

or

3. push

4. push

0V

MODE

G
SEMI

0
TST

0
AUT

0V
MAN BLK

F-L1 0.00HZ PROTECTION SETUP


PROT CTRL I/O SYST

F-L1 0.00HZ SEMI-AUTO MODE

SEL

4.6 Password The unit includes three password levels. All levels can be adjusted in the PC software. Available password levels: Password level Factory setting Customer Customer Service Master 2000 2001 2002 X X X X X X Access Service Master

A parameter cannot be entered with a too low ranking password. But the settings can be displayed without password entry.

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Each parameter can be protected at a specific password level. To do so, the PC utility software must be used. Enter the parameter to be configured and select the correct password level.

The password level can also be changed from the parameter view in the column Level.

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4.6.1 Parameter access To gain access to adjust the parameters, the password level must be entered:

If the password level is not entered, it is not possible to enter the parameters. The customer password can be changed in menu 9116. The service password can be changed in menu 9117. The master password can be changed in menu 9118. The factory passwords must be changed if the operator of the genset is not allowed to change the parameters.

It is not possible to change the password at a higher level than the password entered.

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Additional functions

5. Additional functions
5.1 Start functions The unit will start the genset when the start command is given. The start sequence is deactivated when the remove starter event occurs or when the running feedback is present. The reason for having two possibilities to deactivate the start relay is to be able to delay the alarms with run status. If it is not possible to activate the run status alarms at low revolutions, the remove starter function must be used. An example of a critical alarm is the oil pressure alarm. Normally, it is configured according to the shutdown fail class. But if the starter motor has to disengage at 400 RPM, and the oil pressure does not reach a level above the shutdown setpoint before 600 RPM, then, obviously, the genset would shut down if the specific alarm was activated at the preset 400 RPM. In that case, the running feedback must be activated at a higher number of revolutions than 600 RPM.

RPM

RPM

1000 600 400

Oil pressure

5.1.1 Digital feedbacks If an external running relay is installed, then the digital control inputs for running detection or remove starter can be used. Running feedback When the digital running feedback is active, the start relay is deactivated and the starter motor will be disengaged.

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Remove starter

Running

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Additional functions

RPM

RPMNOM

RPM

Run. feedback

t
Firing speed

The diagram illustrates how the digital running feedback (terminal 117) is activated when the engine has reached its firing speed. Remove starter When the digital remove starter input is present, the start relay is deactivated and the starter motor will be disengaged.
RPM

RPMNOM

RPM

Run. feedback

Remove starter

t
Firing speed Running

The diagram illustrates how the remove starter input is activated when the engine has reached its firing speed. At the running speed, the digital running feedback is activated.

The remove starter input must be configured from a number of available digital inputs.

The running feedback is detected by either the digital input (see diagram above), frequency measurement above 32 Hz, RPM measured by magnetic pick-up or EIC (option H5/H7).

5.1.2 Analogue tacho feedback When a magnetic pick-up (MPU) is being used, the specific level of revolutions for deactivation of the start relay can be adjusted. Running feedback The diagram below shows how the running feedback is detected at the firing speed level. The factory setting is 1000 RPM (6170 Running detect.).

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Additional functions

RPM

RPMNOM

RPM

Run. feedback, menu 4301

t
Firing speed

Notice that the factory setting of 1000 RPM is higher than the RPM level of starter motors of typical design. Adjust this value to a lower value to avoid damage of the starter motor. Remove starter input The drawing below shows how the setpoint of the remove starter is detected at the firing speed level. The factory setting is 400 RPM (6170 Running detect.).
RPM

RPMNOM RPM Run. feedback, menu 4301

Remove starter, menu 6161

t
Firing speed Running

The number of teeth on the flywheel must be adjusted in menu 6170 when the MPU input is used.

5.1.3 Oil pressure The multi-inputs on terminals 102, 105 and 108 can be used for the detection of running feedback. The terminal in question must be configured as a VDO input for oil pressure measurement. When the oil pressure increases above the adjusted value (6175 Pressure level) then the running feedback is detected and the start sequence is ended.

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Additional functions

Running feedback
RPM / Oil pressure

RPMNOM

RPM

Run detection Oil pressure menu 6175

t
Firing speed

Remove starter input The drawing below shows how the setpoint of the "remove starter input" is detected at the firing speed level. The factory setting is 400 RPM (6170 Running detect.).
RPM / Oil pressure

RPMNOM RPM Run detection Oil pressure menu 6175 Remove starter, menu 6161

t
Firing speed Running

The remove starter function can use the MPU or a digital input. 5.2 Breaker types There are five possible selections for the setting of breaker type for both mains breaker and generator breaker. Continuous NE and Continuous ND This type of signal is most often used combined with a contactor. When using this type of signal, the AGC will only use the close breaker relays. The relay will be closed for closing of the contactor and will be opened for opening of the contactor. The open relay can be used for other purposes. Continuous NE is a normally energised signal, and Continuous ND is a normally deenergised signal.

Pulse This type of signal is most often used combined with circuit breaker. With the setting pulse the AGC will use the close command and the open command relay. The close breaker relay will close for a short time for closing of the circuit breaker. The open breaker relay will close for a short time for opening of the breaker. External/ATS no control This type of signal is used to indicate the position of the breaker, but the breaker is not controlled by the AGC.

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Compact This type of signal will most often be used combined with a compact breaker, a direct controlled motor driven breaker. With the setting compact the AGC will use the close command and the open command relay. The close breaker relay will close for a short time for the compact breaker to close. The breaker off relay will close for the compact breaker to open and hold it closed long enough for the motor in the breaker to recharge the breaker. If the compact breaker is tripped externally, it is recharged automatically before next closing. If compact breaker is selected, the length of breaker open signal can be adjusted. This can be done in menu 2160/2200. 5.3 Breaker spring load time To avoid breaker close failures in situations where breaker ON command is given before the breaker spring has been loaded, the spring load time can be adjusted for GB/TB and MB. The following describes a situation where you risk getting a close failure: 1. The genset is in auto mode, the auto start/stop input is active, the genset is running and the GB is closed. 2. The auto start/stop input is deactivated, the stop sequence is executed and the GB is opened. 3. If the auto start/stop input is activated again before the stop sequence is finished, the GB will give a GB close failure as the GB needs time to load the spring before it is ready to close. Different breaker types are used, and therefore there are two available solutions: 1. Timer-controlled A load time setpoint for the GB/TB and MB control for breakers with no feedback indicating that the spring is loaded. After the breaker has been opened it will not be allowed to close again before the delay has expired. The setpoints are found in menus 6230, 7080 and 8190. On the AGC mains unit (option G5), the spring load feedback from the tie breaker can be connected instead of the GB spring load feedback. 2. Digital input Two configurable inputs to be used for feedbacks from the breakers: One for GB/TB spring loaded and one for MB spring loaded. After the breaker has been opened it will not be allowed to close again before the configured inputs are active. The inputs are configured in the ML-2 utility software. When the timers are counting, the remaining time is shown in the display. If the two solutions are used together, both requirements are to be met before closing of the breaker is allowed. Breaker LED indication To alert the user that the breaker close sequence has been initiated but is waiting for permission to give the close command, the LED indication for the breaker will be flashing yellow in this case. If the breaker needs time to reload the spring after it has opened, then the AGC can take this delay into account. This can be controlled through timers in the AGC or through digital feedbacks from the breaker, depending on the breaker type.

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Additional functions

5.3.1 Principle The diagram shows an example where a single AGC in island mode is controlled by the AUTO start/stop input. This is what happens: When the AUTO start/stop input deactivates, the GB opens. The AUTO start/stop is reactivated immediately after the GB has opened, e.g. by the operator through a switch in the switchboard. However, the AGC waits a while before it issues the close signal again, because the spring load time must expire (or the digital input must be activated - not shown in this example). Then the AGC issues the close signal.

GB closed

GB open Auto Start/stop ON

Auto Start/stop OFF t [sec] Spring load time

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Additional functions

5.4 Alarm inhibit In order to select when the alarms are to be active, a configurable inhibit setting for every alarm has been made. The inhibit functionality is only available via the PC utility software. For every alarm there is a dropdown window where it is possible to select which signals that have to be present in order to inhibit the alarm.

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Additional functions

Selections for alarm inhibit: Function Inhibit 1 Inhibit 2 Inhibit 3 GB ON (TB ON) GB OFF (TB ON) Run status Not run status Generator voltage > 30% Generator voltage < 30% MB ON MB OFF Parallel Not parallel The generator breaker is closed The generator breaker is open Running detected and the timer in menu 6160 expired Running not detected or the timer in menu 6160 not expired Generator voltage is above 30% of nominal Generator voltage is below 30% of nominal The mains breaker is closed The mains breaker is open Both GB and MB are closed Either GB or MB is closed, but not both Description M-logic outputs: Conditions are programmed in M-logic

The timer in 6160 is not used if binary running feedback is used.

Inhibit of the alarm is active as long as one of the selected inhibit functions is active.

In this example, inhibit is set to Not run status and GB ON. Here, the alarm will be active when the generator has started. When the generator has been synchronised to the busbar, the alarm will be disabled again. The inhibit LED on the unit and on the display will activate when one of the inhibit functions is active. Function inputs such as running feedback, remote start or access lock are never inhibited. Only alarm inputs can be inhibited.

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Additional functions

The tie breaker unit has no running detection that can be configured, so the only inhibit functions are the binary input and the TB position.

5.4.1 Run status (6160) Alarms can be adjusted to activate only when the running feedback is active and a specific time delay has expired. The diagram below illustrates that after activation of the running feedback, a run status delay will expire. When the delay expires, alarms with Run status will be activated.

tRUN Run. feedback

t Alarms active

The timer is ignored if binary running feedback is used. 5.5 Access lock The purpose of access lock is to deny the operator the possibility to configure the unit parameters and change the running modes. The input to be used for the access lock function is defined in the ML-2 PC utility software (USW). Access lock will typically be activated from a key switch installed behind the door of the switchboard cabinet.

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Additional functions

Button INFO JUMP START STOP GB ON MB ON VIEW LOG LEFT

Button status Active Not active Not active Not active Not active Not active Active Active Active

Comment It is possible to read all alarms, but it is not possible to acknowledge any of them.

UP

Active

SELECT SELECT DOWN

Not active Active Active

If the access lock is activated when the view menu system is displayed, then the button is not active. If the access lock is activated when the setup menu system is displayed, then the button is active.

BACK RIGHT

Active Active

MODE MODE

Active Active

If the access lock is activated when the view menu system is displayed, the button is not active. If the access lock is activated when the setup menu system is displayed, then the button is active.

After three minutes, the display returns to the view menu system. The setup menu system can only be entered again if the access lock is deactivated. The stop push-button is not active in semi-auto mode when the access lock is activated. For safety reasons it is recommended to install an emergency stop switch.

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Additional functions

The following digital input functions are affected when access lock is activated: Input name Remote start Remote stop Semi-auto Test Auto Manual Block Remote GB ON Remote GB OFF Remote MB ON Remote MB OFF Remote TB ON Remote TB OFF Input status Not active Not active Not active Not active Not active Not active Not active Not active Not active Not active Not active Not active Not active Comment

AOP buttons are not locked when access lock is activated. 5.6 Overlap The purpose of the overlap function is to be able to define a maximum paralleling time between the generator and the mains supply. The function is typically used if there are local requirements to maximum allowed paralleling time. The overlap function is only available in the automatic mains failure and load takeover genset modes.

MB
t t

GB

t
The diagram shows that when the generator breaker is synchronised, the mains breaker will be opened automatically after a time delay (t). Later the mains breaker is synchronised, and the generator breaker is opened after the time delay (t). The time delay is measured in seconds and can be adjusted from 0.10 to 99.90 seconds.

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Additional functions

The same time delay is used for both generator and mains breaker synchronisation.

If the function is used in a Power Management (option G5) application, then the overlap will occur between the mains breaker and the tie breaker on the AGC mains. The time delay typed in the setpoint is a maximum time. This means that if 0.10 seconds are used, the two breakers will never be closed at the same time for a longer delay than the setpoint. The short time parallel function is set up in 2760 Overlap. 5.7 Digital mains breaker control The unit will normally execute the automatic mains failure sequence based on the settings adjusted in the system setup. Besides these settings it is possible to configure a digital input that can be used to control the mains return sequence. This input is the "mains OK" input. The purpose of this function is to let an external device or an operator control the mains return sequence. The external device can e.g. be a PLC. The flowchart below shows that if the input is configured, it needs to be activated (by a pulse) in order to initiate the mains return sequence. The load will continue on generator supply if the input is not activated. The mains OK delay is not used at all when the "Mains OK" input is configured.

Mains OK

No

MB input configured

Yes

Mains OK delay

MB control input

Expired Yes

No

No

ON Yes

MB and GB operation

Sequence

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Additional functions

5.8 Command timers The purpose of the command timers is to be able to e.g. start and stop the genset automatically at specific times each weekday or certain weekdays. If auto mode is activated, this function is available in island operation, load takeover, mains power export and fixed power operation. Up to four command timers can be used for e.g. start and stop. The command timers are available in M-logic and can be used for other purposes than starting and stopping the genset automatically. Each command timer can be set for the following time periods: Individual days (MO, TU, WE, TH, FR, SA, SU) MO, TU, WE, TH MO, TU, WE, TH, FR MO, TU, WE, TH, FR, SA, SU SA, SU To start in AUTO mode, the "Auto start/stop" command can be programmed in M-logic or in the input settings. The time-dependent commands are flags that are raised when the command timer is in the active period. 5.9 Running output 6160 Run status can be adjusted to give a digital output when the genset is running.

Select the correct relay number in output A and output B and enable the function. Change the relay function to limit in the I/O menu. Then the relay will activate, but no alarm will appear.

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If the relay function is not changed to "limit" function, an alarm will appear at every running situation. 5.10 Frequency-dependent droop This droop function can be used when the genset is parallel to the mains. In case the frequency drops or rises due to instability of the mains, the curve for frequency-dependent droop is made to compensate the power setpoint. Example: With a nominal frequency of 50 Hz and an actual frequency of 51.5 Hz, there is a deviation of 1.5 Hz which is equal to a 3% deviation from the nominal setting. The genset will then droop to 400 kW according to the below vector diagram.

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P [KW]

MAX

DBH HYSH SLPL Fixed Power Setpoint

SLPH HYSL DBL MIN

(Fnom-fact)*100/fact [%] 10% 9% 8% 7% 6% 5% 4% 3% 2% 1% 0% 1% 2% 3% 4% 5% 6% 7% 8% 9% 10%

The above vector diagram is configured with the parameter settings as in the following table. The curve can be designed inside MIN/MAX [kW] area. Menu 7051 7121 7122 7123 7124 7131 7132 7133 Settings 450 2 2 1 1 150 900 50 kW DBL[%] DBH[%] HYSL[%] HYSH[%] MIN[kW] MAX[kW] SLPL[kW/%] Name Fixed power setpoint Dead band low in percentages of nominal frequency. Dead band high in percentages of nominal frequency. Hysterese low in percentages of nominal frequency. If HYSL is set above DBL, the hysteresis low is disabled. Hysterese high in percentages of nominal frequency. If HYSH is set above DBH, the hysteresis high is disabled. Minimum output of droop handling. Maximum output of droop handling. Slope low. The setting determines the increase/decrease of power reference per percentage the actual frequency drops below nominal frequency. Slope high. The setting determines the increase/decrease of power reference per percentage the actual frequency rises above nominal frequency. Enable droop curve function. Description

7134

-50

SLPH[kW/%]

7143

ON

Enable

The frequency-dependent droop is only available in fixed power mode.

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5.11 Power and cos phi offsets 5.11.1 Power offsets Can be set in menu 7220-7225. The enabled power offsets will be added/subtracted from the fixed power setpoint in menu 7051, which refers to Pnom. The adjusted fixed power setpoint will be limited to be inside the values in menu 7023 "Minimum load", and maximum value is Pnom.

5.11.2 Cos phi offsets Can be set in menu 7241-7245. The enabled cos phi offsets will be added/subtracted from the fixed cos phi setpoint in menu 7052. The adjusted fixed cos phi setpoint will be limited to be inside the values in menu 7171 "Cos phi (x2)", and maximum value is in menu 7173 "Cos phi (x2)".

Power and cos phi offsets can be enabled via M-logic. 5.12 Derate genset The purpose of the derate function is to be able to reduce the maximum output power of the genset if specific conditions require this. An example of such a condition is the ambient temperature. If the ambient temperature increases to a level where the cooling water coolers decrease in cooling capacity, it will be necessary to reduce the power of the genset. If the genset is not derated, alarms and shutdown events will very likely occur. Up to three derate curves can be made to derate the genset independent of each other. The first curve active will derate the genset to the adjusted setpoint.

The derate function is typically used when cooling problems are expected.

5.12.1 Input selection The derate function can be configured to one of the following inputs: Input Multi-input 102 Multi-input 105 Multi-input 108 0-40V DC 4-20 mA Pt100/1000 VDO Digital Water temp. Oil temp. Comment

EIC M-logic Select the needed inputs in 6240-6250-6260 Power derate.

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Refer to the type label for information about engine interface selection.

5.12.2 Derate parameters The parameters that define the derate characteristics are the following: Start derate point (6240/6250/6260 Power derate) This is the setting where the derating must start. The setting can be in mA (max. 20 mA) or in centigrades C (max. 200C).

Slope (6243/6253/6263 Power derate) Adjust the derating speed. The adjustment is in percent per unit, i.e. if the 4-20 mA input is used, then the derating will be in %/mA, and if the Pt100/Pt1000/VDO input is used, then the derating will be in %/ C. Be aware that the 4-20 mA input can be configured with different minimum and maximum settings. In this case the settings "start derate point" and "slope" use these new settings. Derate limit (6246/6256/6266 Power derate) This is the lowest derate level.

PNOM

PLIMIT

mA 0 10 Start derate 16 20

5.12.3 Derate characteristic It can be selected whether the characteristic of the derating should be proportional or inverse proportional. The drawing above shows the inverse characteristic. The proportional characteristic is illustrated below.

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PNOM

PLIMIT

mA 0 10 Start increase 16 20

The genset is derated when the control value is lower than the setpoint (in the example above the control value is an mA signal). The derate characteristic is selected in 6240/6250/6260 Power derate Setting OFF: Setting ON: 5.13 Idle running The purpose of the idle run function is to change the start and stop sequences to allow the genset to operate under low temperature conditions. It is possible to use the idle run function with or without timers. Two timers are available. One timer is used in the start sequence, and one timer is used in the stop sequence. The main purpose of the function is to prevent the genset from stopping. The timers are available to make the function flexible. Inverse characteristic Proportional characteristic

The speed governor must be prepared for the idle run function if this function is to be used.

The function is typically used in installations where the genset is exposed to low temperatures which could generate starting problems or damage the genset. 5.13.1 Description The function is enabled and configured in 6290 Idle running. It has to be noted that the governor itself must handle the idle speed based on a digital signal from the unit (see the principle diagram below).

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When the function is enabled, two digital inputs are used for control purposes: No. 1 Input Low speed input Description This input is used to change between idle speed and nominal speed. This input does not prevent the genset from stopping - it is only a selection between idle and nominal speed. When this input is activated, the genset will start. It will not be able to stop as long as this input is activated.

Temperature control input

If the idle run function is selected by means of timer, the low speed input is overruled.

The input must be configured through the PC software at commissioning.

One extra relay output must be available on the unit. Notice that this is option-dependent.

Turbo chargers not originally prepared for operating in the low speed area can be damaged if the genset is running in "idle run" for too long.
High/low speed selection

Start/stop gen-set

Low speed input Multi-line 2 Temperature control input

relay

Idle run input GOVERNOR

Actuator

5.13.2 Examples Idle speed during starting and stopping In this example both the start and the stop timers are activated. The start and stop sequences are changed in order to let the genset stay at the idle level before speeding up. It also decreases the speed to the idle level for a specified delay time before stopping.

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RPM

1500

tSTART 300

tSTOP

t Start Stop
Idle speed, no stopping In this example both timers are deactivated. If the genset is to be prevented from stopping, then the digital input "temp control" must be left ON at all times. In that case the characteristic looks like this:

RPM

1500

300

t Start Stop

The oil pressure alarm (VDO oil) will be enabled during idle run if set to "ON".

5.13.3 Configuration of digital input The digital input is configured via the PC software.

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5.13.4 Inhibit The alarms that are deactivated by the inhibit function are inhibited in the usual manner, except for the oil pressure alarms; VDO oil 102, 105 and 108 which are active during "idle run" as well. 5.13.5 Running signal The running feedback must be activated when the genset is running in idle mode. 5.13.6 Idle speed flowcharts The flowcharts illustrate the starting and stopping of the genset by use of the inputs "temp control" and "low speed".

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5.13.7 Start
Start

No

Auto start/stop ON Yes Start the Genset

No starting

No

Temp control ON

Yes Start the Genset

Idle timer on Yes No Timer expired Yes

No No

Lowspeed ON Yes

Genset running at idle speed

Genset running at f Nom

End

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5.13.8 Stop
Start

Auto start/stop OFF Yes Genset stop sequence

No

Temp control OFF Yes

No

Genset running at idle speed

No No

Idle timer on Yes

Lowspeed ON Yes Genset running at idle speed

No

Idle timer expired Yes

Genset stop sequence

End

5.14 Engine heater This function is used to control the temperature of the engine. A sensor measuring the cooling water temperature is used to activate an external heating system to keep the engine at a minimum temperature. The setpoints adjusted in menu 6320 are: Setpoint: Output A: Input type: Hysteresis: This setpoint +/- the hysteresis is the start and stop points for the engine heater. The relay output for the engine heater. Multi-input to be used for temperature measurement. This decides how big a deviation from the setpoint is needed to activate/deactivate the engine heater. Enables the engine heater function.

Enable:

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Principle diagram:
43C

37C

Engine heater relay Start attempt DG running

The engine heater function is only active when the engine is stopped.

5.14.1 Engine heater alarm If the temperature keeps dropping after the start setpoint has been exceeded, an alarm will be raised if configured in menu 6330. 5.15 Master clock The purpose of the master clock is to control the frequency of the genset in order to obtain the correct number of periods.

This function can only be used if island operation is selected.

In a 50 Hz system one period lasts 20 ms. If this changes, e.g. due to the dead band setting of the frequency controller, a difference will exist between the actual number of periods and the theoretical number of periods. Equipment that works based on the zero crossings will be affected by the surplus or missing zero crossings. The most common example of such equipment is alarm clocks. The units internal clock is a timekeeper which is included in the battery backed memory circuit. The timekeeper function works based on an oscillating crystal instead of zero crossings of the AC measurements. Due to the accuracy of the timekeeper, it is recommended to synchronise the clock on a regular basis, e.g. once every month.

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Setting 6401 Start 6402 Stop 6403 Difference 6404 Compensation 6405 Enable Start time. Stop time.

Description

Comment The compensation period starts at the adjusted time. The compensation period stops at the adjusted time.

The setpoint in seconds that initiates the compensation. Frequency difference when the compensation is initiated. Enables the function. +/- value.

The compensation frequency must be adjusted to a value higher than the dead band setting.

5.15.1 Compensation time The time for the compensation can easily be calculated at a given adjustment of 6403 and 6404 (example): 6403 = 30 seconds 6404 = +/- 0.1 Hz

5.16 Battery test This function gives the possibility to test the condition of the battery. The battery test can be initiated with a digital input and is available when the genset is in semi-auto and auto mode. If a mains failure occurs during the battery test sequence, the test will automatically be interrupted, and the automatic mains failure start up sequence will be activated. During the test, the battery voltage will decrease, and an alarm will occur if it drops to the setpoint.
UBATTERY tBAT TEST tBAT TEST

Alarm Cancel test

t Test 1 Test 2

The drawing shows that test #1 is carried out without a large voltage drop of the battery voltage, whereas test #2 reaches the alarm setpoint.

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As there is no reason to wear the battery down even more, the test stops when the battery test alarm occurs. The test is typically used at periodical intervals, e.g. once every week. The engine must be at a standstill when the test is started. Otherwise, the test command will be ignored. The stop relay will act depending on the coil type: Stop coil: Run coil: The stop relay activates during the test. The stop relay stays deactivated during the test.

The drawing below shows that when the test is started, the start relay activates making the engine turn.

Start relay

Stop coil or Run coil

Start test

5.16.1 Input configuration If this function is to be used, it is necessary to configure a digital input that initiates the function. This is done in the dialogue box below.

If AUTO mode is selected, the mains failure sequence will be initiated if a mains failure occurs during the battery test.

5.16.2 Auto configuration If the automatic battery test is used, the function has to be enabled in menu 6420. When the function is enabled, the battery test will be carried out with a specified interval, e.g. once a week. Completed battery tests will be logged in a separate battery test log.

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The factory setting in menu 6424 is 52 weeks. This means that the automatic battery test will be executed once a year. If application 3, 6 or 7 is used, it is expected that one of the multi-inputs is used for the battery test of the starter battery.

It is expected that the multi-inputs used for the battery test are configured to "0-40V DC".

5.16.3 Battery asymmetry (6430 Batt. asymmetry) The reason for making the battery asymmetry test is to determine if one of the batteries is getting weak. The battery asymmetry is a combination of measurements and calculations. Setpoints available: T1: RF1: T2: RF2: The input type to be used for calculation of battery asymmetry 1. Reference of asymmetry measurement no. 1. The input type to be used for calculation of battery asymmetry 2. Reference of asymmetry measurement no. 2.

The following seven battery applications are supported. The shown applications are merely examples the choice of multi-input (MI) or power supply input is configurable in menu 6410.

Application 1: Multi-line 2 AUX MI 1 A + E + B A

Application 2: Multi-line 2 AUX MI 2 MI 1 E F + + -

B + +

Start/Manoeuvre battery

Start/Manoeuvre battery

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Application 3: Multi-line 2 AUX MI 1 E + MI 3 B C + D - + - + Start battery

Application 4: Multi-line 2 AUX MI 1 E + -

B +

Manoeuvre battery

Manoeuvre battery

Application 5: Multi-line 2 AUX MI 2 MI 1 E F + + -

B + +

Manoeuvre battery
Application 6: Multi-line 2 MI 3 MI 2 MI 1 B C EF D - + - + -+ -+ -+ -+
Application 7: Multi-line 2 AUX MI 2 MI 1 E F - + - +

AUX A - + - +

MI 3 B C - + - + D - + - + - + - + Start battery

Manoeuvre battery

Start battery

Manoeuvre battery

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Looking at battery application 1 as an example:

Application 1: Multi-line 2 AUX MI 1 A + E + B

Start/Manoeuvre battery
The power supply measurement is used as the reference RF1 (point A and B) in menu 6432 and multi-input 1 is used as the type T1 (point A and E) in menu 6431. By making these measurements it is possible to calculate the voltage between E and B. This gives a full picture of battery voltages, e.g.: Measured value A/B (RF1) = 21V DC Measured value A/E (T1) = 12V DC Calculated value E/B (RF1 T1) = 9V DC Battery asymmetry = E/B (RF1*1/2) = 9 (21*1/2) = -1.5V DC It is expected that the multi-inputs used for the battery asymmetry are configured to "0-40V DC".

The selection power supply is referring to the supply on terminals 1 and 2.

Battery asymmetry alarm Alarms for battery asymmetry 1 and 2 are set up in menus 6440 and 6450. The setpoint in menus 6440 and 6450 is only set in positive values, however, it will also trigger if the battery asymmetry calculation results in a negative value. 5.17 Ventilation This function can be used to control the cooling of the engine. The purpose is to use a multi-input for measuring the cooling water temperature and that way activate an external ventilation system to keep the engine below a maximum temperature. The functionality is shown in the below diagram. Setpoints available (6460 Max ventilation): Setpoint: Output A (OA): Hysteresis: The limit for activation of the relay set in OA. The relay activated when the setpoint is exceeded. The number of degrees the temperature has to be below the setpoint in order to deactivate the relay set in OA. Enable/disable the ventilation function.

Enable:

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The type of input to use for the temperature measurement is selected in menu 6323 Engine heater.

95C

85C

Relay

5.17.1 Max. ventilation alarm Two alarms can be set up in menu 6470 and menu 6480 to activate if the temperature keeps rising after the start setpoint has been reached. 5.18 Summer/winter time This function is used to make the AGC unit automatically adjust the clock in the unit according to summer and winter time. The function is enabled in menu 6490.

The function only supports the Danish rules. 5.19 Switchboard error The switchboard error function is handled in two different menus: 6500 "Block swbd error" and 6510 "Stop Swbd error". The functions are activated by using one configurable input (switchboard error) which is configured with the PC utility software The functionality of the switchboard error input is active as soon as the input is configured. The enable in menus 6500 and 6510 only refers to the alarm function.

5.19.1 Block swbd error (menu 6500) When activated, this function will block the start sequence of the genset in case the genset is not running. Setpoints available: Delay: Parallel: When the input is active, the alarm will be activated when this delay has expired. OFF: Only AMF start sequence is blocked when the input is active. ON: All start sequences, regardless of running mode, are blocked when the input is active. Relay to activate when the delay has expired.

Output A:

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Output B: Enable: Fail class:

Relay to activate when the delay has expired. Enable/disable the alarm function. The fail class of the alarm.

5.19.2 Stop swbd error (menu 6510) When activated, this function will stop the genset if the genset is running in Auto mode. Setpoints available: Delay: When the input is active and the delay has expired, the genset will trip the breaker, cool down and stop. The function is active regardless of the "Enable" setting. Relay to activate when the delay has expired. Relay to activate when the delay has expired. Enable/disable the alarm function. The fail class of the alarm.

Output A: Output B: Enable: Fail class: 5.20 Not in auto

This function can be used for indication or to raise an alarm in case the system is not in Auto. The function is set up in menu 6540. 5.21 Fuel pump logic The fuel pump logic is used to start and stop the fuel supply pump to maintain the fuel level in the service tank at predefined levels. The start and stop limits are detected from one of the three multi-inputs. Setpoints available in menu 6550: Setpoint 1: Setpoint 2: Delay: Output A (OA): Start level. Stop level. If the fuel level has not increased by 2% within this delay, a Fuel fill alarm will be raised. The relay to be used for control of the fuel pump. The selected relay activates below the start limit and deactivates above the stop level. The multi-input to be used for the fuel level sensor. The fail class of the Fuel fill alarm.

Type: Fail class:

The fuel pump relay can be activated via M-logic.

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The output relay should be configured as a limit relay, otherwise, an alarm will be raised whenever the output is activated. The below drawing shows how the fuel pump is activated when the level reaches 20% and stopped again when the level has reached 80%. Fuel level

Fuel service tank level

80 %

20 % Time

Fuel pump start level

Fuel pump stop level

5.21.1 Fuel fill check The fuel pump logic includes a Fuel fill check function. When the fuel pump is running, the fuel level must increase by 2% within the fuel fill check timer set in menu 6553. If the fuel level does not increase by 2% within the adjusted delay time, then the fuel pump relay deactivates and a Fuel fill alarm occurs.

level, 2%

level, 2%

tFill check

The level of increase is fixed at 2% and cannot be changed.

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5.22 Fail class All activated alarms must be configured with a fail class. The fail classes define the category of the alarms and the subsequent alarm action. Eight different fail classes can be used. The tables below illustrate the action of each fail class when the engine is running or stopped. 5.22.1 Engine running Fail class Action Alarm horn relay X X X X X X X X Alarm display X X X X X X X X (X) X (X) X X X X X X X X X X Deload Trip of gen. breaker Trip of mains breaker Coolingdown genset Stop genset

1 Block 2 Warning 3 Trip GB 4 Trip + stop 5 Shutdown 6 Trip MB 7 Safety stop 8 Trip MB/GB

The table illustrates the action of the fail classes. If, for instance, an alarm has been configured with the "shutdown" fail class, the following actions occur. The alarm horn relay will activate The alarm will be displayed in the alarm info screen The generator breaker will open instantly The genset is stopped instantly The genset cannot be started from the unit (see next table) The fail class "Safety stop" will only deload the genset before opening the breaker if option G4 or G5 (power management) is used. If power management is not active, the "Safety stop" will have the same function as "Trip and stop". The fail class "Trip MB/GB" will only trip the generator breaker if there is no mains breaker present.

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5.22.2 Engine stopped Fail class 1 Block 2 Warning 3 Trip GB 4 Trip + stop 5 Shutdown 6 Trip MB 7 Safety stop 8 Trip MB/GB X (X) X (X) X X X X X X X Action Block engine start X Block MB sequence Block GB sequence

In addition to the actions defined by the fail classes, it is possible to activate one or two relay outputs if additional relays are available in the unit. The fail class "Trip MB/GB" will only block engine start and GB sequence if there is no mains breaker present.

5.22.3 Fail class configuration The fail class can be selected for each alarm function either via the display or the PC software. To change the fail class via the PC software, the alarm function to be configured must be selected. Select the desired fail class in the fail class roll-down panel.

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5.23 Trip of non-essential load (NEL)

The two terms "trip of non-essential load" and "load shedding" describe the same functionality. The trip of Non Essential Load (NEL) groups (load shedding) is carried out in order to protect the busbar against an imminent blackout situation due to either a high load/current or overload on a generator set or a low busbar frequency. The unit is able to trip three NEL groups due to: the measured load of the generator set (high load and overload) the measured current of the generator set the measured frequency at the busbar

The load groups are tripped as three individual load groups. This means that the trip of load group no. 1 has no direct influence on the trip of load group no. 2. Only the measurement of either the busbar frequency or the load/current on the generator set is able to trip the load groups. Trip of the NEL groups due to the load of a running generator set will reduce the load on the busbar and thus reduce the load percentage on the running generator set. This may prevent a possible blackout at the busbar caused by an overload on the running generator set. The current trip will be selected in case of inductive loads and unstable power factor (PF <0.7) where the current is increased. Trip of the NEL groups due to a low busbar frequency will reduce the real power load at the busbar and thus reduce the load percentage on the generator set. This may prevent a possible blackout at the busbar.

For output setup, please refer to the description of outputs. 5.24 Service timers The unit is able to monitor the maintenance intervals. Two service timers are available to cover different intervals. The service timers are set up in menus 6110 and 6120. The function is based on running hours. When the adjusted time expires, the unit will display an alarm. The running hours is counting when the running feedback is present. Setpoints available in menus 6110 and 6120: Enable: Running hours: Enable/disable the alarm function. The number of running hours to activate the alarm. The service timer alarm will be activated as soon as the running hours have been reached. The number of days to activate the alarm if the running hours are not reached before this number of days, the alarm will still be activated. The service timer alarm will be activated at 8:00 AM on the day the alarm expires. The fail class of the alarm.

Day:

Fail class:

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Output A: Reset:

Relay to be activated when the alarm is activated. Enabling this will reset the service timer to zero. This must be done when the alarm is activated.

5.25 Wire fail detection If it is necessary to supervise the sensors/wires connected to the multi-inputs and analogue inputs, then it is possible to enable the wire break function for each input. If the measured value on the input is outside the normal dynamic area of the input, it will be detected as if the wire has made a short circuit or a break. An alarm with a configurable fail class will be activated. Input 4-20 mA 0-40V DC VDO Oil, type 1 VDO Oil, type 2 VDO Temp, type 1 VDO Temp, type 2 VDO Temp, type 3 VDO Fuel, type 1 VDO Fuel, type 2 VDO configurable P100 P1000 Level switch Wire failure area < 3mA 0V DC < 1.0 ohm < 1.0 ohm < 4.0 ohm < 4.0 ohm < 0.6 ohm < 0.6 ohm < 1.0 ohm < lowest resistance < 82.3 ohm < 823 ohm Normal range 4-20 mA Only active if the switch is open Wire failure area > 21 mA N/A > 195.0 ohm > 195.0 ohm > 488.0 ohm > 488.0 ohm > 97.0 ohm > 97.0 ohm > 195.0 ohm > highest resistance > 194.1 ohm > 1941 ohm

Principle The illustration below shows that when the wire of the input breaks, the measured value will drop to zero. Then the alarm will occur.
Input signal (mA, C,b, %)

Upper failure limit

Wire failure

Lower failure limit Wire failure t Wire break

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MPU wire break (menu 4550) The MPU wire break function is only active when the genset is not running. In this case an alarm will be raised if the wire connection between the AGC and MPU breaks. Stop coil wire break (menu 6270) The alarm will occur when the stop coil is not activated (generator is running) and the input is deenergised.

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5.26 Digital inputs The unit has a number of binary inputs some of which are configurable and some are not. Engine interface card M4 (standard) Available digital inputs not configurable 1 Auto X X X Semi X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X Test X X X Man X X X X X X X X X X X X Available digital inputs configurable 6 Block X X X Configurable Configurable Configurable Configurable Configurable Configurable Configurable Configurable Configurable Configurable Configurable Configurable Configurable Configurable Configurable Configurable Configurable Configurable Configurable Configurable Configurable Configurable Configurable Not configurable Not configurable Not configurable Not configurable Not configurable Configurable Configurable Configurable Input type Constant Constant Constant Pulse Pulse Pulse Pulse Pulse Pulse Constant Pulse Pulse Pulse Pulse Constant Constant Constant Pulse Constant Constant Constant Constant Constant Constant Constant Constant Constant Constant Constant Pulse

Input function 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 Shutdown override Access lock Running feedback Remote start Remote stop Semi-auto Test Auto Manual Block Remote GB ON Remote GB OFF Remote MB ON Remote MB OFF Remote alarm acknowledge Auto start/stop Remove starter Reset analogue GOV/AVR outputs Manual GOV up Manual GOV down Manual AVR up Manual AVR down GB position ON GB position OFF MB position ON MB position OFF Emergency stop Low speed Temperature control Battery test

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Input function 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 Mains OK External f control External P control External PF control External U control External Q power MB close inhibit Enable mode shift Enable GB black close Enable sep. sync. Start enable Alternative start Switchboard error Total test GB spring loaded MB spring loaded 1st priority mains Ext. MB pos. OFF Heavy consumer 1 request Heavy consumer 2 request Deload GB OFF and BLOCK HC 1 fixed load feedback HC 2 fixed load feedback Secured ON Secured OFF Base load

Auto X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X

Semi X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X

Test X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X

Man X

Block X

Configurable Configurable Configurable Configurable Configurable Configurable Configurable

Input type Pulse Constant Constant Constant Constant Constant Constant Constant Constant Constant Constant Constant Constant Constant Constant Constant Constant Constant Constant Constant Constant Pulse Constant Constant Pulse Pulse Constant

X X X X X X X X X X X X X X

X X X X

Configurable Configurable Configurable Configurable Configurable

X X X X X X X X X

Configurable Configurable Configurable Configurable Configurable Configurable Configurable Configurable Configurable Configurable

X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X

Configurable Configurable Configurable Configurable Configurable Configurable

5.26.1 Functional description 1. Shutdown override This input deactivates all protections except the overspeed protection and the emergency stop input. The number of start attempts is seven by default, but it can be configured in 6180 Start. Also a special cool down timer is used in the stop sequence after an activation of this input. 2. Access lock Activating the access lock input deactivates the control display push-buttons. It will only be possible to view measurements, alarms and the log. 3. Running feedback The input is used as a running indication of the engine. When the input is activated, the start relay is deactivated.

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4. Remote start This input initiates the start sequence of the genset when semi-auto or manual mode is selected. 5. Remote stop This input initiates the stop sequence of the genset when semi-auto or manual mode is selected. The genset will stop without cooling down. 6. Semi-auto Changes the present running mode to semi-auto. 7. Test Changes the present running mode to test. 8. Auto Changes the present running mode to auto. 9. Manual Changes the present running mode to manual. 10. Block Changes the present running mode to block. When block mode is selected, the running mode cannot be changed by activating the digital inputs. 11. Remote GB ON The generator breaker ON sequence will be initiated and the breaker will synchronise if the mains breaker is closed, or close without synchronising if the mains breaker is opened. 12. Remote GB OFF The generator breaker OFF sequence will be initiated. If the mains breaker is opened, then the generator breaker will open instantly. If the mains breaker is closed, the generator load will be deloaded to the breaker open limit followed by a breaker opening. 13. Remote MB ON The mains breaker ON sequence will be initiated and the breaker will synchronise if the generator breaker is closed, or close without synchronising if the generator breaker is opened. 14. Remote MB OFF The mains breaker OFF sequence will be initiated, and the breaker will open instantly. 15. Remote alarm acknowledge Acknowledges all present alarms, and the alarm LED on the display stops flashing. 16. Auto start/stop The genset will start when this input is activated. The genset will be stopped if the input is deactivated. The input can be used when the unit is in island operation, fixed power, load takeover or mains power export and the AUTO running mode is selected. 17. Remove starter The start sequence is deactivated. This means the start relay deactivates, and the starter motor will disengage.

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18. Reset analogue GOV/AVR outputs The analogue +/-20 mA controller outputs will be reset to 0 mA. All analogue controller outputs are reset. That is the governor output and the AVR output if option D1 is selected. If an offset has been adjusted in the control setup, then the reset position will be the specific adjustment. 19. Manual GOV up If manual mode is selected, then the governor output will be increased. 20. Manual GOV down If manual mode is selected, then the governor output will be decreased. 21. Manual AVR up If manual mode is selected, then the AVR output will be increased. 22. Manual AVR down If manual mode is selected, then the AVR output will be decreased. The manual governor and AVR increase and decrease inputs can only be used in manual mode. 23. Generator breaker closed feedback (GB position ON) The input function is used as an indication of the generator breaker position. The unit requires this feedback when the breaker is closed or a position failure alarm occurs. 24. Generator breaker open feedback (GB position OFF) The input function is used as an indication of the generator breaker position. The unit requires this feedback when the breaker is opened or a position failure alarm occurs. 25. Mains breaker closed feedback (MB position ON) The input function is used as an indication of the mains breaker position. The unit requires this feedback when the breaker is closed or a position failure alarm occurs. 26. Mains breaker open feedback (MB position OFF) The input function is used as an indication of the mains breaker position. The unit requires this feedback when the breaker is opened or a position failure alarm occurs. 27. Emergency stop The input shuts down the engine immediately. At the same time it opens the generator breaker.

The shutdown fail class must be selected.

28. Low speed Disables the regulators and keeps the genset running at a low RPM.

The governor must be prepared for this function.

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29. Temperature control This input is part of the idle mode function. When the input is high, then the genset starts. It starts at high or low speed, depending on the activation of the low speed input. When the input is deactivated, then the genset goes to idle mode (low speed = ON), or it stops (low speed = OFF). 30. Battery test Activates the starter without starting the genset. If the battery is weak, the test will cause the battery voltage to drop more than acceptable, and an alarm will occur. 31. Mains OK Disables the "mains OK delay" timer. The synchronisation of the mains breaker will happen when the input is activated. 32. External frequency control The nominal frequency setpoint will be controlled from the analogue inputs terminal 40/41. The internal setpoint will not be used. 33. External power control The power setpoint in fixed power will be controlled from the analogue inputs terminal 40/41. The internal setpoint will not be used. 34. External power factor control The power factor setpoint will be controlled from the analogue inputs terminal 41/42. The internal setpoint will not be used. 35. External voltage control The nominal voltage setpoint will be controlled from the analogue inputs terminal 41/42. The internal setpoint will not be used. 36. External reactive power The reactive power setpoint will be controlled from the analogue inputs terminal 41/42. The internal setpoint will not be used. 37. MB close inhibit When this input is activated, then the mains breaker cannot close. 38. Enable mode shift The input activates the mode shift function, and the AGC will perform the AMF sequence in case of a mains failure. When the input is configured, the setting in menu 7081 (mode shift ON/OFF) is disregarded. 39. Enable GB black close When the input is activated, the AGC is allowed to close the generator on a black busbar, providing that the frequency and voltage are inside the limits set up in menu 2110. 40. Enable separate sync. Activating this input will split the breaker close and breaker synchronisation functions into two different relays. The breaker close function will remain on the relays dedicated for breaker control. The synchronisation function will be moved to a configurable relay dependent on the options configuration.

This function is option-dependent. Option M12 or M14.x is required.

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41. Start enable The input must be activated to be able to start the engine.

When the genset is started, the input can be removed.

42. Alternative start This input is used to simulate an AMF failure and this way run a full AMF sequence without a mains failure actually being present. 43. Switchboard error The input will stop or block the genset depending on running status. 44. Total test This input will be logged in the event log to indicate that a planned mains failure has been made. 45. GB spring loaded The AGC will not send a close signal before this feedback is present. 46. MB spring loaded The AGC will not send a close signal before this feedback is present. 47. 1st priority mains This input is used in G5 applications with two mains connections to select which mains connection has 1st priority. 48. Ext. MB pos. OFF This input is used in G5 applications with two mains connections to tell the AGC mains units that the mains breaker not controlled by them has been tripped. 49. Heavy consumer 1 request This input is used in G5 applications with two generators or more to request heavy consumer 1 to start. 50. Heavy consumer 2 request This input is used in G5 applications with two generators or more to request heavy consumer 2 to start. 51. Deload A running genset will start to ramp down the power. 52. GB OFF and BLOCK The generator breaker will open, the genset will activate the stop sequence and when the genset is stopped, it will be blocked for start. 53. HC 1 fixed load feedback HC 1 is running and consuming 100% power. 54. HC 2 fixed load feedback HC 2 is running and consuming 100% power. 55. Secured mode ON Secured mode adds an extra generator to the system, i.e. one generator too many will be running when comparing with the actual power requirement.

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56. Secured mode OFF Ends secured running mode (see 55). 57. Base load The generator set will run base load (fixed power) and not participate in frequency control. Should the plant power requirement drop, the base load will be lowered so the other generator(s) on line produces at least 10% power.

The input functions are set up with the PC utility software, please refer to "Help" in this. 5.27 Outputs The unit has a number of output functions which can be configured to any available relay. Output function 1 2 3 4 5 HC 1 ack. HC 2 ack. Trip NEL 1 Trip NEL 2 Trip NEL 3 Auto X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X Semi Test Man Block Configurable Configurable Configurable Configurable Configurable Configurable Output type Pulse Pulse Pulse Pulse Pulse

5.27.1 Functional description 1. HC 1 ack. This output is used in G5 applications with two or more generators to acknowledge the heavy consumer requested. 2. HC 2 ack. This output is used in G5 applications with two or more generators to acknowledge the heavy consumer requested.

Please refer to the option G4/G5/G8 manual for reference.

3. Trip NEL 1 This output is used to trip load groups. 4. Trip NEL 2 This output is used to trip load groups. 5. Trip NEL 3 This output is used to trip load groups.

Please refer to the description of NEL. 5.28 Multi-inputs The AGC unit has three multi-inputs which can be configured to be used as the following input types:

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1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8.

4-20 mA 0-40V DC Pt100 Pt1000 VDO oil VDO water VDO fuel Digital

The function of the multi-inputs can only be configured in the PC utility software.

For each input two alarm levels are available, the menu numbers of the alarm settings for each multi-input is controlled by the configured input type as seen in the following table. Input type 4-20 mA 0-40V DC Pt100/Pt1000 VDO oil VDO water VDO fuel Digital Multi-input 102 4120/4130 4140/4150 4160/4170 4180/4190 4200/4210 4220/4230 3400 Multi-input 105 4250/4260 4270/4280 4290/4300 4310/4320 4330/4340 4350/4360 3410 Multi-input 108 4380/4390 4400/4410 4420/4430 4440/4450 4460/4470 4480/4490 3420

Only one alarm level is available for the digital input type.

5.28.1 4-20 mA If one of the multi-inputs has been configured as 4-20 mA, the unit and range of the measured value corresponding to 4-20 mA can be changed in the PC utility software in order to get the correct reading in the display. 5.28.2 0-40V DC The 0-40V DC input has primarily been designed to handle the battery asymmetry test. 5.28.3 Pt100/1000 This input type can be used for heat sensor, e.g. cooling water temp. The unit of the measured value can be changed from Celsius to Fahrenheit in the PC utility software in order to get the desired reading in the display. 5.28.4 VDO inputs The unit can contain up to three VDO inputs. The inputs have different functions, as the hardware design allows for several VDO types. These various types of VDO inputs are available for all multi-inputs:

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VDO oil: VDO water: VDO fuel:

Oil pressure Cooling water temperature Fuel level sensor

For each type of VDO input it is possible to select between different characteristics including a configurable. 5.28.5 VDO oil This VDO input is used for measuring the lubricating oil pressure. VDO sensor type Pressure Bar 0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 3.5 4.0 4.5 5.0 6.0 7.0 8.0 9.0 10.0 psi 0 7 15 22 29 36 44 51 58 65 73 87 102 116 131 145 Type 1 10.0 27.2 44.9 62.9 81.0 99.2 117.1 134.7 151.9 168.3 184.0 107.3 124.3 140.4 155.7 170.2 184.0 89.6 71.0 51.5 31.3 Type 2 10.0 Type 3

The configurable type is configurable with eight points in the range 0-480 . The resistance as well as the pressure can be adjusted. If the VDO input is used as a level switch, then be aware that no voltage must be connected to the input. If any voltage is applied to the VDO inputs, it will be damaged. Please refer to the Application Notes for further wiring information.

5.28.6 VDO water This VDO input is used for measuring the cooling water temperature.

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VDO sensor type Temperature C 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 110 120 130 140 150 F 104 122 140 158 176 194 212 230 248 266 284 302 Type 1 291.5 197.3 134.0 97.1 70.1 51.2 38.5 29.1 22.4 Type 2 480.7 323.6 222.5 157.1 113.2 83.2 62.4 47.6 36.8 28.9 22.8 18.2 7.4 11.7 19.8 36.0 Type 3 69.3 Type 4

The configurable type is configurable with eight points in the range 0-480 . The temperature as well as the resistance can be adjusted. If the VDO input is used as a level switch, then be aware that no voltage must be connected to the input. If any voltage is applied to the VDO inputs, it will be damaged. Please refer to the Application Notes for further wiring information.

5.28.7 VDO fuel This VDO input is used for the fuel level sensor. VDO sensor type Type 1 Value 0% 100% Resistance 78.8 1.6 VDO sensor type Type 2 Value 0% 100% Resistance 3 180 If the VDO input is used as a level switch, then be aware that no voltage must be connected to the input. If any voltage is applied to the VDO inputs, it will be damaged. Please refer to the Application Notes for further wiring information.

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VDO sensor type Value % 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 The configurable type is configurable with eight points in the range 0-480 . The value as well as the resistance can be adjusted. Type configurable Resistance

5.28.8 Illustration of configurable inputs Resistance ()


Setpoint 8

Setpoint 7

Setpoint 6

Setpoint 5 Setpoint 4 Setpoint 3 Setpoint 2 Setpoint 1 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Value (bar, C or %)

Setpoints

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5.28.9 Configuration The eight curve settings for the configurable VDO inputs cannot be changed in the display, but only in the PC utility software. The alarm settings can be changed both in the display and in the PC utility software. In the PC utility software the configurable inputs are adjusted in this dialogue box:

Adjust the resistance of the VDO sensor at the specific measuring value. In the example above the adjustment is 10 at 0.0 bar. 5.28.10 Digital If the multi-inputs are configured to "Digital", they become available as a configurable input. 5.29 Manual governor and AVR control

This function can be activated by pressing more than two seconds, or by activating the digital inputs or AOP buttons for governor or AVR control in semi-auto mode. The intention of this function is to give the commissioning engineer a helpful tool for adjustment of the regulation. The function of the regulation window depends on the selected mode:

0
100% 50%
GOV

0V
100% 60%
AVR

P-Q Setp P-Q Reg.

5.29.1 Manual mode In manual mode the regulation is deactivated. When activating the up or down arrows, the output value to GOV or AVR is changed, this is the Reg. value in the display. The up and down arrows have the same function as the digital inputs or AOP buttons for governor and AVR control when the window is open. To exit the regulation window press "back". 5.29.2 Semi-auto mode As in manual mode, the up and down arrows have the same function as the digital inputs or AOP buttons for governor or AVR control when the window is open.

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The value Setp can be changed by pressing the arrow up or down. When GOV is underlined, the governor setpoint will be changed, and vice versa when the AVR is underlined. When changing the Setp value, an offset will be added to or subtracted from the nominal value. The Reg. value is the output value from the regulator. If the genset is running in parallel, the active or reactive nominal power setpoint value will be changed. If it is a stand-alone genset not parallel to the mains, the nominal frequency or voltage setpoint will be changed and also displayed. When the "back" button is activated, the regulation setpoint returns to nominal. If the digital inputs or AOP buttons are activated in semi-auto, the regulation window is automatically opened.

5.29.3 Auto and test mode Like semi-auto, except from the fact that activating the digital inputs or AOP buttons for governor or AVR control will change the regulation setpoint but not open the regulation window. When the digital inputs or AOP buttons are deactivated, the regulation setpoint returns to nominal.

AVR setpoint manipulation requires option D1.

Regarding AOP setup, please refer to "Help" in the PC utility software. 5.30 Input function selection Digital input alarms can be configured with a possibility to select when the alarms are to be activated. The possible selections of the input function are normally open or normally closed. The drawing below illustrates a digital input used as an alarm input. 1. Digital input alarm configured to NC, normally closed This will initiate an alarm when the signal on the digital input disappears. 2. Digital input alarm configured to NO, normally open This will initiate an alarm when the signal on the digital input appears. The relay output function can be selected to be ND (Normally Deenergised), NE (Normally Energised), Limit or Horn.

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+ V DC

Alarm input Multi-line 2 Dig in Relayout Com

5.31 Language selection The unit has the possibility to display different languages. It is delivered with one master language which is English. This is the default language, and it cannot be changed. In addition to the master language 11 different languages can be configured. This is done via the PC utility software. The languages are selected in the system setup menu 6080. The language can be changed when connected to the PC utility software. It is not possible to make language configuration from the display, but the already configured languages can be selected. 5.32 Texts in status line The status texts must be self-explanatory. If the operator does something wrong, then the status line must indicate it. The table below indicates the texts in the status line.

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5.32.1 Standard texts Status text BLOCK SIMPLE TEST LOAD TEST FULL TEST SIMPLE TEST ###.#min LOAD TEST ###.#min FULL TEST ###.#min ISLAND MAN ISLAND SEMI READY ISLAND AUTO ISLAND ACTIVE AMF MAN AMF SEMI READY AMF AUTO AMF ACTIVE FIXED POWER MAN FIXED POWER SEMI READY FIXED P AUTO FIXED POWER ACTIVE PEAK SHAVING MAN PEAK SHAVING SEMI READY PEAK SHAV AUTO PEAK SHAVING ACTIVE LOAD TAKEOVER MAN LOAD TAKEOVER SEMI READY LTO AUTO LTO ACTIVE MAINS P EXPORT MAN MAINS P EXPORT SEMI READY MPE AUTO MPE ACTIVE DG BLOCKED FOR START GB ON BLOCKED SHUTDOWN OVERRIDE Genset stopped or running and no other action taking place Genset stopped in Auto Genset running in Auto Genset stopped or running and no other action taking place Genset stopped in Auto Genset running in Auto Genset stopped or running and no other action taking place Genset stopped in Auto Genset running in Auto Genset stopped or running and no other action taking place Genset stopped in Auto Genset running in Auto Genset stopped or running and no other action taking place Genset stopped in Auto Genset running in Auto Genset stopped or running and no other action taking place Genset stopped in Auto Genset running in Mains power export mode Generator stopped and active alarm(s) on the generator Generator running, GB open and an active "Trip GB" alarm The configurable input is active Test mode activated and test timer counting down Condition Block mode is activated Test mode is activated Comment

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Status text ACCESS LOCK GB TRIP EXTERNALLY

Condition The configurable input is activated, and the operator tries to activate one of the blocked keys Some external equipment has tripped the breaker

Comment

An external trip is logged in the event log An external trip is logged in the event log

MB TRIP EXTERNALLY

Some external equipment has tripped the breaker

IDLE RUN IDLE RUN ###.#min COMPENSATION FREQ.

The "Idle run" function is active. The genset will not stop until a timer has expired The timer in the "Idle run" function is active Compensation is active The frequency is not at the nominal setting

Aux. test ##.#V ####s DELOAD START DG(s) IN ###s STOP DG(s) IN ###s START PREPARE START RELAY ON START RELAY OFF MAINS FAILURE MAINS FAILURE IN ###s

Battery test activated Decreasing the load of the genset in order to open the breaker The start genset setpoint is exceeded The stop genset setpoint is exceeded The start prepare relay is activated The start relay is activated The start relay is deactivated during the start sequence Mains failure and mains failure timer expired Frequency or voltage measurement is outside the limits The timer shown is the Mains failure delay.Text in mains units The timer shown is the Mains OK delay The timer shown is the Mains OK delay When the timer runs out it is allowed to operate the generator breaker

MIANS U OK DEL ####s

Mains voltage is OK after a mains failure

MAINS f OK DEL ####s

Mains frequency is OK after a mains failure

Hz/V OK IN ###s

The voltage and frequency on the genset is OK

COOLING DOWN ###s COOLING DOWN

Cooling down period is activated Cooling down period is activated and infinite Cooling down timer is set to 0.0 s

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Status text GENSET STOPPING EXT. STOP TIME ###s PROGRAMMING LANGUAGE TOO SLOW 00<-----------------------> 00 TOO FAST EXT. START ORDER

Condition This info is shown when cooling down has finished

Comment

This info is shown if the language file is downloaded from the PC utility software Generator running too slow during synchronising Generator running too fast during synchronising A planned AMF sequence is activated There is no failure on the mains during this sequence

QUICK SETUP ERROR MOUNT CAN CONNECTOR ADAPT IN PROGRESS SETUP IN PROGRESS SETUP COMPLETED REMOVE CAN CONNECTOR RAMP TO #####kW

Quick setup of the application failed Connect the power management CAN line The AGC is receiving the application that it has just been connected to The new AGC is being added to the existing application Successful update of the application in all AGC units Remove the power management CAN lines The power ramp is ramping in steps, and the next step that will be reached after the timer has expired will be displayed Displays the ramp down setpoint Preparing Ethernet connection Downloading M-logic to the unit

DERATED TO #####kW PREPARING ETHERNET PROGRAMMING MLOGIC

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5.32.2 Texts only related to power management (option G5) Status text Condition DG unit BLACKOUT ENABLE UNIT STANDBY DELOADING BTB XX BTB XX DIVIDING SEC. SYNCHRONISING TB XX SYNCHRONISING MB XX SYNCHRONISING BTB XX This info is shown if a CAN failure is present in a power management application. If redundant mains units are present, this message is shown on the redundant unit. DG units are load sharing asymmetrically to deload BTB XX dividing two sections in an island application. BTB XX is dividing two sections in an island application. TB XX is synchronising. MB XX is synchronising. BTB XX is synchronising. Mains unit UNIT STANDBY TB TRIP EXTERNALLY If redundant mains units are present this message is shown on the redundant unit. Some external equipment has tripped the breaker. An external trip is logged in the event log. Comment

BTB unit DIVIDING SECTION READY AUTO OPERATION SEMI OPERATION AUTO OPERATION BLOCKED FOR CLOSING BTB TRIP EXTERNALLY A BTB unit is dividing two sections in an island application. BTB unit in Auto and ready for breaker operation (no active BTB trip" alarm). BTB unit in Semi. BTB unit in Auto, but not ready for breaker operation (active "BTB trip" alarm). Last open BTB in a ring bus. Some external equipment has tripped the breaker. An external trip is logged in the event log.

All units BROADCASTING APPL. # Broadcast an application through the CAN line. Broadcasts one of the four applications from one unit to the rest of the AGCs in the power management system.

RECEIVING APPL. #

AGC receiving an application.

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Status text BROADCAST COMPLETED RECEIVE COMPLETED BROADCAST ABORTED RECEIVE ERROR 5.33 Service menu

Condition Successful broadcast of an application. Application received successfully. Broadcast terminated. Application is not received correctly.

Comment

The purpose of the service menu is to give information about the present operating condition of the genset. The service menu is entered using the "JUMP" push-button (9120 Service menu). Use the service menu for easy troubleshooting in connection with the event log. Entry window The entry shows the possible selections in the service menu.

Available selections: Alarm Shows the alarm timer and the remaining time. The indicated remaining time is minimum remaining time. The timer will count downwards when the setpoint has been exceeded.

IN (digital input) Shows the status of the digital inputs.

OUT (digital output) Shows the status of the digital outputs.

MISC (miscellaneous) Shows miscellaneous messages.

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5.34 Event log The logging of data is divided in three different groups: Event log containing 150 loggings. Alarm log containing 30 loggings. Battery test log containing 52 loggings.

The logs can be viewed in the display or in the PC utility software. When the individual logs are full, each new event will overwrite the oldest event following the "first in - first out" principle. 5.34.1 Display In the display it looks like this when the "LOG" push-button is pressed:

Now it is possible to select one of the three logs. If the "Event" is selected, the log could look like this:

The specific alarm or event is shown in the second line. In the example above the fuel level alarm has occurred. The third line shows the time stamp. If the cursor is moved to "INFO", the actual value can be read when pressing "SEL":

The first event in the list will be displayed if the cursor is placed below "FIRST" and "SEL" is pressed. The last event in the list will be displayed if the cursor is placed below "LAST" and "SEL" is pressed. The keyUP and keyDOWN push-buttons are used for navigating in the list. 5.35 Counters Counters for various values are included, and some of these can be adjusted if necessary, for instance if the unit is installed on an existing genset or a new circuit breaker has been installed. The table shows the adjustable values and their function in menu 6100:

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Description 6101 Running time 6102 Running time 6103 GB operations 6104 MB operations 6105 kWh reset

Function Offset adjustment of the total running hours counter. Offset adjustment of the total running thousand hours counter. Offset adjustment of the number of generator breaker operations. Offset adjustment of the number of mains breaker operations. Resets the kWh counter.

Comment Counting when the running feedback is present. Counting when the running feedback is present. Counting at each GB close command. Counting at each MB close command. Automatically resets to OFF after the reset. The reset function cannot be left active. Counting at each start attempt.

6106 Start attempts

Offset adjustment of the number of start attempts.

Additional counters for "Running hours" and "Energy" can be read out from the PC utility software. 5.36 Pulse input counters Two configurable digital inputs can be used for counter input. The two counters can be used for e.g. fuel consumption or heat flow. The two digital inputs can ONLY be configured for pulse inputs via M-logic, as shown in the example below.

Scaling of pulse input can be set in menu 6851/6861. It is possible to determine the scale value to be pulse/ unit or unit/pulse. Counter values can be read out in display, and the number of decimals can be adjusted in menu 6853/6863. 5.37 kWh/kVArh counters The AGC has two transistor outputs, each representing a value for the power production. The outputs are pulse outputs, and the pulse length for each of the activations is 1 second. Term. number 20 21 22 kWh kVArh Common terminal Output

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The number of pulses depends on the actual adjusted setting of the nominal power: Generator power PNOM PNOM PNOM Value <100 kW 100-1000 kW >1000 kW Number of pulses (kWh) 1 pulse/kWh 1 pulse/10 kWh 1 pulse/100 kWh Number of pulses (kVArh) 1 pulse/kVArh 1 pulse/10 kVArh 1 pulse/100 kVArh

The kWh measurement is shown in the display as well, but the kVArh measurement is only available through the transistor output.

Be careful - the maximum burden for the transistor outputs is 10 mA. 5.38 Quick setup Both the PC utility software and the quick setup menu can be used to set up a plant. The quick setup menu is made to provide easy setup of a plant. Entering the quick setup menu 9180 via the DU-2 display gives the possibility to add or remove e.g. mains and MB without using the utility software. It is only possible to do the same basic setup as via the application configuration in the utility software. Menu 9180 Quick setup 9181: OFF: Mode. When the mode menu is set to "OFF", the existing application of the genset will not be changed. The setup plant mode is used in G5 applications.

Setup plant:

Please refer to the option G5 manual.

Setup standalone:

When the mode menu is set to "Setup stand-alone", the AGC will change the application configuration. The settings in menu 9182-9185 are used for the new configuration.

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Additional functions

If "Setup stand-alone" is activated while the genset is running, an info text, "Quick setup error", will appear. 5.39 Parameter ID This parameter can be used to identify which parameter file is used in the unit.

5.40 M-Logic M-ogic functionality is included in the unit and is not an option-dependent function, however selecting additional options, such as option M12 which offers additional digital inputs and outputs, can increase the functionality. M-Logic is used to execute different commands at predefined conditions. M-Logic is not a PLC but substitutes one, if only very simple commands are needed.

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M-Logic is a simple tool based on logic events. One or more input conditions are defined, and at the activation of those inputs the defined output will occur. A great variety of inputs can be selected, such as digital inputs, alarm conditions and running conditions. A variety of the outputs can also be selected, such as relay outputs, change of genset modes and change of running modes. The M-Logic is part of the PC utility software, and as such it can only be configured in the PC utility software and not via the display. The main purpose of M-Logic is to give the operator/designer more flexible possibilities of operating the generator control system. Please refer to the "Help" function in the PC utility software for a full description of this configuration tool. 5.41 GSM communication The GSM modem communication is used to send a GSM message to up to five cellular telephones when an alarm appears on the display. System single-line diagram

External antenna Controller GSM Modem

DEIF recommends using a MOXA OnCell G2150I, Wavecom WMOD2 or Westermo GDW-11 terminal, as the application has been tested with these terminals. Serial connection The serial connection to the GSM modem is done via the null-modem cable (option J3). Basic parameter settings Setting no. GSM GSM GSM GSM GSM GSM Name GSM PIN code 12345678901 12345678901 12345678901 12345678901 12345678901 Function Set PIN code for GSM modem Set phone no. for SMS to cellular phone 1 Set phone no. for SMS to cellular phone 2 Set phone no. for SMS to cellular phone 3 Set phone no. for SMS to cellular phone 4 Set phone no. for SMS to cellular phone 5 Set to None None None None None None

For calling a foreign number type "+" and country code instead of "00", for example dial +45 99999999 for a Danish number.

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Additional functions

The phone number can only be dialed using the PC utility software.

The SIM card used in the cellular telephone must support data transfer.

PIN code configuration After each auxiliary supply power up, the unit will send the required PIN code to the modem if this is necessary. The PIN code is adjusted in the PC utility software. 5.42 USW communication It is possible to communicate with the unit via the PC utility software. The purpose is to be able to remote monitor and control the genset application. It is possible to remote control the genset from the PC utility software if a modem is used. Take precautions that it is safe to remote operate the genset to avoid personal injury or death. Serial connection The serial connection to the GSM modem is via the null-modem cable (option J3).

Because of the RS232 communication the GSM function is only available with option H9.2.

Setup The Modbus protocol type can be changed from RTU to ASCII (9020 Service port). This menu can only be reached using the JUMP push-button. When set to 1, the ASCII protocol type is used, and the unit will allow for the slower modem communication. 9020 Service port No. 9021 Setting Service port Setpoint Min. setting 0 (normal USW) Max. setting 1 (modem USW) Factory setting 0 (normal USW)

If setting 9020 is set to 1, the PC utility software cannot communicate with the unit when it is connected directly to the PC and a modem is not used. Application settings Please refer to the PC utility software help file. Safety If communication fails, the unit will operate according to the received data. If e.g. only half of the parameter file has been downloaded when the communication is interrupted, the unit will use this actual data. 5.43 Nominal settings The nominal settings can be changed to match different voltages and frequencies. The AGC has four sets of nominal values for the generator, and they are adjusted in menus 6000 to 6030 (Nominal settings 1 to 4). There are also two sets of nominal settings for the busbar, they can be adjusted in menus 6050 to 6060.

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Additional functions

If no busbar voltage transformer is present, the primary and secondary side values are set to generator nominal value. The possibility to switch between the four sets of nominal setpoints is typically used on rental gensets, where switching between 50 and 60 Hz is required. Activation The switching between the nominal setpoints can be done in three ways; digital input, AOP or menu 6006. Digital input M-logic is used when a digital input is needed for switching between the four sets of nominal settings. Select the required input among the input events, and select the nominal settings in the outputs. Example: Event A Dig. input no. 115 Not Dig. input no. 115 or or Event B Not used Not used or or Event C Not used Not used Output Set nom. parameter settings 1 Set nom. parameter settings 2

See the "Help" file in the PC utility software for details.

AOP M-logic is used when the AOP is used for switching between the four sets of nominal settings. Select the required AOP push-button among the input events, and select the nominal settings in the outputs. Example: Event A Button07 Button08 or or Event B Not used Not used or or Event C Not used Not used Output Set nom. parameter settings 1 Set nom. parameter settings 2

See the "Help" file in the PC utility software for details.

Menu settings In menu 6006 the switching is made between settings 1 to 4 simply by choosing the desired nominal setting. Four nominal settings of GOV/AVR offsets In menu 6006 the selection of nominal setting is made. The nominal setting of GOV/AVR offset will follow the setting in 6006, meaning: nominal setting 1 (60016005) will follow GOV/AVR offset in 2550.

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5.44 Step-up transformer The AGC can be used in applications where the generator is followed by a step-up transformer. I.e. the measurement of the generator voltage is on a different level than the measurement of the busbar voltage. The functions available in this application are: 1. 2. 3. 4. Synchronising with or without phase compensation Voltage measurements displayed Generator protections (option-dependent) Busbar protections (option-dependent)

The maximum nominal voltage supported is 160 kV AC.

5.44.1 Applications Different applications are supported by the AGC when a step-up transformer is placed after a generator. Measurement transformers can be installed on the generator side and the busbar side, or direct inputs between 100V AC and 690V AC can be connected. A typical setup includes a low-voltage generator, e.g. 400V AC, and a step-up transformer, e.g. 400/10000V AC. In this case, 400V AC would be connected to the generator inputs and 100 or 110V AC from the measurement transformer would be connected to the busbar inputs. Measurement transformer The AGC can be adjusted with different measurement transformer ratios. This is adjusted in the system setup (menus 6040/6050/6060). The advantage is i.e. that synchronising of a circuit breaker can be performed, even though the voltage measurement points are not placed on the same busbar. Different measurement inputs In the AGC, it is possible to have different measurement inputs on the generator measurements and the busbar measurements. Schematically, it looks e.g. like the diagram below where the generator inputs are 440 volt and the busbar inputs are 100 volt.
Busbar 10 kV

Step up transformer 10/0.4 kV

Measurement transfomer ratio: 10/0.1 kV

Controller 440 V AC direct input

G
UNOMINAL = 440 V AC

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The current measurement point must be placed on the generator side of the step-up transformer. Single-line example The simple diagram below shows a step-up transformer with +/- 30 deg. phase shift. This of course depends of the type of transformer. To be able to synchronise the generator circuit breaker, the AGC must compensate for the 30 deg. offset.
Busbar 13.8 kV

Step up transformer 13.8/3.3 kV 30 deg phase shift

Measurement transfomer ratio: 13.8/0.1 kV

Controller Measurement transfomer ratio: 3.3/0.1 kV Measurement transfomer ratio: 3.3/0.1 kV

G
UNOMINAL = 3.3 kV

When it is used for synchronising, the AGC uses the ratio of the nominal voltages of the generator and the busbar when calculating the AVR setpoint and the voltage synchronising window (dUMAX). Example: A 10000/400V AC step-up transformer is installed after a generator with the nominal voltage of 400V AC. The nominal voltage of the busbar is 10000V AC. Now, the voltage of the busbar is 10500V AC. The generator is running 400V AC before the synchronising starts, but when attempting to synchronise, the AVR setpoint will be changed to UBUS-MEASURED * UGEN-NOM/UBUS-NOM :10500*400/10000 = 420V AC.

The AGC has a phase angle compensation range inside +/- 179 (setting 9140). 5.45 Demand of peak currents 5.45.1 I thermal demand This read-out is used to simulate a bimetallic system which is specifically suited for indication of thermal loads in conjunction with cables, transformers, etc. The measuring principle is using sliding windows.

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Example of sliding window based on FIFO register.

The measured peak currents are sampled once every second, and every 6 seconds an average peak value is calculated. If the peak value is higher than the present MD, it will be saved in the register. The thermal period (Time C.) can be set from 0 to 20 minutes in menu 6841. The thermal demand period will provide an exponential thermal characteristic. The display value can be reset in menu 6842. If the value is reset, it will be logged in the event log. 5.45.2 I max. demand Read-out is showing the Imax. peak value. When a new max. peak current is detected, the value is saved in the display. The value can be reset in menu 6843. If the value is reset, it will be logged in the event log.

The two reset functions will also be available as commands through M-logic.

Display readout is updated with an interval of 6 seconds. 5.46 Fan logic The AGC is able to control four different fans. This could e.g. be air supply fans for supplying air to a genset in a closed enclosure, or radiator fans for switching on and off cooling fans for air coolers. There are two features in the fan control of the AGC. 1. Priority rearranging depending on running hours of the fans 2. Temperature-dependent start and stop

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A priority routine ensures that the running hours of the available fans are evened out and the priority shifts between them. The functionality behind the temperature-dependent start/stop is that the AGC measures a temperature, e.g. cooling water temperature, and based on this temperature it switches on and off relays that must be used for engaging the fan(s) itself. 5.46.1 Fan parameters Each fan has a group of parameters that defines their scheme of operation. It is recommended to use the PC utility SW for the setup, because then it is possible to see all parameters. The setup of the fan control is done in the menus 6561-6620 and by using M-logic in the PC utility SW. Parameters:

M-logic:

5.46.2 Input for fan control The fan control requires a temperature input in order to start and stop the fans based on a temperature measurement. Fan temperature input is set up in parameter 6561, and this input can be selected between the multi-configurable inputs: Multi-input 102, 105, 108 or a value from the EIC (engine interface communication).

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The multi-inputs can be configured to e.g. a Pt100 sensor that measures an engine- or ambient temperature. If EIC is selected, this is defined as the highest measured temperature of either cooling water or oil temperatures. Based on the measurement of the selected input, the fan(s) is (are) started and stopped. 5.46.3 Fan start/stop The start and stop settings of the fan(s) are set up in parameters 6563 to 6574. With the settings in the table below, the illustrative curve can be observed. A hysteresis (abbreviation: hyst.) ensures that there is a range between the start and stop.

The following start/stop curve will be generated if a bow setting is used:

5.46.4 Fan output At parameter 6581 to 6584, the output relays for fans A to D are selected. The purpose of these relays is to issue a signal to the fan starter cabinet. The relay must be energised for the fan to run.

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5.46.5 Fan start delay If two or more fans are requested to be started at the same time, it is possible to add a start delay between each fan start. The reason for this is to limit the peak start current, so all fans will not contribute with a start current at the same time. This delay is adjusted in the menu 6586.

5.46.6 Fan failure It is possible to activate an alarm if the fan does not start. The fan failure alarm appears if the running feedback from the fan does not appear. In parameters 6590 to 6620 the fan failure alarms are set up for fans A to D.

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5.46.7 Fan priority (running hours) The priority of the fans A to D rotates automatically from 1st to 4th priority. This is done automatically, because the running hours of the fans are detected and are used for the rearranging. M-logic setup: If the fan unit is raising a signal that is led to a digital input on the AGC when it is running, then the following M-logic must be programmed:

When it is not possible to get a running feedback from the fan unit, the internal relay of the AGC must be used to indicate that the fan is running. If e.g. R57 is the relay for FAN A, the following M-logic must be programmed:

The running hour can be reset by entering parameter 6585 and then selecting the desired fan hours to be reset.

Only reset is possible. It is not possible to add an offset to the run hour counter.

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5.46.8 Fan priority update In parameter 6562 the priority update rate (hours between priority rearrange) is selected:

If the fan priority update is set to 0 hours, the order of priority will be fixed at: Fan A, fan B, fan C and fan D. 5.47 Oil renewal function The purpose of the oil renewal function is to give the possibility to exchange a small portion of the lubricating oil of the engine with fresh or new oil. This means that the quality of the oil is kept at a satisfactory level without significant degrading of the oil (e.g. contamination and TBN value) in the entire period between the oil changes. The time interval between the oil changes is assumed to be 1000 hours of operation. The renewal function will read the engine hours from the engine interface communication (EIC). The running hours counter in the AGC is only used if the EIC counter is not available. The function in the AGC is to activate a relay under defined conditions. Then the relay must be used for the oil renewal system (not part of the DEIF scope of supply) where lubricating oil is removed and added to the engine. Any freely configurable relay is available for this feature. When the running time information is between 0 and 750 hours, the relay is activated in the AGC. Above 750 hours and up to 999 hours the relay is deactivated.

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Additional functions

5.48 Differential measurement Up to three differential measurements between two sensors can be configured in menus 4600-4606. The sensors can be selected from the input list below:

Two levels of alarms can be made of each differential measurement between sensor A and B.

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Analogue settings for differential measurements.

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Protections

6. Protections
6.1 General The protections are all of the definite time type, i.e. a setpoint and time is selected. If the function is e.g. overvoltage, the timer will be activated if the setpoint is exceeded. If the voltage value falls below the setpoint value before the timer runs out, then the timer will be stopped and reset.
Timer setting Measured value Set point

Time Timer Timer start reset Timer start Alarm

When the timer runs out, the output is activated. The total delay will be the delay setting + the reaction time. Phase-neutral voltage trip If the voltage alarms are to work based on phase-neutral measurements, please adjust menus 1200 and 1340 accordingly. Depending on the selections, either phase-phase voltages or phase-neutral voltages will be used for the alarm monitoring.

Phase-neutral

Phase-phase

UL3-L1

UL1-N

UL1-L2

UL3-L1

UL1-N

UL1-L2

U L3

-N

UL

2-N

-N U L3

UL

2-N

UL2-L3

UL2-L3

As indicated in the vector diagram, there is a difference in voltage values at an error situation for the phaseneutral voltage and the phase-phase voltage. The table shows the actual measurements at a 10% undervoltage situation in a 400/230 volt system. Phase-neutral Nominal voltage Voltage, 10% error 400/230 380/207 Phase-phase 400/230 360/185

The alarm will occur at two different voltage levels, even though the alarm setpoint is 10% in both cases.

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Example The below 400V AC system shows that the phase-neutral voltage must change 20%, when the phase-phase voltage changes 40 volts (10%). Example: UNOM = 400/230V AC Error situation: UL1L2 = 360V AC UL3L1 = 360V AC UL1-N = 185V AC UPH-N = 20%

20%

UL3-L1 UL1-N

UL1-L2

U L3

-N

UL

2-N

UL2-L3
Phase-neutral or phase-phase: both the generator protections and the busbar/mains protections use the selected voltage. 6.2 Voltage-dependent (restraint) overcurrent This protection is used when the generator must be tripped due to a fault situation that creates a reduced generator voltage, e.g. a voltage collapse. During the voltage collapse, the generator can only produce part of its usual rating. A short-circuit current during a voltage collapse can even be lower than the nominal current rating. The protection will be activated based on the overcurrent setpoint as a function of the measured voltage on the generator voltage terminals. The result can be expressed as a curve function where the voltage setpoints are fixed values and the current setpoints can be adjusted (menu 1100). This means that if the voltage drops, the overcurrent setpoint will also drop.

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Protections

200 190 180

% Nominal Current

170 160 150 140 130 120 110 100 50 60 70 80 90 100

% Nominal Voltage
The voltage values for the six points on the curve are fixed; the current values can be adjusted in the range 50-200%.

Voltage and current % values refer to the nominal settings.

Timer value can be adjusted in the range 0.1- 60.0 sec.

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PID controller

7. PID controller
7.1 Description of PID controller The unit controller is a PID controller. It consists of a proportional regulator, an integral regulator and a differential regulator. The PID controller is able to eliminate the regulation deviation and can easily be tuned in.

See "General Guidelines for Commissioning". 7.2 Controllers There are three controllers for the governor control and, if option D1 is selected, also three controllers for the AVR control. Controller Frequency Power P load sharing Voltage (option D1) VAr (option D1) Q load sharing (option D1) X GOV X X X X X X AVR Comment Controls the frequency Controls the power Controls the active power load sharing Controls the voltage Controls the power factor Controls the reactive power load sharing

The table below indicates when each of the controllers is active. This means that the controllers can be tuned in when the shown running situations are present. Governor Frequency X Power P LS AVR (option-dependent) Voltage X
G

Schematic

VAr

Q LS
GB MB

X
G

GB

MB

X
G

GB

MB

GB

GB

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Load sharing mode is option-dependent (option G3/G5). 7.3 Principle drawing The drawing below shows the basic principle of the PID controller.
+ + +

Set point

P-part (Kp)

I-part (Ti) D-part (Td)

Output

As illustrated in the above drawing and equation, each regulator (P, I and D) gives an output which is summarised to the total controller output. The adjustable settings for the PID controllers in the AGC unit are: Kp: Ti: Td: The gain for the proportional part. The integral action time for the integral part. The differential action time for the differential part.

The function of each part is described in the following. 7.4 Proportional regulator When the regulation deviation occurs, the proportional part will cause an immediate change of the output. The size of the change depends on the gain Kp. The diagram shows how the output of the P regulator depends on the Kp setting. The change of the output at a given Kp setting will be doubled if the regulation deviation doubles.
P regulator

100

4%

2%

80

Output (%)

60

1%

40

0,5 %
20

0 0 10 20 30 40 50 60

Kp

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7.4.1 Speed range Because of the characteristic above it is recommended to use the full range of the output to avoid an unstable regulation. If the output range used is too small, a small regulation deviation will cause a rather big output change. This is shown in the drawing below.
kP 1% regulation deviation

kP

mA
5 10 15 20 25

A 1% regulation deviation occurs. With the Kp setting adjusted, the deviation causes the output to change 5 mA. The table shows that the output of the AGC changes relatively much if the maximum speed range is low. Max. speed range 10 mA 20 mA Output change 5 mA 5 mA 5/10*100% 5/20*100% Output change in % of max. speed range 50 25

7.4.2 Dynamic regulation area The drawing below shows the dynamic regulation area at given values of Kp. The dynamic area gets smaller if the Kp is adjusted to a higher value.
Dynamic regulation band
Kp=50 Kp=10

100 75 50 25 0 49 50 -25 -50 -75 -100

Kp=1

Frequency [Hz] 44

45

46

47

48

51

52

53

54

55

56

Output [%]

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7.4.3 Integral regulator The main function of the integral regulator is to eliminate offset. The integral action time Ti is defined as the time the integral regulator uses to replicate the momentary change of the output caused by the proportional regulator. In the drawing below the proportional regulator causes an immediate change of 2.5 mA. The integral action time is then measured when the output reaches 2 x 2.5 mA = 5 mA.

Integral action time, Ti


6 5 4 Ti = 10 s Ti = 20 s

mA 3
2 1 0 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35

sec
As shown in the drawing, the output reaches 5 mA twice as fast at a Ti setting of 10 s than with a setting of 20 s. The integrating function of the I-regulator is increased if the integral action time is decreased. This means that a lower setting of the integral action time Ti results in a faster regulation.

If the Ti is adjusted to 0 s, the I-regulator is switched OFF.

The integral action time, Ti, must not be too low. This will make the regulation hunt similar to a too high proportional action factor, Kp.

7.4.4 Differential regulator The main purpose of the differential regulator (D-regulator) is to stabilise the regulation, thus making it possible to set a higher gain and a lower integral action time Ti. This will make the overall regulation eliminate deviations much faster. In most cases, the differential regulator is not needed; however, in case of very precise regulation situations, e.g. static synchronisation, it can be very useful.

The output from the D-regulator can be explained with the equation:

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D = Regulator output Kp = Gain de/dt = Slope of the deviation (how fast does the deviation occur) This means that the D-regulator output depends on the slope of the deviation, the Kp and the Td setting. Example: In the following example it is assumed that Kp = 1.
D-regulator
8 7

Output/deviation

6 5 4 3
D-output 2, Td=1s Deviation 2

2 1 0 0 0,5 1 1,5 2

Deviation 1 D-output 2, Td=0.5 s D-output 1, Td=0.5 s

2,5

Time [s]

Deviation 1: Deviation 2: D-output 1, Td=0.5 s: D-output 2, Td=0.5 s: D-output 2, Td=1 s:

A deviation with a slope of 1. A deviation with a slope of 2.5 (2.5 times bigger than deviation 1). Output from the D-regulator when Td=0.5 s and the deviation is according to Deviation 1. Output from the D-regulator when Td=0.5 s and the deviation is according to Deviation 2. Output from the D-regulator when Td=1 s and the deviation is according to Deviation 2.

The example shows that the bigger deviation and the higher Td setting, the bigger output from the D-regulator. Since the D-regulator is responding to the slope of the deviation, it also means that when there is no change the D-output will be zero. When commissioning, please keep in mind that the Kp setting has influence on the D-regulator output.

If the Td is adjusted to 0 s, the D-regulator is switched OFF.

The differential action time, Td, must not be too high. This will make the regulation hunt similar to a too high proportional action factor, Kp.

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PID controller

7.5 Load share controller The load share controller is used in the AGC whenever load sharing mode is activated. The load share controller is a PID controller similar to the other controllers in the system and it takes care of frequency control as well as power control. Adjustment of the load share controller is done in menu 2540 (analogue control) or 2590 (relay control). The primary purpose of the PID controller is always frequency control because frequency is variable in a load sharing system as well as the power on the individual generator. Since the load sharing system requires power regulation as well, the PID controller can be affected by the power regulator. For this purpose a so-called weight factor is used (PWEIGHT). The regulation deviation from the power regulator can therefore have great or less influence on the PID controller. An adjustment of 0% means that the power control is switched off. An adjustment of 100% means that the power regulation is not limited by the weight factor. Any adjustment in between is possible. The difference between adjusting the weight value to a high or low value is the speed at which the power regulation deviation is eliminated. So if a firm load sharing is needed, the weight factor must be adjusted to a higher value than if an easy load sharing is required. An expected disadvantage of a high weight factor is that when a frequency deviation and a power deviation exist, then hunting could be experienced. The solution to this is to decrease either the weight factor or the parameters of the frequency regulator. 7.6 Synchronising controller The synchronising controller is used in the AGC whenever synchronising is activated. After a successful synchronisation the frequency controller is deactivated and the relevant controller is activated. This could e.g. be the load sharing controller. The adjustments are made in the menu 2050. Dynamic synchronising When dynamic synchronising is used, the controller "2050 fSYNC controller" is used during the entire synchronising sequence. One of the advantages of dynamic synchronising is that it is relatively fast. In order to improve the speed of the synchronising further, the generator will be sped up between the points of synchronisation (12 oclock to 12 oclock) of the two systems. Normally a slip frequency of 0.1 Hz gives synchronism each 10 seconds, but with this system on a steady engine the time between synchronism is reduced. Static synchronising When synchronising is started, the synchronising controller "2050 fSYNC controller" is activated and the generator frequency is controlled towards the busbar/mains frequency. The phase controller takes over when the frequency deviation is so small that the phase angle can be controlled. The phase controller is adjusted in the menu 2070 ("2070 phase controller"). 7.7 Relay control When the relay outputs are used for control purposes, the regulation works like this:

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PID controller

Regulator output

45Hz

50Hz

55Hz

Hz

Fix up signal

Up pulse

No reg.

Down pulse

Fix down signal

The regulation with relays can be split up into five steps. # 1 2 3 Range Static range Dynamic range Dead band area Dynamic range Static range Description Fix up signal Up pulse No reg. Comment The regulation is active, but the increase relay will be constantly activated because of the size of the regulation deviation. The regulation is active, and the increase relay will be pulsing in order to eliminate the regulation deviation. In this particular range no regulation takes place. The regulation accepts a predefined dead band area in order to increase the lifetime of the relays. The regulation is active, and the decrease relay will be pulsing in order to eliminate the regulation deviation. The regulation is active, but the decrease relay will be constantly activated because of the size of the regulation deviation.

4 5

Down pulse Fix down signal

As the drawing indicates, the relays will be fixed ON if the regulation deviation is big, and they will be pulsing if it is closer to the setpoint. In the dynamic range the pulses get shorter and shorter when the regulation deviation gets smaller. Just before the dead band area the pulse is as short as it can get. This is the adjusted time "GOV ON time"/("AVR ON time"). The longest pulse will appear at the end of the dynamic range (45 Hz in the example above).

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7.7.1 Relay adjustments The time settings for the regulation relays can be adjusted in the control setup. It is possible to adjust the "period" time and the "ON time". They are shown in the drawing below. Adjustment Period time ON time Description Maximum relay time Minimum relay time Comment The time between the beginnings of two subsequent relay pulses. The minimum length of the relay pulse. The relays will never be activated for a shorter time than the ON time.

As it is indicated in the drawing below, the length of the relay pulse will depend on the actual regulation deviation. If the deviation is big, then the pulses will be long (or a continued signal). If the deviation is small, then the pulses will be short.
Relay ON

PERIOD

PERIOD

PERIOD

PERIOD

PERIOD

ON

ON

ON

ON

ON

t [sec]

HIGH

<DEVIATION>

LOW

7.7.2 Signal length The signal length is calculated compared to the adjusted period time. In the drawing below the effect of the proportional regulator is indicated.

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PID controller

P regulator

100

4%

2%

80

Output (%)

60

1%

40

0,5 %
20

0 0 10 20 30 40 50 60

Kp

In this example we have a 2 percent regulation deviation and an adjusted value of the Kp = 20. The calculated regulator value of the unit is 40%. Now the pulse length can be calculated with a period time = 2500 ms:

The length of the period time will never be shorter than the adjusted ON time.

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Synchronisation

8. Synchronisation
8.1 Synchronisation principles The unit can be used for synchronisation of generator and mains breaker (if installed). Two different synchronisation principles are available, namely static and dynamic synchronisation (dynamic is selected by default). This chapter describes the principles of the synchronisation functions and the adjustment of them. In the following, the term "synchronisation" means "synchronising and closing of the synchronised breaker". 8.2 Dynamic synchronisation In dynamic synchronisation the synchronising genset is running at a different speed than the generator on the busbar. This speed difference is called slip frequency. Typically, the synchronising genset is running with a positive slip frequency. This means that it is running with a higher speed than the generator on the busbar. The objective is to avoid a reverse power trip after the synchronisation. The dynamic principle is illustrated below.
Synchronisation principle dynamic synchronisation
LOAD

GB

GB

Speed: 1503 RPM 50.1 Hertz


G G

Speed: 1500 RPM 50.00 Hertz

Synchronising generator
L2 L1 L3 L1 L2 L2 L3 L3 L1 L3 L2 L3 L2 L1 L1

Generator on load
L1 L1 L1

L3

L2

L3

L2

L3

L2

Angle L1gen/L1bus [deg]

Synchronised
180 90 0 0s 2.5 s 5.0 s 7.5 s t [s]

In the example above, the synchronising genset is running at 1503 RPM ~ 50.1 Hz. The generator on load is running at 1500 RPM ~ 50.0 Hz. This gives the synchronising genset a positive slip frequency of 0.1 Hz. The intention of the synchronising is to decrease the phase angle difference between the two rotating systems. These two systems are the three-phase system of the generator and the three-phase system of the busbar. In the illustration above, phase L1 of the busbar is always pointing at 12 oclock, whereas phase L1 of the synchronising genset is pointing in different directions due to the slip frequency.

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Of course both three-phase systems are rotating, but for illustrative purposes the vectors for the generator on load are not shown to be rotating. This is because we are only interested in the slip frequency for calculating when to release the synchronisation pulse. When the generator is running with a positive slip frequency of 0.1 Hz compared to the busbar, then the two systems will be synchronised every 10 seconds.

Please observe the chapter regarding PID controllers and the synchronising controllers.

In the illustration above, the difference in the phase angle between the synchronising set and the busbar gets smaller and will eventually be zero. Then the genset is synchronised to the busbar, and the breaker will be closed. 8.2.1 Close signal The unit always calculates when to close the breaker to get the most accurate synchronisation. This means that the close breaker signal is actually issued before being synchronised (read L1 phases exactly at 12 oclock). The breaker close signal will be issued depending on the breaker closing time and the slip frequency (response time of the circuit breaker is 250 ms, and the slip frequency is 0.1 Hz):

The synchronisation pulse is always issued, so the closing of the breaker will occur at the 12 oclock position. The length of the synchronisation pulse is the response time + 20 ms (2020 Synchronisation). 8.2.2 Load picture after synchronising When the incoming genset has closed its breaker, it will take a portion of the load depending on the actual position of the fuel rack. Illustration 1 below indicates that at a given positive slip frequency, the incoming genset will export power to the load. Illustration 2 below shows that at a given negative slip frequency, the incoming genset will receive power from the original genset. This phenomenon is called reverse power. To avoid nuisance trips caused by reverse power, the synchronising settings can be set up with a positive slip frequency.

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FUEL INDEX

0%

100%

G1

PGen1

GB

LOAD FUEL INDEX

0%

100%

G2

PGen2

GB

Illustration 1, POSITIVE slip frequency ______________________________________________________________________________________


FUEL INDEX

0%

100%

G1

PGen1

GB

LOAD FUEL INDEX

0%

100%

G2

PGen2

GB

Reverse power

Illustration 2, NEGATIVE slip frequency 8.2.3 Adjustments The dynamic synchroniser is selected in 2000 Sync. type in the control setup and is adjusted in 2020 Synchronisation. Setting 2021 fMAX 2022 fMIN 2023 UMAX 2024 tGB 2025 tMB Description Maximum slip frequency Minimum slip frequency Maximum voltage differrence (+/- value) Generator breaker closing time Mains breaker closing time Comment Adjust the maximum positive slip frequency where synchronising is allowed. Adjust the maximum negative slip frequency where synchronising is allowed. The maximum allowed voltage difference between the busbar/mains and the generator. Adjust the response time of the generator breaker. Adjust the response time of the mains breaker.

It is obvious that this type of synchronisation is able to synchronise relatively fast because of the adjusted minimum and maximum slip frequencies. This actually means that when the unit is aiming to control the frequency towards its setpoint, then synchronising can still occur as long as the frequency is within the limits of the slip frequency adjustments. Dynamic synchronisation is recommended where fast synchronisation is required, and where the incoming gensets are able to take load just after the breaker has been closed.

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Static and dynamic synchronisation can be switched by using M-logic. 8.3 Static synchronisation In static synchronisation, the synchronising genset is running very close to the same speed as the generator on the busbar. The aim is to let them run at exactly the same speed and with the phase angles between the three-phase system of the generator and the three-phase system of the busbar matching exactly. It is not recommended to use the static synchronisation principle when relay regulation outputs are used. This is due to the slower nature of the regulation with relay outputs. The static principle is illustrated below.

Synchronisation principle static synchronisation


LOAD

GB

GB

Speed: 1503 RPM 50.1 Hertz


G G

Speed: 1500 RPM 50.00 Hertz

Synchronising generator

L1 L3 L2 L3 L2

Generator on load
L1 L1 L1 L1 L1

L1

L1

L3 L2 L3 L2 L3 L2 L3 L2 L3 L2 L3 L2

Angle L1gen/L1bus [deg]

Synchronised
30 20 10 0 t [s]

8.3.1 Phase controller When the static synchronisation is used and the synchronising is activated, the frequency controller will bring the genset frequency towards the busbar frequency. When the genset frequency is within 50 mHz of the busbar frequency, then the phase controller takes over. This controller uses the angle difference between the generator system and the busbar system as the controlling parameter. This is illustrated in the example above where the phase controller brings the phase angle from 30 deg. to 0 deg.

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8.3.2 Close signal The close signal will be issued when phase L1 of the synchronising generator is close to the 12 oclock position compared to the busbar which is also in 12 oclock position. It is not relevant to use the response time of the circuit breaker when using static synchronisation, because the slip frequency is either very small or nonexisting. To be able to get a faster synchronisation, a "close window" can be adjusted. The close signal can be issued when the phase angle UGENL1-UBBL1 is within the adjusted setpoint. The range is +/-0.1-20.0 deg. This is illustrated in the drawing below.

close window

Max. Du difference Max. Du difference

UBB

Direction of rotation

UGEN

The synchronisation pulse is sent dependent on the settings in menu 2030. It depends on whether it is the GB or the MB that is to be synchronised. 8.3.3 Load picture after synchronisation The synchronised genset will not be exposed to an immediate load after the breaker closure if the maximum df setting is adjusted to a low value. Since the fuel rack position almost exactly equals what is required to run at the busbar frequency, no load jump will occur. If the maximum df setting is adjusted to a high value, then the observations in the section about "dynamic synchronisation" must be observed. After the synchronising, the unit will change the controller setpoint according to the requirements of the selected genset mode. Static synchronisation is recommended where a slip frequency is not accepted, for instance if several gensets synchronise to a busbar with no load groups connected.

Static and dynamic synchronisation can be switched by using M-logic.

8.3.4 Adjustments The following settings must be adjusted if the static synchroniser is selected in menu 2000:

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Setting 2031 Maximum df 2032 Maximum dU 2033 Closing window 2034 Static sync 2035 Static type GB

Description The maximum allowed frequency difference between the busbar/mains and the generator. The maximum allowed voltage difference between the busbar/mains and the generator. The size of the window where the synchronisation pulse can be released. Minimum time inside the phase window before sending a close command. "Breaker" or "Infinite sync" can be chosen. +/- value.

Comment

+/- value related to the nominal generator voltage. +/- value.

"Infinite sync" will close the MB to the busbar and run the generator in sync with the mains. The GB is not allowed to close. "Infinite sync" will close the GB to the busbar and run the generator in sync with the mains. The MB is not allowed to close. Only used during analogue regulation output.

2036 Static type MB

"Breaker" or "Infinite sync" can be chosen.

2061 Phase KP 2062 Phase KI 2070 Phase KP

Adjustment of the proportional factor of the PI phase controller. Adjustment of the integral factor of the PI phase controller. Adjustment of the proportional factor of the PI phase controller.

Only used during relay regulation output.

8.4 GB closing before excitation It is possible to adjust the AGC to start up the genset with the excitation switched off. When the gensets are started up, the breakers will be closed and the excitation started. It is also possible to close the breaker before the engine is started. This function is called "close before excitation". The purpose of the "close before excitation" is that the gensets are able to be ready for the load very quickly. All of the gensets will be connected to the busbar as soon as they are started, and as soon as the excitation is switched on, the gensets are ready for operation. This is faster than the normal synchronising, because in that case the breakers will not be closed until the generator voltage is in the synchronised position, and it takes some time to achieve that position. The "close before start" function can also be used if the load requires a "soft" start. This can be the case when the gensets connect to a transformer. As soon as the excitation is activated, the generators will equalise the voltage and frequency and will eventually run in a synchronised system. When the excitation is activated, then the regulators of the AGC will be switched on after an adjustable delay. The function can be used in the single AGC but also the AGC with option G4 or G5.

The excitation must be increased slowly when this function is used.

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This function can only be used when a magnetic pick-up is used.

This function is not available in units with option G3.

The principle is described in the flowcharts below. Flowchart abbreviations Delay 1 Delay 2 Delay 3 SP1 SP2 = = = = = Menu 2252 Menu 2262 Menu 2271 Menu 2251 Menu 2263

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8.4.1 Flowchart 1, GB handling


Start

Start DG(s) No RPM > SP1 Yes Close GB No RPM > SP2 Yes Delay 1 expired on all DG(s) Yes Start excitation No Delay 1 expired Yes Trip GB Start excitation Yes No Delay 1 expired

No No Yes Delay 2 expired Activate regulators Delay 2 expired

No

No

Yes Activate regulators No Yes UBUS OK Yes End Sync GB Delay 3 expired Yes Close before excitation failure

Delay 3 expired No Yes Close before excitation failure

UBUS OK

No

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8.4.2 Flowchart 2, TB handling (option G5)

Start

No

TB Open Yes

Any GB closed Yes

No

PAVAIL > PCAP Yes GB + TB Yes

No

No

MB OFF Yes

No

Close TB

Sync TB

End

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8.4.3 Genset start actions The start sequence of the AGC is changed in order to achieve the function "close before excitation". The following parameters must be adjusted: Menu 2251 Description RPM setpoint for breaker closing RPM timer Comment The generator breaker will close at the adjusted level. The range is from 0-400 RPM. If it is adjusted to 0, then the breaker will be closed when the start command is given. In the example below the setting is adjusted to 400. The genset must reach the setpoint (menu 2263) within the adjusted delay. When the delay expires and the RPM is above the setpoint, then the excitation will be started. If the RPM is below the setpoint, then the GB will be tripped. Select the relay output that must be used to start the excitation. Configure the relay to be a limit relay in the I/O setup. Enable the function "close before excitation".

2252

2253 2255

Output A Enable

Engine RPM

1500 RPM 1350 RPM

400 RPM

time Close GB Start RPMNOM excitation

The diagram above shows that the GB will be closed at 400 RPM. When the engine RPM has reached the setpoint (menu 2263) (1450 RPM), then the excitation is switched on. 8.4.4 Breaker sequence The "GB close before start" function can be used in three applications: 1. AGC single genset plant 2. AGC power management plant - no tie breaker present 3. AGC power management plant - tie breaker present In one of the applications a tie breaker is present, and it must be adjusted in the menu 2261 whether only the generator breaker must be closed or both the generator breaker and also the tie breaker. The breaker sequence adjustments are the following:

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Menu 2261 2262

Description Breaker selection Timer

Comment Select breakers to close: GB or GB + TB. The timer defines the period from the excitation is started and until the regulation is activated. The alarms with inhibit set to "Not run status" will be activated after this timer has expired. The setting defines at what level of RPM the excitation is started.

2263

Excitation start level

8.4.5 "Close before excitation" failure If the starting of the genset does not succeed, then the alarm menu 2270 "Cl.bef.exc.fail" will occur, and the selected fail class will be executed. 8.5 Separate synchronising relay When the AGC gives the synchronising command, then the relays on terminal 17/18/19 (generator breaker) and terminal 11/12/13 (mains breaker) will activate, and the breaker must close when this relay output is activated. This default function can be modified using a digital input and extra relay outputs depending on the required function. The relay selection is made in the menu 2240, and the input is selected in the input settings in the utility software. The table below describes the possibilities. Input Relay Relay selected Two relays used Synchronising: The breaker ON relay and the sync. relay activate at the same time when synchronising is OK. Blackout closing: The breaker ON relay and the sync. relay activate at the same time when the voltage and frequency are OK. Relay not selected One relay used Synchronising: The breaker ON relay activates when synchronising is OK. Blackout closing: The breaker ON relay activates when the voltage and frequency are OK. DEFAULT selection Synchronising: Not possible. Blackout closing: The breaker ON relay activates when the voltage and frequency are OK. Synchronising: Not possible. Blackout closing: The breaker ON relay activates when the voltage and frequency are OK.

Not used

Low

Synchronising: Not possible. Blackout closing: The breaker ON relay and the sync. relay activate at the same time when the voltage and frequency are OK. Synchronising: The relays will activate in two steps when the synchronising is selected: 1. Breaker ON relay activates. 2. When synchronised the sync. relay activates. See note below! Blackout closing: The breaker ON relay and the sync. relay activate at the same time when the voltage and frequency are OK.

High

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When two relays are used together with the separate sync. input, then please notice that the breaker ON relay will be activated as soon as the GB ON/synchronising sequence is activated. Care must be taken that the GB ON relay cannot close the breaker, before the sync. signal is issued by the sync. relay. The selected relay for this function must have the "limit" function. This is adjusted in the I/O setup.

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Parameter list

9. Parameter list
9.1 Related parameters The Designers Reference Handbook relates to the parameters 1000-1980, 2000-2780, 3000-3490, 4120-4990, 5000-5270, 6000-6900 and 7000-7120. For further information, please see the separate parameter list, document number 4189340688.

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Voltage/VAr/PF control

10. Voltage/VAr/PF control


10.1 Description of option, ANSI numbers

Function Voltage synchronisation matching Constant voltage control for stand-alone generator Constant reactive power control for paralleling generator Constant power factor control for paralleling generator Reactive power load sharing for paralleling with other generators 10.2 Description of option, Option D1

ANSI no. 25, 90 90 90 90 90

Option D1 is a combined software and hardware option. The specific hardware selection depends on the required interfacing to the automatic voltage regulator (AVR). 10.3 Functional description, Running mode selection, AGC/PPM The unit selects the actual setpoint in one of two ways: 1. Automatic selection based on GB and MB feedback (MB for AGC only). 2. Manual selection based on digital inputs selection. 10.3.1 Automatic selection When the automatic running mode selection is used, the actual running mode is as indicated in the table: AGC: Generator breaker OFF Fixed voltage Fixed power factor VAr sharing (requires Option G3 or G5) PPM: Generator breaker OFF Fixed voltage Fixed power factor VAr sharing X X Generator breaker ON, Shaft generator/Shore connection breaker OFF X X Generator breaker ON, Shaft generator/Shore connection breaker ON X X Generator breaker ON, Mains breaker OFF X X Generator breaker ON, Mains breaker ON

VAr sharing mode is a mix of fixed voltage and VAr sharing. This means that the reactive load will be shared equally between the gensets, AND the voltage will be maintained at the nominal value.

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10.3.2 Manual selection If the manual running mode selection is used, the actual mode depends on the activated input. How to select the manual running mode is described in the Designers Reference Handbook. The purpose of manual selection is to be able to use external setpoints, e.g. from an external potentiometer or a PLC. The available running modes and their respective adjustment ranges: Mode Fixed voltage Fixed VAr Fixed PF Comment Stand-alone generator or GB opened Fixed reactive power Fixed power factor Terminal "ext. U/Q setpoint" +/-10V DC input ~ nominal voltage +/-10% 0-10V DC input ~ 0-100% reactive power 10-0-10V DC input ~ 0.6 capacitive-1.0-0.6 inductive PF

0-100% relates to the nominal power of the generator.

10.3.3 Input selection In order to activate the input for the external setpoint, the digital input functions "Ext. U control", "Ext. PF control" or "Ext. Q control" must be programmed in the PC utility software (USW) as illustrated below.

Only one of the functions needs to be programmed. 10.4 Functional description, Regulation mode selecetion, GPC/PPU The regulation mode selection is done in the GPC/PPU using digital inputs, M-Logic or external communication, e.g. Modbus.

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The modes are used to change the control method of the AVR when the GB is closed. With the GB open, the running mode is fixed voltage and frequency unless manual or SWBD mode is activated. Available regulator modes with option D1: Mode Fixed voltage Fixed Q Fixed PF Q load sharing Voltage droop E.g. stand-alone generator Fixed reactive power E.g. parallel with mains Reactive load sharing Voltage will drop with rising reactive power Comment

10.4.1 Input selection The mode inputs must be programmed in the PC utility software (USW) as illustrated below (default settings).

Only one of the functions needs to be programmed.

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10.4.2 Regulators The working principle of the PID regulator is described in the Designers Reference Handbook.

The outputs for the AVR can be either analogue or digital. Please refer to the data sheet for further information about possible selections. 10.4.3 External setpoint The external setpoints can be used if the setpoint comes from another source, e.g. a PLC. In order to activate the external setpoint, the mode input called "Ext. AVR setpoint" is used. When the input is high, the external setpoint is used and when it is low, the internal setpoint is used. The inputs for the external setpoints are terminal 41 (common) and 42 (+) and the signal level is +/-10V DC. The available running modes and their respective adjustment ranges are described in the table below: Mode Fixed voltage Fixed Q Fixed PF Q load sharing Voltage droop "Ext. AVR setpoint" = ON +/-10V DC input ~ nominal voltage +/-10% 010V DC input ~ 0100% reactive power 010V DC input ~ 10.6 inductive PF +/-10V DC input ~ nominal voltage +/-10% +/-10V DC input ~ nominal voltage +/-10% Comment Stand-alone generator or GB opened Fixed reactive power Fixed power factor Reactive power sharing

0100% relates to the nominal power [P] of the generator.

10.4.4 AVR mode undefined (menu 2750) After the breaker has been closed, it is required that 1 AVR regulation mode is selected. In case no mode is selected or more than one mode is selected, the following action will be performed regardless of the fail class selected for "AVR mode undef." in menu 2750: 1. No mode input active: the unit is changed to manual mode (regulator OFF) and an "AVR mode undef." alarm is raised after the delay has expired. 2. More than 1 mode input active: the unit is maintained in the first selected running mode and an "AVR mode undef." alarm is raised. 10.5 Functional description, Regulation mode selection, GPU There is no regulation mode selection available for the GPU. It will always operate in fixed voltage control when the GB is open, make voltage matching during synchronisation and after closing of the GB, the regulation is turned OFF.

To activate the regulation in a GPU, option G2 is required.

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10.6 Functional description, AVR regulation failure The AVR regulation failure in menu 2230 is part of option D1. The alarm occurs when the regulation is activated but the setpoint cannot be reached. The alarm will appear when the setpoint is reached. The deviation is calculated in per cent: Example: UACTUAL = 400V AC UNOMINAL = 440V AC Difference in per cent: (440-400)/440*100 = 9.1% If the alarm setting is lower than 9.1% in this example, the alarm appears.

Adjust the alarm setting "Deadband" to 100% to deactivate the alarm. 10.7 Functional description, Manual AVR control Regarding manual control of the AVR, please refer to the chapter "Manual governor and AVR control" in the Designers Reference Handbook. 10.8 Functional description, Voltage-dependent PF/Q control (y2(x2) droop Voltage-dependent power factor or reactive power control is a function that gives a dynamic power factor/reactive power control in an isolated system based on the grid voltage. The purpose is to support the grid voltage locally behind a transformer by minimising the reactive current flow in the grid. The selection between using power factor and reactive power regulation is made in setting 7143.

The selection between relating to mains voltage or generator power is made in setting 7144.

PF

0.6 C

DBL HYSL MA SH Power Factor Set point SL HYSH MIN DBH

0.6 l (Unom-Uact)*100/Uacy [%] 10% 9% 8% 7% 6% 5% 4% 3% 2% 1% 0% 1% 2% 3% 4% 5% 6% 7% 8% 9% 10%

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The above vector diagram is configured with the following parameter settings: Menu 7052 7053 7151 7152 7153 7154 7171 7172 7173 7174 7175 7176 Settings 0.9 Inductive 2.00 2.00 1.00 1.00 0.8 Inductive 1.00 Inductive -0.05 0.05 Name Power factor Power factor DBL[%] DBH[%] HYSL[%] HYSH[%] MI I/C MA I/C SL[PF/%] SH[PF/%] Power factor setpoint 0.6-1 Inductive/capacitive Deadband low in percentages of nominal X2. Deadband high in percentages of nominal X2. Hysterese low in percentages of nominal X2. If HYSL is set above DBL, the hysteresis low is disabled. Hysterese high in percentages of nominal X2. If HYSH is set above DBH, the hysteresis high is disabled. Minimum output of droop handling. This setting is related to the setting in 7172. Minimum output of droop handling. Maximum output of droop handling. This setting is related to the setting in 7174 Maximum output of droop handling. Slope low. The setting determines the increase/decrease of PF reference per percentage the actual X2 drops below nominal X2. Slope high. The setting determines the increase/decrease of power reference per percentage the actual frequency rises above nominal frequency. Output type for curve 2. Selections currently available Reactive Power and PF Input type for curve 2. Selections currently available Power and Voltage Enable/Disable of curve2. Description

7181 7182 7183

PF(X2) U ON

Y2(X2) X2 ENA

Example: With a nominal voltage of 400 V and an actual voltage of 412 V, there is a deviation of 12 V which is equal to a 3% deviation from the nominal setting. The genset will then droop to a power factor 0.95 inductive according to the above settings.

The Q control is programmed similarly to the frequency droop function. Please see the frequency droop function in the Designers Reference Handbook for reference.

This function is in many ways comparable to the droop functionality. The system measures and reacts based on the mains voltage measurement. The function will make a dynamic voltage-dependent PF/Q ramp that is used to support the mains voltage. The ramp has a configurable deadband that can be used with reference to the nominal voltage of the mains to deactivate the ramp functionality. This is to have a normal operation band where a normal voltage fluctuation does not create disturbance on the mains. If the deadband is set to 0, the deadband is removed and the ramp will be active at any time.

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When the mains measurement is outside the deadband, the voltage deviation is taken into consideration and a new power factor/reactive power value is calculated. The power factor/reactive power regulator of the generator will then adjust the power factor/reactive power and thereby change the VAr import/export of the plant. The calculation is based on the fixed power factor/reactive power setpoint value. The system is able to run the generator with a capacitive and an inductive power factor/reactive power lowering or raising the grid voltage. The system is made with only one active regulator on the generator and a variable curve defining the setpoint to the regulator. This ensures that there are no hunting problems with 2-3 regulators in cascade. The ramp slope is set in % per unit [%/u] where the unit is in V AC, meaning that the nominal setting for slope low, 10%/u means 10% increase of power factor/reactive power per volt AC deviation. AGC: This function is only active when activated and when the generator is running parallel to mains grid. PPU/GPC: This function is only active with "ixed PF"or "ixed Q"mode activated depending on the selection in menu 7143.

PPM: This function is not supported. 10.9 Parameters, Further information The option D1 relates to the parameters 2640-2690, 2730, 2750 and 2782; for voltage-dependent PF/Q control parameter 7150/7180. For further information, please see the separate parameter list for the Multi-line unit in question: AGC-3 AGC-4 PPM GPC-3/GPU-3 Hydro PPU-3/GPU-3 Document number 4189340705 Document number 4189340688 Document number 4189340672 Document number 4189340580 Document number 4189340581

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Load sharing

11. Load sharing


11.1 Description of option, ANSI numbers

Function Load sharing between gensets 11.2 Description of option, Option G3 90

ANSI no.

11.2.1 AGC Option G3 is a hardware option, and therefore a separate PCB is installed in slot #3 in addition to the standard-installed hardware. If option M12 is already installed in the unit, option G3 is a software upgrade. 11.3 Description of option, Terminal description

Term. 37 38 39 40 41 42

Function -5/+5V DC Com. -5/+5V DC -10/+10V DC Com. -10/+10V DC

Technical data Analogue I/O Common Analogue I/O Analogue I/O Common Analogue I/O

Description Active load sharing line Common Reactive load sharing f/P setpoint Common U/Q setpoint

Comment Requires option G3

Requires option D1/G3 Requires option G3

Requires option D1/G3

11.4 Functional description, Load sharing Option G3 is an option that enables the unit to share the active load (and reactive load (option D1)) equally in percentage of the nominal power. The load sharing is active when the genset is running in island mode and the generator breaker is closed. A voltage signal equal to the load produced by the genset is sent to the load sharing line. When the generator load is 0%, 0V DC is sent to the load share line. When the load is 100%, the voltage will be 4V DC. This is illustrated in the drawing below.

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Load sharing

Load sharing line V DC 4V DC

100% load Reverse power 100% load Power

-4V DC

The active load sharing line is illustrated above, and the characteristics of the reactive load sharing line are equivalent to it. 11.4.1 Working principle The controller unit will supply a voltage on the load sharing line equal to the actual load. This voltage comes from an internal power transducer. At the same time, the actual voltage on the load sharing line will be measured. If the measured voltage is higher than the voltage from the internal power transducer, the unit will increase its load in order to match the voltage on the load sharing line. If the measured voltage is lower than the voltage from the internal power transducer, the unit will decrease its load in order to match the voltage on the load sharing line. The voltage on the load sharing line will only be different from the voltage from the internal power transducer, if two or more controller units are connected to the load share line. When the option G3 is activated, the load share line will be active at all times no matter if one generator is running in a single application, or a number of generators are actually sharing the load. In case a generator is running alone, it is recommended to disable the load share line to keep the frequency regulator active. To disable the load share line, use the M-Logic category output/inhibits in the PC utility software.

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To improve the handling of several generators in the same application, the option G3 is working as backup system for the power management AGC; option G5. This means that if both option G3 and power management are available in the same unit, the load sharing will be done by the CANbus communication as the primary choice, but if a CANbus error occurs, the load sharing will continue on the analogue load sharing line. The generators will stay stable even though the power management is lost. AGC only: please refer to the description of option G5 for further information about the power management. Example 1: Two generators are running in parallel. The loads of the generators are: Generator Generator 1 Generator 2 Actual load 100% 0% 4V DC 0V DC Voltage on load sharing line

The voltage level on the load sharing line can be calculated to: ULS: (4 + 0) / 2 = 2.0V DC Now generator 1 will decrease the load in order to match the voltage on the load sharing line (in this example 2.0V DC). Generator 2 will increase the load in order to match the 2.0V DC. The new load share situation will be: Generator Generator 1 Generator 2 50% 50% Actual load 2.0V DC 2.0V DC Voltage on load sharing line

Example 2: If the size of the generators differs, the load sharing will still be carried out on the basis of a percentage of the nominal power. Two generators supply the busbar. The total load is 550 kW. Generator Generator 1 Generator 2 Nominal power 1000 kW 100 kW Actual load 500 kW 50 kW Voltage on load sharing line 2.0V DC 2.0V DC

Both generators are supplying 50% of their nominal power.

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11.5 Functional description, Island ramp up with load steps

Delay, step 1

Delay, step 2

Delay, step 3

Delay, step 4

Power [kWh]

Delay, step 5

Analogue load share set point

One step before the load share setpoint is reached the ramp up function is switched off

Power ramp [%/s]

GB closed

Time [sec]
Ramp up, read from load share line Standard load sharing

When menu 2614 is enabled, the power setpoint continues to rise in ramp up steps, determined by menu 2615, towards the load sharing setpoint. The delay time between each ramp up step will be determined by menu 2613. The ramp up will continue until the load sharing setpoint is reached, and then the regulator will be switched to standard load sharing mode. If the delay point is set to 20% and the number of load steps is set to 3, the genset will ramp to 20%, wait the configured delay time, ramp to 40%, wait, ramp to 60%, wait and then ramp to the system setpoint. If theset point is at 50%, the ramp will stop at 50%. 11.6 Functional description, Freeze power ramp A way to define the ramp up steps is to use the freeze power ramp command in M-Logic. Freeze power ramp active: 1. The power ramp will stop at any point of the power ramp, and this setpoint will be maintained as long as the function is active. 2. If the function is activated while ramping from one delay point to another, the ramp will be fixed until the function is deactivated again. 3. If the function is activated while the delay timer is timing out, the timer will be stopped and will not continue until the function is deactivated again.

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11.7 Functional description, External analogue setpoints The genset can be controlled from internal as well as from external set points. The external set points are activated with a digital input.

The inputs are only available, if option G3 is selected.

Five different inputs can be selected by using the ML-2 PC utility software (USW): Input Ext. frequency ctrl Ext. power ctrl Ext. voltage ctrl Ext. PF ctrl Ext. VAr ctrl Ext. setpoint active condition Stand-alone generator or GB opened Parallel to mains (AGC) Stand-alone generator or GB opened Parallel to mains (AGC) Parallel to mains (AGC) Requires option D1. Comment

The controller setpoints will be ignored if the running condition is not present. It is for instance not possible to use the frequency controller when paralleling to the mains. The table below shows the possible setpoints. Controller Frequency Power Voltage Reactive power Power factor Input voltage +/-10V DC +/-10V DC +/-10V DC +/-10V DC 10 V010V DC Description fNOM +/-10% PNOM +/-100% UNOM +/-10% QNOM +/-100% 0.6 capacitive1.00.6 inductive AGC only: active when GB is OFF Comment AGC only: active when MB is OFF

The external setpoints can be used in all genset modes, when auto or semi-auto mode is selected. Only a limited number of digital inputs are available in the standard unit. The unit should be installed with the sufficient number of options to get the desired digital inputs. If the option H2 (Modbus RS 485 RTU) is available in the unit, the external setpoints can be controlled from the control registers in the Modbus protocol. Please refer to the description of option H2 for further information. 11.8 Functional description, Load sharing type The AGC can be adjusted to work with different types of load sharing modules and ranges of the load sharing signal. This is controlled by two menus: menu 6380 (signal level) and 6390 (load sharing type). The signal level is used to adjust the maximum output of the LS lines. The default range is 0-4V DC, and therefore 4V DC is the voltage applied to the load sharing line at 100% load. If the AGC is interfacing to another product where the max. range is different, then it can be changed in this menu.

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To be able to adjust the max. range, it is necessary to adjust the menu 6391 to "adjustable". The AGC is able to provide between 1.0 and 5.0V DC as 100% load. Load sharing interfacing to DEIF Uni-line LSU (load sharing unit) and Multi-line 2 version 1 and version 2 might require a 0-5V DC range, depending on configuration. If the load sharing is unequal, please check this. Menu 6390 holds the following possibilities: Adjustable Selco T4800 Cummins PCC When either "Selco T4800" or "Cummins PCC" is selected, then the adjustable range is ignored. The selection causes the AGC to modify the signal level of the LS lines to adapt to the specific brand of controller/load share unit. 11.8.1 Load sharing modules If interfacing is performed to the load sharing modules of unspecified brands, it might be necessary to provide galvanic separation of the load sharing lines. The input impedance of such isolation amplifiers should be high impedance for proper function. 11.8.2 Selco T4800 load sharer The signal level is +/-1V DC, so the AGC adapts automatically to this level. The terminals of the T4800 are 12 (com) and 13 (+). When interfacing to the Selco T4800, the frequency difference of the measured compared to generator nominal is taken into account in order to prevent unequal load sharing (not user-configurable). T4800 is for kW sharing only and not kVAr sharing. 11.8.3 Cummins PCC 3100 The signal level is 0.3-2.1V DC, so the AGC adapts automatically to this level. The terminals (TB3) of the PCC3100 are placed on connector 8, and the terminals are 51 (kW), 53 (kVAr), 52 and 54 (common). Terminal 55 is a dedicated terminal for the shield of the load sharing cable. (Notice that kVAr sharing is optiondependent in some DEIF products (option D1)). Cummins PCC applications When the DEIF AGC-3, AGC-4 or AGC 200/IOM230 is being used, then it is possible to interface directly with the PCC using the terminal numbers as mentioned above.

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PCC interface to DEIF AGC

PCC Interface to AGC-200/IOM-230

PCC in DEIF power management system Notice that if the AGC is part of a power management system, then it is possible to enable the analogue load sharing lines. This is done in M-logic by activating the command "Use Ana LS instead of CAN". If the CANbus communication is used for load sharing, the analogue LS line of the AGC-3 and AGC-4 is still updated so the Cummins PCC will be able to adjust the load level according to the load level of the AGCs. This is useful if the AGC is placed on all gensets only sending start and stop commands to the PCC. This means that the Cummins ILSI unit is not necessary.

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11.9 Parameters, Further information The option G3 relates to the parameters 2610 and 6380-6390. For further information, please see the separate parameter list for the Multi-line unit in question: AGC-3 AGC-4 Document number 4189340705 Document number 4189340688

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12. Power management


12.1 Description of options, ANSI numbers

Function Power management 12.2 Description of options, Options G4, G5 and G8 -

ANSI no.

The options G4, G5 and G8 (power management) are software options and therefore not related to any hardware apart from the standard-installed hardware. The options G4, G5 and G8 are alike in the basic functionality. In the below table the differences are shown: Product Option G4 Option G5 Option G8 X X X X AGC gen. AGC mains X X AGC bus tie

This means that all functionalities available in the G4 and G8 options will also be available in the G5 option, but all power management functionalities regarding the mains connections and the sequences handling the mains are not available in the G4 option, and only generator fulctionality will be available in the G8 option. As the basic power management functions are similar in the three options, it will be possible to mix controllers specified with one of the three options in the same application.

A number of AGC units are being used in the power management application, i.e. one for each mains breaker and tie breaker (AGC mains unit), if installed, one for each bus tie breaker (AGC bus tie unit) and one for each generator (AGC generator unit). All units communicate by means of an internal CANbus connection.

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The AGC mains unit includes the power management option and can therefore only be used with option G5 applications. The generator AGC unit must be specified with either option G4, G5 or G8, because this unit can be used in single genset applications and in power management applications.

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12.3 Description of options, Terminal description The CANbus interface for the internal communication between AGC units in a G4/G5/G8 application is placed on the engine interface PCB in slot #7. Term. 98 99 100 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 121 122 123 124 A1 A2 A3 B1 B2 B3 Function +12/24V DC 0V DC MPU input MPU GND A B C A B C A B C Com. Digital input 112 Digital input 113 Digital input 114 Digital input 115 Digital input 116 Digital input 117 Digital input 118 NO NO Com. NO Com. NO CAN-H GND CAN-L CAN-H GND CAN-L CANbus interface B CANbus interface A Relay24V DC/5 A Stop coil w/wire failure detection Common Optocoupler Optocoupler Optocoupler Optocoupler Optocoupler Optocoupler Optocoupler Relay24V DC/5 A Relay24V DC/5 A Relay250V AC/8 A Common for terminals 112-117 Configurable Configurable Configurable Ext. engine failure/configurable Start enable/configurable Running feedback/configurable Emergency stop and common for 119 and 120 Run coil Start prepare Crank (starter) Multi-input 3 0(4)-20 mA Digital Pt100 Pt1000 VDO 0-40V DC Multi-input 1 2-70V AC/10-10.000 Hz Magnetic pick-up Technical data 12/24V DC +/-30% Description DC power supply/common for 118

Multi-input 2

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In menus 7540 and 7550, you can choose which CANbus interface you wish to use for internal communication. For CANbus redundancy it is possible to use both communication interfaces. If the LED marked "CAN B" on the main unit is alive, then the CANbus port(s) is (are) switched on. 12.4 Description of options, Breaker feedbacks 12.4.1 Generator breaker The feedbacks of the generator breaker must always be connected (terminals 26 and 27). 12.4.2 Mains breaker (MB) feedback MB present: MB not present: The feedbacks of the mains breaker must always be connected (terminals 24 and 25). Selected in the power plant constructor (USW).

When no MB is represented, the MB open and close relays together with the inputs for MB open and close feedbacks (terminals 24 and 25) will be configurable.

12.4.3 Tie breaker (TB) TB present: TB not present: The feedbacks of the tie breaker must always be connected (terminals 26 and 27). Selected in the power plant constructor (USW)

When no TB is represented, the TB open and close relays together with the inputs for TB open and close feedbacks (terminals 26 and 27) will be configurable.

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12.5 Description of options, Wiring diagram The following diagrams show examples with three AGC units connected, e.g. one AGC mains and two generator AGC units.
Multi-line 2 CANbus interface 1 H GND L A1 A2 A3 Multi-line 2 CANbus interface 1 H GND L A1 A2 A3 Multi-line 2 CANbus interface 1 H GND L A1 A2 A3

120

120

Multi-line 2 CANbus interface 2 H GND L B1 B2 B3

Multi-line 2 CANbus interface 2 H GND L B1 B2 B3

Multi-line 2 CANbus interface 2 H GND L B1 B2 B3

120

120

Multi-line 2 CANbus interface 1 H GND L A1 A2 A3

Multi-line 2 CANbus interface 2 H GND L B1 B2 B3

Multi-line 2 CANbus interface 1 H GND L A1 A2 A3

120

120

As you can see from the last example, it is possible to mix CANbus interface 1 and 2.

For distances above 300 metres we recommend to use a CAN to fibre converter.

Do not connect the cable shield to the GND terminal of the AGC units. 12.6 Functional description, Power management functions In the following chapter the power management functions of the AGC are listed. Plant modes: Island mode (no mains unit) Automatic Mains Failure (needs mains unit) Fixed power/base load (needs mains unit)

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Peak shaving (needs mains unit) Load takeover (needs mains unit) Mains power export (needs mains unit)

Display: Mains unit display showing mains breaker and tie breaker Generator unit showing generator and generator breaker Power management functions: Load-dependent start/stop Priority selection Manual Running hours Fuel optimisation Ground relay control ATS control Safety stop (fail class = trip and stop) Load management Multiple mains support Secured mode Quick setup/broadcast Base load Heavy consumer (HC) Asymmetric load sharing (LS) Common PF control CAN flags Please refer to the Designers Reference Handbook for standard functions not relating to the power management option.

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12.7 Functional description, Terminal strip overview 12.7.1 AGC generator unit

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12.7.2 AGC mains unit

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12.7.3 AGC bus tie unit

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12.8 Functional description, Applications The G4 and G5 options can be used for the applications listed in the table below. The G8 option can only be used for an island application with DG units. Application Island operation Automatic Mains Failure Automatic Mains Failure Automatic Mains Failure Automatic Mains Failure Fixed power Mains power export Load takeover Peak shaving Drawing below Island mode plant Parallel with 1-16 mains Parallel with 1-16 mains ATS plant, multiple start ATS plant, mains unit Parallel Parallel Parallel Parallel Comment Multiple gensets No back synchronising With back synchronising Multiple start system Mains unit installed Also called base load 1-16 mains units 1-16 mains units 1-16 mains units 1-16 mains units

Refer to the Designers Reference Handbook for description of the individual genset modes.

Regarding AC and DC connections for the individual applications, please refer to the Installation Instructions.

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12.8.1 Island operation plant In an application where up to 16 gensets are installed, the AGC will automatically operate in an island mode with load-dependent starting and stopping.
Display 1 Display 2

Busbar CANbus

Generator breaker (GB 1)

Controller

Generator breaker (GB 2)

Controller

G
Diesel generator set 1

G
Diesel generator set 2

If a mains unit is installed and connected (e.g. for preparing future requirements to the application), the island mode operation is selected in the mains unit.

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12.8.2 Parallel with mains plant An application where a mains breaker is installed together with up to 16 gensets is shown below. The application also supports a redundant mains unit. The application is shown with a tie breaker, but it is also possible to use the application without a tie breaker. The tie breaker can only be placed as shown in the drawing below.
Display mains

Mains

Mains breaker (MB)

Controller

Consumers Tie Breaker (GB) Display 1 Display 2

Busbar CANbus

Generator breaker (GB 1)

Controller

Generator breaker (GB 2)

Controller

G
Diesel generator set 1

G
Diesel generator set 2

This one-line diagram is also valid for AMF plants without back synchronising and load takeover plants without possibility of synchronising the genset to the mains. If no CTs are installed on the AGC mains, a 4-20 mA power transducer TAS-331 can be used instead. The CT measurements are used when the transducer setup is 4/20 mA = 0/0 kW. The transducer is used when the transducer setup is changed from 0/0 kW.

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12.8.3 Dual mains plant An application with two mains breakers installed together with up to 16 gensets is shown below. The application also supports redundant AGC mains units. The application is shown with a tie breaker, but it is also possible to use the application without a tie breaker.
Optional Display mains 1A Display mains 1B Display mains 2A Optional Display mains 2B

Mains 1

Mains 2

Mains breaker (MB 1)

Controller

Controller

Mains breaker (MB 2)

Controller

Controller

Consumers Tie Breaker (GB) Display 1 Display 2

Busbar CANbus

Generator breaker (GB 1)

Controller

Generator breaker (GB 2)

Controller

G
Diesel generator set 1

G
Diesel generator set 2

The tie breaker can only be placed as shown in the drawing.

In this application it will not be possible to synchronise the tie breaker.

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12.8.4 ATS plant Applications that use an ATS for switching between mains supply and generator supply are supported as well. Two application examples which use an ATS are shown below. 12.8.5 ATS plant, multiple start

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12.8.6 ATS plant, mains unit


Display Mains

Mains okay

Controller Consumers ATS ON/OFF

Tie Breaker (TB) Display 1 Display 2 Display 3

Busbar CANbus

Controller

Controller

Controller

G
Diesel generator set 1

G
Diesel generator set 2

G
Diesel generator set 3

12.8.7 Multiple mains An example of a multiple mains plant is shown below. This is just an example; please refer to the chapter on multiple mains for further information about the possible combinations.
Display mains 17 Display mains 18

Mains 17

Mains 18

Mains breaker (MB 17)

Controller

Mains breaker (MB 18)

Controller

Consumers Tie breaker (TB 17) Display 1 Display 2 Display BTB 33 Display 3

Consumers Tie breaker TB 18) Display 4

BTB 33 Busbar CANbus BUSBAR CANBUS

Generator breaker (GB 1)

Controller

Generator breaker (GB 2)

Controller

Controller

Generator breaker (GB 3)

Controller

Generator breaker (GB 4)

Controller

G
Diesel generator set 1

G
Diesel generator set 2

G
Diesel generator set 3

G
Diesel generator set 4

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12.9 Display units, DU for option G5 Three displays exist for the option G5. See the Designers Reference Handbook or the Operators Manual for detailed information about push-button functions and LED indication. 12.10 Display units, Generator unit display

Alarm

Automatic Gen-set Controller

Power Self check ok

Alarm
INFO

multi-line AGC
Alarm Inh.
VIEW

SEL

JUMP

LOG

START

Run

On Load BACK

Auto

STOP

MODE

12.11 Display units, Mains unit display

Alarm

Automatic Gen-set Controller

Power Self check ok

Alarm
INFO

multi-line AGC MAINS


Alarm Inh.
VIEW

SEL

JUMP

LOG

On START Load

On

Auto

BACK STOP MODE

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12.12 Display units, BTB unit display

Alarm

Automatic Gen-set Controller

Power Self check ok

Alarm
INFO

multi-line AGC BUS TIE


Alarm Inh.
VIEW

SEL

JUMP

LOG

On

Auto

BACK MODE

12.13 Power management setup, Initial power management setup The AGC is set up using the display and the PC utility software. 12.13.1 Display setup Enter the menu 9100 using the JUMP push-button. Select one of the following AGC types: 1. Mains unit 2. DG unit 3. BTB unit When this setting is adjusted, the device returns to factory settings! Therefore this must be changed prior to other adjustments. Enter the menu 9170 using the JUMP push-button. Select "CAN protocol 2" for a multi mains functionality. Select "CAN protocol 1" for dual mains or single applications.

An alarm appears if CAN protocol 2 is needed.

12.13.2 PC software setup The communication ID must be adjusted in the utility software for each of the AGC units. In the screen shot below, the internal communication ID is set to 1.

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The numbering of the communication IDs must always start from the lowest number, so an application always includes a DG with ID 1. The principle also applies to the AGC mains where the numbering starts from ID 17 and to the BTB units where the numbering starts from ID 33. 12.13.3 Application design The application is designed through the utility software. Please select configuration.

Select a new application and adjust the settings in this dialogue box.

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Description Product type Plant type Select AGC. Select between Single DG Standard Dual mains Genset group plant Genset group

Comments PPM is a power management system for marine use. Use "single DG" if option G5 is not selected (or if single functionality is needed for a G5 AGC). Use "standard" if a power management application is needed. Use "dual mains" if the power management application with two mains units known from version 3.0-3.2 are to be used. Genset group plant and genset group are used for power plants consisting of 17-256 gensets in the same application. Contact support@deif.com for further information.

Configuration selection

The AGC is able to include four applications. One of these can be active. Write a proper name of your application.

Press "Yes" in the pop-up window to set the application to active when downloading it to the AGC. It is possible to see which application is active when the USW is connected to the AGC.

Bus tie options

Select "Wrap busbar" if the BTBs are connected in a ring. CAN line A: Connect A1-A3. CAN line B: Connect B1-B3.

CAN line options

Now the application can be designed using the section control panel.

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For each area it is defined whether a generator and a mains is present, and the number and type of breakers. 12.14 Power management setup, Remove unit from PM If one or more units have to be taken out of the power management system, the following possibilities exist depending on the situation. 12.14.1 Auxiliary supply OFF The auxiliary supply must be removed from the AGC. This means that a CANbus alarm occurs on the other AGCs. These alarms appear in a 2 DG plant where ID 2 is powered down: Alarms System alarm System alarm Menu 7533 Menu 7535 Failed CAN tx line CAN ID 2 MISSING Miss. all units Any DG missing Functioning unit (ID 1)

The alarms will be present at all times during the failure. A reconfiguration of the power plant is required to remove the alarms.

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12.14.2 Quick setup Normally, the quick setup function is only used for simple rental applications. It only requires a few settings to be running, and these settings can be made via the DU-2 display on the AGC, so no utility software is needed.

For more details, please refer to the chapter "Quick setup" in this document.

The mode changes according to the setting in CAN failure mode (menu 7532).

When the AGC is reconnected, the ID will automatically be enabled again in the other units when the ID has been recognised. If the AGC that is reconnected is a new unit with the factory settings set in the parameter file, a "Duplicate CAN ID" error message will appear. When an ID is chosen for the new unit, and the ID chosen is already active in another device, the error message "CAN ID not available" will appear, and the ID is reset to the start value. 12.14.3 Auxiliary supply ON If a failure appears on the CANbus lines of an AGC, the following alarms appear in the example where a failure appears at ID 2: Alarms System alarm System alarm Menu 7533 Menu 7535 Defective unit Failed CAN tx line CAN ID 1 MISSING Miss. all units Any DG missing Functioning unit Failed CAN tx line CAN ID 2 MISSING Miss. all units Any DG missing

If the auxiliary supply of the unit where the CANbus is not functioning is connected, the AGC can be adjusted to another mode than AUTO. In that case the genset will not take part in the power management routines. Semi-automatic start or automatic start is possible if the mode is changed to SEMI or AUTO mode. The only exception to this is when BLOCK mode is selected on a genset AGC. In this situation the GB can be closed without allowance from the power management system. 12.15 Power management setup, CANbus failure handling 12.15.1 CAN failure mode In case of a CAN failure on the internal CAN controlling the power management, the system can be set up in different ways. In menu 7530 it is decided how the power management system will react in case of a CAN failure. 1. If "MANUAL" is selected, all AGC units will change mode to manual mode, and this way the regulators will have no reaction, and it will not be possible to close any breakers.

Example 1: A break on the CAN line is made between ID1 and ID2 shown below. Both gensets are running and all breakers are closed.

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When the break occurs, the regulators will stop on both gensets, but they will stay online. As the gensets have no valid information about the other unit, over time a blackout can occur as no load sharing is active between the units. If for example six gensets are available in an island application, and the CAN failure happens between ID3 and ID4, the load sharing will still be disabled between all units, as it is the manual mode which is activated. If the CAN error happens when no gensets are running, it will block the whole system and it will not be possible to start any gensets, before the CAN error has been fixed.
Display 1 Display 2

Busbar CANbus

Generator breaker (GB 1)

Controller

Generator breaker (GB 2)

Controller

G
Diesel generator set 1

G
Diesel generator set 2

2.

If "SEMI-AUTO" is selected, all AGC units will change mode to semi-auto mode, and this way the regulators will continue to regulate the load on the gensets which are still "visible" on the internal CAN communication. This means that in the example with six gensets, the load sharing will continue between the units which are still connected (ID1-ID3 and ID4-ID6).

If the CAN error happens when no gensets are running, it will not block the whole system, and it will be possible to start all the gensets in SEMI-AUTO mode, even though the CAN error has not been fixed. A message will be shown in the status line "BLACKOUT ENABLE" on the display. If the CANbus error is present and no generator breakers are closed, it will be possible to close two breakers on the same busbar, which may result in fatal damage to the whole system. It is recommended to use the analogue load sharing (option G3) and an interlock system to prevent this situation. 3. If "No mode change" is selected, all AGC units will stay in the mode they were in before the failure appeared.

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This setting makes it possible to keep the system in Auto mode in case of a CAN failure, however, the faulty unit will not be a part of the power management, since it cannot send or receive status and commands on the CANbus. If this selection is used, it is recommended to use the CANbus fail class settings to disconnect the faulty units (refer to the "CANbus fail class" in this chapter). If the CANbus error is present and no generator breakers are closed, it will be possible to close two breakers on the same busbar, which may result in fatal damage to the whole system. It is recommended to use the analogue load sharing (option G3) and an interlock system to prevent this situation.

12.15.2 Redundant CANbus communication It is possible to use two CANbus communication lines; CAN I/F 1 (A1/A2/A3) and CAN I/F 2 (B1/B2/B3). This way, the communication will be redundant, and if one of the CANbus communication lines are damaged, the application will still continue in Auto mode with full functionality. 12.15.3 CANbus alarms The following alarms can be displayed on an AGC unit in case of CANbus communication failures: CAN A ID X MISSING The AGC unit has lost CANbus communication to one or more CAN IDs on CANbus I/F A. CAN A MAINS X MISSING The AGC unit has lost CANbus communication to the AGC mains unit on CANbus I/F A. CAN A BTB X MISSING The AGC unit has lost CANbus communication to the AGC BTB unit on CANbus I/F A. CAN B ID X MISSING The AGC unit has lost CANbus communication to one or more CAN IDs on CANbus I/F B. CAN B MAINS X MISSING The AGC unit has lost CANbus communication to the AGC mains unit on CANbus I/F B. CAN B BTB X MISSING The AGC unit has lost CANbus communication to the AGC BTB unit on CANbus I/F B. MISSING ALL UNITS The AGC unit has lost the CANbus communication to all the other units. The fail class set in menu 7533 will be executed. FATAL CAN ERROR The AGC unit has lost CANbus communication to more than one CAN ID on the CANbus line. The fail class set in menu 7534 will be executed. ANY DG MISSING The AGC unit has lost CANbus communication to one of the generator CAN IDs on the CANbus line. The fail class set in menu 7535 will be executed.

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ANY MAINS MISSING The AGC unit has lost CANbus communication to one of the mains CAN IDs on the CANbus line. The fail class set in menu 7536 will be executed. ANY BTB MISSING The AGC unit has lost CANbus communication to one of the BTB CAN IDs on the CANbus line(s). The fail class set in menu 7536 will be executed.

12.15.4 CANbus fail class In menu 7530 it is possible to set a fail class of the following CANbus alarms: Missing all units Fatal CAN error Any DG missing Any mains missing

By using these settings, it is possible to disconnect the faulty units and in this way keep the system running in Auto mode. (Depends on the setting 7532).

For a general description of "Fail class" please refer to the Designers Reference Handbook. 12.16 Power management setup, Quick setup This function is made to provide an easy user interface for applications where it is vital for the end-user to be able to change the application quickly and easily. It is often applications for the rental market that need this flexibility, and therefore there are some limitations as to which applications that can be handled through the quick setup menu. The following applications can be handled through the quick setup menu. Island applications

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Simple applications with connection to one mains

12.16.1 Limitations In most cases, the rental applications are very simple applications, and therefore there are some limitations that have to be considered when using the quick setup menu: It will not be possible to have any AGC bus tie units in the application. It will not be possible to set up a "dual mains" application through the quick setup menu.

This function is made to facilitate change of a plant configuration without AGC BTB units. Entering the quick setup menu 9180 via the DU-2 display makes it possible to add or remove a genset without the use of utility software. It is only possible to do the same basic setup as through the "application configuration" in the utility software.

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The functions marked with clear text in the screen shots below can be accessed through the quick setup menu.

12.17 Power management setup, 9180 Quick setup 9181 Mode OFF: When the mode menu is set to "OFF", the existing application that is about to have this genset included will not look for this new genset. This will give the operator time to connect all wiring and to do the basic setup of the genset. When the mode menu is set to "Setup Plant", the new AGC will receive the application configuration from the other units in the plant. The new AGC will then notify the rest of the application that a new ID is available on the line. If the ID of the new AGC already exists, the new AGC will based on the ID numbers in the application configuration have the highest ID + 1 assigned. This new ID will then be included in the application configuration in all the other AGCs. During this process, the existing application will be able to continue running and will not be affected by the upgrade of the system. The new AGC will automatically go to block mode to ensure that it is in a safe mode. When the setup is done, the end-user must decide in which running mode the added genset is to run. If there are already 16 gensets on the CAN line and a new AGC tries to connect to the plant, an alarm text, "No IDs available", will appear.

Setup Plant:

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Setup Standalone:

When the mode menu is set to "Setup Stand-alone", the AGC will change the application configuration, so it will no longer be a part of the application. When the ID is removed from the application, the new application will be broadcasted to the other AGCs. The IDs of the existing gensets in the application will maintain their ID, as a rearrangement could lead to unnecessary starting and stopping of the gensets. If the genset that is to be removed is running, it will not be possible/allowed to continue the process until the genset has stopped. If it is attempted to disconnect, an info text, "Quick setup error", will appear. If "Setup Stand-alone" is activated when the genset is running, an info text, "Quick setup error", will appear. If an AGC BTB is detected in the application, an indicating alarm, "Appl. not possible", will appear. Change of setup from standard to single DG unit: When disconnecting a standard AGC unit in a system, it is important to change the menu 9181, plant setup. After disconnecting, the AGC unit will become a single DG.

12.17.1 9190 Application broadcast This function makes it possible to broadcast an application over the CAN line from one AGC to all units present in the application. It takes one operation to activate the broadcast function. It can be done in two ways: 1. By sending the application. 2. By sending the application and activating it. Menu 9191 Enable OFF: Broadcast: When it is set to OFF, no broadcast will be made. Broadcast of the selected application in menu 9192 will be sent to the units in the application. Broadcast is activated and the application in menu 9192 will be broadcasted and activated in all units.

Broadcast + Activate

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Menu 9192 Application Applications 1-4 can be drawn in the utility software. The following pop-up windows in the utility software will guide you through the broadcast.

12.18 Power management functions, Command unit The power management system is a multi-master system. In a multi-master system, the available generator units automatically perform the power management control. This means that the system never depends on only one master unit. If for instance one unit ID is disabled, and this was the command unit, then the next available unit will take over the command functions. The above also applies to the AGC mains units in that case the command unit is called Mains Command Unit (MCU). The command unit cannot be selected by the operator. It is automatically selected when a power management setting is accessed. 12.19 Power management functions, Load-dependent starting and stopping The purpose of this function is to ensure that sufficient power is always available on the busbar. This means that the gensets will automatically be started and stopped in order to let only the sufficient number of gensets run. This optimises the fuel economy and the maintenance intervals. The load-dependent start/stop function is active when the plant is in AUTO mode. The starting and stopping of the gensets is automatically carried out according to the adjusted setpoints and priority selection. The load-dependent start/stop function can be selected as: Rated power setpoint (P) [kW] Apparent power setpoint (S) [kVA] Actual or load percentage value [%]

The load-dependent starting and stopping can be selected to base on either produced power calculation (%) or available power calculation (P or S).

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The easiest way is to use produced power calculation; however, this method is not suited for systems with three or more generators as regards fuel savings and saving running hours. 12.19.1 Terminology The table shows the abbreviations used. Short PAVAILABLE PTOTAL PPRODUCED PNOMINAL PNOMINAL-STOP Description Available power Total power Produced power Nominal power Nominal power of the genset to stop Priority-dependent Comment PTOTAL - PPRODUCED PNOMINAL of running sets with GBs closed

Deactivate load-dependent stop The load-dependent stop can be deactivated through M-logic, should this be preferred. This is necessary e.g. to allow operators to start the factory load after a blackout before the normal load-dependent operation can be started. In the example below, the function is activated with terminal 43. Now the operator can switch the load-dependent stop ON or OFF with a switch connected to terminal 44.

Produced power method This method is in effect if % power is selected in menu 8880 as basis for the start/stop calculation. If the load % of a generator exceeds the "Start next" setpoint, the start sequence of the lowest priority generator in stand-by will be initiated. If the load % of a generator drops below the "Stop next" setpoint, the stop sequence of the running generator with the highest priority number will be initiated. If the load of the plant decreases so much that the generator with the highest priority number can be stopped and an available power of at least the stop setpoint in % is available, then the stop sequence of this generator will be initiated.

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kW

% load

Power produced % power

500 90 400 300 200 100 0 -100 -200 10

Load dep. start

Load dep. stop

Time

1 1 Load increase

2 Load start delay runs out; PMS start command 3 Stand by genset running and connecting to the busbar
Available power method This method is in effect if P [kW] or S [kVA] is selected as basis for the start/stop calculation. Independent of the selection (P [kW] or S [kVA]), the functionality is basically identical; therefore the example of the functionality below will be given for the load-dependent start function with selected rated power (P) value. The apparent power setpoint is typically selected if the connected load has an inductive character and the power factor is below 0.7. Description This drawing illustrates the terms used.
PNOM 100% 1500 kW PNOM 1000 kW PNOM 1000 kW = 3500 kW ~ 100%

= 1050 kW (available power) 70%

= 2450 kW

DG1

DG2

DG3

Consumed power at the busbar

Nominal power

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The nominal power is the rated power of the genset that can be read on the type plate of the generator. Total power The total power is the summation of the rated nominal power of each individual genset. In the example above the plant consists of three DGs: DG1 = DG2 = DG3 = That is a total of 1500 kW 1000 kW 1000 kW 3500 kW

Produced power The produced power is defined as the existing load on the busbar. In the example above the produced power is indicated as the hatched area, and the total of the three gensets = 2450 kW. Available power The available power is the difference between the maximum possible power produced by the gensets and the actual produced power. In the example above the plant consists of three gensets, in total 3500 kW. The load consumes 2450 kW in total. Since the total load PTOTAL is 3500 kW, and the produced load PPRODUCED is 2450 kW, then the available power PAVAILABLE is 1050 kW, meaning that the gensets can handle this load if it should be added to the busbar. 12.19.2 Principle available power method One genset is running and is supplying the load. The load increases which means that the available power/ apparent power decreases. At a certain time the load has increased so much that only a little amount of power/apparent power is available, and the next priority genset will be started in order to increase the amount of available power/apparent power. When the load drops, the available power/apparent power will increase. When the available power/apparent power has increased above the stop level plus the nominal power of the last priority genset, then the last priority genset will be stopped. Please note that the nominal power of the genset to be stopped is added to the adjusted stop level. The reason is that otherwise the available power/apparent power would immediately drop below the start level again. Example: If the adjusted stop level is 200 kW (PSTOP = 200 kW), and the genset with the last priority is 1000 kW, it is necessary that the available power reaches 1200 kW, because the available power will be reduced with 1000 kW immediately after the last priority genset is stopped.

12.19.3 Principle percentage method One genset is running and is supplying the load. The load increases which means that the % load increases. At a certain time the load has increased so much that the load % start will start up the next priority genset in order to take some of the load. When the load drops, the produced power will decrease. When the produced power has decreased below the stop level plus the nominal power of the last priority genset, then the last priority genset will be stopped. Please note that the nominal power of the genset to be stopped is added to the adjusted stop level. The reason is that otherwise the produced power would immediately drop below the start level again.

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Example: If the adjusted stop level is 10% (100 kW produced power), and the genset with the last priority is 1000 kW, the last priority generator will produce 20% (200 W) after stop. It is necessary that the start level is above this value, otherwise an ongoing starting and stopping will take place.

12.19.4 Adjusting load-dependent start In the example below the available power is 200 kW. When the load increases, the available power drops below the start limit. The stand-by genset will start when the start timer runs out, and after the synchronising the available power increases (in this example to 500 kW). P-Avail. on busbar

500 400 300 200


Load start limit

Measured P-Avail. Predicted P-Avail.

100 0 -100 -200 1 1 Load increase 2 Load start delay runs out; PMS start command 3 Stand by genset running and connecting to the busbar 2 3
Time

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12.19.5 Adjusting load-dependent stop In the example below the available power is 500 kW. When the load decreases, the available power increases to 750 kW. The AGC now calculates what happens if the last priority genset is stopped. In the example below the last priority genset is 400 kW which means that it can be stopped, because the available power will still be above the stop level. Now the difference between the stop level and the available power is 50 kW. This means that only if the genset, which now has the last priority, is 50 kW, it can be stopped!

700 600 500 400 300 200 100 0 1 1 Load decreases 2 Load stop delay runs out; PM stop command 3 Last priority genset stopped 2 3 Load stop limit

If the order of priority is changed, the following must be observed: If the priority does not seem to change as expected, it is because the load-dependent stop function is not able to stop the lowest priority after having started the new first priority. That would cause two DGs to be running at low load instead of one DG.

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12.19.6 Power window The difference between the programmed load-dependent start and stop limits forms the power hysteresis between the start and stop. This is shown in the diagram below:
Available power at the busbar Load-depending stop

Load-depending start

PDG3

PDG3

PDG1

Load stop limit

PDG2

PDG2

Power window Load start limit 1. DG Start 2. DG Start 3. DG Start 3. DG Stop 2. DG Stop

12.20 Power management functions, Load management The function is used to activate a relay when a specific amount of power is available. The purpose of this function is to be able to connect load groups when the gensets of the emergency power plant are running. In each of the gensets, five levels can be adjusted (menus 8220-8260): Available power 1 Available power 2 Available power 3 Available power 4 Available power 5

These setpoints can activate a relay when the specific amount of available power is reached. The relay output can be used for connecting load groups when sufficient power is available. The relays will activate when the available power is higher than the setpoint, but be aware that when the load groups are being connected, the available power will decrease and the relay(s) deactivate again if the available power is below the setpoint. So it is necessary to make an external holding circuit.

The number of available relays is option-dependent.

The function is not depending on the running modes. The relays will activate in all modes including block. To avoid activation, e.g. when the genset is stopped, the inhibit function should be used.

Regarding the inhibit function, please refer to the Designers Reference Handbook.

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It is possible to adjust different levels of available power in all gensets. This gives the possibility to use several load groups if this is necessary. Example: In the example below, generator #1 is started followed by generator #2. The simplified diagram shows the two gensets and two load groups that are being connected by the available power relays R1 and R2 on AGC1.

Trip load group 1

Trip load group 2

Load Group 1

R1

K1

R2

K2

Load Group 2

K1

K2

R1

R2

Multi-line 2

Multi-line 2

G
Diesel generator set 1

G
Diesel generator set 2

12.20.1 Functionality description (refer to the diagram below) The generator #1 is started, and the timer t1 starts running when the GB1 closes. When the t1 is expired, the selected relay activates (R1), and in the example a 200 kW load group is connected. Now the available power falls to 300 kW. After some time the generator #2 is started and its generator breaker is synchronised. When the GB2 closes, the timer t2 runs. When the timer t2 expires, the selected relay activates (R2), and the second load group of 200 kW is connected. Now the available power falls to 600 kW.

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PAVAIL kW

1000 800 600 400 200 t1

t2

GB1 ON

R1

GB2 ON

R2

To connect the load groups, individual relays can be selected on each AGC or on one of the AGC units only. 12.21 Power management functions, Load sharing When the power management communication is running, the load sharing between the gensets is done by using the CANbus communication between the AGC units. If both CANbus ports are being used (A1-A3 and B1-B3), the communication automatically switches to the other port if e.g. A1-A3 is disconnected or faulty. (Please refer to the description of redundant CANbus). If both CANbus lines are disconnected or faulty, the AGCs do not automatically switch over to analogue load sharing. This has to be set up in M-logic: Use the command "Force analogue loadshare". Now the load sharing continues based on the signals from terminals 37/38/39. This means that the power management will be lost, but the gensets already running will stay stable.

The option G3 has to be active to have the backup of the analogue load share line.

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12.22 Power management functions, Island ramp up with load steps

Delay, step 1

Delay, step 2

Delay, step 3

Delay, step 4

Power [kWh]

Delay, step 5

CAN load share setpoint

One step before the load share setpoint is reached the ramp up function is switched off

Power ramp [%/s]

GB closed

Time [sec]
Ramp up, read from load share line Standard load sharing

12.23 Power management functions, Fixed power ramp up with load steps

Delay, step 1

Delay, step 2

Delay, step 3

Delay, step 4

Delay, step 5

Stop signal

Power [kWh]

Power Set point

Power ramp [%/s] GB closed Time [sec] Ramp up, read From load share line Ramp down

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When menu 2614 is enabled, the power setpoint continues to rise in ramp up steps, determined by menu 2615, towards the load sharing setpoint. The delay time between each ramp up step will be determined by menu 2613. The ramp up will continue until the load sharing setpoint is reached and then switch the regulator to standard load sharing mode. If the delay point is set to 20% and the number of load steps is set to 3, the genset will ramp to 20%, wait the configured delay time, ramp to 40%, wait, ramp to 60%, wait and then ramp to the system setpoint. If the setpoint is at 50%, the ramp will stop at 50%. 12.24 Power management functions, freeze power ramp A way to define the ramp up steps is to use the freeze power ramp command in M-logic. Freeze power ramp active: 1. The power ramp will stop at any point of the ramp, and this setpoint will be kept as long as the function is active. 2. If the function is activated while ramping from one delay point to the other, the ramp will be fixed until the function is deactivated again. 3. If the function is activated while the delay timer is timing out, the timer will be stopped and will not continue until the function is deactivated again. 12.25 Power management functions, ATS applications Two possibilities are available; the mains unit can either be installed or not. 12.25.1 AGC mains installed See single line diagram for "Parallel with mains plant".

In an AMF application the AGC mains will normally operate the mains breaker and thereby make sure that the supply is coming from the mains if this is healthy. This function allows the AGC to be used in an application where an automatic transfer switch is installed. This is known as an ATS. In the applications shown as one-line diagrams in the chapter Functional description it can be seen that the ATS will take care of the switching between the generator supply and the mains supply.

If ATS is selected, the AGC has no control over the ATS ("mains breaker").

Description Normally the AGC detects a mains failure based on the voltage and frequency measurement on the mains. However, when ATS is selected in menu 7085 it is necessary to use a digital input together with the position feedbacks from the ATS. Thus, the mains failure is not detected by the AGC measurements but by the following two requirements: 1. Alternative start input ON 2. ATS (MB) feedback OFF

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To make the AGC detect a mains failure, the alternative start input has to be ON and the MB OFF feedback has to be active.

The input used as "Alternative start" function is configured in the PC utility software (USW).

The mains unit will not try to operate the ATS (mains breaker) at all. But it is still necessary that position feedbacks are wired up. It is possible to have a tie breaker installed. This is useful if more gensets need to be started before supplying the load, because the tie breaker will not close until the required number of gensets is available. 12.25.2 ATS island mode See single line diagram for "Island operating plant".

If this application is needed, the gensets can be started by activating the "auto start/stop" input. The gensets will be started and stopped according to the power demand. That is, they will operate in load-dependent start/ stop mode. Be aware that since no tie breaker is installed, it is important that the first genset to close on the busbar can carry the load. If the load is too high, the genset will be overloaded.

This application can be combined with the multi start function. 12.26 Power management functions, Fail class The fail classes described in the Designers Reference Handbook are still valid when the power management option is selected. In addition to these fail classes the safety stop can be used in the AGC units with power management. This means that when a trip + stop alarm occurs, the faulty genset will stay on the busbar until the next priority genset is started and synchronised to the bus. When the incoming genset has taken the load, the faulty genset will ramp down the power, followed by trip of the breaker, cooling down of the engine and finally stop. If the faulty genset has the last priority, or no standby gensets are available, then it will stay on the busbar and will not trip. If no genset can start in a safety stop situation, then the faulty genset will not be stopped. Therefore it is important that the safety stop is backed up, e.g. by a trip and stop alarm or a shutdown alarm. 12.27 Power management functions, Local/remote/timer operation The plant can be adjusted to local, remote or timer operation (menu 8021). This selection is done in the command unit, i.e. one of the generator units.

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The setting defines how the plant is started while it is in AUTO mode.

The settings can be changed in M-logic and via display or PC utility software. Display Local Remote start Timer start X X X Utility SW (Parameter setup) X X X M-logic X X -

The purpose of the selection is to decide whether the plant can be started from the display (local operator), from remote (e.g. PLC) or by an internal timer. Remote means that the control can be carried out by activating the digital input or through Modbus/Profibus communication. 12.27.1 Local selection All operation is carried out on the display. In island operation any generator unit display can be used, and in load takeover, mains power export and fixed power the mains unit display must be used. The plant mode must be AUTO. 12.27.2 Remote selection The plant is started using the digital input "auto start/stop" when "remote" is selected. Island mode In island mode the "auto start/stop" input on any of the generator AGCs can be used for starting the plant. However, DEIF recommends to wire up the "auto start/stop" input to all of the AGCs to be sure that the automatic operation is able to continue even though one of the DGs is taken out for service (power supply disconnected to the AGC). In island mode any running mode (MAN, AUTO, SEMI, BLOCK) can be selected on the generator units, and the remote start signal is still working for the remaining AGC which is still in AUTO mode. Parallel to mains mode In load takeover, mains power export and fixed power mode the "auto start/stop" input on the mains unit must be used for starting the plant. 12.27.3 Plant operation The table shows how the plant is started: Plant mode Island mode Fixed power mode Mains power export Load takeover Selection Local Display on generator units Display on mains unit Display on mains unit Display on mains unit Remote Auto start/stop on gen. units Auto start/stop on mains unit Auto start/stop on mains unit Auto start/stop on mains unit

In peak shaving and AMF the automatic operation starts automatically depending on the imported power (peak shaving) or mains failures (AMF).

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12.27.4 Timer selection The operation of the plant is controlled by up to eight internal command timers which are programmed using the PC utility software (USW). The function can be used in load takeover, mains power export and fixed power, and the mains unit has to be in auto. 12.27.5 Principle

Start

Timer mode No No Plant running No No Timer ON Yes Start plant Yes Yes Timer ON No Stop plant

Local Yes

Remote Yes

Yes Local mode No Plant running Yes No Press stop button Yes Stop plant No Press start button Yes Start plant No Plant running No Auto start/stop ON Yes Start plant Yes Remote mode Yes Auto start/stop ON No Stop plant

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12.28 Power management functions, Multi-starting gensets The multi-start function can be used to determine the number of gensets to start. This means that when the start sequence is initiated through push-button, digital input or automatic start, then the adjusted numbers of gensets will start. This function is typically used e.g. together with applications where a certain number of gensets is required to supply the load. Example: In an AMF application with a tie breaker, the tie breaker must not close before the maximum power is available (power capacity setpoint).

The multi-start function is adjusted in menu 8922-8926.

12.28.1 Multi-start configuration The multi-start function can be adjusted to operate with two different settings. These settings consist of setpoints for how many gensets to start and the minimum number of running gensets. It is possible to switch between the settings using M-Logic or menu 8924. Setpoint 1 Multi-start (numbers to start) Min no. running Default setting Start condition Emergency operation Normal operation Mains failure No mains failure Setpoint 1 X Setpoint 2 X Default setting of DGs to start Start all DGs Auto calculate 8922 8923 8925 8926 Setpoint 2

The default setting of the selection between setpoint 1 and setpoint 2 is made so the setpoint 1 is adjusted to "Auto calculation" and is used in all modes except for AMF. Setpoint 2 will automatically be selected in case a mains failure occurs (this is adjusted in M-logic). Setpoint 2 is adjusted to 16 gensets which means that all available gensets will start when the mains failure occurs.

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The default setting can be changed, if convenient.

12.28.2 Numbers to start The numbers to start (menu 8922/8925) can be selected depending on the number of DGs available. The load-depending start and stop function will be active as soon as the generator breakers are closed or, if a tie breaker is installed, as soon as the tie breaker is closed. It is possible to adjust the number of gensets, or an auto calculation can be selected. If it is needed to delay the load-dependent start and stop function, it can be done through the M-logic function. Auto calculation When auto calculation is selected, the sufficient number of gensets will be started as soon as the start command is given. This is not depending on the plant mode. Example: In a four DG plant each generator is rated with 1000 kW. The setpoint for load-dependent start (menu 8001) is adjusted to 100 kW. If a start command is given in fixed power mode and the setpoint is 2000 kW, then three gensets will be started immediately and the fourth genset will remain stopped. Three gensets will be started because two gensets are requested to supply the load (2*1000 = 2000 kW) and the load-dependent start function requests the third genset.

12.28.3 Minimum numbers running The multi starting function can be combined with the setting of a minimum number of running gensets (menu 8923/8926). This means that the load-dependent stop function is disregarded when only the specific number of gensets is running. This is also the situation even though the load would justify a load-dependent stop. "Numbers to start" (menu 8922/8925) and "Minimum numbers running" (menu 8923/8926) are available for all modes.

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12.29 Power management functions, Priority selection It is possible to use one of five types of priority selection.

The parameter for each of the five priority selections will only be enabled (visible) when one of the five options is selected via the USW channel 8031, or by using the display parameter 8030 Priority select.

12.29.1 Manual The manual selection gives a possibility to adjust the order of priority between the adjusted numbers of available DGs. This means that each genset always has a specific priority setting. The adjustment is made in the menus 8080 (P1-P5), 8090 (P6-P11) and 8100 (P12-P16). In this example the order of priority is DG3, DG1, DG2, DG4. Priority/Genset Menu 8081 Menu 8082 Menu 8083 Menu 8084 P1 P2 P3 P4 X X X DG1 DG2 DG3 X DG4

These settings are only adjusted in the generator units. After the adjustment the order of priority must be transmitted manually to the other gensets using the transmit function in menu 8086. Manual abs. (absolute) Scenario: The four gensets in the drawing below are set up to have the same priority and ID (genset 1 has priority 1, etc.). When sections are separated with a BTB and the gensets are in AUTO, the Manual abs setup will at all times keep the priority adjusted for each controller. If the BTB is open the four gensets can start and stop as two independent applications. E.g. if a genset is running on each side of the BTB, genset 1 and genset 3 will be running as the first priority gensets. If the BTB is synchronised and closed the genset 2 will start and take over the load from genset 3. When this is done, genset 3 is stopped and the application is now considered as one common application with four gensets.

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Manual rel. (relative) Scenario: The four gensets in the drawing below are set up to have the same priority and ID (genset 1 has priority 1, etc.). Manual relative makes sense if there is a mains connection on each side of the BTB as shown in the picture below. When sections are separated with a BTB and the gensets are in AUTO, the Manual rel setup will autochange the priority depending on the position of the BTB and depending on which mains ID has the ID to run function activated. If the BTB is open the four gensets can start and stop as two independent applications. E.g. if the gensets 3 and 4 are running on the right side of the BTB and the BTB is synchronised and closed, the gensets 1 and 2 will not start and take over the load from gensets 3 and 4 as they are seen as new gensets being available in an already running application, and gensets 1 and 2 will now become priority 3 and 4.

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12.29.2 Running hours The purpose of the priority selection based on running hours is to let all the gensets have the same or nearly the same amount of running hours. Every time the adjusted period in menu 8111 is reached, a new order of priority is determined, and the gensets with first priorities will be started (if not already running), and the gensets with the last priorities will stop. There are two possibilities for operating the priority routine based on the running hours: Absolute or relative. The selection between the absolute and relative routine defines whether the offset adjustment of the running hours is taken into consideration in the priority calculation. The offset adjustment is used e.g. when the AGC is installed on an old genset which already has many running hours, or if an AGC is replaced. Running hours abs. (absolute) All gensets participate in the priority routine based on the principle shown in the table below. This means that the gensets with the lowest number of running hours will be running. This can be a disadvantage for instance if the application consists of old gensets together with new gensets. In that situation the new gensets will be the first priorities, until they have reached the same number of running hours as the old gensets. To avoid this, the priority routine called relative running hours can be used instead. The actual number of running hours is adjusted in each genset AGC in menus 6101 and 6102, typically at the commissioning. The purpose of the menu is to have the correct number of running hours displayed. Running hours rel. (relative) When "relative" is selected, all gensets will participate in the priority routine independently of the number of running hours adjusted in menus 6101 and 6102. This means that all gensets in AUTO mode participate in the priority routine. The relative selection gives a possibility to reset the priority routine. When the reset is activated in menu 8113, the relative running hour counters in the AGC units will be reset to 0 hours, and at the next priority selection the calculation is based on the reset values. Principle for priority routine The principle for the priority routine is described in the following table where the running hours (menu 8111) are adjusted to 24 hours. In this example only one genset is required by the load.

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DG1 (int. ID3) Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday 0 24 48 72 1051 h 1051 h 1051 h 1075 h

DG2 (int. ID2) 1031 h 1055 h 1055 h 1055 h

DG3 (int. ID4) 1031 h 1031 h 1055 h 1055 h

DG4 (int. ID1) 1079 h 1079 h 1079 h 1079 h

Comment DG2 will start due to the lowest internal ID number DG3 will be started, and DG2 will be stopped DG1 will be started, and DG3 will be stopped DG2 will be started due to the lowest internal ID number, and DG1 will be stopped DG3 will be started, and DG 2 will be stopped DG1 will be started, and DG3 will be stopped DG4 will be started due to the lowest internal ID number and so on

Friday Saturday Sunday

96 120 144

1075 h 1075 h 1099 h

1079 h 1079 h 1079 h

1055 h 1079 h 1079 h

1079 h 1079 h 1079 h

The time adjusted in menu 8111 is the time between each priority calculation.

12.29.3 Fuel optimisation The purpose of the fuel optimisation routine is to always let the gensets run in the best combination at any given load based on their actual nominal powers.

The settings are adjusted in the command unit.

The multi start function cannot be used together with the fuel optimising routine.

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Description The function is set up in the following menus: Menu number 8171 Menu text Setpoint Description Load with best fuel economy (% of PNOM) Initiate optimising Time delay Running hours Activate running hours Comment The units will optimise around this genset load

8172 8173 8174 8175

Swap setpoint Delay Hour Enable

The improvement in nominal power must be better than this setpoint to initiate fuel optimising Optimal combination must be present during this period, before optimising is initiated Maximum allowed difference in running hours Activates the dependency of the running hours

The function is best described with an example. Below an example with three DGs is shown. DG1 = 1000 kW DG2 = 1000 kW DG3 = 500 kW

Settings used in the fuel optimising function in this example: 8011 Load-dependent stop = 220 kW (extended with 10% in this function) 8171 Setpoint = 100% 8172 Swap percentage = 200 kW

Situation 1: The two 1000 kW gensets must operate. The load is too big for one 1000 kW and one 500 kW genset. Situation 2: Since the load has decreased to 1400 kW, it would be enough with one 1000 kW and one 500 kW genset. The improvement is 500 kW which is better than 200 kW (menu 8172). The problem is that only 100 kW would be available. The load-dependent stop requires 220 kW available, so no swapping can take place. Situation 3: Now the load has decreased to 1300 kW. It would be enough with one 1000 kW and one 500 kW genset. The improvement is 500 kW which is better than 200 kW (menu 8172). The problem is that only 200 kW would be available. The load-dependent stop requires 220 kW available, so no swapping can take place. Situation 4: Now the load has decreased to 1200 kW. It would be enough with one 1000 kW and one 500 kW genset. The improvement is 500 kW which is better than 200 kW (menu 8172). This means that 300 kW would be available, so the load-dependent stop does not interfere with the fuel optimising. Fuel optimising is initiated! Situation 5: Now DG3 has been started and is running with 400 kW. This is the best combination at this time, and no swapping takes place with this load.

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The setpoint (menu 8171) in percent is typically set to 80-85% for optimum fuel economy.

Running hours It is possible to combine the fuel optimising with the running hours. This is enabled in menu 8175. If this setting is OFF the fuel optimising will be active, but the running hours will not be included in the calculation. If the function "running hours" is enabled, the principle is the following: If one genset reaches the adjusted amount of running hours, it will be given quarantine. This means that it will just rest until it has the lowest number of running hours. The only exception to this is if there is no alternative combination. Then it will be used but will still be in quarantine.

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12.30 Power management functions, Conditional connection of heavy consumers Each diesel generator unit is able to handle two heavy consumers (HC). When a heavy consumer is requested, the function for conditional connection of heavy consumers reserves the programmed HC requested value (parameter 8201/8211) on the busbar and blocks for engagement of the heavy consumer, until sufficient predicted available power is present at the busbar.
Available power on busbar kVA kW 700 kw

625 500 375 250 125 0 HC request value -125 -250

500 400 300 200 100 0 -100 -200 DG2 start delay HC ackn delay HC running DG2 stop delay
Time

Consumed power Available power

1 HC request value: 375 kVA HC nominal load: 150 kW DG nominal power: 500 kW Cos phi: 0.8 Load-dep. start value 90% Load-dep. stop value 70%

3 1 Request HC 2 Connect DG2 3 Acknowledge HC 4 Disable request HC 5 Disconnect DG2

When the available power is above the requested HC power, the heavy consumer is subsequently blocked until the programmed HC acknowledge delay runs out (fixed delay of 4 sec.). The "DELAY ACK. HC" may be necessary in order to allow the recently started generator set to take load and thus actually increase the available power at the busbar before engagement of the HC. The heavy consumers (HC) are connected according to their priority. This means that if two or more heavy consumers request start acknowledgement at the same time, the HC with the highest priority is handled first, and subsequently HCs with lower priority, etc. HC 1.1 (1st HC in DG unit with CAN ID no. 1) is designated the highest priority. This means that HC 1.1 is handled before HC 1.2, and HC 2.1 is handled before HC 2.2 if they are requested for start at the same time. If there are any preferential HCs, they must be connected to the hardware interface for the 1st HC in order to ensure first priority handling.

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The power management system carries out the following systematic sequence when a heavy consumer is requested for start: a) b) c) d) e) The programmed "HC n REQ. VALUE" is reserved at the busbar (parameter 8201/8211). A PMS start command is transmitted to the next stand-by generator set if the predicted available power is below the programmed "LOAD START LIMIT". When sufficient available power is present at the busbar, the timer "DELAY ACK. HC n" starts running (fixed delay time of 4 sec.). The start acknowledge signal is transmitted to the HC in question when the timer "DELAY ACK. HC n" runs out and sufficient available power is still measured at the busbar. The nominal HC power value (parameter 8202/8212) is used for load-dependent start/stop calculation after the acknowledge signal is given.

12.30.1 Power feedback from the heavy consumer The AGC is able to handle two types of power feedback: Binary feedback Analogue feedback

The two types of power feedback signals are handled the same way by the conditional connection of heavy consumers function. Changing the power feedback type is done by a parameter (8203/8213) in each generator unit. Activating the corresponding start request binary input activates the HC engagement sequence. The AGC system transmits a start acknowledge signal when sufficient predicted available power is present at the busbar. HC with binary power feedback signal:
Start request HC 1 375 kVA

Nom. power HC 1

188 kVA

0 kVA 300 kW Power reservation at the busbar 150 kW

P-avail. OK "Delay ACK. HC1"

Start acknowledge HC1

HC 1 fixed load Time

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12.30.2 Engagement sequence for HCs with fixed load The power reservation by means of the feedback "HCx fixed load" input is enabled as long as the start request signal is active. An OFF status (indicates that the HC is not operating) of the power feedback signal results in a 100% power reservation at the busbar. An ON status (indicates that the HC is operating) at the power feedback signal results in a 0% power reservation at the busbar. HC with analogue power feedback signal:
Start request HC 1

Nom. power HC 1

0 kVA Request value 300 kW Power reservation at the busbar Nom. power HC 1 100% 75% 50% 25%

P-avail.OK

Start acknowledge HC1 100% 75% 50% 25%

HC 1 fixed load 4..20 mA

Time

The analogue power feedback for the heavy consumer is intended for a power transducer with a 4-20 mA output corresponding to 0-100% load. If the heavy consumer is of 400 kW, the power transducer has to be calibrated to 0-400 kW = 4-20 mA, and the setting has to be set for 400 kW. 12.31 Power management functions, Ground relay The purpose of this function is to always let the star point of only one genset be connected to ground during island mode operation. The reason for this is to avoid circulating currents between the generators. The function is adjusted in menu 8120. The AGC which has the lowest CAN ID and where the generator breaker is closed will close its ground relay. Should this genset stop, it will open its ground relay when the generator breaker opens, and the ground relay of the generator which now has the lowest CAN ID closes its ground relay instead. The number of available configurable relays is option-dependent. The relay for this function is selected in each AGC unit.

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12.32 Power management functions, Stop of non-connected gensets If peak shaving is selected and the imported power increases above the start setpoint, the genset(s) will start. If the load now drops below the start setpoint, it will remain disconnected from the busbar but will not stop, because the imported power is higher than the stop setpoint. The function "stop of non-connected DGs" (menu 8140) will make sure that the gensets stop after the adjusted time. In other modes, the generator will also be stopped if it is in automatic without the GB closed. 12.33 Power management functions, Secured mode Secured mode adds an extra generator to the power management system. This means that one genset more than calculated in load-dependent start will be running. It is only possible to activate secured mode if the genset is in auto mode. Secured mode can be activated/deactivated by means of digital inputs or via M-logic. The extra generator running in secured mode will be selected, so it is possible to replace the largest running generator if this should fail. 12.34 Power management functions, Base load One genset unit in a power management system can be selected as running with base load (2952). This can be done from the display unit, via M-logic or via a binary input. If the unit is selected to run with base load, the status message "FIXED POWER" will be indicated. The fixed power value can be adjusted with parameter 2951.

If a generator runs in base load and the total load decreases to a point below the base load setpoint, the system will lower the fixed power setpoint. This is to prevent frequency control problems, as the generator running in base load does not participate in the frequency control. When the generator breaker is closed, the generator power will be increased to the fixed power setpoint.

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If AVR control (option D1) is selected, the setpoint will be the adjusted power factor. The unit selected for base load operation will automatically be set in SEMI-AUTO. Only one generator per independent busbar can run with base load. The busbar has to be active with one or more DG units running, before the unit with the lowest ID can activate base load. Only one AGC unit at a time can run in base load. The unit with the lowest ID will be allowed to run in base load. 12.35 Power management functions, Asymmetric load sharing (LS) When asymmetric LS is enabled in menu 8282, the "normal" G5 load sharing is deactivated in all AGC units in the system. The AGC units will then load share according to the asymmetric LS setpoint in menu 8281. Example: Four DGs able to produce 2800 kW each as nominal power. Asymmetric LS setpoint = 90%. Load on the busbar is 3030 kW. The generator with priority 01 will start up first, taking 90% of the load = 2727 kW. The generator with priority 02 will take the rest of the load = 303 kW.
kW

Total load on busbar = 3030 kW Loadshare 90 % setpoint P01

2727

Remaining 10 % load P02 DG 1

303 DG 2 DG 3 DG 4

If the asymmetric LS setpoint in menu 8281 "kW value" is higher than the nominal power of the generators, the whole system will switch back to symmetric. 12.36 Power management functions, Tie breaker configuration Some of the possible applications of the AGC with option G5 can be used with a tie breaker, i.e. a breaker connected between the gensets and the load bus. 12.36.1 Tie breaker selection In menu 8191, the tie breaker can be selected ON (present) or OFF (not present).

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12.36.2 Tie breaker control It can be selected whether the tie breaker should be open or closed when the generators are stopped. This depends on the application and the auxiliaries. If auxiliary load is connected to the generator bus, the tie breaker must be closed, but if no load is connected to the generator bus, then the tie breaker is often preferred to be open when the generators are stopped. The tie breaker will open or close depending on the setting in the menu 8191 ("Tie breaker enable"). The tie breaker only opens or closes depending on the selection in menu 8191 and it is not depending on the selected mode whether it should open or close.

12.36.3 Tie breaker open point If the gensets are running parallel to mains and the mains breaker trips, e.g. due to a mains failure, it can be necessary to trip the tie breaker as well. This depends on the total nominal power of the running gensets. If the gensets cannot supply the amount of load which is adjusted in the "tie breaker open point" menu 8192, then the tie breaker will open. It will close again when the power capacity setpoint menu 8193 is reached. This delay time can be used to trip non-essential load groups. Example In the example illustrated below it can be seen that the tie breaker will trip if DG1 or DG2 is connected to the load, because they are smaller than 510 kW. If DG1 and DG2 are running together, the tie breaker will also trip, because the total nominal power is still below 510 kW. If, however, DG3 is running alone or together with one of the two smaller DGs, then the tie breaker will not trip, because the total nominal power will be higher than 510 kW.

Trip No trip DG 3 = 600 kW DG 2 = 250 kW DG 1 = 250 kW

Tie breaker open point = 510 kW

The powers mentioned above are nominal powers of the gensets in the application.

12.36.4 Power capacity The power capacity setting in menu 8193 is used in AMF applications to determine how much power must be available, before the tie breaker can close. When the gensets are started the generator breakers will close, and when sufficient power is available, then the tie breaker will be closed.

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Power capacity overrule: In case some of the generators fail starting and the power capacity setpoint is not reached, the tie breaker will never be closed. Because of this, it is possible to overrule the power capacity setpoint after a period of time set in menu 8194. The function "power capacity overrule" is enabled in menu 8195. 12.37 Power management functions, Island application with TB
Area 1

Load

TB 17
Display 1 Display 2 Display 3

Busbar CANbus

Controller

Controller

Controller

G
Diesel generator set 1

G
Diesel generator set 2

G
Diesel generator set 3

A tie breaker in the mains unit can be operated in an island application. It is controlled in the same way as in the AMF situation described above. The power capacity setpoint menu 8193 is used to ensure that the generators produce enough power to take the load. This is done to protect the generators from going into overload.

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12.38 Power management functions, Multiple mains The AGC can be used in an application with multiple mains incomers. This is an example of the multiple mains application:

MB 17
Load

MB 18
Area 3 Load

MB 19
Load

TB 17
Display 1

TB 18
Display 2 Display 3 Display 4

TB 19
Display 5

BTB 33
Busbar CANbus

BTB 34
Busbar

Controller

Controller

Controller

Controller

Controller

G
Diesel generator set 1

G
Diesel generator set 2

G
Diesel generator set 3

G
Diesel generator set 4

G
Diesel generator set 5

Each application can handle: 0-16 mains feeders in the same application 0-16 gensets in the same application 8 bus tie breakers The multiple mains functionality covers a great variety of different applications. Please contact DEIF support (support@deif.com) for questions concerning the functionality.

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12.38.1 Definitions A multiple mains application consists of feeders and generators + a number of GBs, TBs, BTBs and MBs.

Sections The application consists of static and dynamic sections if one or more BTBs are installed. The definition of a section is mentioned in the table below. Section Static section Definition Part of the total application which is separated by one or two open BTBs. There will be no closed BTBs within this section. A static section can also be a dynamic section, but not vice versa. Dynamic section Part of the total application which is separated by one or two open BTBs. There may be one or more closed BTBs within this section.

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If no BTBs are installed, the application consists of a static section only.

Only use remote start signal in island application with BTB units.

Area 1

Static section: The BTB 33 is in open position. Therefore the indicated section is a static section.
MB 18
Load

MB 17
Load

TB 17
Display 1 Display 2

TB 18
Display 3

Dynamic section: The section is separated by an open BTB, so this is a dynamic section.

BTB 33
Busbar CANbus

BTB 34
Busbar

Controller

Controller

Controller

G
Diesel generator set 1

G
Diesel generator set 2

G
Diesel generator set 3

Area 1

Dynamic section: The BTB 34 is in closed position. Therefore the indicated section is a dynamic section.
MB 18
Load

MB 17
Load

TB 17
Display 1 Display 2

TB 18
Display 3

BTB 33
Busbar CANbus

BTB 34

Busbar

Controller

Controller

Controller

G
Diesel generator set 1

G
Diesel generator set 2

G
Diesel generator set 3

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12.38.2 Configuration Please select "Standard" in the plant configuration tool to configure this application.

Now the application can be configured using the section control panel.

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12.38.3 Plant mode handling Basically, six menus are available for setting up the functionality of the application. No. 8181 8182 8183 8184 8185 8186 MB failure start Parallel No break transfer Auto switch Run type Run type Setting Enable Enable Enable Enable Run one/all mains ID to run Min. setting OFF OFF OFF OFF Static Max. setting ON ON ON Dynamic All Factory setting OFF OFF OFF OFF Run one mains 17

Run all mains 17

Run one mains 32

MB close failure start: This setting determines whether a start of the DGs should be executed if an MB close failure occurs. If "MB close failure start" is activated, the mode shift functionality will automatically be enabled. In peak shaving, fixed power, mains power export and load takeover, the function is only active when menu 7081 Mode shift is set to ON. MB parallel: This setting determines whether the mains connections (MBs) should be able to run in parallel or not.

The setting of "MB parallel" affects the function of the "Auto switch" setting.

No break transfer: This setting determines whether switching between the mains connections (MBs) should be executed as a black coupling or a synchronised coupling. If the TBs in a section are adjusted to normally closed and "MB parallel" is switched OFF, then only one of the TBs can be closed at the time. The system will try to keep the ID selected in menu 8186 ("My ID to Run") to keep its TB closed. If, however, the selected ID does not have a TB configured as a normally closed breaker, or if it fails to close it, it will be the mains unit holding the lowest ID without TB failures present that will close. If "My ID to Run" is changed during operation, then the MB parallel setting will decide whether a black or a synchronised change-over will take place.

If "MB parallel" is activated, the "No break transfer" will automatically be enabled.

Auto switch: This setting determines whether a mains unit detecting a mains failure will try to get the connected load supplied by another mains or by the available DGs.

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Description OFF Static section Dynamic section All sections The auto switch functionality is switched OFF. The back-up power is recovered within its own static section. The back-up power is recovered within its own dynamic section. The application will never try to synchronise/close a BTB to get help in an AMF situation. The back-up power is recovered within all available sections.

Section description

Page 69 Page 69

Sections are divided by bus tie breakers. If no BTBs are installed, then the settings static/dynamic/all have the same auto switch function. If dynamic is selected, then please be aware that one mains unit will be requested to carry all load from the dynamic section without any help from the DGs. Therefore the remaining mains feeders must be able to carry the load from the entire section. Run type: This setting determines how the system in a dynamic section reacts in all the plant modes except island and AMF. Description Run one mains Only one mains breaker is allowed to be closed at the time. Comment "My ID to Run" (menu 8186) determines which mains feeder is allowed to operate parallel to the mains. If other TBs are closed, they will be tripped in order to only have the TB of "My ID to Run" closed. If no TB is available in the section, the MB will be tripped (causing a blackout). Run all mains All mains breakers are allowed to be closed at the time.

This setting can be handled from M-logic. 12.39 Power management functions, Dual mains If the AGCs are configured with two mains units, the settings for the dual mains application must be adjusted.

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12.39.1 Configuration Please select "Dual mains" in the plant configurator tool to configure this application.

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12.39.2 Plant mode handling This is an illustration of the dual mains application.

Four additional settings have been specified to determine the behaviour of the system. The settings are to be set in one of the AGC mains units and are then communicated via the CANbus to the other mains unit. The four additional settings in menu 8180 are:

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Description 8181 8182 8183 8184 8185 8186 MB close failure start MB parallel No break transfer Auto switch Run one/all mains ID to run

Dual mains relevance X X X X Not relevant Not relevant

The menus 8185 and 8186 are ignored in the dual mains application.

MB close failure start: This setting determines whether a start of the DGs should be executed if an MB close failure occurs. If "MB close failure start" is activated, the mode shift functionality will automatically be enabled. In peak shaving, fixed power, mains power export and load takeover, the function is only active when menu 7081 Mode shift is set to ON. MB parallel: This setting determines whether the two mains connections (MBs) should be able to run in parallel or not.

The setting of "MB parallel" affects the function of the "Auto switch" setting.

No break transfer: This setting determines whether a priority switch between the two mains connections (MBs) should be executed as a black coupling or a synchronised coupling.

If "MB parallel" is activated, the "No break transfer" will automatically be enabled.

1st priority mains: The configurable input "1st priority mains" determines which of the mains connections to consider the first priority. The binary input must be configured via the PC utility software (USW). The priority of the mains connections can then be altered by switching the input status on the AGC mains units.

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The "1st priority" input has to be active on one of the mains units at all times. Auto switch: MB parallel OFF: - If "Auto switch" is ON, an attempt will be made to switch to the 2nd priority mains if a mains failure occurs on the 1st priority mains before the generators are started. - If "Auto switch" is OFF, no attempt will be made to switch to the 2nd priority in case of a mains failure. MB parallel ON: - If "Auto switch" is OFF, the two mains will act as one meaning that both mains breakers have to be closed at all times, since one mains connection is not enough to supply the load. A mains failure on either of the mains will cause a trip of both mains breakers and subsequently start of the gensets. - If "Auto switch" is ON, both mains breakers will be closed in case both mains are OK. If a mains failure occurs on one of the mains, the mains breaker in question will be tripped, but an AMF start of the gensets will only happen when a mains failure is present on both mains.

If "Auto switch" is enabled (ON), mode shift (menu 7081) must also be enabled (ON).

12.39.3 Internal CAN ID The internal CAN ID for the AGC mains units can be set between 17 and 32 when multiple mains has been selected (otherwise the system only expects one mains and the ID is set to 17 as default). The selection of the CAN ID cannot be made randomly but must be made with caution. The reason for this is that the system expects ID 17 and ID 18 as a couple controlling the mains breaker for one mains connection, i.e. the ID 18 unit acts as a redundant unit to ID 17. In the same manner, the system expects ID 19 and ID 20 as a couple controlling the mains breaker for one mains connection, i.e. the ID 20 unit acts as a redundant unit to ID 19. This means that when no redundant mains units are present, the ID selected for the two AGC mains units must be ID 17 and 19. Setting of the CAN ID in multiple mains applications: AGC mains unit 1A 1B 2A 2B ID no. 17 18 19 20 Required Not required, redundant to 1A Required Not required, redundant to 2A Comment

Please refer to the drawing above for the location of the AGC mains units.

12.39.4 AGC mains unit redundancy It is possible to install a redundant AGC mains unit for each mains connection. If this is done, the redundant AGC mains unit will automatically take control if:

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a mains breaker failure occurs on the primary control unit the primary control unit is suddenly missing on the CAN line due to a CAN error the primary control unit is put into semi-auto

When the alarm situation on the primary control unit has been reset, the control is switched back to this AGC mains unit.

The primary control units are ID 17 and ID 19.

Be aware that if "ID to run" is active, the mains unit to run must have higher nominal power than the load on the busbar to prevent overload. The redundant controller is selected in the configuration window (section control).

12.39.5 Tie breaker configuration In applications with two mains connections, the tie breaker is handled by the AGC mains unit fulfilling the following conditions: Holding the lowest CAN ID No tie breaker error Not in semi-auto

If the AGC mains unit controlling the tie breaker is not able to open the tie breaker, the tie breaker handling is moved to the next AGC mains unit fulfilling the conditions above. This will continue until the tie breaker is opened or all the AGC mains units have tried to open the tie breaker. Because of the AC wiring it is not possible to synchronise the tie breaker in applications supporting two mains connections.

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12.40 Power management functions, Configurable CAN IDs

Can IDs can be configured as desired, as a mix of DG, mains and BTB units: 16 gensets 16 mains 8 bus tie breakers IDs 1-16 IDs 17-32 IDs 33-40

This makes a total of 40 CAN IDs. 12.41 Power management functions, CAN flags 16 CAN flags can be accessed in M-logic. They can be used in the same way as digital inputs. CAN flags can be set active when a CAN command is sent from one unit to another. The benefit is that no wire is needed, as the CAN flags are activated via the G5 CANbus.

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Example: CAN cmd 01 will be active when DG 5 is running. All units in the power management system will receive "CAN input 01 active" and then be able to act on this information. Only use of constant signals from digital inputs or AOP buttons can activate the CAN inputs. AOP buttons are pulse inputs, so a latch function must be made to make similar functionality as constant signals. 12.42 Power management functions, Common PF control A common PF value can be set in menu 7052, and menu 7053 can be set to either "Inductive" or "Capacitive". To activate the common PF control, menu 7054 must be enabled. These setpoints can only be handled from the AGC mains unit and then sent through the power management CANbus to all the DG units in the system. The DG units will then adjust their individual PF control according to the received setpoint.

Inductive/capacitive setpoints can be set up from M-logic.

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12.43 Parameter lists, Common settings The options G4 and G5 relate to the parameters 2250, 2260, 2270, 2761, 2950, 6071, 6400, 7011-7014, 7041-7044, 7051-7054, 7061-7084, 7531-7536, 7871-7873, 8000-8120, 8170-8175, 8181-8195, 8201-8213, 8220-8225, 8230-8272, 8280-8282, 8880-8882, 9160, 9170, 9180-9186, 9190-9192. For further information, please see the separate parameter list: AGC-3 AGC-4 Document number 4189340705 Document number 4189340688

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13. Plant management


13.1 Description of option, Option G7 The option G7, Plant Management, is a combined software and hardware option. It is a HW option because one of the used controller types communicates with the plant control system as well as with the belonging generators and then it uses an additional CAN port. Plant management is only used in the AGC-4 product line. 13.2 Functional description, Plant management What is DEIF plant management? DEIF plant management is an option in the AGC-4 controller that gives a number of possibilities for increased and optimised performance, typically of large-scale power plants but also for power plants (critical power or power producing) in a smaller scale. The number of supported generators in the system is from 1 to 256 DGs per plant. If more generators are needed, please contact your DEIF office for the solution. DEIF plant management is typically used on rental or stationary power plants with the purpose of exporting power to the mains. The plant will operate base-loaded, alternatively supplying the mains in islanded mode of operation. The main control of the plant is performed from the central AGC control unit. The start and stop of the plant is controlled from this unit, and activation and control of voltage and frequency support as well as MW and PF control setpoints are adjusted here. The generators can be controlled from the central point of control, or, depending on system architecture, they can be controlled in groups from 1 to 16 DGs. DEIF plant management offers the possibility to control an extra level of breakers compared to traditional DEIF power management systems. This will be explained further in this manual. All breakers in the system can be synchronised. The system can also be configured with a reduced number of breakers according to applicational demands.

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13.2.1 Unit definitions The AGCs used in the plant management system are shown in the table below. AGC type DG
Alarm

Layout Y1
Automatic Gen-set Controller
Power Self check ok Alarm
INFO

Required options

multi-line AGC
Alarm Inh.
VIEW

G7

SEL

JUMP

LOG

START

Run

On Load BACK

Auto

STOP

MODE

Group (AGC Mains)

Y5
Alarm

Automatic Gen-set Controller

Power Self check ok

Alarm
INFO

multi-line AGC BUS TIE


Alarm Inh.
VIEW

G7

SEL

JUMP

LOG

On

Auto

BACK MODE

Plant (AGC Mains)

Y4
Alarm

Automatic Gen-set Controller

Power Self check ok

Alarm
INFO

multi-line AGC MAINS


Alarm Inh.
VIEW

G7

SEL

JUMP

LOG

On START Load

On

Auto

BACK STOP MODE

BTB
Alarm

Y5
Automatic Gen-set Controller
Power Self check ok Alarm
INFO

multi-line AGC BUS TIE


Alarm Inh.
VIEW

G7

SEL

JUMP

LOG

On

Auto

BACK MODE

All other options can be selected by choice and availability. Notice that the term "group" refers to a group of generators. The generators are referred to as generators or DGs. Unit plant role Here you will find a short description of the role the individual controller plays in the power plant. DG: the DG unit controls a generator and the associated generator breaker. It will start the generator and synchronise the generator breaker. When the breaker closes, it will control the set according to the load level when load sharing with other gensets (island mode) or according to the kW reference from the plant unit. The power factor can be controlled individually from the group unit or from the plant unit. The kW setpoint cannot be controlled individually on each genset when working as a part of the plant management system. However, it is possible to remove the individual AGC DG from the plant management and then operate it in a single fixed power mode. This would be e.g. for service purposes.

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Group unit: the group handler has two main purposes. One purpose is that it is the plant management link between the plant unit and the genset controllers, i.e. it is connected to two CAN networks, "genset group" and "genset group plant". The other main purpose is that it controls the tie breaker of the group handler if such is installed. Plant unit: this is the main control device of the plant; setpoints, start/stop commands and plant modes are selected from here. BTB unit: the bus tie breaker unit can be placed on the generators busses like in the traditional power management system, or it can be placed between the mains feeders. 13.2.2 Applications The plant management functionality of the AGC makes it possible to build applications with many DGs. The maximum number of AGC units in one plant is mentioned in this table: Unit type DG Group Plant BTB (plant level) BTB (group level) 1-256 1-16 0-16 0-8 (0-16)*8 Available number (total)

Breakers Each unit in the plant is able to synchronise and control one breaker. The DG and BTB units are always assigned to one breaker (it is not possible to install an AGC DG or an AGC BTB without a breaker being present). Notice that the AGC BTB can be drawn in the single line diagram, but that it can be externally controlled. In this case it is not necessary to install AGC BTBs, but the configuration of the application ("application configuration") has to be correct and include the externally controlled bus tie breaker.

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Example of an application with three group units and one mains feeder. The mains feeder does not have a breaker to be controlled in this application. Plant management levels Genset group plant The plant management application is split up in two levels, i.e. plant level and genset level. The plant level (known as "Genset group plant" in the PC utility software) consists of mains feeders, mains breaker and tie breakers. Plant level bus tie breakers can also be installed. The table shows which unit controls which part of the application: Part of application Mains feeder Mains breaker control Group feeder Tie breaker control Plant level BTB Plant Plant Group Group BTB Controlled by 16 16 16 16 8 Available numbers

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Overview plant level: A typical application (on "Genset group plant" level) could for instance look like this:

On genset group PLANT level, the following controllers are needed for this application: 1 AGC Mains, plant unit 4 AGC Mains, group units Genset group The genset level (known as "Genset group" in the PC utility software) consists of one tie feeder and tie breaker and the number of DGs available in the group. Genset level bus tie breakers are also available. The table shows which unit controls which part of the application: Part of application Tie feeder Tie breaker Diesel generator Generator breaker Genset level BTB Group Group DG AGC DG AGC BTB Controlled by 1 1 16 16 8 Available numbers

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Overview genset group level: A typical application (on "genset group" level) could for instance look like this:

On GENSET group level, the following controllers are needed for this application: 1 AGC Mains, group unit 10 AGC DG controllers Plant overview Knowing the possibilities with the number of controllers available for the system, the complete system can be put together (example 8 DGs, 2 groups and 2 mains feeders):

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CANbus IDs Each AGC unit in the system has a dedicated ID number. However, it must be noted that the group handlers have an ID number for the genset group PLANT level and one for the genset group level. ID number assignment: CANbus network Genset network DG BTB GROUP Plant network GROUP PLANT BTB AGC unit type ID number 1-16 33-40 17-32 1-16 17-32 33-40 7531 7531 7531 7540 7531 7531 Menu number

Notice that the group unit exists on both CANbus networks, i.e. the plant network and the genset network. 13.3 Functional description, Plant mode descriptions Plant mode descriptions The plant management system supports the following plant modes: Island mode (Island) Power plant with synchronising generators or a stand-alone generator. Can also be used in critical power plants. Automatic mains failure (AMF) Critical power/emergency standby plants, black start generator. Peak shaving (Peak shaving) Power plant where generator supplies peak load demand paralleled to the mains. Fixed power (FP) Power plant with fixed kW setpoint (including building load). Mains power export (MPE) Power plant with fixed kW setpoint (excluding building load). Load takeover (LTO) Plant mode where the load is moved from mains to generator, e.g. peak demand periods or periods with risk of power outages.

A plant mode defines the method of operation of the plant, and it is adjusted in the plant unit (menu 6071) if such is present. In island mode the plant unit is not needed - only in all other modes. Using the supported modes, the plant will run with the gensets paralleled to the mains or islanded if they perform their intended scheme of operation in full AUTO mode. This is shown in the table: Parallel to mains FP Peak shaving MPE Island mode AMF LTO Islanded

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The functionality of the plant modes is described in the "Designer's Refence Handbook" (in which it is referred to as "genset mode") Group interaction There is no interaction between the groups, except that they start and stop at the "start/stop" limit adjusted in the group units. The start and stop limit is using the setpoint of asymmetrical LS (menu 8281). This means that functions such as CAN flags, heavy consumers and ground relay are working inside the individual group, and they do not cross groups. See separate chapter about the use of CAN flags. Starting and stopping of the plant The starting and stopping of the plant is driven either automatically or by a start/stop signal: AMF and peak shaving are the only two modes that start/stop automatically. The start/stop is system-dependent, meaning that a loss of mains or mains failure will initiate the AMF operation, and an increase/decrease in imported load will initiate starting and stopping in peak shaving. The modes Island, MPE, LTO and FP all require a start signal. This can be given from the display unit, digital input or communication, i.e. Modbus or Profibus. The start signal is called "AUTO Start/Stop". This signal has to be given on the plant unit. If the plant management system is without plant units (island mode plant), then the "AUTO Start/Stop" has to be given on the group units.

Example of setting up AUTO start/stop in the plant unit using digital input terminal 23. The plant mode is MPE. When the plant is started using the display unit, the setting of menu 8021 has to be "LOCAL". When the plant is started from the digital inputs or SCADA, the setting of menu 8021 has to be "REMOTE". This is adjusted in the plant unit, or, if the plant unit is not installed (island mode plant management applications only), in the group units. The setting of LOCAL/REMOTE is a shared setpoint between the group units. Island mode, plant management In island mode the plant is running with the feature of load-dependent start/stop active. This means that the groups will be started and stopped based on the load demand. (LD start/stop is also active inside the individual groups).

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When the plant is started, one group with the first priority (P01) will start and connect its tie breaker. The number of gensets that will start in the group depends on the power capacity setpoint (the menu number is 8192) in the group unit and the multi-start setpoints of the DG units (the menu number is 8920). If the power capacity of the group units varies, make sure that the first priority group (P01) is able to carry the load. Mains parallel, plant management During mains parallel, the plant is running with the feature of load-dependent start and stop. The setpoint is coming from the plant unit which is always there in //-mains applications, so depending on the kW/MW setpoint, the right number of groups is requested. The load-dependent starting and stopping of other groups is using the asymmetrical LS setpoint (see description of asymmetrical load sharing). When operating paralleled to the mains, the cos phi setpoint can be adjusted on the plant unit, the individual group unit, the individual DG controllers or a combination of those. See description of cos phi control. PLANT mode remarks Some plant modes vary from the traditional plant modes, or some useful remarks are mentioned in this chapter. Fixed power remarks. It is observed that the fixed power mode can be used with BTBs in the genset group levels. Normally, this is not possible in an AGC power management system where the AGC Mains in an FP mode cannot request DGs in another dynamic section than its own. Due to the design of the plant management system, the BTBs can be requested even though they are part of another dynamic section than the group controller. (A dynamic section is separated by opened BTBs. In the diagram below there are three dynamic sections when the two BTBs are opened, two dynamic sections when one BTB closes and one dynamic section when both BTBs are closed).

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Example of FP application where the plant controllers are able to request the DGs. Mains power export remarks MPE mode maintains the MW setpoint measured at the plant controller. This means that if auxiliaries inside the plant consume variable power, the power setpoint is still maintained. This could be cooling fans, pumps any load connected inside the plant. Notice that the difference between FP and MPE is that in FP mode, the power setpoint is maintained at the generator side instead of at the plant controller side as in MPE. So with a 30 MW setpoint/1 MW auxiliaries, the generators would produce 31 MW in MPE mode in order to dispatch 30 MW, and in FP mode they would produce 30 MW and 29 MW would be dispatched to the grid. The same observation can be made about the cos phi setpoint. The generators will adjust their setpoint so the total cos phi is maintained at the plant controller side. This must be enabled in the menu 7054 (select superior setpoint) in all controllers, including DG and group controller. See description of cos phi control. Notice that MPE mode requires the use of CTs or a mains power transducer on the plant controller. The CTs must be connected, so the sign of the power is negative when exporting to the grid and positive when importing from the grid (e.g. peak shaving applications). It is not required on the group controllers, but it is possible. Knowing that the displayed value of the exported power is negative, it is necessary to point out that the setpoint (menu 7001/7002 (day setting/night setting)) can be adjusted negative or positive; the negative value is imported and the positive is exported. So it is the contrary of the displayed. Peak shaving remarks. Notice that peak shaving mode requires the use of CTs or a mains power transducer on the plant controller. The CTs must be connected, so the sign of the power is negative when exporting to the grid (e.g. MPE applications) and positive when importing from the grid. It is not required on the group controllers, but it is possible.

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13.4 Functional description, Plant management functions 13.4.1 Group controller start and stop Group start and stop The genset group PLANT consists of individual genset groups. In the individual genset group, traditional power management is operating - i.a. load-dependent start/stop of the gensets based on percentage or available power (selected in menu 8882). If the load in a group increases, the group controller will be able to request another group (other groups). A group controller can request groups but not generators in another group. This means that the priority settings in the specific groups are respected. Next group start The next available group will start when the setting of asymmetrical LS on the group controller level is reached on the groups that are running. This menu is adjusted in one of the group controllers in menu 8281. It is a shared setpoint so it is only necessary to adjust it in one (any) group controller. The factory setting is 80%. If the PLANT is in operation and the group with first priority (P01) is in operation, the group with second priority (P02) will start when the first priority group reaches the asymmetrical LS setpoint. (Factory set = 80%). There is a timer that must expire before the next group starts. This timer is adjusted in the group controller in the menu number 8001 (shared setting, so it can be adjusted in any of the group controllers). If the asymmetrical LS setpoint is lower than the LD start setpoint of the generators, then DG(s) in the next group will start before all generators in the first group are running. To avoid this, the asymmetrical LS setpoint on group level must be higher than the LD start setpoint of the generators. This setpoint of asymmetrical LS has two functions; one is to be the actual asymmetrical LS setpoint if this is enabled on group controller level, and the other is to act as a setting of when to start/stop the groups. The latter is what is described in this chapter.

Example: Two groups of 10 DGs exist in a plant. Each DG is 1000 kW LD start setpoint is 90% All 20 DGs are ready and in full AUTO Asymmetrical LS setpoint = 80%

If one group is running with nine generators and the load has increased to 80% (0.8*10*1000 = 8000 kW), then the next group (group 2) is requested and one or several sets will start. If e.g. the load is 8100 kW (90% load on all nine generators), then group 1 will run with nine DGs and group 2 will run with one DG. The load on each DG will be 8100/10 = 810 kW. The value of the scale (setting 8006 DG) must be equal in all groups because it is used for the next group start routine. It is preferred to adjust the timer of the LD start of the group higher than the LD start timer in the generator group.

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Next group stop The groups will be stopped according to the load demand. The setting of asymmetrical LS is used to decide when to stop a group. So the asymmetrical LS setpoint is used to request groups (described in previous chapter) and to shut down groups. There is a timer used for the group load-dependent stop function. This is adjusted in a group controller in menu 8011 (shared setpoint so it can be adjusted in any of the group controllers). Example: Two groups of 10 DGs exist in a plant. Each DG is 1000 kW 11 DGs are running and they are sharing 8100 kW Asymmetrical LS setpoint = 80%

This is the present situation: if the second group was stopped, the first group would have to carry this load (8100 kW). This is above the start setpoint (see description of next group start), so the second group continues to be in operation. If the load decreases below 8000 kW (e.g. to 7900 kW), the group load-dependent stop timer starts counting and the second group is stopped. The reason is that the group load of the first group ends below the group start setpoint: 7900*100/(10*1000) = 79%. The second group stops the generator that it has in operation. It is preferred to adjust the timer of the LD stop of the group higher than the LD stop timer in the generator group. 13.4.2 Power reference scaling The AGC-4 uses scaling of some of the settings. The purpose of this is to make it possible or easier to adjust some of the setpoints. If e.g. a scaling of 1:100 is used and the kW/MW reference is 400 kW, the actual kW setpoint is [400 x 100 = 40000 kW/40 MW]. Scaling is used in the following parameters: Mode FP TEST mode (load test) Peak shaving MPE LD start and stop Menu 7055 plant unit 7055 plant unit 7005 plant unit 7005 plant unit 8006 DG controller Power reference 7051 7041 7001/7002 7001/7002 8001/8011 This must be equal in all DGs Instruction

13.4.3 Cos phi-controlled export The AGC is capable of controlling the cos phi at the mains breaker side with a common setpoint. This is useful for power plants with requirements of importing or exporting power at a certain cos phi, e.g. in mains power export mode (MPE). The function can be used in all parallel to mains modes, though. If the reactive load of the power plant is variable, the cos phi at the mains side would become variable too if the generators operate at a fixed cos phi setting. In order to prevent the varying cos phi, the fixed cos phi setpoint can be enabled in the mains unit. Three settings exist, and their function is shown in this table:

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AGC Mains selection OFF Fixed for DGs Fixed for import/ export Superior

Used cos phi Individual DG setpoint is used All DGs All DGs receive the setpoint from the mains Uses setpoint from a controller on a higher level

Comment

Fixed PF setpoint regardless of the load. This set is aiming to maintain the PF imported or exported to/from the mains, taking the reactive load of the plant into consideration. If the plant unit has a setting of "fixed for imp/exp" and the group and DG units have the setting of superior, the DGs will respond to the setpoint sent from the AGC plant unit.

In multi-mains systems with mains feeders paralleled, it is the AGC plant unit with "My ID to Run" that contains the setpoint. Sign of cos phi An important difference between Fixed for DG and Fixed for import/export is the sign of the cos phi. This is different because when power is exported to the mains, the power is shown as a negative reading in the display unit. If the power is imported, the power is shown as a positive reading. When the power reading is negative, the mains unit will display a capacitive reading when the generators are running with an inductive cos phi, and the setpoint in the mains unit must be a capacitive setpoint. A table describes the difference between inductive and capacitive setting: Exporting power to the mains Inductive setpoint Fixed for DGs Fixed for import/ export The generators operate with inductive PF The generators operate with capacitive PF Capacitive setpoint The generators operate with capacitive PF The generators operate with inductive PF

The settings minimum and maximum cos phi are not cancelled! Factory settings are 0.8/inductive...1.0/inductive. So with the factory settings the DGs are never brought to operate underexcited. M-logic Notice that the reference can be switched using the M-logic commands between inductive and capacitive reference.

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Plant management considerations: In plant management systems, the common cos phi control is a cooperation between the plant controller and the group controller. Three levels of cos phi settings are available: 1. On plant level 2. On group level 3. On DG level The cos phi setpoint of the DGs can be overridden by the group unit and the plant unit. The cos phi setpoint of the group unit can be overridden by the plant unit. The table below presents an overview of the cos phi reference unit type and menu: DG unit OFF Superior Superior OFF OFF Superior Superior OFF Fixed for DG Fixed for imp/exp OFF OFF Superior Superior Group unit OFF OFF OFF Fixed for DG Fixed for imp/exp Fixed for DG Fixed for imp/exp X (7051) X (7051) X (7052) X (7052) Plant unit DG unit X (7051) X (7052) X (7052) Group unit Plant unit

Notice the difference between fixed for DG and fixed for import/export in the begining of this chapter. Display view Notice that it is possible to select the cos phi reference in the display lines of the AGC. This is useful to verify the setpoint of the generators with a given reference adjusted in the AGC Mains (group or plant unit).

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Notice that the measured cos phi of the generators and the mains are different due to the reactive load of the plant. 13.4.4 Voltage support DEIF plant management has the voltage support function also referred to as Voltage-dependent PF/Q control (y2(x2) droop). The function changes the cos phi or the kVAr setpoint of the generators if the mains voltage changes beyond certain values in order to suport the mains voltage. The idea is that if the mains voltage drops, the generators increase their excitation and support the mains voltage. If the mains voltage increases, the excitation of the DGs decreases in order to produce a smaller amount of VAr. This function is used when the generators are paralleling to the mains. It cannot be used in island mode applications. Functional description The diagram below shows the principle. The dotted line illustrates the x-axis (voltage deviation), and the vertical line (PF) is the y-axis. The cos phi setpoint is 0.90 in this example, but the voltage support works around any setpoint that is adjusted.

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COS PHI

0.6 C

DBL MAX SH Power Factor Set point 0.9 I SL

MIN DBH 0.6 l

(Unom-Uact)*100/Uact [%] 10% 9% 8% 7% 6% 5% 4% 3% 2% 1% 0% 1% 2% 3% 4% 5% 6% 7% 8% 9% 10%

The diagram illustrates the following areas: Zone Minimum cos phi Limit Decreasing slope Low Dead band Increasing slope High Maximum cos phi Limit 104-110% Max. limit 7173 98-102% 102-104% 0.90 Sloping 7151-7152 7176 96-98% Sloping 7175 Voltage 90-96% Cos phi Min. limit 7171 Menu

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Parameters The above diagram is configured with the following parameter settings: Menu 7052 7053 7151 7152 7153 7154 7171 7172 7173 7174 7175 7176 7181 7182 7183 Settings 0.9 Inductive 2.00 2.00 1.00 1.00 0.8 Inductive 1.00 Inductive -0.05 0.05 PF(X2) U ON Name Power factor Power factor DBL [%] DBH [%] HYSL [%] HYSH [%] MI I/C MA I/C SL [PF/%] SH [PF/%] Y2(X2) X2 ENA Power factor setpoint 0.6-1. Inductive/capacitive. Dead band low in percentage of nominal X2. Dead band high in percentage of nominal X2. Hysteresis low in percentage of nominal X2. If HYSL is set above DBL, the hysteresis low is disabled. (Not shown in the diagram). Hysteresis high in percentage of nominal X2. If HYSH is set above DBH, the hysteresis high is disabled. (Not shown in the diagram). Minimum output of droop handling. This setting is related to the setting in 7172. Minimum output of droop handling. Maximum output of droop handling. This setting is related to the setting in 7174 Maximum output of droop handling. Slope low. The setting determines the increase/decrease of PF reference per percent the actual X2 drops below nominal X2. Slope high. The setting determines the increase/decrease of power reference per percent the actual frequency rises above nominal frequency. Output type for curve 2. Selections currently available Reactive Power and PF. Input type for curve 2. Selections currently available Power and Voltage. Enable/disable of curve 2. Description

Hysteresis In addition to the mentioned settings, a hysteresis can also be used. The function of the hysteresis is that the cos phi setpoint stays at the drooped value if the voltage returns towards nominal until the adjusted hysteresis is reached. If e.g. the voltage drops, the cos phi setpoint follows the slope to e.g. 0.82. If the voltage now recovers, the cos phi setpoint stays at the mentioned 0.82 (in our example) until the voltage reaches 99%, and then it moves back to our setpoint of 0.90. (1% is the setpoint of the hysteresis). If the hysteresis is adjusted at a higher value than the dead band, it is not in effect. Therefore, if the hysteresis is not used, please adjust it higher than the DB. Slope Two settings for the slope are available, namely the "Slope Low" (SL) and the "Slope High" (SH). The name of the settings refer to the voltage being lower or higher than the nominal voltage (100%). The slope is adjusted with a sign (positive or negative). The positive sign is the leading (capacitive) range, and the negative sign is the lagging (inductive) range. In order to explain when to adjust positive or negative sign, the following coordinate system is used.

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When the requirement of the voltage support is known, it can be decided whether the slope is positive or negative. This is best illustrated with an example: If the voltage drops compared to the nominal voltage, the generator is requested to increase the excitation and thereby the produced kVArs (in order to support the grid). If the setpoint (SP) is 1.00 and a dead band setting is 1%, the cos phi setpoint will decrease from 1.00 to 0.90 (SL setting is -0.05). SPNEW 388 VAC = 1.00 - ((396-388)/400*100) x 0.05 = 0.90 (simplified)

Capacitive range Even though the function is normally used to support a low mains voltage, it is possible to adjust the function to decrease the excitation if the voltage increases (leading power factor). To avoid pole slip and damage of the generators, make sure that the capability curve of the generators is respected and that the generators are not running underexcited or without excitation.

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13.4.5 Priority routine, load profile The purpose of the load-profiled priority routine is to make sure that the engines with the lowest recorded load profile are given highest priorities. The goals are several, but all focused on engine handling in order to increase the maintenance intervals and the lifetime of the engines. This priority routine gives a method of always dedicating the highest priority status to the engines with the lowest recorded load profile. This is an alternative to the running hour-based priority routines; if the routine is changed only on an hourly basis, the accumulated load scheme is not taken into account, only the running hours. Different load profiles exist, and they are known as e.g. stand-by power, prime power, emergency stand-by and continuous power. Only three of those will be mentioned in this chapter. The engine is specified for a specific use, and this must be respected. Some, but not all, load profiles can substitute each other according to engine manufacturer instructions. The AGC uses PNOMINAL setting 1 for calculations of the mentioned priority routine. This is a suggested setup if more or different nominal setpoints are being used: Menu Pnominal SETTING 1 Pnominal SETTING 2 Pnominal SETTING 3 Pnominal SETTING 4 Suggested name Stand-by power Prime power Continuous power Pnominal SETTING 4 Menu for configuration 6002 6012 6022 6032 Comment Load profile routine uses this value

Be careful when changing the Pnominal SETTING 1 (menu 6002). If the value is changed, the load profile calculations are based on a wrong Pnom setpoint.

Pnominal SETTING 1 can be protected with master password (to be configured).

For a given engine (if supported by the same engine), the continuous power rating is smaller than the prime power rating, and the stand-by power rating would be larger than the prime power rating - see the example below: Rating Stand by rating Prime power rating Continuous power rating Power 1600 kW 1400 kW 1300 kW Notes Limitations in running conditions Limitations in running conditions 24:7 operation is possible

Always follow the instructions of the engine builder! If a job site involves two methods of operation, e.g. continuous power and prime power, then switching between nominal setting 2 and 3 is used when operating in the requested selection. This is a way of keeping the load of the engine within the acceptable levels. One example is to run the set in fixed power mode (continuous power) at 1300 kW and in island mode (prime power) at 1400 kW. This would then be achieved by switching between nominal setting 2 and 3. Regardless of the operation, the calculation of the priority routine is always based on nominal setting 1.

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Counters The load profile counter can be read from the display unit using the configurable view function.

Load profile accumulation This section explains how the load profile is being accumulated during islanded mode of operation. The priority routine can be used in all plant modes, though. If a power plant consists of two or several gensets and they operate as prime power machines in islanded operation (ISLAND MODE), the sets operate according to the load demand in load sharing mode. The load profile will be logged and accumulated by the AGC. The priority routine is then switching the order of priority of the engines depending on this logged load profile. This simplified diagram shows that the running sets accumulate a load profile, but the stand-by set does not. This is indicated by the second arrow on the right hand side.

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This means that since DG2 does not accumulate on its load profile during the entire period of operation, it will be shifted to a higher priority at the next rearrange. Priority rearrange The command to make a rearranging of the priority order is given automatically or manually. This is shown in the table below: Command MANUAL AUTOMATIC Activate the transmit function of the menu 8086 in the DG unit. Rearranges according to fixed time intervals. Comment Same command as used for MANUAL priority routines. Also used for "RUN hour total" and "RUN hour trip" routines.

Plant management considerations The group units read the average load profile of the genset groups. This means that in the group handlers, the group priority can be controlled similar to the priority on the genset level, i.e. automatically based on "Run Hours" (total/trip/load-profiled running hours) or manually based on user-programmed order of priority. The following types of priority methods exist in the group units: Running hours abs: The running hours (total, trip or load-profiled) of the DGs are used to rearrange the order of group priority of the group units (not the DGs). An average value of the group (depending on number of gensets) is used for this rearranging, so the number of DGs in the group does not matter. This means that the order of group priority is changed at hourly-based intervals (run hour setpoint) and no user intervention is required. The interval is adjusted in hours in the menu 8111. If a manual rearranging is necessary, this can be forced in the menu 8086 by selecting manual update even though "running hours" has been selected as the type of priority routine in menu 8031. Manual abs: If the required priority update is manual, the new order of priority is adjusted in the menus 8080-8090-8100, followed by the transmit order in menu 8086: "Manual update". If the manual priority routine is desired, but the order of priority should be determined on the basis of the running hours (total, trip or load-profiled), this is possible by selecting "Running hour update" in menu 8086 instead of "Manual update".

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Operator-controlled rearranging The table below presents an overview of the different possibilities of making manual priority rearranging: Type of priority routine Manual order to rearrange Manual update Run hour update Manual New routine is adjusted in menu 8080/8090/8100. The average running hours from the group is used for the new order of priority. Type of priority routine Running hour This can be used to "override" the automatically selected order of priority. The average running hours from the group is used for the new order of priority. This can be used to advance the planned rotation of the order of priority.

Display views In the group unit, the views related to prioritising can be selected:

13.4.6 Offset of setpoints Power offset In the AGC-4 it is possible to make a fixed setting of power and cos phi offsets. This means that the setpoints can be manipulated e.g. by the digital inputs, Modbus or other events. The settings are adjusted in the menu group 7220 (7221-7226) for kW/MW reference and the menu group 7240 (7241-7246) for cos phi reference. A typical example of when the offsets could be used is when more mains feeders, tie breakers or consumers are connected. This table shows an example where the fixed power setpoint depends on the breakers A, B and C.

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Fixed power setpoint Breaker A connected Breaker A and B connected Breaker A, B and C connected 5 MW 5 MW 5 MW

Offset value 5 MW 10 MW

Fixed power setpoint 5 MW 10 MW 15 MW

Comment No offset activated P offset 1 activated P offset 2 activated

The offsets can be used one at a time or as a combination. This means that in the example above, the total fixed power setpoint if Poffset 1 and 2 were both activated would be 5+5+10=20 MW. Notice that the setpoint is the same, and it is independent of the use of offsets. Used power setpoint = power setpoint + offset(1:2:3) Used power setpoint = 7051 + (7221+7223+7225) Cos phi offset Three menus exist for offsetting the cos phi setpoint. This is an example where the offsets are controlled with digital inputs: Cos phi setpoint No digital input Digital input 112 Digital input 113 Digital input 114 0.80 0.80 0.80 0.80 Offset value 0.10 0.15 0.20 Cos phi setpoint 0.80 0.90 0.95 1.00 Comment No offset activated Cos phi offset 1 activated Cos phi offset 2 activated Cos phi offset 3 activated

It is shown that the setpoint is the same when the offsets are activated. So the real cos phi setting will be: Used cos phi setpoint = cos phi setpoint + offset(1:2:3) Used cos phi setpoint = 7052 + (7241+7243+7245) M-logic The offsets can be activated and deactivated through M-logic. This way they can be activated depending on system conditions, SCADA commands or inputs. The screendump below is just one example.

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13.4.7 Asymmetrical load sharing The function of asymmetrical load sharing (asymmetrical LS) has the purpose of topping up the load of the running engines to a certain percentage when the load is lower than the asymmetrical LS setpoint but not so low that the last priority genset will be stopped by the load-dependent stop function. If asymmetrical LS is not used, the load setpoint will be shared equally between the generators. If asymmetrical LS is used, the majority of the generators will run at the asymmetrical LS setpoint, and the minority will run at a lower load. The function is useful because the generators can be brought to operate at their optimal setpoint. Asymmetrical load sharing can be used on two levels; power management (inside the genset group) and plant management (genset group PLANT level). Asymmetrical LS, genset group The asymmetrical LS function is best described with an example. 10 DGs available, each 1000 kW LD stop level is 70% LD start level is 90% Asymmetrical LS setpoint is 80%

If the load is 6400 kW, eight generators will be running at 80%. If the load increases to 7208 kW, the generators run at 90.1%, meaning that another generator starts. Now nine DGs operate at [7208/9 = 801 kW], and since the load factor is higher than the asymmetrical LS setpoint, the load will be shared equally. With asymmetrical LS switched ON, the load will be shared asymmetrically between the LD stop setting and the asymmetrical LS setpoint. In this example with nine sets running and the LD stop setting at 70%, the asymmetrical LS will happen between [LD STOP limit] and [ASYMM SP]: [(9-1) * 1000 * 0.7 = 5600 kW] and [9 * 1000 * 0.8 = 7200 kW].

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Priority DG1 DG2 DG3 DG4 DG5 DG6 DG7 DG8 DG9 DG10 P01 P02 P03 P04 P05 P06 P07 P08 P09 P10

7200 kW 800 kW 800 kW 800 kW 800 kW 800 kW 800 kW 800 kW 800 kW 800 kW 0 kW (not running)

6700 kW 800 kW 800 kW 800 kW 800 kW 800 kW 800 kW 800 kW 800 kW 300 kW 0 kW (not running)

6401 kW 800 kW 800 kW 800 kW 800 kW 800 kW 800 kW 800 kW 800 kW 1 kW* 0 kW (not running)

6200 kW 800 kW 800 kW 800 kW 800 kW 800 kW 800 kW 800 kW 300 kW 300 kW 0 kW (not running)

5602 kW 800 kW 800 kW 800 kW 800 kW 800 kW 800 kW 800 kW 1 kW* 1 kW* 0 kW (not running)

*Actually the sets will run at the defined minimum load (adjusted in menu 8005). It is shown in the table that one or more generators can be running asymmetrically, depending on the range between LD stop and the asymmetrical setpoint. It is affecting the fuel consumption if this function is used. Therefore the fuel consumption curves of the generators must be studied before using the function The actual setpoint is a shared setpoint, so all generators will be using the same setpoint. Asymmetrical LS, genset group PLANT The asymmetrical load sharing can be used to bring the groups to run at a predefined load level. If the function is enabled, the groups will be running at the asymmetrical LS setpoint. The last group will produce the remaining load, similar to the asymmetrical LS within the genset group. 13.5 Functional description, Plant management toolbox 13.5.1 CAN flags 16 internal flags (binary states) can be raised and communicated throughout the plant. These can be used for user-defined functions, e.g. common mode switching or change of nominal settings. Since the plant management consists of a genset group plant network and genset group networks, two levels of CAN flags exist in the group handler. The use of CAN flags is best illustrated with an example: Change nominal setpoint from nominal setting 2 to nominal setting 3 (this could be the case when switching from prime power to continuous power). A switch is connected to the AGC Mains (terminals 112, 113 (com=111)), but it is not wired to the AGC DG controllers. The link from the AGC Mains to the AGC DG controllers will be CAN flags, and this will be programmed in M-logic.

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AGC Mains M-logic:

AGC DG M-logic (all DG controllers):

So with this setting in all of the DG units, they will all follow the command from the switch connected to the AGC Mains. Plant management considerations The CAN flags exist on two levels in a plant management system. The group controllers are linking the plant management system with the genset power management system. Therefore it is necessary to bridge the CAN flags from the plant management level to the power management level in the group controllers. This is best illustrated with an example: Change nominal setpoint from nominal setting 2 to nominal setting 3 (this could be the case when switching from prime power to continuous power). A switch is connected to the AGC PLANT unit (terminals 112, 113 (com=111)), but it is not wired to the AGC GROUP units or the AGC DG controllers. The link from the AGC Mains to the AGC DG controllers will be CAN flags through the group controllers.

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AGC PLANT unit M-logic:

AGC GROUP unit M-logic:

AGC DG M-logic (all DG units):

So with these settings in all of the respective AGC units, they will all follow the command from the switch connected to the plant unit.

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In an overview table it looks like this: Plant management level Plant unit input 112 113 Plant unit output CAN command 1 CAN command 2 Group unit input GG CAN input 1 GG CAN input 2 Group unit output CAN command 1 CAN command 2 Power management level DG unit input DG unit output

CAN input 1 CAN input 2

Nominal setting 2 Nominal setting 3

Multiple use of CAN flags It is possible to use the same CAN flags in different controllers. It can be raised by several controllers, but if it is raised in one controller, it cannot be lowered by another controller. AGC ID DG 1 DG 2 DG 3 DG 4 Not in AUTO CAN flag 1 CAN flag 1 CAN flag 1 CAN flag 1 AUTO SEMI-AUTO AUTO AUTO CAN 1 HIGH State Status CAN flag

In this table it is shown that all DGs are able to raise CAN flag 1, and that DG2 presently raises it. The CAN flag will be raised until DG2 + the DGs 1, 3 and 4 are all in AUTO mode.

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13.5.2 Common settings Some settings in the power and plant management system are shared settings. This chapter will show these parameters. Parameter CBE setpoint CBE delay CBE output CBE enable CBE breaker sequence CBE regulation delay CBE RPM excite CBE failure Master clock start Master clock stop Master clock diff Master clock comp CAN failure mode CAN failure mode, plant LD start P LD start S LD start pct LD start delay LD start/stop scale LD stop P LD stop S LD stop pct LD stop delay LD stop Blocked ON (HC) Remote/local start Priority type Run hours Run hour type Ground relay Fuel optimise setpoint Fuel optimise swap setpoint Fuel optimise delay Fuel optimise quarantine Asymmetrical LS Menu number 2251 2252 2253 2254 2261 2262 2263 2270 6401 6402 6403 6404 7532 7542 8001 8002 8003 8004 8006 8011 8012 8013 8014 8015 8021 8031 8111 8112 8121 8171 8172 8173 8174 8280 X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X DG unit X X X X X X X X X X X X X X Mains unit Group unit Plant unit

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Parameter LD start/stop basis LD start/stop method Multi-start method 1 Multi-start Min number to run Multi-start selection Multi-start method 2 Multi-start Min number to run Secured mode Plant mode MB failure start Parallel Autoswitch No break transfer Run type ID to run

Menu number 8881 8882 8922 8923 8924 8925 8926 8921 6070 8181 8182 8183 8184 8185 8186

DG unit X X X X X X X X

Mains unit

Group unit

Plant unit

X X X X X X X

X X X X X X X

X X X X X X X

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13.5.3 Modbus addresses The most common Modbus addresses from the parameter list that are normally used in the plant management SCADA are shown in this table. For all other addresses, please check the manual of option H2, Modbus RTU. Description Menu number Offset address base 0 Plant unit kW setpoint kW setpoint kW setpoint kW scale 7051 7001 7002 7005 541 527 528 1508 base 1 542 528 529 1509 +4000 +4000 +4000 +4000 16 16 16 16 value 0,1,2,3 equals 1:1, 1:10, 1:100, 1:1000 Address area Function code Comment

Test kW Cos phi common setpoint Ind/cap Enable Scale

7041 7052 7053 7054 7055

538 542 1236 1299 1300

539 543 1237 1300 1301

+4000 +4000 +4000 +2000 +4000

16 16 16 15 16 0=ind, 1=cap 0,1,2 value 0,1,2,3 equals 1:1, 1:10, 1:100, 1:1000

Enable frequency support Enable voltage support Nominal voltage Power offset 1 Power offset 2 Power offset 3 Cos phi offset 1 Cos phi offset 2 Cos phi offset 3 Group unit Cos phi common setpoint Ind/cap Enable Assym LS Enable

7143 7183 6004 7222 7224 7226 7242 7244 7246 7052 7053 7054 8281 8282

1306 1311 410 1476 1477 1478 1479 1480 1481 542 1236 1299 1294 1294

1307 1212 411 1477 1478 1479 1480 1481 1482 543 1237 1300 1295 1295

+2000 +2000 +4000 +2000 +2000 +2000 +2000 +2000 +2000 +4000 +4000 +2000 +4000 +2000

15 15 16 15 15 15 15 15 15 16 16 15 16 15 0=ind, 1=cap 0,1,2 value in percent

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Description Prty update DG units Assym LS Enable Cos phi individual setpoint Ind/cap Enable Prty update Run hour trip reset Nominal setting

Menu number 8086 8281 8282 7051 7052 7053 8086 8113 6006

Offset address 656 1294 1294 542 1236 1299 656 659 412 657 1295 1295 543 1237 1300 657 660 413

Address area +4000 +4000 +2000 +4000 +4000 +4000 +4000 +2000 +4000

Function code 16 16 15 16 16 16 16 15 16

Comment 0,1,2 value in percent

15

0=OFF, 3=superior 0,1,2

0,1,2,3

13.5.4 AOP design The plant management system can easily be controlled by the additional operator's panel, AOP. This panel is supplied (option X3 and X4) either as AOP-1 or AOP-2. The front layouts are different, because the AOP-2 has a lamp test push-button.

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AOP-1 or AOP-2 The difference between the AOP-1 and the AOP-2 is the number of selectable panels and the distance from the AGC display to the AOP. Since it is possible to install the AOP-2 at a distance, there is a lamp test button on the device. Distance from the AGC display: AOP-1 0.5 m AOP-2 200 m

Number of selectable AOPs: AOP-1 1 pce AOP-2 5 pcs

Other differences: AOP-1 RJ45 straight patch cable for connection AOP-2 CANbus communication AOP-2 lamp test button

Examples: Vast possibilities exist when using the AOP-1 or AOP-2. These two examples are just to give an impression of how to use the AOPs. This is an example of an AOP design on an AGC Mains, but the LEDs and buttons can be configured so they match the individual plant functionality. In this example, four LEDs have been used to indicate failure of groups. This would typically be made with the use of CAN flags.

This is an example where the group consists of 10 DGs and their fault status (typically with the use of CAN flags) is shown on the 10 first LEDs.

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13.6 Parameters, Further information The option G7 relates to a wide range of parameters. The description of those can be found in the parameter list of the AGC-4. In this document, a Modbus table is included, in which the most common parameters related to plant management are mentioned. 13.7 Appendix, Operating settings The appendix includes some basic information about how the plant is operated, i.e. how the plant is started and stopped, where the power or frequency setpoints are adjusted and how to remove the genset for service without affecting plant operation. There is one section for each plant mode, depending on the operation: AMF, fixed power, load takeover, island, peak shaving or mains power export. Notice which section applies to your plant. 13.7.1 Fixed power operation Operating the plant - fixed power mode This chapter is a description of the basics of operating the plant, i.e. where are the commands and setpoints coming from. All operation of the plant should be carried out or supervised by responsible personnel according to the instructions from the owner of the site. Start the plant (AUTO start)

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Type: Local start/stop (menu 8021) Remote start stop (menu 8021) Remote start stop (menu 8021) Remote start stop (menu 8021)

Instruction Plant controller display unit: Press the (green) start button SCADA: See SCADA screen design AOP-1 or AOP-2: Press the dedicated button Selector switch: Turn the selector switch to the start position

Comment

Your selection

Modbus/Profibus Programmed in M-logic (Auto start/stop) Digital input (Auto start/ stop)

Menu 8021 is checked in the plant unit. (The group units must also be adjusted to remote). Stop the plant (AUTO stop) Type: Local start/stop (menu 8021) Remote start/stop (menu 8021) Remote start/stop (menu 8021) Remote start/stop (menu 8021) Instruction Plant controller display unit: Press the (red) stop button SCADA: See SCADA screen design AOP-1 or AOP-2: Press the dedicated button Selector switch: Turn the selector switch to the stop position Modbus/Profibus Programmed in M-logic (Auto start/stop) Digital input (Auto start/ stop) Comment Your selection

Menu 8021 is checked in the plant unit. (The group units must also be adjusted to remote). Servicing the plant If a DG unit has to be taken offline for service, AUTO mode should be deselected on the unit in question. This can be done by selecting SEMI, BLOCK or MAN depending on the service job that needs to be made. If SEMI mode is selected, the setting of menu 8022 (mode update) should be checked. If it is adjusted to "update all", all units in the genset group with the same setting move to SEMI mode. If they are running, they do not stop but they do not react to AUTO start/stop commands such as AUTO start. Setting SEMI mode SEMI mode BLOCK mode MANUAL mode Setting of menu 8022 Local update Update all Don't care Don't care Yes always Not always (Selecting SEMI switches all AGCs to SEMI) Yes always Yes always Applicable Your selection

Setpoints of the plant

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When the plant is operating in the plant management mode, the MW and cos phi setpoints of the plant are normally adjusted in the plant controller. It is also possible to control the cos phi setpoint from the individual genset controller; please see description of cos phi control. Type Display unit SCADA Instruction MW menu 7051 Cos phi menu 7052 See SCADA screen design Your selection

Hz and V support Voltage and frequency support can be activated in the plant unit. Function Frequency support Voltage support 7143 7183 Menu Your selection

The control (enable and setpoints) of the frequency and voltage support can also be accessed through SCADA. Notice that other settings might be required for specific plants. 13.7.2 AMF operation This chapter is a description of the basics of operating the plant, i.e. where are the commands and setpoints coming from. All operation of the plant should be carried out or supervised by responsible personnel according to the instructions from the owner of the site. Start the plant (AUTO start) The gensets of the plant start when there is a mains failure. Stop the plant (AUTO stop) The gensets of the plant stop when the mains is restored. Servicing the plant If a DG unit has to be taken offline for service, AUTO mode should be deselected on the unit in question. This can be done by selecting SEMI, BLOCK or MAN depending on the service job that needs to be made. If SEMI mode is selected, the setting of menu 8022 (mode update) should be checked. If it is adjusted to "update all", all units in the genset group with the same setting move to SEMI mode. If they are running, they do not stop but they do not react to AUTO start stop commands such as AUTO start. Setting SEMI mode SEMI mode BLOCK mode MANUAL mode Setting of menu 8022 Local update Update all Don't care Don't care Yes always Not always (Selecting SEMI switches all AGCs to SEMI) Yes always Yes always Applicable Your selection

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Setpoints of the plant In automatic mains failure operation the generators are controlled according to frequency and voltage setpoints, and they are at the same time performing load and VAr sharing. The Hz and voltage setpoints of the plant are those of the nominal settings of the generator AGCs. If switching of voltage and frequency setpoints is needed, it must therefore be adjusted on all the generators, although normally on most applications these setpoints are not changed. If the change of setpoint is done individually, it should be done while the plant is stopped to avoid different frequency and voltage setpoints on generators (to avoid breaker tripping). Alternatively, the switching can be done by switching between the four sets of nominal values that are available. The kW and kVAr setpoints depend on the load of the plant, and the generators perform load sharing between them. Setting Nominal settings - individual Hz adjust 48-62 Hz Nominal settings - individual V adjust 0.100-160 kV Nominal setting - setpoint group 1-4 Menus 6001, 6011, 6021, 6031 6004, 6014, 6024, 6034 6006 Your selection

CAN flags can be used to select between the nominal settings 1-4 (menu 6006) by adjustment in M-logic and carried out from e.g. SCADA or AOP-1. This can typically be performed on the plant unit, and the CAN flags are transmitted to the genset controllers effecting the change in nominal setting.

Other settings might be required for specific plants.

13.7.3 Island mode operation with plant unit This chapter is a description of the basics of operating the plant, i.e. where are the commands and setpoints coming from. All operation of the plant should be carried out or supervised by responsible personnel according to the instructions from the owner of the site. Start the plant (AUTO start)

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Type: Local start/stop (menu 8021) Remote start stop (menu 8021) Remote start stop (menu 8021) Remote start stop (menu 8021)

Instruction Plant controller display unit: Press the (green) start button SCADA: See SCADA screen design AOP-1 or AOP-2: Press the dedicated button Selector switch: Turn the selector switch to the start position

Comment

Your selection

Modbus/Profibus Programmed in M-logic (Auto start/stop) Digital input (Auto start/ stop)

Menu 8021 is checked in the plant unit. (The group units must also be adjusted to remote). Stop the plant (AUTO stop) Type: Local start/stop (menu 8021) Remote start/stop (menu 8021) Remote start/stop (menu 8021) Remote start/stop (menu 8021) Instruction Plant controller display unit: Press the (red) stop button SCADA: See SCADA screen design AOP-1 or AOP-2: Press the dedicated button Selector switch: Turn the selector switch to the stop position Modbus/Profibus Programmed in M-logic (Auto start/stop) Digital input (Auto start/ stop) Comment Your selection

Menu 8021 is checked in the plant unit. (The group units must also be adjusted to remote). Servicing the plant If a DG unit has to be taken offline for service, AUTO mode should be deselected on the unit in question. This can be done by selecting SEMI, BLOCK or MAN depending on the service job that needs to be made. If SEMI mode is selected, the setting of menu 8022 (mode update) should be checked. If it is adjusted to "update all", all units in the genset group with the same setting move to SEMI mode. If they are running, they do not stop but they do not react to AUTO start stop commands such as AUTO start. Setting SEMI mode SEMI mode BLOCK mode MANUAL mode Setting of menu 8022 Local update Update all Don't care Don't care Yes always Not always (Selecting SEMI switches all AGCs to SEMI) Yes always Yes always Applicable Your selection

Setpoints of the plant

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In island mode the generators are controlled according to frequency and voltage setpoints and they are at the same time performing load sharing. The Hz and voltage setpoints of the plant are those of the nominal settings of the generator AGCs. If switching of voltage and frequency setpoints is needed, it must therefore be adjusted on all the generators, although normally on most applications these setpoints are not changed. If the change of setpoint is done individually, it should be done while the plant is stopped to avoid different frequency and voltage setpoints on generators (risk of breaker tripping). Alternatively, the switching can be done by switching between the four sets of nominal values that are available. The kW and kVAr setpoints depend on the load of the plant, and the generators perform load sharing between them. Setting Nominal settings - individual Hz adjust 48-62 Hz Nominal settings - individual V adjust 0.100-160 kV Nominal setting - setpoint group 1-4 Menus 6001, 6011, 6021, 6031 6004, 6014, 6024, 6034 6006 Your selection

CAN flags can be used to select between the nominal settings 1-4 (menu 6006) by adjustment in M-logic and carried out from e.g. SCADA or AOP-1. This can typically be performed on the plant unit, and the CAN flags are transmitted to the genset controllers effecting the change in nominal setting.

Other settings might be required for specific plants.

13.7.4 Island mode operation without plant unit This chapter is a description of the basics of operating the plant, i.e. where are the commands and setpoints coming from. All operation of the plant should be carried out or supervised by responsible personnel according to the instructions from the owner of the site. Start the plant (AUTO start) Type: Local start/stop (menu 8021) Remote start stop (menu 8021) Remote start stop (menu 8021) Remote start stop (menu 8021) Instruction Group unit display unit: Press the (green) start button SCADA: See SCADA screen design AOP-1 or AOP-2: Press the dedicated button Selector switch: Turn the selector switch to the start position Comment Any group unit Modbus/Profibus Programmed in M-logic (Auto start/stop) Digital input (Auto start/ stop) Your selection

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Menu 8021 is checked and adjusted in the group units. Stop the plant (AUTO stop) Type: Local start/stop (menu 8021) Remote start/stop (menu 8021) Remote start/stop (menu 8021) Remote start/stop (menu 8021) Instruction Plant controller display unit: Press the (red) stop button SCADA: See SCADA screen design AOP-1 or AOP-2: Press the dedicated button Selector switch: Turn the selector switch to the stop position Modbus/Profibus Programmed in M-logic (Auto start/stop) Digital input (Auto start/ stop) Comment Your selection

Menu 8021 is checked and adjusted in the group units. Servicing the plant If a DG unit has to be taken offline for service, AUTO mode should be deselected on the unit in question. This can be done by selecting SEMI, BLOCK or MAN depending on the service job that needs to be made. If SEMI mode is selected, the setting of menu 8022 (mode update) should be checked. If it is adjusted to "update all", all units in the genset group with the same setting move to SEMI mode. If they are running, they do not stop but they do not react to AUTO start stop commands such as AUTO start. Setting SEMI mode SEMI mode BLOCK mode MANUAL mode Setting of menu 8022 Local update Update all Don't care Don't care Yes always Not always (Selecting SEMI switches all AGCs to SEMI) Yes always Yes always Applicable Your selection

Setpoints of the plant In island mode the generators are controlled according to frequency and voltage setpoints and they are at the same time performing load sharing. The Hz and voltage setpoints of the plant are those of the nominal settings of the generator AGCs. If switching of voltage and frequency setpoints is needed, it must therefore be adjusted on all the generators although normally on most applications these setpoints are not changed. If the change of setpoint is done individually, it should be done while the plant is stopped to avoid different frequency and voltage setpoints on generators (risk of breaker tripping). Alternatively, the switching can be done by switching between the four sets of nominal values that are available. The kW and kVAr setpoints depend on the load of the plant, and the generators perform load sharing between them.

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Setting Nominal settings - individual Hz adjust 48-62 Hz Nominal settings - individual V adjust 0.100-160 kV Nominal setting - setpoint group 1-4

Menus 6001, 6011, 6021, 6031 6004, 6014, 6024, 6034 6006

Your selection

CAN flags can be used to select between the nominal settings 1-4 (menu 6006) by adjustment in M-logic and carried out from e.g. SCADA or AOP-1. This can be performed on one of the group controllers, and the CAN flags are transmitted to the genset controllers effecting the change in nominal setting.

Other settings might be required for specific plants.

13.7.5 Load takeover mode This chapter is a description of the basics of operating the plant, i.e. where are the commands and setpoints coming from. All operation of the plant should be carried out or supervised by responsible personnel according to the instructions from the owner of the site. Start the plant (AUTO start) Type: Local start/stop (menu 8021) Remote start stop (menu 8021) Remote start stop (menu 8021) Remote start stop (menu 8021) Instruction Plant controller display unit: Press the (green) start button SCADA: See SCADA screen design AOP-1 or AOP-2: Press the dedicated button Selector switch: Turn the selector switch to the start position Modbus/Profibus Programmed in M-logic (Auto start/stop) Digital input (Auto start/ stop) Comment Your selection

Menu 8021 is checked in the plant unit. (The group units must also be adjusted to remote). Stop the plant (AUTO stop)

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Type: Local start/stop (menu 8021) Remote start/stop (menu 8021) Remote start/stop (menu 8021) Remote start/stop (menu 8021)

Instruction Plant controller display unit: Press the (red) stop button SCADA: See SCADA screen design AOP-1 or AOP-2: Press the dedicated button Selector switch: Turn the selector switch to the stop position

Comment

Your selection

Modbus/Profibus Programmed in M-logic (Auto start/stop) Digital input (Auto start/ stop)

Menu 8021 is checked in the plant unit. (The group units must also be adjusted to remote). Servicing the plant If a DG unit has to be taken offline for service, AUTO mode should be deselected on the unit in question. This can be done by selecting SEMI, BLOCK or MAN depending on the service job that needs to be made. If SEMI mode is selected, the setting of menu 8022 (mode update) should be checked. If it is adjusted to "update all", all units in the genset group with the same setting move to SEMI mode. If they are running, they do not stop but they do not react to AUTO start stop commands such as AUTO start. Setting SEMI mode SEMI mode BLOCK mode MANUAL mode Setting of menu 8022 Local update Update all Don't care Don't care Yes always Not always (Selecting SEMI switches all AGCs to SEMI) Yes always Yes always Applicable Your selection

Setpoints of the plant No setpoint can be adjusted in the LTO mode. The number of generators that is sufficient for supplying the load will start, and the MB will open when no load is flowing across the mains breaker.

Other settings might be required for specific plants.

13.7.6 Mains power export mode This chapter is a description of the basics of operating the plant, i.e. where are the commands and setpoints coming from. All operation of the plant should be carried out or supervised by responsible personnel according to the instructions from the owner of the site.

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Start the plant (AUTO start) Type: Local start/stop (menu 8021) Remote start stop (menu 8021) Remote start stop (menu 8021) Remote start stop (menu 8021) Instruction Plant controller display unit: Press the (green) start button SCADA: See SCADA screen design AOP-1 or AOP-2: Press the dedicated button Selector switch: Turn the selector switch to the start position Modbus/Profibus Programmed in M-logic (Auto start/stop) Digital input (Auto start/ stop) Comment Your selection

Menu 8021 is checked in the plant unit. (The group units must also be adjusted to remote). Stop the plant (AUTO stop) Type: Local start/stop (menu 8021) Remote start/stop (menu 8021) Remote start/stop (menu 8021) Remote start/stop (menu 8021) Instruction Plant controller display unit: Press the (red) stop button SCADA: See SCADA screen design AOP-1 or AOP-2: Press the dedicated button Selector switch: Turn the selector switch to the stop position Modbus/Profibus Programmed in M-logic (Auto start/stop) Digital input (Auto start/ stop) Comment Your selection

Menu 8021 is checked in the plant unit. (The group units must also be adjusted to remote). Servicing the plant If a DG unit has to be taken offline for service, AUTO mode should be deselected on the unit in question. This can be done by selecting SEMI, BLOCK or MAN depending on the service job that needs to be made. If SEMI mode is selected, the setting of menu 8022 (mode update) should be checked. If it is adjusted to "update all", all units in the genset group with the same setting move to SEMI mode. If they are running, they do not stop but they do not react to AUTO start stop commands such as AUTO start. Setting SEMI mode SEMI mode BLOCK mode MANUAL mode Setting of menu 8022 Local update Update all Don't care Don't care Yes always Not always (Selecting SEMI switches all AGCs to SEMI) Yes always Yes always Applicable Your selection

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Setpoints of the plant The MW and cos phi setpoints of the plant are adjusted in the plant unit. It is also possible to control the cos phi setpoint from the individual genset controller; please see separate chapter. Type Display unit Instruction MW day menu 7001 MW night menu 7002 Cos phi menu 7052 See SCADA screen design Your selection

SCADA

Hz and V support Voltage and frequency support can be activated in the plant unit. Function Frequency support Voltage support 7143 7183 Menu Your selection

Other settings might be required for specific plants.

13.7.7 Peak shaving mode This chapter is a description of the basics of operating the plant, i.e. where are the commands and setpoints coming from. All operation of the plant should be carried out or supervised by responsible personnel according to the instructions from the owner of the site. Start the plant (AUTO start) The plant starts according to the adjusted import setpoints and the load-dependent start setpoint (default #8001). This is best illustrated with an example: Day and night setting = 10000 kW; LD start setting = 200 kW; LD stop setting = 400 kW Generators are stopped and the mains feeds the load When the imported load increases to [10000-200 = 9800 kW], the generators are started (according to the multi-start settings Any load above 10000 (day/night setting) will be supplied by the generator. The mains supply is maintained at 10000 kW When the load (sum of load of mains+DGs) drops to [10000-400 = 9600 kW], the generators are stopped The 9600 kW are supplied by the mains

Stop the plant (AUTO stop) The plant stops according to the adjusted import stop setpoint and the load-dependent stop setpoint (default #8011). See example above.

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Servicing the plant If a DG unit has to be taken offline for service, AUTO mode should be deselected on the unit in question. This can be done by selecting SEMI, BLOCK or MAN depending on the service job that needs to be made. If SEMI mode is selected, the setting of menu 8022 (mode update) should be checked. If it is adjusted to "update all", all units in the genset group with the same setting move to SEMI mode. If they are running, they do not stop but they do not react to AUTO start stop commands such as AUTO start. Setting SEMI mode SEMI mode BLOCK mode MANUAL mode Setting of menu 8022 Local update Update all Don't care Don't care Yes always Not always (Selecting SEMI switches all AGCs to SEMI) Yes always Yes always Applicable Your selection

Setpoints of the plant The MW and cos phi setpoints of the plant are adjusted in the plant unit. It is also possible to control the cos phi setpoint from the individual genset controller; please see separate chapter. Type Display unit Instruction MW day menu 7001 MW night menu 7002 Cos phi menu 7052 See SCADA screen design Your selection

SCADA

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14. Analogue controller and transducer outputs


14.1 Description of option, ANSI numbers

Function Selectable +/-25 mA or relay output for speed control (governor) Selectable +/-25 mA or relay output for voltage control (AVR) PWM speed control output for 1 x 0(4)-20 mA outputs 2 x 0(4)-20 mA outputs 14.2 Description of option, Option EF6 CAT engines

ANSI no. 77 77 77 77 77

Option EF6 is a hardware option, and a separate PCB is installed in slot #4. The PCB will replace the standard-installed relay PCB in slot #4. The PWM (Pulse Width Modulated) speed output is intended for Caterpillar electronic engine control systems ADEM and PEEC.

14.2.1 Terminal description Term. 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 Function Not used Not used 0 +/-25 mA PWM PWM + 0 +/-25 mA Connect PWM - to the engine battery negative and PWM + to the engine control system S-SPD (speed) input (called RATED SPEED on the ADEM controller and PRIMARY THROTTLE on the PEEC controller). Speed governor, AVR or transducer output 72 PWM speed governor signal Speed governor, AVR or transducer output 68 Description

AVR control requires the D1 option. 14.3 Functional description, Analogue outputs The analogue outputs are active and galvanically separated. No external supply can be connected. The current outputs can be converted to any voltage in the range inside +/-10V DC by mounting a resistor across the terminals. Example: A 200 resistor across the terminals of the +/-25 mA output will supply a range of +/-5V DC.

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The choice of resistor depends on the specific governor. Please refer to the DEIF documents "Interfacing DEIF Equipment with Governors and AVRs" and "General Guidelines for Commissioning" for detailed information.

Place the resistor at the governor/AVR end to avoid the signal being disturbed by noise.

The outputs from the controller unit are active outputs, and no external supply can be connected. 14.4 Functional description, Duty cycle The PWM signal has a frequency of 500 Hz +/- 50 Hz. The resolution of the duty cycle is 12 bits, which gives output 4095 different levels. The output is an open collector output with a 1 k-ohm pull-up resistor. The low level of the signal is between 0 and 0.05 volt, whereas the high level is between 5.7 and 6 volt.

Voltage 5.76V

00.5V Time 0100% duty cycle

14.4.1 Principle of duty cycles The drawing below shows an example of a 10% duty cycle:

Duty cycle = 10%

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The drawing below shows an example of a 90% duty cycle:

Duty cycle = 90%


When used as transducer outputs, the signal can be connected directly to 4-20 mA instruments as shown below.

Transducer output

4-20mA instrument or similar

Out 0

+ -

It is recommended to use instruments from the DQ series of DEIF instruments. Please refer to www.deif.com for more information. 14.5 Functional description, Analogue controller offset In addition to the controller parameters, this additional setting can be used. The purpose of this setting is to give the analogue output an offset value when powering up the unit. Furthermore, a digital input can be used to reset the output to the offset value. The offset value must be adjusted so the genset will start up at the correct speed and voltage. The following drawing is for the E1 option with the output limits set to +/-25 mA.

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Controller offset 100%

-25mA 25mA

0%

The offset always refers to the analogue output limits.

When the engine is stopped the controller outputs are reset to the analogue offset value.

Typically the initial speed/voltage adjustment is made on the speed governor/AVR itself. 14.6 Functional description, Output limits If the full range of the analogue output is not needed it is possible to limit the maximum and minimum output values. This can especially be useful when using the analogue output for governor control, since some governors only accept a specific voltage range. In the following example, analogue output 66 with a standard output of +/- 25 mA (option E1) is limited to an output of 0-20 mA to be used for governor control.

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Regulator output

Regulator output

100%

25 mA

100%

20 mA

80%

80%

60%

60%

40%

40%

20%

20%

0%

-25 mA

0%

0 mA

The menus used for setting up the output limits are 5780 to 5810. The menus available are option-dependent. 14.7 Parameters, further information The options E and F relate to the parameters 5780-5990. For further information, please see the separate parameter list for the Multi-line unit in question: AGC-3 AGC-4 PPM GPC-3/GPU-3 Hydro PPU-3/GPU-3 Document number 4189340705 Document number 4189340688 Document number 4189340672 Document number 4189340580 Document number 4189340581

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Configurable I/O extension cards, four 4-20 mA inputs

15. Configurable I/O extension cards, four 4-20 mA inputs


15.1 Description of option, Option M15.x Option M15.x is a hardware option and therefore a separate PCB is installed in addition to the standard-installed hardware. 15.1.1 Terminal description, M15.6 Term. 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 Function Analogue input 91 Analogue input 91 Analogue input 93 Analogue input 93 Analogue input 95 Analogue input 95 Analogue input 97 Analogue input 97 Technical data Common 4-20 mA in Common 4-20 mA in Common 4-20 mA in Common 4-20 mA in 4-20 mA input, configurable 4-20 mA input, configurable 4-20 mA input, configurable Description 4-20 mA input, configurable

15.1.2 Terminal description, M15.8 Term. 126 127 128 129 130 131 132 133 Function Analogue input 127 Analogue input 127 Analogue input 129 Analogue input 129 Analogue input 131 Analogue input 131 Analogue input 133 Analogue input 133 Technical data Common 4-20 mA in Common 4-20 mA in Common 4-20 mA in Common 4-20 mA in 4-20 mA input, configurable 4-20 mA input, configurable 4-20 mA input, configurable Description 4-20 mA input, configurable

Please refer to the Installation Instructions for the wiring of active and passive transducers.

AGC-3/PPM: The option M15 can only be installed one time for each unit, so it is not possible to have M15.6 and M15.8 at the same time. 15.2 Functional description, Analogue input configuration The analogue input can be used for protection and display of values. The configuration can be done with the ML-2 utility software or by using the display. In the display, the readings of the 4-20 mA input can be read. The readings are found in the second line of the setup menu or, if configured, in the view menu system.

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Refer to the Designers Reference Handbook regarding the menu system and configuration of user views. The ML-2 utility software enables you to change the text, scale and unit of the measurement. The text and units can be changed in the "Translations" section of the utility software. The menus used for configuring the scale are 11010-11110. The menus available are option-dependent and can only be accessed from the ML-2 utility software. If the text of the input is changed, you will see the changed text. This could e.g. be "Oil press. ##bar" instead of "4-20mA 91.1 ##mA" 15.3 Functional description, Inverse proportional In situations where the signal of the input is reversed, the "Inverse proportional" selection can be made. The selection ensures that the display reading is correct when an "inversed" signal is made.

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The diagram shows the characteristics of the "normal" proportional sensor and of the inversed proportional sensor.
Value [%] 100% High alarm area Alarm Inverse proportional Proportional

Low alarm area

0% 4mA 9mA 15mA 20mA

Current [mA]

This function can only be activated by using the ML-2 utility software. 15.4 Functional description, PC utility software The PC utility software is a Windows based software, which can be downloaded from our website www.deif.com. To adjust the inputs via the PC utility software, a computer must be connected to the controller unit. Furthermore, the unit parameters must be uploaded to the computer. 15.5 Functional description, Wire failure detection If it is necessary to supervise the sensors/wires connected to the analogue inputs, it is possible to activate the wire failure detection on each individual input. If the measured value on the input is outside the normal dynamic area of the input, it will be detected as if the wire has made a short circuit or a break, and an alarm with a configurable fail class will be activated. 15.5.1 Principle The illustration below shows that when the wire of the input breaks, the measured value will drop to zero. Then the alarm will occur.
Input signal (mA, C,b, %)

Upper failure limit

Wire failure

Lower failure limit Wire failure t Wire break

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15.6 Parameters, Further information The option M15 relates to the parameters 4000-4110 (M15.6) and 4800-4910 (M15.8). For further information, please see the separate parameter list for the Multi-line unit in question: AGC-3 AGC-4 PPM GPC-3/GPU-3 Hydro PPU-3/GPU-3 Document number 4189340705 Document number 4189340688 Document number 4189340672 Document number 4189340580 Document number 4189340581

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Configurable I/O extension cards, 13 binary inputs, 4 relay outputs

16. Configurable I/O extension cards, 13 binary inputs, 4 relay outputs


16.1 Description of option, Option M12 Option M12 is a hardware option, and therefore an extra PCB is placed in slot #3 in addition to the standardinstalled hardware. 16.2 Description of option, ANSI numbers

Function 13 x binary inputs for control and/or alarms 4 x digital outputs 77 74

ANSI no.

AGC: if option G3 is already installed, option M12 is a software upgrade.

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16.3 Description of option, Terminal descriptions 16.3.1 Terminal description, AGC Term. 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 -10010V DC Com. -10010V DC Digital input 43 Digital input 44 Digital input 45 Digital input 46 Digital input 47 Digital input 48 Digital input 49 Digital input 50 Digital input 51 Digital input 52 Digital input 53 Digital input 54 Digital input 55 Com. NE/ND Com. NE/ND Com. NE/ND Com. NE/ND Com. Analogue I/O Common Analogue I/O Optocoupler Optocoupler Optocoupler Optocoupler Optocoupler Optocoupler Optocoupler Optocoupler Optocoupler Optocoupler Optocoupler Optocoupler Optocoupler Common Relay 57 250V AC/5 A Relay 59 250V AC/5 A Relay 61 250V AC/5A Relay 63 250V AC/5 A Configurable Configurable Configurable f/P setpoint Common U/Q setpoint Configurable Configurable Configurable Configurable Configurable Configurable Configurable Configurable Configurable Configurable Configurable Configurable Configurable Common for terminals 43 to 55 Configurable Function Used for the option G3 Technical data Description

Please refer to the Installation Instructions for detailed description of the wiring of digital inputs.

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16.3.2 Terminal description, GPU/GPU Hydro Term. 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 Digital input 43 Digital input 44 Digital input 45 Digital input 46 Digital input 47 Digital input 48 Digital input 49 Digital input 50 Digital input 51 Digital input 52 Digital input 53 Digital input 54 Digital input 55 Com. NE/ND Com. NE/ND Com. NE/ND Com. NE/ND Com. Optocoupler Optocoupler Optocoupler Optocoupler Optocoupler Optocoupler Optocoupler Optocoupler Optocoupler Optocoupler Optocoupler Optocoupler Optocoupler Common Relay 57 250V AC/5 A Relay 59 250V AC/5 A Relay 61 250V AC/5 A Relay 63 250V AC/5 A Configurable Configurable Configurable Configurable Configurable Configurable Configurable Configurable Configurable Configurable Configurable Configurable Configurable Configurable Configurable Configurable Common for terminals 43 to 55 Configurable Function Not used Technical data Description

Please refer to the Installation Instructions for detailed description of the wiring of digital inputs. 16.4 Functional description, Digital inputs The digital inputs available in this option can be used for two purposes: 1. Protection (alarm) inputs 2. Function inputs

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16.5 Functional description, Protection/alarm inputs The delay settings are all of the definite time type, i.e. a set time is selected. The delay will be activated if the input goes ON (or OFF if selected to be N/C). If the input is reset before the delay runs out, the delay will be reset.
Input Input ON OFF Input ON

Timer setting

Timer Timer start reset

Timer start

Alarm

Time

When the delay runs out, the output will be activated. 16.5.1 Function input The function inputs can be set up via the PC utility software. The PC utility software is a Windows-based software, which can be downloaded from our website www.deif.com. To adjust the inputs via the PC utility software, a computer must be connected to the controller unit. Furthermore, the unit parameters must be uploaded to the computer. Please refer to the Designers Reference Handbook for a complete list of the available input functions.

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16.6 Functional description, Relay setup Each relay has a function and an OFF delay setting as described below. Function Alarm relay NE Alarm relay ND (GPU/GPU Hydro only) Alarm/reset (GPU/GPU Hydro only) Limit relay Description When the relay is activated, an alarm is displayed. The relay will remain activated for as long as the alarm is present and unacknowledged. When the relay is activated, an alarm is displayed. The relay will remain activated for as long as the alarm is present and unacknowledged. The functionality is similar to "Alarm", but with a short-time reset if the relay is ON and another alarm tries to activate the same relay. When the relay is activated, no alarm message is displayed. After the condition activating the relay has returned to normal, the relay will deactivate when the "OFF delay" has expired. When the relay is activated, an alarm message is displayed. The relay will be activated until the time set in menu 6130 "Alarm horn" has expired or the alarm activating the relay has been acknowledged. The output activates on all alarms, like Horn output. If the relay is ON and another alarm is active, a short-time reset = 1 s will be activated. The "OFF delay" is used when limit relay is selected. It is the time between the disappearance of the event that caused the relay to activate and the actual deactivation of the relay.

Horn relay

Siren relay (GPU/ GPU Hydro only) OFF delay

It is possible to configure the relay outputs to be used for speed and/or voltage regulation. Please refer to the Designers Reference Handbook. The relays can also be used together with M-logic. Please refer to the help function in the PC utility software. 16.7 Functional description, External analogue setpoints 16.7.1 AGC The genset can be controlled from internal as well as from external setpoints. The external setpoints are activated with a digital signal. Five inputs can be selected, and their function depends on the mains breaker position. Input Island mode, stand-alone Island mode, load sharing Parallel to the mains Frequency X X X Power Voltage X X X X Reactive power Power factor

The controller setpoints will be ignored if the running condition is not present. For instance, it is not possible to use the frequency controller when paralleling to the mains.

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The table below shows the setpoints. Controller Frequency Power Voltage Reactive power Power factor Input voltage +/-10V DC +/-10V DC +/-10V DC +/-10V DC 10 V010V DC Description fNOM +/-5 Hz +/-100% *PNOM UNOM +/-10% +/-100% *QNOM 0.6 capacitive1.00.6 inductive Active when GB is OFF Comment Active when MB is OFF

The external setpoints can be used in all genset modes when auto or semi-auto mode is selected. Only a limited number of digital inputs are available in the standard unit. The unit should be installed with the sufficient number of options to get the desired digital inputs. If the option H2 is available in the unit, the external setpoints can be controlled from the control registers in the Modbus protocol. Please refer to the description of option H2 for further information. 16.8 Parameters, Further information The option M12 relates to the parameters 3130-3250 and 5110-5140. For further information, please see the separate parameter list for the Multi-line unit in question: AGC-3 AGC-4 GPC-3/GPU-3 Hydro PPU-3/GPU-3 Document number 4189340705 Document number 4189340688 Document number 4189340580 Document number 4189340581

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17. Ethernet hardware


17.1 Description of option, Hardware The option N is an Ethernet hardware option offering a number of features; hereafter called the option N. The hardware needed for the option N replaces the default interface board placed under the service port (See figure below). The option N board has four connectors: 1. Display port (9-pole SUB-D) 2. Service port (USB A-B) 3. USB Memory (currently not used) 4. Ethernet (RJ-45 for CAT 5 cable) There are currently two different option N hardware cards. They are almost identical in features, but the two versions are different in hardware. You can tell which card you have from the version of the software embedded in the option N. This information can be retrieved from the menu 9000 on the display unit. Either it is version 1.xx.x, or it is the more recent version 2.xx.x. This document focuses on the most recent version, but it also describes the differences compared to a setup using the older option N hardware.

37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50

51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64

65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72

Engine CAN PMS CAN Ethernet USB Power Self check ok Alarm inhibit

Ethernet

USB Memory

Service port

Display

73 74 75 76 77 78

79 80 81 82 83 84

85 86 87 88 89

90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97

Multi-line 2 device mounted with the option N interface board. 17.2 Description of option, Option N configuration software The features that the option N offers can only be configured using the free PC tool:

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DEIF Multi-line 2 Utility Software v.3.x (USW).

The USW-3 can be downloaded from: www.deif.com. Please see the application note "Download guide" for information about how to download and install this software and which operating systems are compatible with this software. When the DEIF Multi-line 2 Utility Software v.3.x (USW) is running, click the "Option N" icon to run the option N configuration software.

17.3 Network configuration of the option N board, Network settings The Ethernet port of the Multi-line 2 option N board is delivered pre-configured with these network settings: Factory setting IP address Subnet mask 192.168.2.21 255.255.255.0

To be able to configure and use the option N, it must be connected directly to a PC. Please note that the option N network parameters cannot be programmed by using the Multi-line 2 unit display. The PC must be configured to use the same network as specified above. Using Microsoft Windows XP, this can be done by changing the TCP/IP settings to the following (see the below figure): Factory setting IP address Subnet mask 192.168.2.22 255.255.255.0

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TCP/IP settings window from Microsoft Windows XP. 17.4 Network configuration of the option N board, Option N board setup When your PC has been set up as described on the previous pages, and the PC is directly connected to the Ethernet socket of the option N board, you must check if you have access by means of the "Ping" menu of the option N configuration software.

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Enter the right IP address and press the "Ping" button (see example below).

Then press the "Stop" button and close this window. 17.4.1 Modifying the network configuration from the option N configuration software When the option N configuration software is running, it is also possible to modify the option N network parameters (IP address, subnet mask, etc.) This can be done using the menus "Settings" and "Network parameters", see below.

Please note that the "Network parameters" menu point is only available after the "Get" function in the "Connection" menu has been used. The default user name and password are both "admin" (see the below screen dump).

The below parameters are read, and they can be modified here:

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DHCP is a new feature in version 2.xx.x of the option N card. When the DHCP function is enabled, the network parameters will be retrieved automatically if a DHCP server is available in the local network. If no DHCP server is available, the network parameters will fall back to factory settings. Press the "OK" button to write the new configuration to the Multi-line 2 unit.

After pressing "OK", the option N reboots automatically. It will take two minutes before the unit is fully operational again. Access control setup Using a web interface, the user names and passwords of the option N card can be set. This function is to allow access for selected users only. To programme this access control, you must start your internet browser software, enter the IP address in the internet address field and press the "Enter" key.

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Click the bottom link, "Access control", to change the access control parameters of the option N card (user name = admin, password = admin).

"Passwords" "WWW IP Filtering"

Is used to modify the passwords of each web page type (admin, application or FTP). Is used to select one or several IP addresses that will be allowed to access the option N card for each option N applicaton type. If these fields are left blank, no IP address filter is applied, and the option N card is accessible by all IP addresses without any restriction.

17.5 TCP/IP Modbus communication, Further information TCP/IP Modbus is identical with the classical serial Modbus communication, except for the fact that the media used for this communication is a TCP/IP communication. So the basic Modbus functionalities will not be explained here, but more information can be found in the Multi-line 2 option H2 (Modbus option) documentation, which can be downloaded free of charge from the DEIF web page www.deif.com.

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The useful parameters required from the software you use for communicating with the option N card by means of a TCP/IP Modbus communication are: The IP address of the option N card to talk to The port number to be used

The previous chapters explain the way to set up the IP address parameter of the option N card. The port number to be used is: 502. 17.6 SMS or e-mail alarms transfer When the option N card has access to the Internet, it can be configured to send SMS and e-mail alarm messages. These functions require third party service providers (often a priced service). The SMS function has been designed and tested to work with the Clickatell service provider, www.clickatel.com. The e-mail function requires an available e-mail server that supports SMTP. Most popular e-mail servers support SMTP. Contact your system administrator for details. This alarm application supervises a number of Modbus flags. Should one or more of these alarm flags get set, the configured SMS and/or e-mail messages will be sent. Each of the supervised alarm flags holds the state of a "fail class", which is one of the following: AGC Block Warning Trip GB (generator breaker) Trip MB (mains Breaker) Block Warning Trip GB (generator breaker)/SGB/SCB/BTB Trip SGB (shaft generator breaker) Trip SCB (shore connection breaker) Trip BTB Trip + Stop Shutdown Trip TB (mains breaker unit) Safe stop Trip BTB (bus tie breaker) Trip + Stop Shutdown Trip TB (tie breaker, emergency generator unit) Safe stop Trip + Stop Shutdown Trip TB (mains breaker unit) Safe stop PPM Block Warning Trip GB (generator breaker) GPC/GPU/PPU

5 e-mail receivers and 5 SMS receivers can be defined. For each recipient, the fail classes to receive notifications about can be defined. For e-mails, it can furthermore be specified if the user should receive the mails as a "To" receiver or a "Cc" receiver. The alarm flags are scanned every second and for each unit (from lowest to highest CAN ID number), each fail class (from highest to lowest priority) is evaluated, and e-mail/SMS messages are sent accordingly. There is one special case, where an alarm is suppressed: when a warning alarm is detected at the same time as some higher priority alarm, the warning alarm will not be sent.

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17.7 SMS or e-mail alarms transfer, SMS or e-mail alarms configuration You must use the "Get" function ( ) before you will be able to access this alarm function. Then go to the ).

"Settings" menu and select the "Email and SMS" menu or click the "Email and SMS settings" icon (

>>> Write the above configuration to the option N card. >>> Read the configuration present in the option N card.

EMail general This field gathers all the useful parameters for exporting the alarms by means of e-mail messages. This section is then connected to the e-mail section containing the "Recipients e-mail" (right upper section of this window). If you do not require exporting the alarms by means of e-mail messages, do not fill in these fields. Address of SMTP server Must contain the IP address of the SMTP server you want to use for exporting alarms by means of e-mail messages. Sender address Must contain the senders e-mail address. User name for mail server If required by the used SMTP server, you can type a user name here.

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Password for mail server If required by the used SMTP server, you can type a password here. User text in email The text you enter here will be placed in the subject line of the sent e-mail messages.

SMS general This field gathers all the useful parameters for exporting the alarms by means of SMS messages. This section is then connected to the section containing the Recipients tlf (right lower section of this window). SMS gateway Two different services can be used for exporting alarms by means of SMS messages when using the services from an SMS gateway provider (for example: Clickatell www.clickatell.com): http to SMS (see the Clickatell http post specification document _SMS Gateway). mail to SMS (see the Clickatell SMTP post specification document _SMS Gateway).

Visit their website to get all the details concerning these two different services. The first field is for selection of the service type for alarms by means of SMS messages. Select "http" or "mail". The contents of the next field (to the right) depend on the SMS gateway type ("http" or "email"): http: email: The heading of the http command line (ex: http://api.clickatell.com). The e-mail address given by your SMS gateway provider (Example from Clickatell: sms@messaging.clickatell.com).

User name for SMS gateway Type the user name ID given by your SMS gateway provider. Password for SMS gateway Type the password ID given by your SMS gateway provider. SMS gateway ID (optional) Type the application ID given by your SMS gateway provider if this is necessary to use your provider services. Pattern for mail subject line You must fill in this field, if "mail" is selected in the SMS gateway field (see above). In this case, the text line you enter here will be the subject line of the e-mails that will be sent for exporting alarms by means of SMS messages.

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Pattern for mail body You must fill in this field, if you select "mail" in the SMS gateway field (see above). In this case, the text line you enter here will be the body text of the e-mails that will be sent for exporting alarms by means of SMS messages. Pattern for http GET request You must fill in this field if you select "http" in the SMS gateway field (see above). In this case, the text line you enter here will be the http line of the http message that will be used for exporting alarms by means of SMS messages. The below symbols must be used to incorporate all the useful data from the other fields into this http GET request. The line to enter here can then be as follows: /http/sendmsg?api_id=%I&user=%U&password=%P&to=%N&text=%M In these patterns, the substitution parameters to use in the above http command line are: %U is replaced by the "User name for SMS gateway" field content. %P is replaced by the "Password for SMS gateway" field content. %I is replaced by the "SMS gateway ID" field content. %N is replaced by the "Recipients tlf" field content. %M is replaced by the "User text in SMS" field content. The final http command line that will be sent to the SMS gateway provider will then be: content of the field situated at the right side of the SMS gateway field/http/sendmsg? api_id=SMS gateway ID field content. &user=user name for SMS gateway field content&password=password for SMS gateway field content&to=Recipients tlf field content&text=user text in SMS field content. Http proxy Must contain the proxy server IP address (and the port number) that is required to reach the WEB (World Wide Web) from the Multi-line 2 unit option N card TCP/IP port. For example 192.168.1.1:8080. A semicolon must be used as separator between the proxy server IP address (192.168.1.1) and the port number (8080). User text in SMS The text line you enter here will be used as SMS text when exporting alarms by means of SMS messages.

The above table has to be filled in if you want to export the alarms by means of e-mail messages. Recipients Email Must contain the e-mail addresses of the persons to contact by e-mail messages when an alarm is detected from the Multi-line 2 unit.

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Alarm list This field informs about which fail class alarm is interesting for the corresponding e-mail address (from the left side). Min. value: a, max. value: h, in steps of one letter. Example: a,b,d,f - in this case, the Multi-line 2 unit will only export its alarms with a fail class type a, b, d or f.

The above table has to be filled in, if you want to export the alarms by means of SMS messages. Recipients tlf Must contain the GSM phone number of the persons to contact by SMS messages when an alarm is detected from the Multi-line 2 unit. Alarm list This field informs which fail class alarm is interesting for the corresponding GSM phone number (from the left side). Min. value: a, max. value: f, in steps of one letter. Example; a,b,d,f. In this case, the Multi-line 2 unit will only export its alarms with a fail class type a, b, d or f. Fail class Alarm list a b c d e f GPU/ PPU/ GPC Block Warning Trip GB Trip +stop Shutdown N/A AGC (single gen.) Block Warning Trip GB Trip +stop Shutdown Trip MB AGC DG (option G5) Block Warning Trip GB Trip +stop Shutdown Safety stop AGC Mains Block Warning Trip MB Trip TB N/A N/A AGC/ PPM BTB Block Warning Trip BTB N/A N/A N/A PPM DG Block Warning Trip GB Trip + stop Shutdown Safety stop PPM SG Block Warning Trip SGB N/A N/A N/A PPM SC Block Warning Trip SCB N/A N/A N/A PPM EDG Block Warning Trip EGB Trip + stop Shutdown Trip TB

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Examples for the SMS or e-mail alarms configuration Example 1: Exporting the Multi-line 2 alarms by e-mails.

By adding "To" or "Cc" at the end of each alarm list item, the concerned IP address will be used as "To" or "Cc" field in the e-mail that will send the alarm.

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Example 2: Exporting the Multi-line 2 alarms by SMS (SMS gateway service type: http).

Pattern for http GET request: http/sendmsg?api_id=%I&user=%U&password=%P&to=%N&text=%M. %I: Will insert what is already typed inside the "SMS gateway ID" field (api_id). %U: Will insert what is already typed inside the "User name for SMS gateway" field (user name). %P: Will insert what is already typed inside the "Password for SMS gateway" field (password). %N: Will insert what is already typed inside the "Recipients tlf" field (mobile phone numbers). %M: Will insert what is already typed inside the "User text in SMS" field (user-selectable text).

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Example 3: Exporting the Multi-line 2 alarms by SMS (SMS gateway service type: mail).

Pattern for mail body: api_id:%I&user:%U&password:%P&to:%N&text:%M. %I: Will insert what is already typed inside the "SMS gateway ID" field (api_id). %U: Will insert what is already typed inside the "User name for SMS gateway" field (user name). %P: Will insert what is already typed inside the "Password for SMS gateway" field (password). %N: Will insert what is already typed inside the "Recipients tlf" field (mobile phone numbers). %M: Will insert what is already typed inside the "User text in SMS" field (user-selectable text). 17.8 SMS or e-mail alarms transfer, Received message format The content of the message sent is defined as: "MsgNo._n1_IDNo._n2_t1_t2_t3" The variables in the message are as follows: n1: Unique number of the alarm, incremented at each new alarm detection. n2: CAN ID of the unit giving the alarm:

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CAN ID 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

Comment Single mains unit Genset unit Genset unit Genset unit Genset unit Genset unit Genset unit Genset unit Genset unit 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16

CAN ID

Description Genset/multiple mains unit Genset/multiple mains unit Genset/multiple mains unit Genset/multiple mains unit Genset unit Genset unit Genset unit Genset unit

t1: User-defined text. t2: Name of the fail class. t3: Specific alarm text: The alarm texts for the individual alarms will be used. An example of a message could be: "MsgNo._1_IDNo._3_User defined text_WARNING_Dig. input 23" 17.8.1 Alarm transfer function selection from the option N configuration software The alarm transfer is a user-selectable option. Open the "Settings" menu of the option N configuration SW to enable or disable this option.

Select the required option here:

The Modbus TCP/IP option is marked with grey because it is not a user-selectable option. This option is always selected as standard.

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Check that the IP address is right, correct it if necessary and click "OK".

You must now reboot the option N board to enable this new option. To reboot, use the "Reboot" icon of the option N configuration SW ( ).

17.9 Option N firmware upgrade The jump menu no. 9000 of the Multi-line 2 unit display shows the option N firmware version, also called image software (see the example below).

0
W1 W2

0V

GW: 192.168.001.001 Image Ver. 2.00.0


APPL REV

In the example, the image software version is 2.00.0. This chapter will explain how to update the image software. 17.9.1 Obtain the option N firmware from DEIF The USW is normally obtained from DEIF via the internet. Visit www.deif.com.

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Select "Documentation & Software" in the top menu, and select "Software download".

There are two hardware versions of the option N card. One supports software version 1.xx.x and the other version 2.xx.x. You can only store software of the same major version as that of the hardware. So, for example, an option N card with software of the version 2.00.1 can only support other software versions with major version number 2. The current software version can be retrieved from the jump menu 9000 of the Multi-line 2 unit. 17.9.2 How to write the option N firmware Follow the steps described in this chapter to write a new firmware on the option N card, also called image software. Click the "option N" icon in the USW to open the option N configuration software.

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Click the "Send firmware to device" icon,

- or use the "Connection" menu and the "Firmware" submenu.

Open the new image file "xxx.mm21" to be written to the unit if it is for a version 2.xx.x software type

- or open the new image file "xxx.bin" to be written to the unit if it is for a version 1.xx.x software type. Enter IP address, user name and password (the factory settings are: user name = admin and password = admin).

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Remember to check the jump menu 9000 to see the IP address of the unit.

Upgrade of the firmware is in progress.

Download of the new image software is now completed.

17.10 Parameters, further information The option N relates to the parameter 9000. For further information, please see the separate parameter list for the Multi-line unit in question: AGC-3 AGC-4 PPM GPC-3/GPU-3 Hydro PPU-3/GPU-3 Document number 4189340705 Document number 4189340688 Document number 4189340672 Document number 4189340580 Document number 4189340581

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18. Additional display and operator's panel


18.1 Description of option, Option X2 The option includes an additional standard display (DU-2) for the ML-2 unit to be connected to the original display unit via a CANbus connection. With additional DU-2 units it is possible to operate the system from various positions, e.g. start/stop, alarm acknowledge, readings, access setpoints, etc.

A maximum of three standard displays can be connected to each ML-2 unit.

The maximum length of the CANbus line is 200 m.

18.1.1 Rear side view


Standard display DU-2

AOP-1
End resistor 2 OFF ON 1

ML - 2

CAN 1

CAN 2

18.1.2 Connectors ML-2: AOP-1: CAN 1: CAN 2: End resistor: The serial connection to/from the display port of the ML-2 unit. The connector for the cable to an AOP-1. DC supply and CANbus communication to/from other DU-2 or AOP-2 units. CANbus communication to/from other DU-2 or AOP-2 units. Dip switch for 120 Ohm end resistor for the CANbus communication. Dip switch no. 2 is not to be used.

18.2 Description of option, Option X3 The option includes an additional operators panel (AOP-1) which is to be connected directly to a standard display (DU-2) via a serial communication line, and only one AOP-1 can be connected to each DU-2. The AOP-1 has 16 configurable LEDs and eight configurable buttons, which are programmed with the PC utility software. It can be used as an interface to the ML-2 units for indication of status and alarms together with buttons for e.g. alarm acknowledge and mode selection. Since a DU-2 is required for each AOP-1, the possible number of AOP-1 units is determined by the number of DU-2 units.

The maximum distance between the DU-2 and the AOP-1 is 0.5 m.

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18.2.1 Rear side view


Additional operators panel AOP-1

DU-2

18.2.2 Connectors DU-2: DC power supply and serial communication to/from the DU-2.

18.3 Description of option, Option X4 This option includes an additional operators panel (AOP-2) which can be connected to the standard display via a CANbus communication line. The AOP-2 has 16 configurable LEDs and eight configurable buttons, which are programmed with the PC utility software. It can be used as an interface to the ML-2 units for indication of status and alarms together with buttons for e.g. alarm acknowledge and mode selection.

A maximum of five AOP-2 units can be connected to each ML-2 unit.

The maximum length of the CANbus line is 200 m.

18.3.1 Rear side view


Additional operators panel AOP-2

End resistor 2 OFF ON 1

CAN 1

CAN 2

18.3.2 Connectors CAN 1: CAN 2: End resistor: DC supply and CANbus communication to/from other DU-2 or AOP-2 units. CANbus communication to/from other DU-2 or AOP-2 units and status relay output. Dip switch for 120 Ohm end resistor for the CANbus communication. Dip switch no. 2 is not to be used.

18.4 Functional description, Additional displays and operator's panels Below is a principle diagram of the connection of the additional displays and operators panels.

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ML-2

Serial comm. and DC power supply

DC power supply CANbus comm.

DC power supply CANbus comm.

DC power supply CANbus comm.

DC power supply CANbus comm.

DC power supply

DU-2

CANbus comm.

DU-2

DU-2

AOP-2

AOP-2

AOP-2

Serial comm. and DC power supply

Serial comm. and DC power supply

Serial comm. and DC power supply

AOP-1

AOP-1

AOP-1

Only three AOP-2 units are shown in the diagram, but up to five units are supported.

Only one DU-2 has to be connected to the ML-2 unit. The rest of the displays and AOP units are connected to each other with communication lines (serial or CANbus) and get their information through the DU-2 unit connected to the ML-2 unit.

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18.5 Functional description, Display unit - DU-2 18.5.1 Wiring

It is recommended to keep a fair distance to power cables.

The maximum length of the CANbus line is 200 m.

A DC/DC converter for the DC supply voltage and 2 x 1 m cable with an RJ45 plug in one end and stripped wires in the other end are included in the DU-2 delivery.

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18.5.2 End resistor 2 units connected: 3 units connected: More than 3 units connected: Dip switch no. 1 has to be set to ON on both units. Dip switch no. 1 has to be set to ON on unit 1 and unit 3. Dip switch no. 1 has to be set to ON on the first and the last unit on the CANbus line.

18.5.3 CAN ID configuration The CAN ID on the DU-2 can be set from 0 to 3. If it is set to zero, the CANbus communication is deactivated. The CAN ID selection is done in the following way:

1. On the DU-2, press the left selection menu.

, up

and right

buttons at the same time to activate a CAN ID

2. Select the desired CAN ID with the up The CAN ID of the DU-2 has now been selected.

and down

buttons and press ENTER.

The DU-2 which is connected to the ML-2 unit has to have CAN ID no. 1.

If the CANbus communication to other DU-2 or AOP-2 units are not used, the CAN ID should be set to zero.

18.5.4 Protocol selection The DU-2 contains three protocols for the data transmission between the ML-2 unit and the display. Normally the protocol is set automatically, however if the display is used with older ML-2 units, it is necessary to choose the protocol which supports these according to the following table. Protocol 1 2 3 Supports Std. ML-2 with software version 1.xx.x and 2.xx.x AGC units with software version 1.xx.x and 2.xx.x PPM units with software version 2.xx.x AGC units with software version 3.xx.x and 4.xx.x PPM units with software version 3.xx.x Comment

Change of protocol is done like this:

1. On the DU-2, press the left selection menu.

, ENTER and right

buttons at the same time to activate a protocol

2. Select the desired protocol with the up

and down

buttons and press ENTER.

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18.6 Functional description, Additional operator's panel - AOP-1 18.6.1 Front side view

As shown on the drawing, the configurable LEDs are named 1 to 16, and the buttons are named 1 to 8.

18.6.2 Wiring The AOP-1 is connected to the connection on the DU-2 named AOP-1 by means of the enclosed cable. This connection handles the communication and power supply.
Standard display DU-2 Additional operators panel AOP-1

AOP-1
End resistor 2 OFF ON 1

ML - 2

DU-2

CAN 2

The maximum distance between the DU-2 and the AOP-1 is 0.5 m.

The cable for connection between the AOP-1 and DU-2 is included in the AOP-1 delivery.

18.6.3 CAN ID configuration The ID of the AOP-1 is decided by the DU-2 unit to which it is connected. 18.6.4 Programming The programming of the AOP-1 is made with the PC utility software, which can be downloaded from www.deif.com. Please refer to the Help function in the PC utility software for programming instructions.

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18.7 Functional description, Additional operator's panel - AOP-2 18.7.1 Front side view

As shown on the drawing, the configurable LEDs are named 1 to 16, and the buttons are named 1 to 8.

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18.7.2 Wiring

Standard display DU-2


App./Bootl. End Res. AOP-1 ML - 2

Additional operators panel AOP-2


App./Bootl. OFF ON End Res. CAN 1

OFF ON

CAN 1

CAN 2

CAN 2

Black/White

Red Brown/white Red/white

Red Brown/white Red/white

5V DC

-+

Terminal block 1 2 Cable shield 1 2


24V DC

DIN Rail -+

Comm. to next units

1...6 6 - Black: GND 5 - Black/White: +5 VDC 4 - Brown: Not used 3 - Red: CAN L 2 - Brown/white: CAN GND 1 - Red/white: CAN H

1...6

Status relay

6 - Black: Relay common 5 - Black/White: Relay NO 4 - Brown: Relay NC 3 - Red: CAN L 2 - Brown/white: CAN GND 1 - Red/white: CAN H

Left CAN port (CAN 1)

Right CAN port (CAN 2)

A DC/DC converter for the DC supply voltage and 2 x 1 m cable with an RJ12 plug in one end and stripped wires in the other end is included in the AOP-2 delivery.

The cable between the terminal blocks should be shielded twisted pair.

The maximum length of the CANbus line is 200 m.

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NO Common NC

Red Brown/white Red/white Black/white Black Brown

Black

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18.7.3 End resistor 2 units connected: 3 units connected: More than 3 units connected: Dip switch no. 1 on both units should be set to ON. Dip switch no. 1 on unit 1 and unit 3 should be set to ON. Dip switch no. 1 on the first and the last unit on the CANbus line should be set to ON.

18.7.4 CAN ID configuration The CAN ID for the AOP-2 can be changed by the following procedure: 1. Push button no. 7 and no. 8 at the same time to activate the CAN ID change menu, this will activate the LED for the present CAN ID number, and LED no. 16 will be flashing. 2. Use button no. 7 (increase) and button no. 8 (decrease) to change the CAN ID according to the table below. 3. Press button no. 6 to save the CAN ID and return to normal operation. Selection of CAN ID: CAN ID 0 1 2 3 4 5 Indication of CAN ID selection CANbus OFF: LED 16 flashes LED 1 light steady + LED 16 flashes (default value) LED 2 light steady + LED 16 flashes LED 3 light steady + LED 16 flashes LED 4 light steady + LED 16 flashes LED 5 light steady + LED 16 flashes

18.7.5 Status relay The status relay will activate approximately five seconds after power up. 18.7.6 Programming The programming of the AOP-2 is made with the PC utility software, which can be downloaded from www.deif.com. Please refer to the Help function in the PC utility software for instructions regarding the programming. 18.7.7 Lamp test/dimmer The AOP-2 has a separate push-button for the combined lamp test and dimmer functionality. A short activation of the push-button will activate the lamp test function. If no further action is done within three seconds, the AOP-2 will turn back to normal indication. To activate the dimmer function, the push-button has to be pressed more times or continuously to reach the desired light intensity. 18.8 Functional description, Error handling 18.8.1 Duplicate CAN ID DU-2: If two units on the CANbus have the same CAN ID, the following will be displayed:

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Warning: Two displays have same CAN ID Press Enter. When ENTER is pressed, the CAN ID change menu will be displayed and another CAN ID can be selected for the unit. AOP-2: If two units on the CANbus have the same CAN ID, LED no. 1 to 4 will flash quickly. In this case, press button no. 6 to jump into the CAN ID change menu and select another CAN ID for the unit.

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Installation instructions

19. Installation instructions


19.1 General product information, AGC-3 product information 19.1.1 Introduction The AGC is part of the DEIF Multi-line 2 product family. Multi-line 2 is a complete range of multi-function generator protection and control products integrating all the functions you need into one compact and attractive solution. The concept of the AGC is to offer a cost-effective solution to genset builders, who need a flexible generator protection and control unit for medium to large genset applications. Being part of the Multi-line product family, the standard functions can be supplemented with a variety of optional functions. 19.1.2 Type of product The Automatic Genset Controller is a micro-processor based control unit containing all necessary functions for protection and control of a genset. It contains all necessary 3-phase measuring circuits, and all values and alarms are presented on the LCD display. 19.1.3 Options The Multi-line 2 product range consists of different basic versions, which can be supplemented with the flexible options needed to provide the optimum solution. The options cover e.g. various protections for generator, busbar and mains, voltage/VAr/PF control, various outputs, power management, serial communication, additional operator display etc. 19.2 General product information, Standard functions This chapter includes functional descriptions of standard functions as well as illustrations of the relevant application types. Flowcharts and single-line diagrams will be used in order to simplify the information. In the following paragraphs, the standard functions are listed. 19.2.1 Operation modes Automatic Mains Failure Island operation Fixed power/base load Peak shaving Load takeover Mains power export Remote Maintenance 19.2.2 Engine control Start/stop sequences Run and stop coil Relay outputs for governor control 19.2.3 Generator protection (ANSI) 2 x reverse power (32) 5 x overload (32) 6 x overcurrent (50/51) 2 x overvoltage (59) 3 x undervoltage (27)

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3 x over-/underfrequency (81) Voltage-dependent overcurrent (51V) Current/voltage unbalance (60) Loss of excitation/overexcitation (40/32RV) Non-essential load/load shedding, 3 levels (I, Hz, P>, P>>) Multi-inputs (digital, 4-20 mA, 0-40V DC, Pt100, Pt1000 or VDO) Digital inputs

19.2.4 Busbar protection (ANSI) 3 x overvoltage (59) 4 x undervoltage (27) 3 x overfrequency (81) 4 x underfrequency (81) Voltage unbalance (60) 19.2.5 Display Prepared for remote mounting Push-buttons for start and stop Push-buttons for breaker operations Status texts 19.2.6 M-Logic Simple logic configuration tool Selectable input events Selectable output commands 19.3 General product information, Standard and optional applications In the following sections, the standard and optional applications of the AGC will be presented. In addition, the correct application configuration for the different applications is listed. It is only possible to use the unit for one of the purposes, e.g. AMF (Automatic Mains Failure). The selection must be made on site.

All units are supplied with AMF as factory setting.

19.3.1 Automatic Mains Failure, AMF

Load Controller

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No. 6071 Genset mode

Setting AMF AMF

Setting

19.3.2 Island operation


Load Controller

No. 6071 Genset mode

Setting Island operation

Setting Island operation

19.3.3 Fixed power/base load

Load Controller

No. 6071 Genset mode

Setting Fixed power

Setting Fixed power

19.3.4 Peak shaving


TRANSDUCER P/4-20 mA

Load Controller

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No. 6071 Genset mode

Setting Peak shaving

Setting Peak shaving

19.3.5 Load takeover


TRANSDUCER P/4-20 mA

Load Controller

No. 6071 Genset mode

Setting Load takeover

Setting Load takeover

19.3.6 Mains power export (fixed power to mains)


TRANSDUCER P/4-20 mA

Load Controller

No. 6071 Genset mode

Setting Mains power export

Setting Mains power export

19.3.7 Multiple gensets, load sharing


Load Controller Controller

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No. 6071 Genset mode

Setting Island operation

Setting Island operation

19.3.8 Multiple gensets, power management For information about the power management application, please refer to "Description of Option G4, G5 and G8". 19.4 Mounting, AGC-3 mounting 19.4.1 Mounting of the unit The unit is designed for mounting inside the switchboard. The display can be installed on the switchboard door and connected to the main unit with a display cable. The technical specifications include detailed information about: Unit dimensions Panel cut-out Screw hole positions and dimensions

19.4.2 Panel cut-out In order to ensure optimum mounting, the switchboard door must be cut out according to the panel cut-out illustration in the chapter Technical information. 19.4.3 Mounting instructions The unit can be mounted in two different ways: 1. Directly mounted on a DIN rail. 2. Fastened with screws to the rear side of the cabinet. Six screw holes are available for this mounting method.

DEIF recommends using the screw hole fastening. 19.5 Hardware, Board slot positions The unit housing is divided into board slot positions. This means that the unit consists of a number of printed circuit boards (PCB) mounted in numbered slots. The green terminal blocks are then mounted in the PCBs. Some of these board slots are standard and some are intended for options. The board slot positions are arranged as illustrated below.

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Slot type Terminals Power supply AC measurements Engine interface Load sharing Power management Engine communication I/O extension Slot type Terminals Analogue controller outputs Analogue transducer outputs Combination outputs Serial communication Engine communication I/O extension cards I/O extension cards I/O extension cards Plant management E1/E2 F1

Option

Slot #1 1-28

Slot #3 37-64

Slot #5 73-89

Slot #7 98-125

Standard Standard Standard G3 G4/G5/G8 H7 M12 Option

X X X X X X X Slot #2 29-34 Slot #4 65-72 X X X X X X X X X Slot #6 90-97 Slot #8 126-133

EF2/EF4/EF5/EF6 H2/H3/H8.2 H5/H6 M13.2 M13.6/M14.6/M15 M13.8/M14.8/H8.8 G7

Only hardware options, which will affect the hardware of the unit, are represented in the table. The software options will be seen through the PC utility software. The software options that are not represented in the above table can be found in the data sheet.

19.5.1 Unit top side overview An overview of the terminals is presented below. The slot positions are as follows:
1 3 2 4

37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50

51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64

65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72

CAN A CAN B Ethernet


9

Ethernet

Service port

Display

Power Self check ok Alarm inhibit

73 74 75 76 77 78
5

79 80 81 82 83 84

85 86 87 88 89

90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97
6

The numbers in the drawing above refer to the slot numbers indicated in the table below.

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No. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 #1, terminal 1-28, power supply (standard) #2, terminal 29-36, communication #3, terminal 37-64, in-/outputs/load sharing

Slot

#4, terminal 65-72, governor, AVR, in-/outputs (standard) #5, terminal 73-89, AC measuring (standard) #6, terminal 90-97, in-/outputs #7, terminal 98-125, engine I/F (standard) #8, terminal 126-133, engine communication, in-/outputs LED I/F

19.5.2 Terminal strip overviews Standard unit

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The hardware shown in slot #3 is option M12 and G3. For a detailed description of these options, please refer to the option manuals.

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Mains unit

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The hardware shown in slot #3 is option M12 and G3. For a detailed description of these options, please refer to the option manuals.

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BTB unit

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The hardware shown in slot #3 is option M12 and G3. For a detailed description of these options, please refer to the option manuals.

19.5.3 Input/output lists In the I/O lists, the following terms will be used in connection with the relay outputs: NO means Normally Open NC means Normally Closed NE means Normally Energised ND means Normally Deenergised Com. means common terminal

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19.5.4 Slot #1, power supply PCB Term. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 Function +12/24V DC 0V DC NC Com. NO Com. NC NO Com. NC NO Com. NC NO Com. NC NO Com. NC Open collector 1 Open collector 2 Com. Digital input 23 Digital input 24 Digital input 25 Digital input 26 Digital input 27 Com. Transistor output/Relay 20 Transistor output/Relay 21 Common Optocoupler Optocoupler Optocoupler Optocoupler Optocoupler Common Pulse output 1, kWh counter/configurable Pulse output 2, kVArh counter/configurable Common terminal for terminals 20 and 21 Configurable Mains breaker open/configurable Mains breaker closed/configurable Generator breaker open Generator breaker closed Common for terminals 23 to 27 Relay 250V AC/8 A Close generator breaker (synchronising) Relay 250V AC/8 A Open generator breaker Relay 11 250V AC/8 A Close mains breaker (synchronising)/configurable Relay 08 250V AC/8 A Open mains breaker/configurable Technical data 12/24V DC +/-30% Status relay 24V DC/1 A Relay 05 250V AC/8 A Power supply Description

Normally closed relay, processor/power supply status supervision Central alarm HORN/configurable

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19.5.5 Slot #1, power supply PCB - AGC mains unit The I/O list below is for the AGC mains unit.

Term. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28

Function +12/24V DC 0V DC NC Com. NO Com. NC NO Com. NC NO Com. NC NO Com. NC NO Com. NC Open collector 1 Open collector 2 Com. Digital input 23 Digital input 24 Digital input 25 Digital input 26 Digital input 27 Com.

Technical data 12/24V DC +/-30% Status relay 24V DC/1 A Relay 05 250V AC/8 A Power supply

Description

Normally closed relay, processor/power supply status supervision Central alarm HORN/configurable

Relay 08 250V AC/8 A

Open mains breaker/configurable

Relay 11 250V AC/8 A

Close mains breaker (synchronising)/configurable

Relay 14 250V AC/8 A

Open tie breaker/configurable

Relay 17 250V AC/8 A

Close tie breaker/configurable

Transistor output/Relay 20 Transistor output/Relay 21 Common Optocoupler Optocoupler Optocoupler Optocoupler Optocoupler Common

Pulse output 1, kWh counter/configurable Pulse output 2, kVArh counter/configurable Common terminal for terminals 20 and 21 Configurable Mains breaker open/configurable Mains breaker closed/configurable Tie breaker open/configurable Tie breaker closed/configurable Common for terminals 23 to 27

19.5.6 Slot #2, serial communication (option H) Modbus (option H2)

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Term. 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36

Function DATA + (A) GND DATA - (B) Not used DATA + (A) Not used DATA - (B) Not used

Description Modbus RTU, RS485

The serial communication line should be terminated between DATA + and DATA - with a resistor equal to the cable impedance. The terminals 29/33 and 31/35 are internally connected. Never connect the GND terminal 30 to earth. Only connect it to a third wire in the communication cable! Profibus (option H3) Term. 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 Function DATA + (B) GND DATA - (A) DATA + (B) GND DATA - (A) Not used Not used Never connect the GND terminal 30 to earth. Only connect it to a third wire in the communication cable! Description Pin 3 on 9 pole sub-D connector Pin 5 on 9 pole sub-D connector Pin 8 on 9 pole sub-D connector

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19.5.7 Slot #2, external I/O module (option H8.2) Term. 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 CAN-H CAN-GND CAN-L CAN-H CAN-GND CAN-L Not used Not used Function Description CANbus card option H8.2

Terminals 29 and 32 are internally connected. Terminals 31 and 34 are internally connected.

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19.5.8 Slot #3, load sharing control (option G3) Term. 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 Not used -10010V DC Function -505V DC Com. -505V DC -10010V DC Technical data Analogue I/O Common Analogue I/O Analogue I/O Common Analogue I/O Description Active load sharing line Common for load sharing lines Reactive load sharing f/P setpoint (passive) Common for 40/42 U/Q setpoint (passive)

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19.5.9 Slot #3, 13 binary inputs and 4 relay outputs (option M12) Term. 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 -10/+10V DC Com. -10/+10V DC Binary input Binary input Binary input Binary input Binary input Binary input Binary input Binary input Binary input Binary input Binary input Binary input Binary input Com. NE/ND Com. NE/ND Com. NE/ND Com. NE/ND Com. Analogue I/O Common Analogue I/O Optocoupler Optocoupler Optocoupler Optocoupler Optocoupler Optocoupler Optocoupler Optocoupler Optocoupler Optocoupler Optocoupler Optocoupler Optocoupler Common Relay 57 250V AC/5 A Relay 59 250V AC/5 A Relay 61 250V AC/5 A Relay 63 250V AC/5 A f/P setpoint Common U/Q setpoint Configurable Configurable Configurable Configurable Configurable Configurable Configurable Configurable Configurable Configurable Configurable Configurable Configurable Common for terminals 43 to 55 Configurable Not used Function Technical data Description

Configurable

Configurable

Configurable

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19.5.10 Slot #4, relay outputs (option M14.4, standard) Term. 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 Function NE/ND Com. NE/ND Com. Not used Com. Not used Com. Technical data Relay 65 250V AC/5 A Relay 67 250V AC/5 A Relay 69 250V AC/5 A Relay 71 250V AC/5 A Description Generator GOV: Increase frequency/configurable

Generator GOV: Decrease frequency/configurable

Configurable

Configurable

19.5.11 Slot #4, analogue outputs for GOV/AVR or transducer (option E1) Term. 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 Not used +/-25 mA 0 Not used Not used +/-25 mA 0 Not used Configurable Configurable Function Description

19.5.12 Slot #4, analogue outputs for GOV/AVR or transducer (option EF2) Term. 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 Not used +/-25 mA 0 Not used Not used 0(4)-20 mA 0 Not used Configurable Configurable Function Description

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19.5.13 Slot #4, combination outputs for GOV/AVR or transducer (option EF4) Term. 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 +/-25 mA 0 Not used Not used NO Com. NO Com. Relay 71 Relay 69 Function Configurable Description

19.5.14 Slot #4, PWM output for GOV and combination output for AVR (option EF5) Term. 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 Function +/-25 mA 0 PWM + PWM NO Com. NO Com. Relay output for AVR. Lower voltage Relay output for AVR. Raise voltage PWM speed governor signal AVR setpoint output Description

19.5.15 Slot #4, PWM output for GOV and combination output for AVR (option EF6) Term. 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 Function Not used Not used 0 +/-25 mA PWM PWM + 0 +/-25 mA Connect PWM - to the engine battery negative and PWM + to the engine control system S-SPD (speed) input (called RATED SPEED on the ADEM controller and PRIMARY THROTTLE on the PEEC controller). Speed governor, AVR or transducer output 72 PWM speed governor signal Speed governor, AVR or transducer output 68 Description

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AVR control requires the D1 option.

19.5.16 Slot #4, analogue outputs for GOV/AVR or transducer (option E2) Term. 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 Not used 0(4)-20 mA 0 Not used Not used 0(4)-20 mA 0 Not used Configurable Configurable Function Description

19.5.17 Slot #5, AC measuring Term. 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 U L2 UNEUTRAL U L3 U L3 UNEUTRAL U L1 U L2 Function I L1, s1 I L1, s2 I L2, s1 I L2, s2 I L3, s1 I L3, s2 U L1 Generator voltage L1 Not used Generator voltage L2 Not used Generator voltage L3 Generator voltage neutral Mains/bus voltage L1 Not used Mains/bus voltage L2 Mains/bus voltage neutral Mains/bus voltage L3 Max. 690V AC phase-phase value Max. 690V AC phase-phase value Max. 690V AC phase-phase value Max. 690V AC phase-phase value Max. 690V AC phase-phase value Max. 690V AC phase-phase value Generator current L3 x/1 A or x/5 A input Generator current L2 x/1 A or x/5 A input Technical data Generator current L1 Description x/1 A or x/5 A input

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19.5.18 Slot #5, AC measuring - AGC mains unit The I/O list below is for the AGC mains unit.

Term. 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89

Function I L1, s1 I L1, s2 I L2, s1 I L2, s2 I L3, s1 I L3, s2 U L1

Technical data Mains current L1

Description x/1 A or x/5 A input

Mains current L2

x/1 A or x/5 A input

Mains current L3

x/1 A or x/5 A input

Mains voltage L1 Not used

Max. 690V AC phase-phase value

U L2

Mains voltage L2 Not used

Max. 690V AC phase-phase value

U L3 UNEUTRAL U L1

Mains voltage L3 Mains voltage neutral Bus voltage L1 Not used

Max. 690V AC phase-phase value

Max. 690V AC phase-phase value

U L2 UNEUTRAL U L3

Bus voltage L2 Bus voltage neutral Bus voltage L3

Max. 690V AC phase-phase value

Max. 690V AC phase-phase value

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19.5.19 Slot #5, AC measuring - AGC BTB unit The I/O list below is for the AGC BTB unit.

Term. 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89

Function I L1, s1 I L1, s2 I L2, s1 I L2, s2 I L3, s1 I L3, s2 U L1

Technical data Bus A current L1

Description x/1 A or x/5 A input

Bus A current L2

x/1 A or x/5 A input

Bus A current L3

x/1 A or x/5 A input

Bus A voltage L1 Not used

Max. 690V AC phase-phase value

U L2

Bus A voltage L2 Not used

Max. 690V AC phase-phase value

U L3 UNEUTRAL U L1

Bus A voltage L3 Bus A voltage neutral Bus B voltage L1 Not used

Max. 690V AC phase-phase value

Max. 690V AC phase-phase value

U L2 UNEUTRAL U L3

Bus B voltage L2 Bus B voltage neutral Bus B voltage L3

Max. 690V AC phase-phase value

Max. 690V AC phase-phase value

19.5.20 Slot #6, 7 digital inputs (option M13.6) Term. 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 Com. Binary input 91 Binary input 92 Binary input 93 Binary input 94 Binary input 95 Binary input 96 Binary input 97 Function Technical data Common Optocoupler Optocoupler Optocoupler Optocoupler Optocoupler Optocoupler Optocoupler Description Common for terminals 90-97 Configurable Configurable Configurable Configurable Configurable Configurable Configurable

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19.5.21 Slot #6, 4 relay outputs (option M14.6) Term. 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 Function NE/ND Com. NE/ND Com. NE/ND Com. NE/ND Com. Technical data Relay 90 250V AC 5 A Relay 92 250V AC 5 A Relay 94 250V AC 5 A Relay 96 250V AC 5 A Description Configurable

Configurable

Configurable

Configurable

19.5.22 Slot #6, 4 analogue inputs (option M15.6) Term. 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 Function Analogue input 91 Analogue input 91 + Analogue input 93 Analogue input 93 + Analogue input 95 Analogue input 95 + Analogue input 97 Analogue input 97 + Technical data Common 4-20 mA in Common 4-20 mA in Common 4-20 mA in Common 4-20 mA in Configurable Configurable Configurable Description Configurable

19.5.23 Slot #6, analogue outputs for GOV/AVR or transducer (option F1) Term. 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 Not used 0 0(4)-20 mA Not used Not used 0 0(4)-20 mA Not used Transducer output Transducer output Function Description

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19.5.24 Slot #7, engine interface card (standard) Term. 98 99 100 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 121 122 123 124 A1 A2 A3 B1 B2 B3 Function +12/24V DC 0V DC MPU input MPU GND A B C A B C A B C Com. Digital input 112 Digital input 113 Digital input 114 Digital input 115 Digital input 116 Digital input 117 Digital input 118 NO NO Com. NO Com. NO CAN-H GND CAN-L CAN-H GND CAN-L CANbus interface B (option G4 or G5) Common Optocoupler Optocoupler Optocoupler Optocoupler Optocoupler Optocoupler Optocoupler Relay 24V DC/5 A Relay 24V DC/5 A Relay 250V AC/5 A Relay 24V DC/5 A Common for terminals 112-117 Configurable Configurable Configurable Configurable Configurable Configurable Emergency stop and common for 119 and 120 Run coil Start prepare Crank (starter) Multi-input 3 Technical data 12/24V DC +/-30% 0.5-70V AC/ 10-10,000 Hz 0(4)-20 mA Digital Pt100 Pt1000 VDO 0-40V DC DC power supply Description

Magnetic pick-up

Multi-input 1

Multi-input 2

Stop coil w/wire failure detection

CANbus interface A (option G4, G5 or H7)

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19.5.25 Slot #7, engine interface card (standard) AGC mains/BTB Term. 98 99 100 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 121 122 123 124 A1 A2 A3 B1 B2 B3 Function +12/24V DC 0V DC MPU input MPU GND A B C A B C A B C Com. Digital input 112 Digital input 113 Digital input 114 Digital input 115 Digital input 116 Digital input 117 Digital input 118 NO NO Com. NO Com. NO CAN-H GND CAN-L CAN-H GND CAN-L CANbus interface B (option G4 or G5) Common Optocoupler Optocoupler Optocoupler Optocoupler Optocoupler Optocoupler Optocoupler Relay 24V DC/5 A Relay 24V DC/5 A Relay 250V AC/5 A Relay 24V DC/5 A Common for terminals 112-117 Configurable Configurable Configurable Configurable Configurable Configurable Emergency stop and common for 119 and 120 Not used Not used Not used Multi-input 3 Technical data 12/24V DC +/-30% 0.5-70V AC/ 10-10,000 Hz 0(4)-20 mA Digital Pt100 Pt1000 VDO 0-40V DC DC power supply Description

Magnetic pick-up

Multi-input 1

Multi-input 2

Not used

CANbus interface A (option G4 or G5)

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19.5.26 Slot #8, engine interface communication (option H5) Term. 126 127 128 129 130 131 132 133 Function Not used Not used CAN-L GND CAN-H CAN-L GND CAN-H Description CANbus-based engine interface communication

19.5.27 Slot #8, Cummins engine interface communication (option H6) Term. 126 127 128 129 130 131 132 133 Not used DATA - (B) Not used DATA + (A) Not used DATA - (B) GND DATA + (A) Function Description Modbus RTU (RS485)

19.5.28 Slot #8, 7 digital inputs (option M13.8) Term. 126 127 128 129 130 131 132 133 Com. Digital input 127 Digital input 128 Digital input 129 Digital input 130 Digital input 131 Digital input 132 Digital input 133 Function Technical data Common Optocoupler Optocoupler Optocoupler Optocoupler Optocoupler Optocoupler Optocoupler Description Common for terminals 127-133 Configurable Configurable Configurable Configurable Configurable Configurable Configurable

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19.5.29 Slot #8, 4 relay outputs (option M14.8) Term. 126 127 128 129 130 131 132 133 Function NE/ND Com. NE/ND Com. NE/ND Com. NE/ND Com. Technical data Relay 126 250V AC/5 A Relay 128 250V AC/5 A Relay 130 250V AC/5 A Relay 132 250V AC/5 A Description Configurable

Configurable

Configurable

Configurable

19.5.30 Slot #8, external I/O module (option H8.8) Term. 126 127 128 129 130 131 132 133 Function Not used Not used CAN-L GND CAN-H CAN-L GND CAN-H Terminals 133 and 130 are internally connected. Terminals 131 and 128 are internally connected. 19.6 Wirings, AC connections The Multi-line 2 unit can be wired up in 1-phase, 2-phase or 3-phase configuration. Contact the switchboard manufacturer for accurate information about required wiring for the specific application. Description CANbus card option H8.8

19.6.1 Neutral line (N) When three-phase distribution systems are used, the neutral line (N) is only necessary if it is a three-phase + neutral system. If the distribution system is a three-phase system without neutral, then leave the terminals 84 and 88 empty. 19.6.2 Current transformer grounding The current transformer ground connection can be made on s1 or s2 connection, whichever is preferred.

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19.6.3 Fuses If the cables are protected with fuses, then use 2 A, slow blow. 19.6.4 Breaker wiring The breaker off wiring is an example only. 19.6.5 3-phase AMF, fixed power, peak shaving, load takeover, mains power export.

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19.6.6 Single phase

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19.6.7 2-phase L1L2

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19.6.8 2-phase L1L3 (split phase)

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19.6.9 Island mode and power management (option G4/G5/G8)

1-phase and 2-phase systems also supported.

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19.6.10 Power management (option G5), AGC mains

1-phase and 2-phase systems also supported.

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19.6.11 Power management (option G5), dual mains - AGC mains

1-phase and 2-phase systems also supported.

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19.6.12 Power management (option G5), AGC BTB

1-phase and 2-phase systems also supported. 19.7 Wirings, DC connections 19.7.1 Load sharing lines (option G3)
Always use screened cable

37 PS 0...5 V DC

38 COMMON 0...5 V DC

39 QS

37 PS 0...5 V DC

38 COMMON 0...5 V DC

39 QS

37 PS 0...5 V DC

38 COMMON 0...5 V DC

39 QS

LOAD SHARING LINES Multi-line 2

LOAD SHARING LINES Multi-line 2

LOAD SHARING LINES Multi-line 2

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19.7.2 Digital inputs

Battery positive to input:


12/24V DC

Battery negative to input:


12/24V DC

Switch

23

23
Multi-line 2

Multi-line 2 28 (COM.)

Switch 28 (COM.)

Emergency stop:
12/24V DC

118

Multi-line 2 99 (COM.) 0V DC

19.7.3 Analogue inputs 4-20 mA (option M15) Active transducer


4-20 mA transducer +12/24V DC 0V DC Measurement + + Multi-line 2 91 Analogue input 91 90 (Common)

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Passive transducer
4-20 mA transducer +12/24V DC Measurement + 0V DC Multi-line 2 91 Analogue input 91 90 (Common)

V DC sensor
Multi-line 2 91 0-10V DC sensor R = 450 Analogue input 91 90 (Common)

External setpoints (option G3) The setpoint inputs are passive, i.e. an external power source is needed. This can be an active output from e.g. a PLC, or a potentiometer can be used. 0-10V DC input using potentiometer
2000 Ohm W potentiometer 10V DC 40 or 42 0V DC 41 (Common) Multi-line 2

+/-10V DC input using potentiometer


2000 Ohm W potentiometer 10V DC 40 or 42 -10V DC 0V DC 41 (Common) Multi-line 2

19.7.4 Multi-inputs The multi-inputs are placed in slot #7, the terminal numbers for the individual multi-inputs can be seen in the "Input/output list". 0(4)-20 mA

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Active transducer
4-20 mA transducer +12/24V DC 0V DC Measurement + + Multi-line 2 A B C Multi-input

Passive transducer
4-20 mA transducer +12/24V DC Measurement + 0 V DC Multi-line 2 A B C Multi-input

If the passive sensor has its own battery supply, the voltage must not exceed 30V DC.

19.7.5 Digital inputs


Multi-line 2 A R B C Multi-input

The resistor is only mounted if wire fail supervision is required. The value of the resistor should be 270 +/-10%.

19.7.6 Pt100/Pt1000 2-wire


Pt100/1000 A B C Multi-input Multi-line 2

3-wire
Pt100/1000 Multi-line 2 0 I P A B C Multi-input

19.7.7 VDO 1-wire


VDO A B C Multi-input Multi-line 2

2-wire
VDO A B C Multi-input Multi-line 2

DEIF A/S

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19.7.8 0-40V DC
Battery 0-40V DC A B 0V DC C Multi-input Multi-line 2

19.7.9 RPM input Magnetic pick-up (MPU)


MPU Multi-line 2

Output

100 101

NPN sensor
NPN +V DC Output 0V DC 0V DC C C 100 101 +12/24V DC R Multi-line 2

C = 22 nF, 100V foil type R = 1200@24V DC, 600@12V DC PNP sensor


PNP +V DC Output R 0V DC 0V DC +12/24V DC C C 100 101 Multi-line 2

C = 22 nF, 100V foil type R = 1200@24V DC, 600@12V DC Charger, W output


Charger C Multi-line 2

100 101

C = 22 nF, 100V foil type

DEIF A/S

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Installation instructions

19.7.10 Stop coil


+12/24V DC

Multi-line 2 123 124 A1 Stop coil A2

0V DC

Remember to mount the free wheel diode.

19.7.11 Transistor outputs (open collector outputs) The open collector outputs can be used as kWh and kVArh counter outputs or as relay outputs. The outputs are low power outputs. For that reason, one of the following circuits must be applied. External counter:
+12/24 VDC

Relay outputs:
+12/24 VDC

A1

0,5 F 100 V

External counter

Relay A2

20 kWh Multi-line 2 22 (Com. For 20/21) 0 VDC


0 VDC

20 (Relay 20) Multi-line 2 22 (Common)

Connection to PLC:
+12/24 VDC

4,7 k

PLC

Input (positive)

20 kWh Multi-line 2 22 (Com. For 20/21) 0 VDC

DEIF A/S

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Remember to mount the free wheel diode.

Maximum load on the open collector outputs is 10 mA at 24V DC.

19.8 Wirings, Communication 19.8.1 CANbus (option G4/G5/G8) Examples with three AGC units connected, e.g. one AGC mains and two generator AGC units. It is not possible to mix CANbus interface A and B.
Multi-line 2 CANbus interface A H GND L A1 A2 A3 Multi-line 2 CANbus interface A H GND L A1 A2 A3 Multi-line 2 CANbus interface A H GND L A1 A2 A3

120

120

Multi-line 2 CANbus interface B H GND L B1 B2 B3

Multi-line 2 CANbus interface B H GND L B1 B2 B3

Multi-line 2 CANbus interface B H GND L B1 B2 B3

120

120

Connect shield to earth at one end only. Shield ends must be insulated with tape or insulation tubing.

Use shielded twisted cable.

End resistor R = 120 Ohm.

DEIF A/S

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Installation instructions

19.8.2 Modbus (option H2) Connection with 2-wire screened cable (recommended):
Multi-line 2 DATA + (A) 29 DATA (GND) 30 DATA (GND) DATA - (B) 31 Multi-line 2 DATA + (A) 29 DATA (GND) 30 DATA - (B) 31 Multi-line 2 DATA + (A) 29 DATA (GND) 30 DATA - (B) 31

PLC or other device

Connect shield to ground at one end only. Shield ends must be insulated with tape or insulation tubing.

Use shielded twisted cable.

DEIF A/S

DATA - (B)

DATA + (A)

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Connection with 3-wire shielded cable:


Multi-line 2 DATA + (A) 29 DATA (GND) 30 DATA (GND) DATA - (B) 31 Multi-line 2 DATA + (A) 29 DATA (GND) 30 DATA - (B) 31 Multi-line 2 DATA + (A) 29 DATA (GND) 30 DATA - (B) 31

PLC or other device

Connect shield to ground at one end only. Shield ends must be insulated with tape or insulation tubing.

Use shielded twisted cable.

This solution is only feasible if the COM line is insulated. Check PLC/other device before connecting. A non-insulated COM line may result in damage to the equipment. Normally, the Modbus does not need bias resistors (end terminators). These are only needed in case of very long lines and/or many nodes (>32) on the Modbus network. If bias resistors are needed, the calculation should be based on the following data: - A line internal pull-up bias resistor: - B line internal pull-down bias resistor: - Receiver input sensitivity: - Receiver input impedance: 22 k 22 k +/-200 mV 12 k

Cable: Belden 3105A or equivalent. 22 AWG (0.6 mm2) twisted pair, shielded, <40 m/m, min. 95% shield coverage.

DEIF A/S

DATA - (B)

DATA + (A)

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19.8.3 Profibus DP (option H3) Connection with 2-wire screened cable (recommended):
Multi-line 2 DATA + (B) 29 DATA - (A) COM 30 COM DATA - (A) 31 DATA + (B) Multi-line 2 DATA + (B) 29 COM 30 DATA - (A) 31 Multi-line 2 DATA + (B) 29 COM 30 DATA - (A) 31

PLC or other device

Connect shield to ground at one end only. Shield ends must be insulated with tape or insulation tubing.

Use shielded twisted cable.

19.8.4 CANbus engine communication (option H5) Connection with 2-wire screened cable (recommended):
Multi-line 2 CAN-H CAN-GND CAN-GND CAN-L 120 120

133 132 131

ECM engine control module

DEIF A/S

CAN-L

CAN-H

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Installation instructions

Connection with 3-wire shielded cable:


Multi-line 2 CAN-H CAN-GND CAN-GND CAN-L 120 120

133 132 131

ECM engine control module

DEIF A/S

CAN-L

Connect shield to ground at one end only. Shield ends must be insulated with tape or insulation tubing.

Use shielded twisted cable.

End resistor R = 120 Ohm.

The terminating resistor at the engine side might not be needed, please refer to the engine manufacturers literature.

CAN-H

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Installation instructions

19.8.5 Cummins GCS (option H6)


Multi-line 2, option H6 DATA - B 131 R
DEIF A/S

Engine controller, connector 06 DATA - B DATA (GND) DATA + A

132

Connect shield to ground at one end only. Shield ends must be insulated with tape or insulation tubing.

Use shielded twisted cable.

Normally, the communication does not need bias resistors (end terminators). These are only needed in case of very long lines between the two modules. If bias resistors are needed, the calculation should be based on the following data: - A line internal pull-up bias resistor: - B line internal pull-down bias resistor: - Receiver input sensitivity: - Receiver input impedance: 22 k 22 k +/-200 mV 12 k

Cable: Belden 3105A or equivalent. 22 AWG (0.6 mm2) twisted pair, shielded, <40 m/m, min. 95% shield coverage.

DATA (GND)

DATA + A 133

18

20

31

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Installation instructions

19.8.6 CANbus engine communication (option H7)


Multi-line 2 CAN-H A1
Multi-line 2 Option H 8.8 Option H 8.2

A2

CAN-GND CAN-GND

A3

CAN-L 120 120

ECM engine control module

19.8.7 External I/O module (option H8)

CANopen
DIP

DEIF A/S

BECKHOFF
ON 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

CAN-L

Connect shield to ground at one end only. Shield ends must be insulated with tape or insulation tubing.

Use shielded twisted cable.

End resistor R = 120 Ohm.

The terminating resistor at the engine side might not be needed, please refer to the engine manufacturers literature.

CAN-H
120 CAN-H 120 CANopen 133 131 29 31 CAN-L

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Installation instructions

19.8.8 Display cable (option J) A standard computer extension cable can be used (9-pole SUB-D male/female plugs) or a cable can be tailored.
Connect shield to plug metallic casing

9-p SUB D male 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

9-p SUB D female 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

Wires min. 0.22 m2, max. cable length 6 m. Cable types: Belden 9540, BICC H8146, Brand Rex BE57540 or equivalent.

DEIF A/S

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19.9 Technical information, AGC-3 19.9.1 Technical specifications Accuracy Class 1.0 Class 0.5 with option Q1 Positive, negative and zero sequence alarms: class 1 within 5% voltage unbalance Class 1.0 for negative sequence current Fast overcurrent: 3% of 350%*In Analogue outputs: class 1.0 according to total range Option EF4: class 4.0 according to total range To IEC/EN60688 -2570C (-13...158F) (UL/cUL Listed: max. surrounding air temperature: 55C/131F) -4070C (-40...158F) 97% RH to IEC 60068-2-30 100-690V AC +/-20% (UL/cUL Listed: 480V AC phase-phase) Consumption: max. 0.25 VA/phase -/1 or -/5 A AC (UL/cUL Listed: from CTs 1-5 A) Consumption: max. 0.3 VA/phase 4 x In continuously 20 x In, 10 sec. (max. 75 A) 80 x In, 1 sec. (max. 300 A) 30...70 Hz Terminals 1 and 2: 12/24V DC (8...36 V continuously, 6 V 1 sec.). Max. 11 W consumption Terminals 98 and 99: 12/24V DC (8...36 V continuously, 6 V 1 sec.). Max. 5 W consumption The aux. supply inputs are to be protected by a 2 A slow blow fuse. (UL/cUL Listed: AWG 24) Optocoupler, bi-directional ON: 8...36V DC Impedance: 4.7 k OFF: <2V DC -10...+10V DC: not galvanically separated. Impedance: 100 k 0(4)...20 mA: impedance 50 . Not galvanically separated RPM (MPU): 2...70V AC, 10...10000 Hz, 250...3000 0(4)...20 mA: 0-20 mA, +/-1%. Not galvanically separated Binary: max. resistance for ON detection: 100 . Not galvanically separated Pt100/1000: -40...250C, +/-1%. Not galvanically separated. To IEC/EN60751 VDO: 0-1700 , +/-2%. Not galvanically separated V DC: 0...40V DC, +/-1%. Not galvanically separated

Operating temperature Storage temperature Climate Measuring voltage Measuring current Current overload

Measuring frequency Aux. supply

Binary inputs

Analogue inputs Multi-inputs

DEIF A/S

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Relay outputs

Electrical rating: 250V AC/30V DC, 5 A. (UL/cUL Listed: 250V AC/24V DC, 2 A resistive load) Thermal rating @ 50C: 2 A: continuously. 4 A: ton= 5 sec., toff = 15 sec. (Unit status output: 1 A) Supply: 8...36V DC, max. 10 mA 0(4)...20 mA and +/-25 mA. Galvanically separated. Active output (internal supply). Load max. 500 . (UL/cUL Listed: max. 20 mA output) Update rate: transducer output: 250 ms. Regulator output: 100 ms -5...0...+5V DC. Impedance: 23.5 k Between AC voltage, AC current and other I/Os: 3250V AC, 50 Hz, 1 min. Between analogue outputs and other I/Os: 500V DC, 1 min. Between binary input groups and other I/Os: 500V DC, 1 min. Busbar: Over-/undervoltage: <50 ms Over-/underfrequency: <50 ms Voltage unbalance: <250 ms Generator: Reverse power: <250 ms Overcurrent: <250 ms Fast overcurrent: <40 ms Directional overcurrent: <150 ms Over-/undervoltage: <250 ms Over-/underfrequency: <350 ms Overload: <250 ms Current unbalance: <250 ms Voltage unbalance: <250 ms Reactive power import: <250 ms Reactive power export: <250 ms Voltage-dependent I>: <250 ms Negative sequence I: <500 ms Negative sequence U: <500 ms Zero sequence I: <500 ms Zero sequence U: <500 ms Overspeed: <500 ms Digital inputs: <250 ms Emergency stop: <200 ms Multi-inputs: 800 ms Wire failure: <600 ms Mains: df/dt (ROCOF): <130 ms (4 periods) Vector jump: <40 ms Positive sequence: <60 ms Time-dependent undervoltage, Ut<: <50 ms Undervoltage and reactive power low, UQ<: <250 ms

Open collector outputs Analogue outputs Load sharing lines Galvanic separation Response times (delay set to min.)

DEIF A/S

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Installation instructions

Mounting Safety EMC/CE Vibration

DIN-rail mount or base mount with six screws To EN 61010-1, installation category (overvoltage category) III, 600 V, pollution degree 2 To UL 508 and CSA 22.2 no. 14-05, overvoltage category III, 300 V, pollution degree 2 To EN 61000-6-1/2/3/4. IEC 60255-26. IEC 60533 power distribution zone. IACS UR E10 power distribution zone 313.2 Hz: 2 mmpp. 13.2100 Hz: 0.7 g. To IEC 60068-2-6 & IACS UR E10 1060 Hz: 0.15mmpp. 60150 Hz: 1 g. To IEC 60255-21-1 Response (class 2) 10150 Hz: 2 g. To IEC 60255-21-1 Endurance (class 2) 10 g, 11 ms, half sine. To IEC 60255-21-2 Response (class 2) 30 g, 11 ms, half sine. To IEC 60255-21-2 Endurance (class 2) 50 g, 11 ms, half sine. To IEC 60068-2-27 20 g, 16 ms, half sine. To IEC 60255-21-2 (class 2) All plastic materials are self-extinguishing according to UL94 (V1) AC current: 0.2-4.0 mm2 stranded wire. (UL/cUL Listed: AWG 18) AC voltage: 0.2-2.5 mm2 stranded wire. (UL/cUL Listed: AWG 20) Relays: (UL/cUL Listed: AWG 22) Terminals 98-116: 0.2-1.5 mm2 stranded wire. (UL/cUL Listed: AWG 24) Other: 0.2-2.5mm2 stranded wire. (UL/cUL Listed: AWG 24) Display: 9-pole Sub-D female Service port: USB A-B

Shock (base mount) Bump Material Plug connections

Protection Governors

Unit: IP20. Display: IP52 (IP54 with gasket: option L). (UL/cUL Listed: Type Complete Device, Open Type). To IEC/EN 60529 Multi-line 2 interfaces to all governors, including GAC, Barber-Colman, Woodward and Cummins See interfacing guide at www.deif.com UL/cUL Listed to UL508 Wiring: use 60/75C copper conductors only Mounting: for use on a flat surface of type 1 enclosure Installation: to be installed in accordance with the NEC (US) or the CEC (Canada) AOP-2: Maximum ambient temperature: 60C Wiring: use 60/75C copper conductors only Mounting: for use on a flat surface of type 3 (IP54) enclosure. Main disconnect must be provided by installer Installation: to be installed in accordance with the NEC (US) or the CEC (Canada) DC/DC converter for AOP-2: Tightening torque: 0.5 Nm (4.4 lb-in) Wire size: AWG 22-14

Approvals UL markings

Weight

Base unit: 1.6 kg (3.5 lbs.) Option J1/J3/J4/J6/J7: 0.2 kg (0.4 lbs.) Option J2: 0.4 kg (0.9 lbs.) Display: 0.4 kg (0.9 lbs.)

DEIF A/S

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Installation instructions

19.10 Technical information, Unit dimensions


115 (4.528)

165 (6.496)

220 (8.661)

115 (4.528)

Display or AOP

220 (8.661)

144 (5.669)

20.0 (0.787)

Dimensions are given in mm (inches). 19.11 Technical information, Panel cut-out


174.0 = 26.0 26.0 =

Required space 222X115mm

Gasket outer 186X77mm

Screws for fastning: 3.5mm selfcutting threads max. depth in display 9 mm

66.0

15.0

61.0 50.5

DEIF A/S

41.0

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Installation instructions

Dimensions are given in mm.

DEIF A/S

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