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Wednesday Sept. 12, 2012 Vol XII, Edition 22
REMEMBERING 9/11
NATION PAGE 18
GATOR BACK
FROM INJURY
SPORTS PAGE 11
ZUKERBERG: ITS GREAT
TIME TO DOUBLE DOWN
BUSINESS PAGE 10
SMALLER MEMORIALS ON SEPT. 11 ANNIVERSARY
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
A Jordanian man working at United Parcel
Services San Bruno hub was discriminated
by coworkers as a terrorist who might blow
up the building and involuntarily transferred
after reporting the harassment that included
assaults with rocks and bottles, according to a
lawsuit led on his behalf.
The suit filed by the U.S. Equal
Employment Opportunity Commission on
Tuesday charges the global shipping company
with violating federal law by allowing dis-
crimination of Talal Alfaour and illegally
retaliated against him after he reported the
behavior to the company and his union.
Alfaour faced egregious and intolerable
harassment at UPS but remains employed
there in hopes of remedying the situation, said
William Tamayo, regional attorney for the
EEOC in San Francisco, in a prepared
announcement of the ling.
That remedy includes monetary damages
on behalf of Alfaour, training on anti-discrim-
ination laws and posting anti-discrimination
notices at the work site.
Alfaour, who is Muslim, joined UPS in the
South San Francisco center in 1995 as a
loader and revenue worker. Since at least
2004, Alfaour was physically and verbally
assaulted by coworkers and supervisors who
called him Dr. Bomb, Al-Qaida and
Taliban, according to the EOCC.
Alfaour reported that a supervisor told him
he could never work with hazardous materials
because you are a terrorist and you are going
to blow up the building. The suit also states
UPS suedfor discrimination
San Bruno hub employee claims coworkers called him a terrorist
Health care district
faces odd election
Challenger, already on the
board, seeks its dissolution
By Bill Silverfarb
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
An odd election is brewing for three seats on the Sequoia
Healthcare District board that pits three current members in a
race for just two open seats.
Kim Grifns and Katie Kanes seats are up for re-election
MICHELLE DURAND/DAILY JOURNAL
Opponents of a proposed new jail in San Mateo County expressed their concern over plans during the public comment
period of the Board of Supervisors meeting yesterday morning.
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Ongoing site preparation for a new
San Mateo County jail hasnt dampened
opponents who again gathered at the
Board of Supervisors meeting to
demand they focus on rehabilitation and
programming rather than a new incarcer-
ation facility.
The standing-room group, a mixture
of several organized groups and some
individuals who hoisted signs, said the
supervisors risk their political careers by
continuing forward with the jail and
demanded they rethink $44 million in
planning funds at the Sept. 25 county
budget hearing. By turns for nearly two
hours, the opponents also knocked the
jail plan as a way to incarcerate more
minorities who can be used as free labor,
generate federal money and avoid strate-
gizing ways to cut recidivism.
This is the agenda of the 1 percent,
said Sandy Sanders who said money
spent on jails is money that wont go for
more important needs, like schools.
The crowd has made similar
entreaties, often when the issue is on the
board agenda, and is undaunted by the
county not heeding its demands.
Were going to keep coming back
until you stop the jail, said Emily Harris
of Californians United for a Responsible
Budget.
Harris suggested the county follow the
example of Contra Costa County which
decided not to go forward with a jail.
The county signed off on a new incar-
ceration facility on the former Chemical
Jail opponents rally at county center
Vocal group makes its dissent known to Board of Supervisors
See UPS, Page 22
See JAIL, Page 23
City delays vote
on school move
Residents argue merits of Crystal Springs
Uplands Schools plan to expand in Belmont
By Bill Silverfarb
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
The Belmont City Council listened for hours last night as to
why it should or should not allow a private school to expand
on land that is currently occupied by a vacant ofce building.
After hearing multiple reports related to trafc, noise, eco-
nomic benets and the environment related to Crystal Springs
Uplands Schools desire to build a new middle school on
Davis Drive, the council then heard from about 40 members of
the public on the issue. Many people expressed opposition to
the project based on a problem the city already has bad traf-
c conditions on Ralston Avenue.
The council listened so long, however, it decided not to
make a decision on the matter last night but voted instead to
table the public hearing until its Oct. 9 meeting, giving it
another month to weigh the merits of the plan.
Many residents said the school would make trafc on
Ralston even worse despite multiple trafc studies that indi-
cate otherwise.
The term eminent domain was even brought up as the school
has indicated it would be willing to build a right-hand turn lane
See RACE, Page 22
See SCHOOL, Page 23
FOR THE RECORD 2 Wednesday Sept. 12, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
The San Mateo Daily Journal
800 S. Claremont St., Suite 210, San Mateo, CA 94402
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Basketball player
Yao Ming is 32.
This Day in History
Thought for the Day
1942
During World War II, a German U-boat
off West Africa torpedoed the RMS
Laconia, which was carrying Italian
prisoners of war, British soldiers and
civilians. The German crew, joined by
other U-boats, began rescue operations.
Conscience without
judgment is superstition.
Benjamin Whichcote, English philosopher (1609-1683)
Actor Ian Holm is
81.
Singer Jennifer
Hudson is 31.
Birthdays
REUTERS
Dancers perform before the Future Cinema outdoor screening of the 1978 lm Grease in Barnes, southwest London.
Wednesday: Mostly cloudy in the morning
then becoming sunny. Highs in the lower to
mid 60s. Southwest winds 5 to 15 mph.
Wednesday night: Mostly clear in the
evening then becoming partly cloudy. Lows
in the lower 50s. West winds around 5 mph.
Thursday: Partly cloudy in the morning
then becoming sunny. Highs in the 60s.
Light winds...Becoming northwest around 5 mph in the after-
noon.
Thursday night: Mostly clear in the evening then becoming
mostly cloudy. Patchy fog after midnight. Lows in the lower
50s. Northwest winds 5 to 10 mph.
Friday: Mostly cloudy in the morning then becoming sunny.
Patchy fog. Highs in the 60s.
Friday night through Sunday: Mostly cloudy.
Local Weather Forecast
Lotto
The Daily Derby race winners are Winning Spirit,
No. 9, in rst place; Gold Rush, No. 1, in second
place; a..nd Solid Gold, No. 10, in third place.The
race time was clocked at 1:42.98.
(Answers tomorrow)
ABHOR YOUNG CREAMY RATHER
Yesterdays
Jumbles:
Answer: After he asked the movers a question, he
said CARRY ON
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
GNART
KROCO
YONTHR
DMELID
2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
All Rights Reserved.
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here:
9 0 8
5 11 20 33 36 11
Mega number
Sept. 11 Mega Millions
7 10 12 28 39
Fantasy Five
Daily three midday
6 8 6 7
Daily Four
5 4 5
Daily three evening
In 1814, the Battle of North Point took place in Maryland dur-
ing the War of 1812 as American forces slowed the advance of
British troops on Baltimore.
In 1846, Elizabeth Barrett secretly married Robert Browning at
St. Marylebone Church in London.
In 1910, Gustav Mahlers Symphony No. 8, popularly known
as the Symphony of a Thousand, had its premiere in Munich,
Germany, with Mahler conducting.
In 1938, Adolf Hitler demanded the right of self-determination
for the Sudeten Germans in Czechoslovakia.
In 1943, German paratroopers took Benito Mussolini from the
hotel where he was being held by the Italian government.
In 1953, Massachusetts Sen. John F. Kennedy married
Jacqueline Lee Bouvier in Newport, R.I.
In 1960, Democratic presidential candidate John F. Kennedy
addressed questions about his Roman Catholic faith, telling a
Southern Baptist group, I do not speak for my church on pub-
lic matters, and the church does not speak for me.
In 1962, in a speech at Rice University in Houston, President
John F. Kennedy reafrmed his support for the manned space
program, declaring: We choose to go to the moon. We choose
to go to the moon in this decade and do the other things, not
because they are easy, but because they are hard.
In 1972, the situation comedy Maude premiered on CBS.
In 1974, Emperor Haile Selassie was deposed by Ethiopias
military after ruling for 58 years.
In 1977, South African black student leader Steve Biko died
while in police custody, triggering an international outcry.
In 1986, Joseph Cicippio, the acting comptroller at the
American University in Beirut, was kidnapped (he was
released in Dec. 1991).
Actor Dickie Moore (Our Gang) is 87. Actor Freddie Jones
is 85. Country singer George Jones is 81. Actress Linda Gray is
72. Singer Maria Muldaur is 70. Actor Joe Pantoliano is 61.
Singer-musician Gerry Beckley (America) is 60. Rock musician
Neil Peart (Rush) is 60. Actor Peter Scolari is 57. Kansas Gov.
Sam Brownback is 56. Actress Rachel Ward is 55. Actress Amy
Yasbeck is 50. Rock musician Norwood Fisher (Fishbone) is 47.
Actor Darren E. Burrows is 46. Rock singer-musician Ben Folds
(Ben Folds Five) is 46. Actor-comedian Louis C.K. is 45. Rock
musician Larry LaLonde (Primus) is 44. Actor Josh Hopkins is
42. Actor Paul Walker is 39.
Lucille Ball (1911-1989) became a red-
head at age 30, 10 years before she
starred in I Love Lucy (1951-1957).
She was a natural brunette.
***
The ashes of Wisconsin born artist
Georgia OKeeffe (1887-1986) are scat-
tered at Ghost Ranch, a retreat in New
Mexico where OKeeffe had a summer
home. Some of her most famous land-
scape paintings were painted at the
ranch.
***
Tiny Tim, born Herbert Khaury (1932-
1996), became famous when he
appeared on Rowan and Martins
Laugh-In (1968-1973) and sang Tip-
Toe Through the Tulips in a falsetto
voice while playing the ukulele. The
song became a hit single.
***
Sideburns are named after General
Ambrose Burnside (1824-1881), a
politician in Rhode Island and a Civil
War general who made the facial hair
style popular.
***
In a bout of Sumo wrestling, the rst
wrestler to touch the ground with any
part of his body other than his feet loses
the bout. Or, the rst wrestler to touch
the ground outside the circle loses.
***
Do you know where a pistil, stamen and
receptacles can be found? See answer at
end.
***
Author Margaret Mitchell (1900-1949)
wrote the majority of her novel Gone
With the Wind (1936) while living in
apartment number 1 at 990 Peachtree
St., Atlanta, Ga. The building is now a
historic city landmark that pays homage
to Mitchell.
***
When young Billy Batson shouts
Shazam! he gets struck by a magic
lightning bolt and becomes Captain
Marvel, an adult super hero.
***
The word platypus means at-footed
in Greek.
***
Flourish and Blotts Bookstore, the
Leaky Cauldron and Quality Quidditch
Supplies are shops in Diagon Alley, a
shopping area for witches and wizards in
the Harry Potter series of books.
***
Ginsu knives were one of the rst prod-
ucts to be sold on infomercials. The
knives were demonstrated as a kitchen
cutting tool that could cut through a nail,
a tin can and a radiator hose, yet still
slice a tomato paper thin!
***
American labor leader Jimmy Hoffa
(1913-1975?) was last seen at a restau-
rant in Bloomeld Hills, Mich. July 30,
1975. He was never found. It was
assumed that he was killed by the Maa.
Hoffa was legally declared dead in 1982.
***
The worlds largest single-pane window
is at the Monterey Bay Aquarium. The
13-inch thick acrylic window is 17 feet
high and 56 feet long. It is the window to
the Outer Bay aquarium exhibit, which
holds 1.2 million gallons of seawater.
***
Kathryn Beaumont (born 1938) was the
voice of Alice in Disneys Alice in
Wonderland (1951) and the voice of
Wendy in Peter Pan (1953). Kathryn
had her schooling at the Disney Studio
lots so she could be on call during pro-
duction of the movies.
***
Marty McFly in Back to the Future
(1985) was originally played by Eric
Stoltz (born 1961). One-third of the
movie was lmed with Stoltz as the lead
role, however the producers felt he was-
nt right for the part and hired Michael J.
Fox (born 1961) instead.
***
Spuds MacKenzie was the ultimate
party animal with an entourage of beau-
tiful women in commercials for Bud
Light. Spuds was played by a Bull
Terrier named Honey Tree Evil Eye
(1983-1993).
Answer: They are all parts of a ower.
Know It All is by Kerry McArdle. It runs in
the weekend and Wednesday editions of the
Daily Journal. Questions? Comments? Email
knowitall@smdailyjournal.com or call 344-
5200 ext. 114.
4 6 22 29 47 27
Mega number
Sept. 8 Super Lotto Plus
3
Wednesday Sept. 12, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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Centrally located near two major hospitals
SAN CARLOS
DUI. A man was arrested for driving under the
inuence on Belmont Avenue and Chestnut
Street before 1:26 a.m. on Sunday, Sept. 9.
DUI. A man was cited for driving under the
inuence on the 1900 block of Eaton Avenue
before 2:15 a.m. on Saturday, Sept. 8.
Arrest. A man was arrested for burglary, fraud
and resisting arrest on the 1100 block of
Industrial Road before 3:41 p.m. on Friday,
Sept. 7.
Suspicious circumstances. A vehicle was tam-
pered with on the 2000 block of Belle Avenue
before 5 p.m. on Thursday, Sept. 6.
Indecent exposure. A man was arrested for
exposing himself on El Camino Real and San
Carlos Avenue before 8:30 p.m. on Monday,
Sept. 3.
Warrant arrest. A man was arrested for an out-
standing $15,000 warrant on the 1000 block of
East San Carlos Avenue before 12:57 a.m. on
Monday, Sept. 3.
FOSTER CITY
Grand theft. Approximately $150,000 worth of
property was stolen from a residence on Bounty
Drive before 12:02 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 8.
Disturbance. A man from Hawaii was arrested
after a ght broke out in the lobby at Crowne
Plaza on Chess Drive before 2:03 a.m. Saturday,
Sept. 8.
Grand theft. An estimated $3,600 in stereo
equipment was taken from a boat at Rain Cycle
Storage on Foster City Boulevard before 10:29
a.m. Monday, Sept. 3.
Stolen vehicle. A vehicle was stolen and later
located with the engine running but missing
vital parts. It was towed from the corner of
Polaris Avenue and Celestial Lane before 10:41
a.m. Monday, Sept. 3.
Police reports
No pirates allowed
A man with a parrot on his shoulder was
seen harassing patrons of a restaurant on
El Camino Real in Redwood City before
2:24 p.m. on Saturday, Sept. 8.
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
A 92-year-old Washington state woman is
suing Burlingame-based Splendid Products
which distributed salmonella-contaminated
mangoes that she claims left her hospitalized
for weeks.
The suit on behalf of Dorothy Pearce, of
Stanwood, Wash., holds Splendid liable for
distributing Daniella mangoes identied by
the Center for Disease Control and Prevention
as the source of a nationwide outbreak last
month.
According to the personal injury suit led in
western district court, Pearce ate a Daniella
mango and fell ill Aug. 20. For two days, her
symptoms included nausea, vomiting, diar-
rhea and severe stomach cramping that led to
her hospitalization. Lab tests conrmed sal-
monella Braenderup and, as of Sept. 5, Pearce
was still hospitalized, according to her
attorney William D. Marler.
The suit claims Pears
suffered severe physi-
cal and emotional
injuries and sub-
stantial econom-
ic loss.
S p l e n d i d
Products did
not respond to
an inquiry for
comment.
Marler said
to date the
contamination
has sickened
204 people in the
United States and 21
in Canada.
The up to 1 million recalled man-
goes were packed in Mexico
and distributed by
Splendid Products
between July 12
and Aug. 29.
The Mexican
manufacturer and
producer of the
mangoes has yet
to be identied,
according to the
suit.
S a l mo n e l l a
infections can be
l i f e- t hr eat eni ng,
especially to those
with weak immune sys-
tems such as infants and the
elderly.
Burlingame company sued
over contaminated mangoes
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO A federal
appeals court blocked
implementation of San
Franciscos cellphone
radiation warning law
pending the outcome of an
industry challenge.
The ordinance,
believed to be the rst of
its kind in the nation,
requires cellphone dealers
to tell customers the devices
may expose them to cancer-
causing radiation levels.
It was scheduled to take
effect last October but it has
been on hold because of court challenges.
The 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals on
Monday barred enforcement while
the case continues. In its brief,
unpublished opinion, the court
reversed a trial court judge who
said the city could
compel cellphone
companies to dis-
tribute a fact
sheet because
its Board of
Supervisors concluded
there is debate in the scien-
tic community about the
health effects of cell-
phones.
The ordinance requires retailers to give cell-
phone buyers a fact sheet saying the World
Health Organization classifies cellphone
radio-frequency emissions as possible car-
cinogens.
The cellphone industrys lobbying group
led a lawsuit in 2010 seeking to invalidate
the citys ordinance. The industry claims that
the citys requirements go beyond disclosures
that are purely factual and uncontroversial
and stray into disputed views of cellphones.
The disclosures would advise consumers on
what to do if they want to reduce cellphone
emissions.
This language could prove to be interpret-
ed by consumers as expressing San
Franciscos opinion that using cellphones is
dangerous, the three judges concluded in the
unsigned ruling.
Court blocks San Francisco cellphone warning law
4
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Wednesday Sept. 12, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL/STATE
Amy Brooks Colin Flynn Hal Coehlo
consultant
Al Stanley Jim Esenwen
Family Owned & Operated
Established: 1949
Gas prices stabilizing after record highs
Motorists in Northern California are seeing a slowdown in
the rise in gas prices after a month of volatility at the pump,
according to AAA Northern California, which tracks gas
prices as a service to consumers.
In San Mateo, AAA reports the average price for a gallon of
gas is up ve cents to $4.24. Californias average for a gallon
of regular, unleaded gasoline is $4.17, up seven cents since last
months AAA report Aug. 14. Thats 22 cents more than
Californias average price on this date last year. Among all 50
states, California has the second highest state average price for
regular, unleaded gasoline. Hawaii is rst at $4.37, according
to AAA.
Northern California gas prices are now averaging $4.18, up
eight cents from last month. In the San Francisco Bay Area,
motorists can expect to pay an average price of $4.25, which
is a seven-cent increase. The national average price of $3.84 is
up by 14 cents, which is 18 cents more than the national price
on this date last year, when it was $3.66, according to AAA.
Conicting economic factors last week resulted in little
change in oil prices. Continued bearish economic news, both
domestically and internationally, pressured prices lower, while
tight supplies and rumors of a potential third round of quanti-
tative easing by the Federal Reserve, designed to stimulate the
U.S. economy, pressured prices higher, according to AAA.
Man pleads not guilty to touching child in store
A man charged with touching the buttocks of a 6-year-old
girl shopping with her family at a San Bruno Target store
pleaded not guilty to committing a lewd
act on a child.
Police arrested Glenn Albrecht, 39, on
Aug. 26 after he reportedly came back into
the store after the incident and was identi-
ed by the child. The girls father struck
Albrecht and held him until police arrived.
Police reported Albrecht was wearing a
shirt emblazoned with the slogan Rub me
for luck and a search of his home turned
up a life-sized doll of a female child.
Albrecht remains in custody in lieu of $100,000 bail.
Local briefs
Glenn Albrecht
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LOS ANGELES Californias com-
munity colleges are reorienting their regis-
tration system to give priority to students
who are focused on earning a degree or
transferring to a four-year college.
The governing board of the 112-college
system on Monday voted in favor of the
plan, which will go into effect in 2014.
Under the system, students in good aca-
demic standing who have not exceeded
100 units will be given priority to register
for classes.
The policy comes as colleges are cut-
ting class offerings due to budget reduc-
tions and students are nding it hard to get
courses they need to complete their asso-
ciates degrees and either start their
careers to transfer to earn a bachelors
degree.
It marks a shift in the orientation of
community colleges, which have histori-
cally been places where failing students
could repeat courses or community resi-
dents could easily take courses for person-
al enrichment.
State two-year colleges alter registration policy
By Chris Cooney
BAY CITY NEWS SERVICE
Gov. Jerry Brown was at Oracle
Headquarters in Redwood Shores
Tuesday morning to sign legislation cre-
ating a new department that aims to
strengthen economic ties with foreign
trading partners.
Assembly Bill 2012 designates the
Governors Office of Business and
Economic Development or GO-Biz
as a central ofce of contact for eco-
nomic development between businesses
in California and other countries, such as
China, Mexico and South Korea.
The bill paves the way for California
to ofcially welcome visiting delega-
tions and re-open the states foreign
trade ofces in key trading countries that
had to be closed in 2003 due to budget
cutbacks.
Bill Wunderman,
CEO of the business
advocate group Bay
Area Council, said at
Tuesday mornings
signing ceremony
that the new GO-Biz
office will partner
with private
California firms
wishing to bolster
relations with foreign trading partners,
and help a variety of businesses in the
state form important economic ties with
Pacic Rim nations.
This bill shows that California is
open for business, Wunderman said.
Wunderman said that California
has the ninth largest economy in the
world, and added that strengthening
business ties with countries enjoying
strong positive growth like China
would help stimulate the states eco-
nomic growth as well.
Chinas economy is growing and
growing, Wunderman said. It would be
so wonderful to grow together.
Assembly Speaker John Perez one
of AB 2012s sponsors said that the
newly established GO-Biz ofce will
offer a one-stop shop for California
businesses wanting to foster relation-
ships with overseas entities.
This is progress, this is economic
development, Perez said. This is what
the business community in California
has been waiting to enjoy.
Gov. Brown said that California is
embedded in the world economy, and
that the bold move to re-open foreign
trade ofces and encourage international
trade and investment will ultimately help
California move from economic recov-
ery to economic prosperity.
Were making progress, folks. Were
making progress, Brown said.
Brown creates economic
development department
Jerry Brown
6
Wednesday Sept. 12, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL/STATE/NATION
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opportunity?
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CITY GOVERNMENT
The Redwood City Council
approved a controversial plan for a
nine-home subdivision on Finger
Avenue after moving the houses on
three parcels away from the street
and the top of the creek bank, as rec-
ommended by city staff. The propos-
al calls for demolishing six existing homes at 50, 80 and 88
Finger Ave. and replacing them with nine houses and a U-
shaped private road on the 1.69-acre site. The developer and
opposing residents are also working on an acquisition deal
for some of the property.
The Foster City Council voted 4-1 Monday night to
approve the sale of an 11-acre city-owned property to the
North Peninsula Jewish Campus for $20 million. The land
is adjacent to City Hall. Mayor Art Kiesel voted against the
land sale.
By Kevin Freking
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON Both parties are
using a brief pre-election session of
Congress to make campaign appeals to
returning veterans.
Senate Democrats are pushing
President Barack Obamas proposed $1
billion Veterans Jobs Corps to relieve
high unemployment among servicemen
and women returning from Iraq and
Afghanistan. House Republicans are
pushing a bill making it a crime to ben-
efit from lying about military services
or awards.
Lawmakers in both parties agreed
this week to come up with more money
to help the Veterans Administration
reduce a disability claims backlog.
Obama proposed a job corps for vet-
erans last February that would put
place them in jobs restoring public
lands and beefing up local police and
fire departments. It cleared a prelimi-
nary test vote Tuesday, as was expect-
ed, but aides said progress could easily
unravel as lawmakers negotiate what
amendments and how many of them
will be allowed.
Although the legislation is not
expected to become law this session, it
gives lawmakers a chance to display
their support for the nations 21 mil-
lion-plus veterans before Congress
adjourns for the campaign season.
The unemployment rate for veterans
of Iraq and Afghanistan has been trend-
ing lower in recent months, but hit a
bump last month. Joblessness among
them was nearly 11 percent in August
compared, compared with an 8.1 per-
cent jobless rate nationwide.
Sen. Bill Nelson of Florida said the
problem is likely to grow as troops are
withdrawn from Afghanistan.
For the troops, when they come
home, the fight is not over. Theres
another fight when they get back home
to America, said Nelson, the bills
lead sponsor who is in a tough re-elec-
tion contest. We need to give them as
many opportunities as possible to suc-
ceed when they get back home here in
America.
Ruth Lise Locatelli (Harmegnies)
Ruth Lise Locatelli (Harmegnies) died
Sept. 9, 2012 after a short battle with
leukemia.
Born in 1936 in Canada, Ruth was the
oldest of ve children. She received her
nursing degree before marrying her hus-
band of 53 years, Tarcisio, and relocat-
ing to California in 1959. She was a reg-
istered nurse and provided loving care to
obstetrical patients at Sequoia Hospital
in Redwood City and Mercy San Juan in
Carmichael.
Ruth raised two daughters (Julia
Locatelli and Annalise Locatelli
OConnor), and
loved her three
grandchildren (Jason
Varni, Marissa Varni
and Nicholas
OConnor).
Ruth and her hus-
band moved to Grass
Valley in 1983. She
volunteered for the
Interfaith Food Ministry, Animal Save
Thrift Store and Sierra Nevada
Memorial Foundation. Ruth loved trav-
eling, cooking, shopping, attending
retired nurses luncheons and gardening,
especially multiplying geraniums.
She is survived by her husband, two
daughters, son-in-law (Brian
OConnor), three grandchildren, two
brothers and one sister.
In lieu of owers, memorial gifts may
be made to the Interfaith Food Ministry,
Animal Save or the Sierra Nevada
Memorial Hospital Foundation.
A memorial service will be conducted
noon Sunday, Sept. 16 at the Biblical
Gardens on Auburn Road in Grass
Valley followed by a light lunch.
Congress courting veterans before election
For the troops,when they come home,the ght
is not over.Theres another ght when they get
back home to America....We need to give them
as many opportunities as possible to succeed
when they get back home here in America.
Sen. Bill Nelson
First group of delayed young deportees approved
WASHINGTON Just three week after the Obama admin-
istration started accepting applications from young illegal immi-
grants seeking to avoid deportation and get a work permit, the
government already has approved some of the roughly 72,000
applications the government has received.
The Homeland Security Department said Tuesday that a small
group of applications has been approved and those immigrants
are being notied this week about the decision. The department
did not say how many applications had been approved.
The rst wave of approvals comes months head of DHS own
internal estimates of how long the application process for the
administrations Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals pro-
gram could take and less than 60 days before the Nov. 6 elec-
tions. According to an internal DHS document obtained by the
Associated Press, the departments Citizenship and Immigration
Services had estimated that each application could take several
months to be completed.
Following a thorough, individualized case review, USCIS
has now begun notifying individuals of the determination on
their deferral requests, DHS spokesman Peter Boogaard said in
a statement.
Around the nation
Obituary
STATE/NATION 7
Wednesday Sept. 12, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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By Anick Jesdanun
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK After weeks of
speculation, anticipation and a dose
of hype, Apple is widely expected to
announce a new smartphone at an
event in San Francisco on
Wednesday.
Apple isnt saying anything about
the topic of the event, but the email
invitation it sent to reporters con-
tains a shadow in the shape of a 5
a nod to the iPhone 5. It is being
held in San Francisco at Yerba
Buena Center for the Arts Theater,
where Apple has held many product
launches.
The new model is expected to
work with fourth-generation, or 4G,
cellular networks. That capability is
something Samsungs Galaxy S III
and many other iPhone rivals
already have. A bigger iPhone
screen is also possible. The new
model will likely go on sale in a
week or two.
Apple Inc. also plans to update its
phone software this fall and will
ditch Google Inc.s mapping service
for its own, as a rivalry between the
two companies intensies.
In a related development, Google
said Tuesday that it is releasing a
new YouTube app for the iPhone
and the iPad. The changes come
amid the expiration of a ve-year
licensing agreement that had estab-
lished YouTube as one of the built-in
applications in Apples mobile
devices.
Still unknown is whether Apple
will announce a smaller version of
its iPad on Wednesday.
Apple dominates the market for
tablet computers, shipping seven out
of every 10 tablets worldwide in the
second quarter, according to
research rm IHS iSuppli. Rivals
have been trying to compete by pro-
ducing smaller, cheaper models
such as Amazons Kindle Fire. A
mini iPad would challenge those
relative newcomers.
Sales of Apples iPhones are still
strong, though the company lost the
lead in smartphones to Samsung this
year. Samsung Electronics Co. ben-
eted from having its Galaxy S III
out in the U.S. in June, while Apple
was still selling an iPhone model it
released last October. A new iPhone
will allow Apple to recapture the
attention and the revenue.
New iPhone nears as holiday lineups unveiled
REUTERS FILE PHOTO
Apple CEO Tim Cook speaks at the Apple headquarters in Cupertino.Apple
Inc. is expected to reveal the iPhone 5 during a media event on today in
San Francisco.
1. Giveit toyour kids
sotheystoptakingyours...
Every parent,aunt and uncle knows that no toy
in the history of toys has ever been as appealing
to a kid as an iPhone.They are shiny, they have
games and grown-ups use them for important
things. More importantly, they are either off-
limits or doled out in limited quantities as a
reward for,say,sitting still for a minute.Load up
your old iPhone with games and give it to a
deserving child in your life.
2. ...or toyour momso
shecannally see the light
Alternately,if a Luddite adult has been thinking
of taking the plunge into the world of
smartphones,your old iPhone may help him or
her get over the hump.If you have an iPhone 4
or 4S, you might also nd someone whos still
hanging on to an earlier model and give them
the gift of an upgrade.You may just buy a friend
for life (or at least until iPhone 6 comes out).
3. Useit asateeny-tinyiPad
Youll be able to watch videos, send email and
search Wikipedia for random facts to end
cocktail-party disagreements with your
decommissionediPhoneaslongasyouhave
aWi-Fi connection.Theresevenacamera,which
means you can avoid being that guy (or gal) at
the concert whos turning heads for taking
photos with an iPad.
4. Donatetocharity
Several charitiesacceptoldphonesfordonation,
though its worth remembering that these
groups likely wont physically give your old
phones to people in need. Rather, they work
with phone recyclers and sell your donated
phones to them.
AnonprotgroupcalledCell PhonesforSoldiers
will take your gently usedphone and sell it to
recycling company ReCellular. It will then use
the proceeds to buy calling cards for soldiers.
The National Coalition Against Domestic
Violence works with another recycling group
in a similar manner. About 60 percent of the
phones it collects are refurbished and resold.
The money goes toward supporting the
coalition. The remaining 40 percent of the
phones are recycled, according to the groups
website. It pays for shipping if you are mailing
three or more phones.
There are a few more suggestions from New
Yorks Department of Environmental
Conservation at:
http://www.dec.ny.gov/chemical/8818.html .
5. AlarmClock
Do you still use that old radio alarm you bought
foryourcollegedormroominthe20thcentury?
Jointhe21stcenturybyturningyouroldiPhone
into an alarm clock.Hide it in a different spot in
your bed each night for an added challenge.
6. Sell, sell, sell!
Join the eBay hordes and sell your phone for a
fewhundredbucksif youcan.Therewill likelybe
a ood of the gadgets soon after people start
getting their new phones, so it might make
sense to wait a little.
AcompanycalledGazelle,meanwhile,will make
an offer for your old phone based on its
condition, your phone carrier and other
information.A32gigabyteiPhone4SonVerizon
Wireless, for example, was recently going for
$237 if its in good condition and $90 if its
broken.
Glyde.com also offers to help you resell your old
phone. A recent check showed the above 4S
getting roughly $325 to $350 after fees are
deducted provided there is a buyer.A speed
salethat guarantees to sell it in seven days will
get the seller slightly less money.
7.TradeinatGameStop
The video game retailer offers cash or store
credit for old iPhones (along with iPods and
iPads).The service is only available in stores and
not online.A 32 gigabyte iPhone 4S on Verizon
will get you up to $335 in store credit or up to
$268 in cash.
8. Streammusic
Stick that baby in a speaker dock, spring for a
Pandora subscription ($36 per year) or Spotify
($10 per month) and bam, you have a stereo.
Or try SoundCloud. Although its meant to let
you create and share music with people,its also
a good place to listen to DJs you like or discover
new ones.TuneIn,meanwhile,will let you listen
to online radio stations playing music, sports,
news or talk shows.
9. Keepasabackupin
caseyouloseyour fancynewone
Nearly one-third of cellphone owners have had
theirgadgetslostorstolen,accordingtoarecent
survey from Pew Internet & Pew Internet &
American Life Project.
10. Useasacamera
At its core, a decommissioned iPhone is a hard
drive with a camera. Snap photos with it. No
Canon needed.You can also use the iPhone to
movephotosandotherlesfromonecomputer
to another.
11. RecyclewithApple
AppleInc.sownrecyclingprogramwill giveyou
an Apple gift card if it is determined to have a
monetary value.A 32 gigabyte iPhone 4S with
some light scratches but in good working
condition was recently estimated at $280.Thats
higher than Gazelle, but youll have to spend
the money at Apple.The company also accepts
broken phones for recycling but you wont get
any money for them.
11 things to do with your old iPhone
NATION/WORLD 8
Wednesday Sept. 12, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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www.sanmateoexpo.org
By Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON It sounds like
good news: Annual premiums for
job-based family health plans went
up only 4 percent this year.
But hang on to your wallets.
Premiums averaged $15,745, with
employees paying more than $4,300
of that, a glaring reminder that the
nations problem of unaffordable
medical care is anything but solved.
The annual employer survey
released Tuesday by two major
research groups also highlighted
another disturbing trend: employees
at companies with many low-wage
workers pay more money for
skimpier insurance than what their
counterparts at upscale rms get.
Overall, its historically a very
moderate increase in premiums,
said Drew Altman, president of the
Kaiser Family Foundation, which
conducted the survey with the
Health Research & Educational
Trust.
He quickly added: But even a
moderate increase feels really big to
workers when their wages are at or
falling. The rise in premiums easily
outpaced workers raises and ina-
tion.
Following a 9-percent hike in pre-
miums last year, the 2012 increase
quickly became fodder for the polit-
ical debate. Republicans said
President Barack Obamas promises
to control health care costs ring hol-
low in light of the ndings.
But the most signicant cost-con-
trol measures in Obamas law have
yet to take effect, and the presidents
big push to cover the uninsured
doesnt start until 2014. Those
measures include a new tax on the
most expensive insurance plans and
a powerful board to keep Medicare
spending manageable.
Trying to head off critics, the
administration issued a report esti-
mating that consumers have saved
$2 billion as a result of the health
care law. Thats due to a combina-
tion of insurance rebates for
employers and individual policy
holders, as well as closer state over-
sight of proposed rate increases,
facilitated by Obamas law.
Still, the Kaiser survey shows pre-
miums for job-based family cover-
age rose by nearly $2,400 since
2009 when Obama took ofce, with
a corresponding increase of nearly
$800 for employee-only coverage.
We arent happy to see any
increase in health insurance premi-
ums, said Gary Cohen, head of the
administrations Center for
Consumer Information and
Insurance Oversight, adding that
ofcials are heartened it was only
a modest rise this year and look for-
ward to slowing costs as more pro-
visions of the health care law take
effect.
Most independent experts say the
fact that premiums keep rising faster
than overall ination reects under-
lying problems with the health care
system that have frustrated policy-
makers of both parties for years, as
well as corporate benet managers.
Premiums for family
health plans hit $15K
By Zaheer Babar
and Adil Jawad
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LAHORE, Pakistan Factory
fires in two of Pakistans major
cities killed 45 people and injured
dozens more on Tuesday, including
some who had to break through
barred windows and leap to the
ground to escape the ames, said
ofcials and survivors.
Workers recounted how their col-
leagues were trapped behind
blocked exits, and reghters said
that one reason why the blazes were
so deadly is that the buildings a
shoe factory in the eastern city of
Lahore and a garment factory in the
southern port of Karachi lacked
clear escape routes.
Such safety issues are common
through Pakistan, where buildings
also lack emergency equipment like
alarms and sprinklers and municipal
rules are rarely enforced.
The re that swept through the
four-story shoe factory in Lahore
killed 25 people, some from burns
and some from suffocation, said
senior police ofcer Multan Khan.
The factory was illegally set up in a
residential part of the city.
It broke out when people in the
building were trying to start their
generator after the electricity went
out. Sparks from the generator made
contact with chemicals used to
make the shoes, igniting the blaze.
Pakistan faces widespread black-
outs, and many people use genera-
tors to provide electricity for their
houses or to run businesses.
Factory fires in Pakistan kill 45
REUTERS
Residents gather while reghters try to extinguish a re at a shoe factory
in Lahore, Pakistan.
By Sam Hanenel
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON The massive
teachers strike in Chicago offers a
high-profile test for the nations
teachers unions, which have seen
their political inuence threatened as
a growing reform movement seeks
to improve ailing public schools.
The reforms include expanding
charter schools, getting private com-
panies involved with failing schools
and linking teacher evaluations to
student test scores.
Union leaders are taking a major
stand on teacher evaluations, one of
the key issues in the Chicago dis-
pute. If they lose there, it could have
ripple effects around the country.
The American Federation of
Teachers and the National Education
Association the nations two
largest teachers unions have
been playing defense in jurisdictions
around the country as Republicans
and Democrats alike seek greater
concessions in a bid to improve ail-
ing public schools.
After decades of growth in mem-
bership and inuence, the unions
now are in a weaker position, said
Rick Hess of the American
Enterprise Institute, a nonpartisan
think tank.
They are playing on more hostile
terrain and they are facing opponents
the likes of which they have not had
to face before, Hess said.
Chicago teacher strike poses test for unions
OPINION 9
Wednesday Sept. 12, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
President Obama
Editor,
I particularly appreciated the analogy
of the neighbor buying ve cars (in
response to Randy Swans letter Tax the
rich in the Sept. 11 edition of the Daily
Journal). I think thats perfect. He has a
job where he can afford ve new cars
and the security in that job to know that
hes going to be there a while longer.
The auto industry is alive, well and pro-
ducing vehicles. The economy has
turned the corner and we are on the road
to full recovery. Thank you, President
Obama! You are obviously on the right
track!
JD Rhoads
San Mateo
Earth to women,
are you out there?
Editor,
Watching woman after woman come
forward at the Democratic National
Convention whining about a war on
women in this country was a complete
insult to many men in America. This rant
culminated with a completely self-
absorbed woman who took a swing at
imaginary evil men keeping her from
abortion, contraceptives and health care.
Sandra Fluke and many women like her
really need to get over themselves.
Ladies, the majority of men dont care
two cents about your bodies or what you
do to them and we are denitely not
at war with them.
As if this is the main issue that needs
our immediate attention in this country
right now. Really? Nobody is threatening
your need to have unlimited access to
abortions and contraceptives. What we
do ask is that we not have to pay for
your unlimited access to abortions and
contraceptives. Cause you see, some of
us dont believe the same things you
believe and dont really want our tax
money being spent on your choices. So,
here is the bottom line. We wont get in
the middle of your business concerning
abortion, contraceptives and your body if
you agree not to get in the middle of our
wallets and make us pay for it. Deal?
Christopher P. Conway
San Mateo
Support for Israel
Editor,
Is it just me or was the kerfufe at the
Democratic Convention on Jerusalem as
Israels capital much ado about nothing?
I support Israels declarations supporting
Jerusalem as its capital. I favor support-
ive language in both party platforms.
What bothers me is pandering attempts
by some in the GOP to turn support for
Israel, an issue with overwhelming
bipartisan support, into some sort of lit-
mus test or wedge issue. Its just silly.
Despite empty promises in every presi-
dential administration since 1967, has
the U.S. Embassy moved from Tel Aviv
to Jerusalem? Has international support
for Israel increased? Id almost say quite
the opposite.
Shame on those who try to make polit-
ical hay by attempting to divide us. To
my friends in the GOP, stop trying to
turn support for Israel into a divisive
issue. It isnt. American leaders in both
parties overwhelmingly support Israel
where it counts as do the vast majority of
American voters. There are real dangers
facing our community from those who
delegitimize Israel at every turn, support
terrorists who threaten Israelis and Jews
the world over, and those who advocate
openly for Israels destruction.
Steve Lipman
Foster City
Letters to the editor
T
he San Mateo County Harbor
District may not make deci-
sions that have a direct impact
on everyone in the countys day-to-day
lives, but it is funded by our tax dollars
and is the steward of two well-estab-
lished and critical gateways to our com-
munity. The rst gateway is at Pillar
Point Harbor on the coast the only
place for most commercial, recreational
and charter shermen to launch their
vessels to collect the oceans bounty.
That enterprise is constantly facing
challenges and needs thoughtful assis-
tance by those in charge of the harbor.
The second gateway is the Oyster Point
Marina/Park with ferry service to and
from the East Bay. It is providing an
alternative transit opportunity for those
who live and work in South San
Francisco, though it is mainly used as a
way for workers who live in the East
Bay to get to the biotech hub of South
San Francisco. There is an opportunity
for progressive thought in getting more
transit alternatives, whether it be addi-
tional ferry stops or nding new and
sustainable ways to get workers to their
places of work once they arrive at the
Bay shore.
Fortunately for voters in San Mateo
County, there are six people running for
three seats on the Harbor Districts
Board of Commissioners and an oppor-
tunity for new ideas.
Of the six, we recommend Sabrina
Brennan, William Holsinger and Pietro
Parravano. All three bring a variety of
experience and ideas to the table. For
Brennan, maintaining water quality of
both locations is key to its success and
development at either site should be
embarked upon with the environment
and community access at the forefront.
Brennan is quick with new ideas, and
suggested a bike rental station at Pillar
Point as a way to allow visitors quick
access to more of what the coast has to
offer while also providing revenue for
the district. Her scal conservatism is
refreshing from someone so focused on
environmental stewardship. Holsinger
has lled the seat of former commis-
sioner Sally Campbell since after her
death earlier this year. As a former can-
didate for a seat several years ago,
Holsinger has been a quick study and,
as an attorney, has a keen eye when it
comes to legal language. Parravano
understands the needs of the shermen
and has spent years working toward
nding ways to make it a viable career.
His idea of creating a curriculum at
local community colleges for the sh-
ing industry is a solid step in formaliz-
ing the ins and outs of the industry
knowledge whether it be navigation,
boat maintenance or marketing. That
last component is key since many sh-
ermen have signicant work to do once
their boats are tied up after the days
catch. By providing new avenues of
selling their catch, they can maintain an
industry that has as many ebbs and
ows as the ocean itself. Brennan, too,
would like to extend the reach of the
seafood caught off the coast and would
like to work with local companies with
in-house chefs or restaurants with chefs
who understand the importance of local
and sustainable seafood. Parravano also
has a track record of getting shermen
to branch out when shing is not
allowed in partnering with research
groups to the benet of both.
The shing industry is in constant
change, and the environment of Pillar
Point Harbor is key to its welfare.
Members of the Board of
Commissioners serve in a support role
for the industry while taking care of the
natural resource of the harbor that
houses the industry. Key too is the
Oyster Point Marina/Park and its capa-
bility to provide new ways for people to
enter our county for work or for pleas-
ure. Brennan, Holsinger and Parravano
would provide the best balance of expe-
rience, points of view and forward-
thinking for both, and for all of us.
Brennan,Holsinger,Parravanofor Harbor Commission
Going organic?
E
ven if we discount the research intuitively, foods
grown with chemicals that are literally poisons
cant be as safe and wholesome as foods grown
without them. Jonathan Wright, M.D. and Linda Larson,
Eating Clean for Dummies.
A new study related to organic foods came out over the
Labor Day weekend. The purported purpose of the research,
under the direction of Dr. Dena Bravada, a senior research
afliate at Stanford University, was to determine if organic
food products are more nutri-
tious than regular foods.
According to Dr. Bravada and
associates, fruit and vegetables
labeled organic were, on aver-
age, no more nutritious than
their conventional counterparts,
which tend to be far less
expensive.
I doubt there are many peo-
ple who prefer organic foods
who are as concerned about
their nutritional content as they
are about the differences in
pesticide, hormones and addi-
tives and the differences in
effects on human health and
the environment. And yet, Michael Pollan wrote in In
Defense of Food: Recently a handful of well-controlled
comparisons of crops grown organically and conventionally
have found appreciably higher levels of anti-oxidants,
avonoids, vitamins and other nutrients in several of the
organic crops.
Dr. Bravada states that the aim of the research was to pro-
vide an objective view of the current science of organic foods
so people can make more informed choices. She says that the
study was not inuenced by anyone with a vested interest in
the results. Though the researchers claim they used no out-
side nancing and wanted us to have no perception of bias,
it is just the kind of study onto which the food industry would
latch. And one statement that makes one wonder is: A lush
peach grown with the use of pesticides could easily contain
more vitamins than an unripe organic one. Really?
The above study has provided an opportunity for me, with
the help of some of my favorite nutritionally focused authors,
to describe some of the more important reasons to go organic.
Ill start with Gary Hirshberg who wrote in Food Inc.
Organic Healthy Food and So Much More; I see organ-
ic as part of a philosophy of wholeness, the science of integra-
tion, the need to keep nature humming as the interdependent
web of life. Organic is also a pragmatic state of mind, offering
real antidotes to societys assorted ills and errors. It backs a
sensible farm policy that protects not only family farmers, but
also the health of all Americans. When you eat better, you are
better. In fact, an organic food system could bring down
health-care costs by eliminating toxic lifestyles and the unnec-
essary disease and illness they cause.
Add Marion Nestle, who wrote, Eating Made Simple, also
from Food, Inc.: The USDA forbids producers of Certied
Organic fruit and vegetables from using synthetic pesticides,
herbicides, fertilizers, genetically modied seeds, irradiation
or fertilizer derived from sewage sludge ... Although the
USDA is responsible for organics, its principle mandate is to
promote conventional agriculture, which explains why the
department asserts that it makes no claims that organic food is
safer or more nutritious than conventionally produced food.
Organic food differs from conventionally grown food in the
way it is grown, handled and processed. ... Organics may be
somewhat healthier to eat, but they are far less likely to dam-
age the environment, and that is reason enough to choose
them at the supermarket.
Dr. Bravada concluded: People purchased organic food for
a number of reasons. Concerns about the effects of pesticides
on young children, the environmental impact of large-scale
conventional farming and the potential public health threat if
antibiotic resistant bacterial genes jumped to human
pathogens.
I hope Dr. Bravada will soon conduct a study on the report-
ed effects of exposure to pesticides on pregnant women and
young children. As reported in The San Mateo County
Times, three studies published last year followed pregnant
women exposed to higher amounts of pesticides known as
organo-phosphates, then followed the children for years and
found that in elementary school their children had, on average,
IQs several points lower than those of their peers.
But the debate over whether organic foods are more nutri-
tious than conventionally grown crops seems almost irrelevant
when we consider the big picture as described by Marion
Nestle. Organic methods of agriculture can help stabilize
food prices and reduce our dependence on foreign oil. They
can lead to true national security, which, in time, fosters plan-
etary security. By using less fossil fuel and chemicals, and by
trapping and building carbon in the soil instead of in the
atmosphere, organic farming is a crucial WME (weapon of
mass enlightenment) in humanitys now or near ght against
the air pollution that causes global warming In short, there
is nothing alternative about organic.
Going organic?
Since 1984, Dorothy Dimitre has written more than 500
columns for various local newspapers. Her email address is
gramsd@aceweb.com.
Editorial
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BUSINESS 10
Wednesday Sept. 12, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Dow 13,323.36 +0.52% 10-Yr Bond 1.695 +0.71%
Nasdaq3,104.53 +0.02% Oil (per barrel) 96.900002
S&P 500 1,433.56 +0.31% Gold 1,734.70
By Matthew Craft
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK Investors spent
Tuesday preparing for two events sure to
move markets this week: a Federal
Reserve meeting and a court decision on
whether Germany can help support its
struggling neighbors. And if the stock
markets gains Tuesday are any sign,
they expect both events to turn out well.
The Dow Jones industrial average rose
69.07 points to close at 13,323.36. The
average of 30 large company stocks has
already gained 1.8 percent to start
September, a month which is usually
dismal for stocks.
Bank of America led the 30 stocks in
the Dow, rising 5 percent, or 45 cents, to
$9.03.
Federal Reserve ofcials will gather
for a two-day meeting on Wednesday.
Many expect the Fed will announce a
new effort to revive the sluggish econo-
my Thursday afternoon.
On the same day the Fed starts its
meeting, Germanys high court is
expected to rule on whether the country
can participate in a European bailout
fund. The court rejected a last-minute
appeal to delay the decision on Tuesday.
Its going to get interesting this
week, said Randy Frederick, managing
director of active trading and derivatives
at the brokerage Charles Schwab.
Frederick expects the Fed will make
some sort of move, especially after the
government reported last Friday that
employers added fewer than 100,000
jobs in August.
Prior to the employment report peo-
ple werent as sure, Frederick said. I
am denitely on the majority side here.
Theres some sort of easing coming.
In other trading, the Standard & Poors
500 index rose 4.48 points to 1,433.56.
The Nasdaq composite increased 0.51 of
a point to 3,104.53.
The assumption that the Fed will
announce new stimulus measures is so
widespread that some worry the market
could take a plunge if the Fed fails to
deliver.
Ron Florance, managing director of
investment strategy at Wells Fargo
Private Bank in Scottsdale, Ariz., said
hes always wary when stocks rise on
nothing more than expectations.
These are the things that make you
nervous, when markets are going strong
in anticipation of news, Florance said.
Stocks rise ahead of Fed
Wall Street
Stocks that moved substantially or traded
heavily Tuesday on the New York Stock
Exchange and Nasdaq Stock Market:
NYSE
Legg Mason Inc., up $1.38 at $26.85
The money manager said that is searching for
a new CEO.Its chairman and CEO,Mark Fetting,
is stepping down next month.
Thor Industries Inc., up $1.08 at $33.75
The camper and bus maker said that it is raising
its regular quarterly dividend to 18 cents per
share from 15 cents per share.
Sonoco Products Co., down 91 cents at $30.13
Due to operational problems, the packaging
materials company cut its current-quarter prot
outlook and withdrew its 2012 outlook.
Nasdaq
Caseys General Stores Inc., up $2.33 at $57.99
The operator of Midwestern convenience stores
reported a prot in the scal rst-quarter that
beat Wall Street expectations.
United Natural Foods Inc.,down $5.19 at $55.23
Even though its fourth-quarter net income rose
46 percent, the food distributors scal 2013
guidance was weaker than expected.
Finish Line Inc., up 72 cents at $24.51
Analysts from Citi and Canaccord reiterated
their Buyratings on the sneaker retailers stock,
citing higher sales.
First Solar Inc., up $1.01 at $21.80
The company said that Pacic Gas & Electric Co.
will purchase electricity from two California solar
power plants it is developing.
Cell Therapeutics Inc., up 99 cents at $3.56
The drugmaker said it will begin selling cancer
drug pixuvri in Europe.The drug is for patients
with non-hodgkin b-cell lymphoma.
Big movers
By Michael Liedtke
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO Facebook CEO
Mark Zuckerberg, acknowledging con-
cerns about his companys stock perform-
ance, said Tuesday that Facebook has sur-
vived troubles before.
He spoke to a standing-room-only
audience at a tech conference in San
Francisco in his rst interview since the
companys rocky initial public offering in
May. Facebook Inc.s stock has lost half
its value since the IPO.
Zuckerberg said the drop has obvious-
ly been disappointing, but he said its a
great time to double down on the com-
panys future.
Facebook has not
been an uncontrover-
sial company,
Zuckerberg said. Its
not like this is the rst
up and down we have
ever had.
Among other
things, Facebook Inc.
has repeatedly faced
criticism and user
rebellion over its
policies and practices affecting data pri-
vacy.
Wearing a gray T-shirt, jeans and
sneakers, Zuckerberg appeared Tuesday
in a half-hour reside chat at the San
Francisco Disrupt conference organized
by technology blog TechCrunch.
After he began speaking, Facebooks
stock increased 74 cents, 3.8 percent,
$20.17 after-hours trading. Thats on top
of a 3.3 percent gain during the regular
session.
We have a pretty good compass,
Zuckerberg said. I always like to think
that when folks are being too nice, we
arent as good as they say they are. And
when the media is being too critical, we
are not as bad as they say we are.
Investors have been concerned about
Facebooks ability to keep growing rev-
enue, especially as more people use it
from mobile devices, where this is less
room to how ads.
Zuckerberg: Facebook has overcome hurdles
Mark
Zuckerberg
KB Home acquires
330 acres for home development
AUSTIN, Texas KB Home said Tuesday that it bought
Mason Ranch, a 330-acre piece of land near Austin, Texas,
and hopes to develop it into a planned community with 1,019
home sites. Financial terms were not disclosed.
KB Home said the community will include energy efcient
homes that are built to order and are located on roads that wind
through a family friendly neighborhood. The area includes
nationally recognized schools, a variety of retail establish-
ments and nearby access to interstate highways and toll roads,
the company said.
Land development is scheduled to begin in early 2013, with
model homes opening later in the year.
YouTube offers new iPhone app
SAN FRANCISCO YouTube is being reprogrammed for
the iPhone and iPad amid the latest fallout from the growing
hostility between Google and Apple.
The changes are being made because Google Inc. and Apple
Inc. didnt renew a ve-year licensing agreement that estab-
lished YouTubes video service as one of the built-in applica-
tions in the operating system that runs the iPhone and iPad.
YouTube is being bumped from the menu of pre-installed
apps on the next version of Apples mobile operating system,
or iOS, which could be released as early as Wednesday when
the latest iPhone is expected to be unveiled.
AMD invests in cloud gaming company CiiNow
SUNNYVALE Chip maker Advanced Micro Devices
Inc. said Tuesday that it has invested in CiiNow, a provider of
cloud-based video game technology.
AMD did not say how much it invested and a representative
could not immediately be reached for comment.
Cloud-based gaming lets people stream video games over
the Internet. One of the most prominent startups in this area,
OnLive, recently went through a complex bankruptcy alterna-
tive, reorganizing its business amid nancial difculties so it
could keep operating.
Business briefs
<< WR Jacoby Ford to have foot surgery, page 15
NHL, union going back to bargaining table, page 15
Wednesday, Sept. 12, 2012
GIANTS PULLING AWAY: GIANTS SLIP PAST ROCKIES WHILE DBACKS DOWN DODGERS >>> PAGE 12
By Nathan Mollat
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
The Serra water polo team warmed up for
its West Catholic Athletic League opener
Wednesday by hosting Carlmont Tuesday
afternoon.
If nothing else, the Padres should be full of
condence heading into Wednesdays match
against St. Francis following a 14-2 win over
the outgunned Scots. The Padres scored seven
goals on nine shots in the opening period and
cruised to the victory.
Hole set Anthony Buljan scored six times
for Serra, while Brandon Yes added three, all
in the opening minutes of the game. Matt
Blais added a pair, while Dominic Mirt and
Joe Kmak each scored once.
Carlmonts Nathan Callahan scored both his
teams goals one in the second period and
one in the fourth. Elias Sebti assisted on
Callahans rst goal.
With such a lopsided win, it begs the ques-
tion: why schedule an obviously overmatched
team? For Serra coach Bob Greene, the
answer is two-fold: one, to see what kind of
talent he has on his bench and two, to hope-
fully make teams like Carlmont better for hav-
ing played the Padres.
When youre early in the season, its very
hard to truly evaluate what your bench can
do, Greene said. Also, Im a San Mateo guy.
I want Carlmont, Aragon, Burlingame,
Hillsdale (and the like), I want all those guys
to have good polo (programs). If they can
learn some things from playing us, maybe
they can take that [into Peninsula Athletic
League play].
As far as nding out how good his team can
be, Greene said a couple of players have been
a revelation. Blais has scored 10 goals already
this preseason.
He was low on my bench, but he has a nice
shot, Greene said.
The other surprise has been Daniel
Campoverde. Greene said he is the smallest
member or the team, but has played himself
into the Padres rotation with his preseason
performance. Greene said he wasnt even sure
Campoverde would stay with the varsity team.
I didnt know if he could contribute at a
high level, Greene said. Now, hes playing
about a quarter of a game.
Green said its imperative the Padres have a
Serra polo ready to contend for WCAL title
By Nathan Mollat
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
The Sacred Heart Prep girls volleyball
team, which was the Central Coast Section
Division IV runnerup last year and advanced
to the Northern California seminals, is poised
for another strong year in 2012.
The Gators improved to 8-1 on the young
season, sweeping past host San Mateo 25-15,
25-22, 25-17 Tuesday evening in San Mateo.
With eight seniors, a number of which were
part of the Gators Nor Cal championship team
in 2010, this could be their last run at great-
ness with this core of players. Hoping to make
the most of it is senior Sonia Abuel-Saud, who
missed most of last season after tearing both
the anterior cruciate and medial collateral lig-
aments in her knee in the nal game before the
start West Bay Athletic League play last sea-
son.
How important is Abuel-Saud?
We win (CCS with her). Period, said
Sacred Heart Prep coach Damien Hardy. The
kid is worth eight points a set. Were happy
to have her back.
Abuel-Saud said it was hard watching the
Gators make their run through league play and
into the playoffs. But she was determined to
get back on the court as soon as she could. She
had surgery at the end of September and was
back on the oor with her club team at the end
of December.
It was really tough. I was really excited for
my junior year, Abuel-Saud said. I had an
amazing surgeon. He was so awesome with
his positivity.
Abuel-Saud was determined not to have the
knee injury dene her. She wore a brace for a
few weeks, but got rid of it as soon as she felt
comfortable. Not only did she want to use it
as a mental brace, she wanted to affect the
psyche of opponents as well. She did not want
Putting injury behind
NATHAN MOLLAT/DAILY JOURNAL
Sonia Abuel-Saud missed most of last season with a knee injury.She hopes to lead the Gators
back to a CCS title and beyond.
By Julio Lara
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
If the week before the Peninsula Athletic
League is meant to be a dress rehearsal of
sorts, then it would appear that the Burlingame
volleyball team is ready for the show to begin.
The Panthers were methodical Tuesday
evening, defeating Woodside High School 25-
19, 25-19, 25-17 in preparation for the start of
the PAL Bay Division season Sept. 18.
Were a pretty young team, said senior
outside hitter Morgan McKeever, who had 12
kills for the match. Were a little stronger
offensive then defensive so far. Weve had a
pretty good start.
The Panthers were strong from start to nish
against the Wildcats. While Woodside threat-
ened to make runs at certain times, you never
got the sense that Burlingame wasnt in com-
plete control.
More than anything else it was our pass-
ing, said Woodside coach Kyle Mashima of
his teams performance. If we controlled the
serve and got our offense going, we were even.
So, really the difference was in our ability to
control the rst ball. I think Burlingame was
serving the ball really well and we werent
passing as well. The rest of the offense was
pretty even. Things will get better as we go
forward.
Game 1 was pretty even with Woodside
leading midway through the frame on the help
of several Burlingame hitting errors (11 by
sets end).
But the Panthers found their stride, gaining
the lead at 13-12 and never really letting up
the rest of the match. Isabell Walker was all
Burlingame
is too much
for Woodside
By Julio Lara
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
By glancing at the College of San Mateo
football schedule and seeing an upcoming
game against an 0-2 team, there are those peo-
ple who might think the Bulldogs have caught
a break.
But make no mistake about it. Diablo Valley
College is not your typical 0-2 team. Not by a
long shot. And the Bulldogs know that from
here on the out, theyre in for seven all-out
wars.
This team should be 2-0, said Tim
Tulloch, CSM assistant head coach and defen-
sive coordinator Tim Tulloch. We know
theyre a great team. You just look at the lm
and we see it. If they long snap a little bit bet-
ter, they win both their games.
Tulloch is talking about two impressive per-
formances against two giant opponents
City College of San Francisco (the reigning
national champions) and Santa Rosa. The
Vikings lost both games by a combined nine
points while racking up an average of 521
yards of offense against two very well-
coached and respected defenses.
Theyre extremely well-coached on the
offensive side of the ball, Tulloch said. And
they challenge you because they can run the
ball extremely effectively out of the spread.
They can run the ball until the cows come
home when they want to. And its not four
yards here, six yards there, theyre explosive
plays. They have some serious weapons.
While competing against very talented
teams is nothing new to CSM, Saturdays
game against DVC comes on the heels of a
CSMcant afford slow start against DVC
NATHAN MOLLAT/DAILY JOURNAL
Serra goaltender Steven Olujic makes one of
his 12 saves during the Padres 14-2 win.
See PANTHERS, Page 16 See GATORS, Page 16
See PADRES, Page 16
When youre early in the season, its very hard
to truly evaluate what your bench can do.
Bob Green, Serra polo coach
See CSM, Page 14
SPORTS 12
Wednesday Sept. 12, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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By Pat Graham
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
DENVER Madison Bumgarner hit a three-
run homer on a night when he struggled on the
mound and Brandon Belt drove in four runs,
helping the San Francisco Giants hold on for a 9-
8 win over the Colorado Rockies in rainy condi-
tions Tuesday.
Belt broke a tie in the fth with a two-run dou-
ble. He also brought in a run on a elders choice
and added a solo homer for
the NL West leaders, who
are 20-7 on the road since
the All-Star break.
Bumgarner was roughed
up by the Rockies, allowing
ve runs and 11 hits in 4 1-
3 innings. The lefty gave
the Giants a big boost,
though, with his bat, send-
ing a 93 mph fastball from
Jhoulys Chacin into the
left-eld seats.
San Franciscos bullpen was stellar heading
into the ninth, giving up just one run. But Sergio
Romo gave up a two-out, two-run homer to
pinch-hitter Tyler Colvin to make things inter-
esting. Lefty Javier Lopez was called in to face
Jason Giambi, who popped up to end the game.
It was Lopezs seventh save.
George Kontos (2-1) picked up the win by
bailing the Giants out of a tight spot in the fth
with two strikeouts.
Chris Nelson, Wilin Rosario, Jordan Pacheco,
Matt McBride and Carlos Gonzalez all had RBI
singles for the Rockies.
After a shaky outing from Chacin, Carlos
Torres (4-2) took over in the fth and promptly
ran into trouble. Belt gave the giants the lead for
good when he doubled off the glove of Gonzalez
in left. As the ball rolled into the corner, Marco
Scutaro and Buster Posey came around to score.
Scutaro has been quite a catalyst for the Giants
since he was acquired from the Rockies in late
July. Hes hit safely in 34 of 43 games since don-
ning a San Francisco uniform.
For him coming up with some of the big hits
with the Giants, Im not the least bit surprised,
Colorado manager Jim Tracy said before the
game. Hes a terric player. Hes a very heady
player.
Down 4-0 in the fth, the Giants rallied to tie
it. The big blow was Bumgarners three-run shot
a no-doubter, too, as Gonzalez briey turned
to give chase before watching it leave the park.
Bumgarners only other major league homer
came three months ago against Houston.
While Bumgarner shined at the plate also
lacing a single he never found a groove on the
mound. Thats unusual for Bumgarner in this
park, where he had allowed just two earned runs
in his last three starts at Coors Field.
The quirky Colorado weather befuddled the
Giants in the third inning. With San Francisco
about to bat, the wind and rain moved in, mak-
ing the conditions almost look like swirling
snow. Chacin yielded two singles, but wiggled
out of the jam when Pablo Sandoval ew out.
Then, in the bottom half of the inning, the rain
all but vanished.
And the Rockies took full advantage of the
change in weather. Chacin ignited a three-run
inning with a leadoff double. He later scored
when Josh Rutledge hit into a double play.
Bumgarner then gave up four straight hits,
including run-scoring singles to Rosario and
Pacheco.
Colorado scored a run in the second on
Nelsons RBI single. Bumgarner escaped any
further trouble by getting DJ LeMahieu to hit
into an inning-ending double play.
NOTES: The Giants reinstated RHP Clay
Hensley (groin) from the disabled list. ... RHP
Tim Lincecum (8-14) will start Wednesday
against LHP Jeff Francis (5-4). ... Rockies C
Ramon Hernandez (hamstring) had an MRI on
Tuesday. ... LHP Jorge De La Rosa (elbow)
threw 3 2-3 innings and gave up one run
Monday for Class-A Modesto.
Giants increase lead
By Greg Beacham
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
ANAHEIM Jerry Blevins got Howie
Kendrick to ground into a game-ending dou-
ble play with two runners on in the ninth
inning, and the Oakland Athletics held off the
Los Angeles Angels 6-5 Tuesday night for
their fth straight victory.
Brandon Moss and Yoenis Cespedes home-
red and Dan Straily pitched into the seventh
inning of his fourth major league start for the
As. Oakland emerged with its 11th straight
road victory, matching the second-longest
streak in franchise history.
Torii Hunter and Albert Pujols had run-scor-
ing singles in the ninth for the Angels, who
had runners at the corners and nobody out
before Blevins relieved As closer Grant
Balfour and earned his rst save since 2010 in
dramatic fashion.
Coco Crisp hit a ninth-inning RBI triple and
scored on Hunters error in right eld for the
As, who have taken two straight at Angel
Stadium with a rookie starter on the mound.
This one wasnt nearly as tidy as Mondays
3-1 win, however.
Balfour walked Chris Iannetta and Mike
Trout to open the ninth, and Hunter cut
Oaklands lead to two runs with a single to
center. Pujols then drove an RBI single to left,
chasing the As closer.
Blevins, who had just one save in his rst
204 career appearances, struck out Kendrys
Morales. Kendrick then grounded to third, and
Oakland smartly turned the double play to end
it.
Vernon Wells hit an early two-run homer
and Hunter chased Straily with a seventh-
inning shot for the Angels, whose wild-card
hopes took another hit. Los Angeles had won
six straight and 11 of 12 before opping twice
against the As, who were swept by the Angels
in a three-game series last week.
Straily (2-0) yielded seven hits and struck
out eight in his rst start since coming up from
Triple-A Sacramento last week to take the
rotation spot of injured right-hander Brandon
McCarthy.
Oakland (81-60) has won 14 of 17 and 20 of
25, moving 21 games over .500 for the rst
time since the end of the 2006 season. The
Athletics grasp on a wild-card spot gets
stronger with each game in Anaheim, and
theyre just three games behind Texas for the
AL West lead.
The As hadnt won 11 straight road games
since 1981. Theyll attempt to match the fran-
chise record of 12 straight road wins
Wednesday night when A.J. Grifn pitches
against Los Angeles Ervin Santana.
Trout had three hits for Los Angeles (77-
65), which dropped 2 1/2 games behind
Baltimore and the Yankees (79-62) for the sec-
ond wild-card spot with its rst back-to-back
losses since Aug. 25-26. Tampa Bay (77-64)
also is between the Angels and that wild-card
slot.
Jerome Williams (6-8) couldnt make it out
of the fourth inning in his rst start for Los
Angeles since July 19. The veteran gave up
four runs and ve hits, including four straight
during Oaklands three-run fourth.
Cespedes hadnt homered in his previous 21
games until he connected in the second
inning, his line drive barely eluding Trouts
glove at the wall in center.
Wells put the Angels in front with a two-run
shot down the left-eld line in the second
inning, his fth homer in 15 games.
Williams was the Angels fth starter early
in the season before injuries sidelined him, but
he got a spot start when ace Jered Weaver
skipped a turn to rest the tendinitis in his right
shoulder.
After Moss hit his 18th homer, Josh
Donaldson singled and scored on Stephen
Drews sacrifice fly off reliever Nick
Maronde.
Hunter, who is hitting well over .400 in the
past two weeks, connected for his 14th homer
in the seventh.
Streaking As win again
By Rusty Miller
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
COLUMBUS, Ohio Spurred on by a
roaring crowd decked out in red, white and
blue, the United States used all of that emo-
tion as fuel to pull off a signicant World Cup
qualifying victory.
The U.S. rebounded from a loss at Jamaica
four nights earlier and moved back into a tie
for its group lead by beating the Reggae Boyz
1-0 Tuesday night as Herculez Gomez curled
in a free kick in the 55th minute.
It was a night when the only respite from
the din from a capacity crowd of 23,881 was
the moment of silence before the game in
remembrance of the 11th anniversary of Sept.
11 terrorist attacks.
That was an awesome homecoming,
Gomez said afterward, almost drowned out as
fans left Crew Stadium chanting and cheer-
ing. You couldnt ask for more. The crowd
was great, and the guys fed off of it.
The U.S., which made ve changes to its
starting lineup from Fridays 2-1 loss in
Kingston, is tied with Guatemala (2-1-1) at
seven points in Group A of the North and
Central American and Caribbean seminals.
Jamaica (2-1-1) also has seven points but
trails on goal difference.
The top two nations advance to next years
six-team regional nals, which will produce
three qualiers for the 2014 tournament in
Brazil.
Seeking its seventh straight World Cup
appearance, the U.S. plays at virtually elimi-
nated Antigua and Barbuda on Oct. 12, then
completes the semis four days later against
Guatemala at Kansas City, Kan.
U.S. bounces back to beat Jamaica
Giants 9, Rockies 8
U.S. 1, Jamaica 0
Brandon Belt
As 6, Angels 5
13
Wednesday Sept. 12, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SANTA CLARA Leonard
Davis is one of the NFLs biggest
men today because his parents, both
of whom had lost spouses, found
each other in small-town Texas and
decided to add one more child to their
already enormous blended family.
He became No. 22 in the brood,
between them.
No wonder Davis has been such a
perfect t in Jim Harbaughs family-
oriented San Francisco locker room
since the 12th-year guard signed with
the 49ers this summer.
When his mother remarried,
Sammie Lee Davis never doubted
she would have one more child to
give her 11.
Little did she know, her last would
wind up a 6-foot-6, 355-pound offen-
sive lineman. After all, Davis was
born at a healthy, yet rather average 7
1/2 pounds, less than a month after
she turned 40.
He got big in a hurry.
Ive been the biggest since Day
1, Davis said, From kindergarten
all the way through.
In fact, Davis began growing so
fast he was out of his infant clothes in
no time, and he fussed so regularly
his mom nally realized he was just
plain hungry. All the time.
I started to put a teaspoon of baby
rice in his bottle with formula, and it
was just like you gave him a sleeping
pill, she recalled.
Sammie Lee was twice a widow
when she married Davis dad. She
lost her rst husband in a car accident
and her second to cancer. L.A. Davis,
a minister who died in 2007, was
already a father to 11 of his own
before his rst wife died of a hemor-
rhage.
One of his young sons was in
school with one of her daughters.
Davis is doing a much better job
keeping track of the 49ers complex
playbook than he ever has remember-
ing how many nieces and nephews he
has, let alone their names.
People dont have that many kids
nowadays, said Davis, a father of
two girls, 9-year-old Meeya and 7-
year-old Mariya.
Davis emerged as a rock-solid run-
blocker during his best seasons from
2007-2010 with the Dallas Cowboys,
who released him before training
camp in 2011. He started every game
from 2006, his last season in Arizona,
through 2010.
Yet the 34-year-old Davis didnt
play a single snap last season after
signing with Detroit in November.
Then, Davis had offseason foot
surgery. Harbaugh gave him a shot
after Davis visited the 49ers this
spring. He signed four months later,
ahead of training camp.
Leonard Davis literally a big addition to 49ers
back-to-back performances in
which the Bulldogs consider them-
selves somewhat fortunate to come
away with wins.
Against Chabot College, CSM
found themselves down 13-0 before
waking up and charging out to a 27-
13 lead behind three Quincy Nelson
touchdowns.
Chabot answered and tied the
game at 27 and it took a strong n-
ish by the Bulldogs to come away
with the 40-27 win.
Tulloch knows that comebacks
are nice, but if the Bulldogs have a
similar start against DVC, they
might nd themselves at the bottom
of a pit way too deep to claw out of.
We cant dig ourselves holes,
Tulloch said. The first drive is
extremely important. We have to
make sure rst series, rst quarter,
we start with that killer instinct.
That we punch rst. In any ght,
you have to punch rst and you have
to punch hard. And I think thats
what were preaching this week.
You have to start strong. You cant
dig yourself a hole against a great
team.
DVC has some gifted weapons.
Pulling the trigger at quarterback is
Quinn Kaehler, a two-year starter
whos thrown for 860 yards and
eight touchdowns already in 2012.
A ne trio of receivers helps
Cameron Rowland in the slot is
DVCs leading receiver while
Diante Jackson, a bounce-back from
Oregon University, and Andre
Lewis (Utah-committed already)
and his ve touchdowns, are major
threats on the outside.
No. 1 thing we need to do is play
hard and play together, Tulloch
said. If we do that, were going to
be on the right track and ready for
these teams of this caliber. You cant
start slow, you have to start strong
and you have to eliminate easy ones.
You have to make it earn it. You
have to make good teams earn their
points.
Names on a roster aside, CSM
hasnt looked very sharp defensive-
ly in 2012. The Bulldogs come into
Saturdays game allowing an aver-
age of 387 yards on defense.
[Thats] way too much, Tulloch
said. Way too much. I dont think
anybody on defense, players and
coaches included, are happy with
what were doing. And we surely
havent played our best. We need to
take a step forward and hopefully
this is the week we do it. If we
dont, with DVCs offense, youre
going to have your hands full. Its
going to be a long day. So, you bet-
ter make some strides and I know
the players are committed to do it.
We expect on defense to change it.
Tulloch made it clear his defense
isnt backing down. And the same
goes for the CSM offense, who is
airing the ball out a lot more in 2012
behind John Willis.
What was great [against Chabot]
was seeing all the explosion on
offense, Tulloch said. You seen all
the skill players really step up and
that was a big thing. Obviously the
turnovers are something were
working hard to address. If we can
do be explosive like we are and run
the ball like we did last week, along
with protecting the football, were
going to continue to make those
strides. Defensively, we just have to
play harder.
Theyll have to play much harder
from here on out. While DVC is 0-
2, after Saturdays game, their
remaining six opponents are cur-
rently a combined 12-0.
We respect everybody, Tulloch
said, but were not a team thats
going to be scared of anybody.
Theres a big difference. We respect
what they do. We understand the
challenges they pose but there not
an ounce of fear. Were going to out
and play Bulldog football.
We see the best offenses in the
state year in and year out. So, our
guys, its no different for them.
They know theyre going to be chal-
lenged by the best and thats why
they came to (CSM). They want to
play this schedule. We want to
coach this schedule. You embrace it
and you encourage it. Its great for
our guys.
Continued from page 11
CSM
SPORTS 15
Wednesday Sept. 12, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
ALAMEDA Coach Dennis Allen has a lot more to deal
with than just a loss in his debut as Oakland Raiders coach.
Big-play receiver Jacoby Ford will undergo surgery on his
injured left foot and miss signicant time, and the Raiders
must nd a contingency at long snapper after a concussion to
Pro Bowler Jon Condo played a major role in the teams 22-14
loss to San Diego on Monday night.
Backup long snapper Travis Goethel rolled two snaps back
to punter Shane Lechler, who couldnt get
a kick off on either try. Lechler also had a
punt blocked after lining up closer to the
line of scrimmage than usual. The three
miscues led to three eld goals for San
Diego and left Allen lamenting that he did-
nt give Goethel more work in practice at
long snapping.
Goethel hadnt snapped in a game since
high school and got only limited work
before practices before being thrown into a
game on national television.
That falls on me, Allen said. Ive got to do a better job of
making sure were prepared for all those different situations.
We practiced Travis snapping the ball but we could have prob-
ably done a better job of putting him in more live-type situa-
tions and giving him the opportunity to do it, kind of repre-
senting what he would do in a regular game.
Condo will have to be cleared medically before he can return
for practice this week and Allen said the team will have a con-
tingency plan in place if he cant play Sunday at Miami.
The Raiders also will have to come up with a plan going for-
ward without Ford, who decided to have the operation after
consulting with a specialist in North Carolina when the injury
did not heal as quickly as hoped.
It will be a signicant amount of time, Allen said. I dont
know exactly what that number would be.
Ford hurt his foot on Aug. 17 in an exhibition game against
Arizona. He missed six games with the same injury last season
and now is dealing with the same problem again.
Its really basically the same injury that he had last year,
Allen said. When he re-injured it this season there was noth-
ing new structurally different from where it was last year. After
visiting with the foot specialist in Carolina, everybody thought
that given a little bit of time he could come back from it. After
giving it some time and re-evaluating, everybody, the medical
people, felt like that surgery was probably the best thing for
him.
The Raiders could place Ford on a new short-term injured
reserve list, which would sideline him for at least six weeks
and open up a roster spot for another player.
Ford has 44 catches for 749 yards and three touchdowns in
24 games over two seasons. He has also scored two touch-
downs rushing and returned four kicks for TDs in his career.
Taiwan Jones had one return for 6 yards and downed the
other six kicks in the end zone.
The Raiders hope to get a boost at receiver this week with
the expected return of deep-threat Denarius Moore. Moore
injured his hamstring in June and participated in only a hand-
ful of practices before last week. Allen said hes hopeful
Moore will be able to play in Miami.
Allen also said he did not know until too late that the Raiders
should have had one last play from their 5-yard line after the
Chargers downed a punt before an Oakland player touched it.
Allen said he knew the rule that the replacement ofcials did
not follow but was not sure until it was too late which team
touched the ball rst.
NOTES: CB Ron Bartell had an MRI on the shoulder he
injured during the game and Allen did not know what his sta-
tus would be this week. ... FB Marcel Reece signed a multiyear
contract extension on Tuesday. ... C Stefen Wisniewski could
get back into the starting lineup this week after being a back-
up in the opener because of a calf injury.
Raiders WR Ford to have surgery
Jacoby Ford
NHL and union plan to meet Wednesday in NYC
NEW YORK The NHL and the players association
will resume negotiations on Wednesday in an effort to avoid
a lockout this weekend.
After not meeting face to face since last Friday, the sides
planned to get together at the league ofce in New York
before the NHLPA holds player meetings later Wednesday.
The NHL board of governors will convene on Thursday
with Commissioner Gary Bettman, while the union holds a
second day of discussions with as many as 250 players.
The hastily scheduled negotiating session for Wednesday
came just hours after NHL Deputy Commissioner Bill Daly
said owners and players were both to blame for their failure
to reach a new collective bargaining agreement before cur-
rent deal expires on Saturday.
Daly wrote in an email to the Associated Press on Tuesday
that he hoped both sides would meet before Saturday, but
didnt sound optimistic it would happen.
To this point, we have received no indication that the
union has anything new to say to us. And right now, we have
nothing new to say to them, he wrote Tuesday. Its unfor-
tunate, but its the reality of the situation.
That changed Tuesday night. Whether the restart of talks
will lead to a quick resolution remains to be seen. The NHLs
labor contract expires at midnight Saturday night, and a
lockout seems likely. It would be the leagues fourth work
stoppage since 1992.
NHL brief
16
Wednesday Sept. 12, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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strong bench if they are to compete for a WCAL title this
year.
If you do not have a bench, its not going to happen,
Greene said.
One through six, however, Green believes he has the hors-
es to challenge for a championship. Last year, Greene said
he had three 30-goal scorers. He expects to have seven or
eight this year. He already has one in Buljan, who has found
the back of the net 36 times in just six games so far this sea-
son. Yee has 11, Mirt has nine, while Kmak and Chris
Bradley have seven each.
In the last couple years, we had to give the ball to one or
two guys and that was it, Greene said.
Defensively, the Padres have who Greene believes is a
Division I caliber goaltender in Steven Olujic, who had 12
saves against Carlmont. Additionally, Greene believes he
has a team that can compete with opponents in the swim-
ming department.
Finally, we have the swimmers we need to keep up with
Bellarmine and other teams, Greene said. I think we have
a shot in every (WCAL) game. This is a year I truly believe
we can win all our league games.
We have the speed, we have the repower. I expect good
things this season.
Continued from page 11
PADRES
anyone to see she had any weakness.
I didnt want anything to hold me back, Abuel-Saud said.
I thought about [the knee] a little bit. But I wasnt going to let
it affect my play.
After spending the club season as a libero or defensive
specialist she has returned to the all-around game for the
Gators that makes her one of the best high school players on the
Peninsula. She said just concentrating on defense allowed her
to focus on the game instead of whether or not her knee could
handle the rigors of being an outside hitter.
Im still rusty. I didnt hit at all during club, Abuel-Saud
said. For club, I wanted to play libero. It was just a coinci-
dence that I shouldnt be hitting.
Hardy admitted he did not know how Abuel-Saud would
respond. He saw her playing during the club season and knew
she was back on the court. But moving from a defensive spe-
cialist to an offensive threat was something she had not done on
her rebuilt knee.
You never know how [a knee injury and surgery] will
respond, Hardy said. Mentally, thats the hardest part. Shes
come through it with ying colors.
While Abuel-Saud is still getting in a groove hitting-wise,
like riding a bike, its coming back rather easily. Coming into
the San Mateo match, she was averaging 6.6 kills per match.
She got off to a slow start, but in her previous four matches, she
had kill totals of 10, 9,9 and 10. She was nearly unstoppable
against the Bearcats, nishing with 17 kills a season high.
The Bearcats fell to 0-2 with the loss, but they cant be
accused of losing to weak squads. Their rst two games have
featured two teams who advanced to CCS championship
matches last year Woodside Priory and now Sacred Heart
Prep. And while San Mateo has won only one game so far, the
Bearcats have played well at times against both teams.
Angelica Petelo led the Bearcats with seven kills Tuesday,
while Bella Mauricio added six. Kelley Ghiorso continued her
strong serving early in the season, adding three more aces.
But it was the Bearcats inability to nish that cost them
against the Gators. They were more or less blown out in Game
1, but in Game 2 they led most of the way, only to see the
Gators score six of the last seven points to pull out a 25-22 win.
In Game 3, San Mateo led 17-15 before Sacred Heart Prep won
10 straight points to close out the match.
Hardy believes Abuel-Saud, more than her physical abilities,
helps out the team even more with her leadership, which was
evident when the games got close. A well-time clap, word or
pat on the rear end seemed to re up her teammates and push
them through to the end.
Shes irreplaceable, Hardy said. Her game has gotten so
much better. Her teammates have no doubt shes back.
Abuel-Saud does not doubt it either. In fact, she believes her
injury has increased her focus when she is on the oor. She said
the injury came out of the blue last year and as such, she is leav-
ing nothing to chance this year.
Im going to play all out. I want to leave everything on the
court, Abuel-Saud said. I do have high hopes for this year.
For me, I have unnished business. Last year, we could have
won it all.
Continued from page 11
GATORS
over the court for Burlingame. The setter had seven assists, two
aces and three winners in the rst set.
Offensively, our passing, especially the rst two games was
really good, said Burlingame coach Nilo Mauricio. I let
Isabell, our setter, run whatever she wanted. It help set up the
1-on-1, Morgan has a great advantage in the 1-on-1. Any vol-
leyball match, if you get a 1-on-1, the hitter should always win.
It all starts with the pass and Isabell is a very good setter.
The Panthers capped off Set 1 by winning the last four points
and they carried that momentum right into the second frame.
The Wildcats last lead of the second game was 2-1 and from
there, Burlingame took off. McKeever caught re, carrying the
Panthers through a 8-0 run that helped build a 9-2 lead.
We just have to keep focused, McKeever said. I think
when we all work together and just focus, we executed.
The Wildcats did their best to push the Panthers in Game 2,
but every time they would step on the accelerator, Burlingame
was there to hit the brakes. Woodside got as close as 19-15
before the Panthers took off and nished the set 25-19. Walker
added six more assists in the frame and Tatum Novitsky added
three kills.
Perhaps sensing the victory, the Panthers put the pressure on
the Wildcats in Game 3. They nickled and dimed their way to a
18-9 lead behind Walker and a pair of Kristin Chaney kills.
Woodside mounted their last run behind Sydney Hickman
and Sadie Foti. Middle blocker Allie Sullberg got some great
swings in as well and helped cut that 18-9 decit to 18-17.
But it was just too much Panthers on Tuesday. Walker right-
ed the ship and McKeever closed out Burlingames nal 7-0
run with a kill.
Brittney (Carias), our libero, shes just done a really great
job, McKeever said. I think were off to a great start. I think
we need to work on little things, of course servicing mainly.
But once we get that done, well be in good shape for the sea-
son.
We need to improve our passing, but otherwise, were pret-
ty much ready, Mashima said. The girls can play.
Were pretty condent right now, Mauricio said. Weve
seen a lot of the teams and heard how the other teams are. You
definitely have to worry about Menlo-Atherton and also
Aragon. Its going to be a very good season for us. We hope.
Thats what were looking at. Our team works hard.
Continued from page 11
PANTHERS
SPORTS 17
Wednesday Sept. 12, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
CALIFORNIA FORECLOSURE

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East Division
W L Pct GB
Washington 88 54 .620
Atlanta 81 62 .566 7 1/2
Philadelphia 71 71 .500 17
New York 65 77 .458 23
Miami 63 80 .441 25 1/2
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Cincinnati 86 57 .601
St. Louis 75 66 .532 10
Pittsburgh 72 69 .511 13
Milwaukee 71 71 .500 14 1/2
Chicago 55 87 .387 30 1/2
Houston 45 97 .317 40 1/2
West Division
W L Pct GB
San Francisco 80 62 .563
Los Angeles 74 68 .521 6
Arizona 70 72 .493 10
San Diego 67 75 .472 13
Colorado 57 84 .404 22 1/2
TuesdaysGames
Philadelphia 9, Miami 7
Cincinnati 5, Pittsburgh 3
Washington 5, N.Y. Mets 3
Houston 1, Chicago Cubs 0
Milwaukee 5, Atlanta 0
San Francisco 9, Colorado 8
Arizona 1, L.A. Dodgers 0
WednesdaysGames
Miami (Jo.Johnson 8-11) at Philadelphia (Cl.Lee 4-
7), 1:05 p.m.
St.Louis (Lohse 14-2) at San Diego (Richard 12-12),
3:35 p.m.
Pittsburgh (A.J.Burnett 15-6) at Cincinnati (H.Bai-
ley 10-9), 4:10 p.m.
Washington (Lannan 2-0) at N.Y. Mets (Harvey 3-
4), 4:10 p.m.
Chicago Cubs (T.Wood 5-11) at Houston (Abad 0-
3), 5:05 p.m.
Atlanta (Maholm 12-9) at Milwaukee (Gallardo 14-
8), 5:10 p.m.
San Francisco (Lincecum 8-14) at Colorado (Fran-
cis 5-4), 540 p.m.
East Division
W L Pct GB
New York 79 61 .564
Baltimore 78 62 .557 1
Tampa Bay 77 63 .550 2
Toronto 64 75 .460 14 1/2
Boston 63 78 .447 16 1/2
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Chicago 76 64 .543
Detroit 73 67 .521 3
Kansas City 63 77 .450 13
Cleveland 59 82 .418 17 1/2
Minnesota 59 82 .418 17 1/2
West Division
W L Pct GB
Texas 83 57 .593
Oakland 81 60 .574 3
Los Angeles 77 65 .542 7 1/2
Seattle 67 74 .475 16 1/2
MondaysGames
Minnesota 7, Cleveland 2
Chicago White Sox 6, Detroit 1
Oakland 3, L.A. Angels 1
TuesdaysGames
Baltimore 9,Tampa Bay 2
Seattle 4,Toronto 3
Boston 4, N.Y.Yankees 3
Texas 6, Cleveland 4
Detroit 5, Chicago White Sox 3
Kansas City 9, Minnesota 1
Oakland 6, L.A. Angels 5
WednesdaysGames
Tampa Bay at Baltimore, 4:05 p.m.
Seattle at Toronto, 4:07 p.m.
N.Y.Yankees at Boston, 4:10 p.m.
Cleveland at Texas, 5:05 p.m.
Detroit at Chicago White Sox, 5:10 p.m.
Kansas City at Minnesota, 5:10 p.m.
Oakland at L.A. Angels, 7:05 p.m.
NL STANDINGS AL STANDINGS
PENINSULAATHLETIC LEAGUE
BayDivision
Sacred Heart Prep 2-0
Aragon 1-0
Burlingame 1-1
Menlo-Atherton 1-1
Half Moon Bay 0-2
Terra Nova 0-2
OceanDivision
Menlo School 2-0
Sequoia 2-0
South City 1-1
Jefferson 0-2
Kings Academy 0-2
Woodside 0-2
LakeDivision
Carlmont 1-1
El Camino 1-1
Mills 0-1-1
Capuchino 0-2
Hillsdale 0-2
San Mateo 0-2
WESTCATHOLICATHLETIC LEAGUE
Mitty 2-0
Riordan 2-0
Serra 1-0
Bellarmine 1-1
Sacred Heart Cath. 1-1
St. Ignatius 1-1
Valley Christian 1-1
St. Francis 0-2
PREP FOOTBALL
BASEBALL
AmericanLeague
BALTIMORE ORIOLESSelected the contracts
of OF Endy Chavez and OF L.J. Hoes from Norfolk
(IL). Designated RHP Kevin Gregg and INF Ryan
Adams for assignment. National League
HOUSTONASTROSAnnounced they have ex-
tended its player development contract with
Oklahoma City (PCL) through the 2014 season.
LOS ANGELES DODGERSReinstated SS Dee
Gordonfromthe60-dayDL.RecalledRHPStephen
Fife and INF-OF Elian Herrera from Albuquerque
(PCL). Placed INF Adam Kennedy on the 60-day
DL.
MILWAUKEEBREWERSAnnounced they have
extended its player development contract with
Nashville (PCL) through the 2014 season.
ST. LOUIS CARINALSAnnounced they have
extended their player development contract with
the Memphis (PCL) through the 2014 season.
FOOTBALL
National Football League
BUFFALO BILLSSigned RB Johnny White.
Placed WR David Nelson on injured reserve.
CLEVELAND BROWNSSigned OL D.J. Young
to the practice squad. Released OL Jeff Shugarts
fromthepracticesquad.AnnouncedtheNFLlifted
the exemption for LB Scott Fujita.
DALLASCOWBOYSReleased TE Colin Cochart.
DENVER BRONCOSSigned C Dan Koppen.
Waived C C.J. Davis, Re-signed QB Caleb Hanie.
Placed DT Ty Warren on injured reserve.
INDIANAPOLISCOLTSSignedOTBradleySow-
ell from the Tampa Bay practice squad. Released
OT Kashif Moore from the practice squad.Signed
C A.Q. Shipley to the practice squad.
OAKLANDRAIDERSSignedFBMarcel Reeceto
a contract extension.
WASHINGTON REDSKINSSigned LS Justin
Snow.Placed LS Nick Sundberg on injured reserve
and designated him for return.Signed FB Eric Ket-
tani and RB Javarris Williams to the practice squad.
Released RB Antwon Bailey, FB Robert Hughes
and DL Jason Shirley from the practice squad.
TRANSACTIONS
GIRLS GOLF
Mitty267, NotreDame-Belmont 267
At Sharp Park, par 36
NDB Back 49; Hens 50; Elbe 53; Li 56; Pan 59;
Haghverdian 64
M Aiello 39; Moreno 43; Karina 47; Tomasello
50; Fernandez, Ahearn 52
GIRLSTENNIS
Crystal Springs 7, Mercy-Burlingame0
SINGLES Chui (CS) d.Dwyer 6-0,6-0;Tsuei (CS)
d. Levaggi 6-1, 6-3; Sxhulz (CS) d. Faoro 6-2, 6-3;
Maluth (CS) d. Duffy 6-1, 6-2. DOUBLES Loh-
Park (CS) d. Doherty-Sanders 6-2, 6-0;
Milligan-Wang (CS) d. Adam-Geronimo 6-1, 6-2;
Chu-McCrum (CS) d. Hou-McCormick 6-2, 6-0.
Records Crystal Springs 3-0 overall.
Burlingame 7, Mills 0
SINGLES Harrigan (B) d. Chan 6-0, 6-0; L. Sina-
tra (B) d. Fung 6-0, 6-1; Somers (B) d. Phan 6-0, 6-0;
S. Sinatra (B) d. Kobayashi 6-0, 6-0. DOUBLES
Murphy-Hu (B) d. Zhao-Leon 6-2, 6-0; Arfania-
Blukher (B) d. He-Wong 6-1, 6-3; Patel-Delehanty
(B) d. Lai-Lee 6-2, 6-1. Records Burlingame 1-1
PAL Bay, 2-3 overall.
Sequoia6, TerraNova1
SINGLES Oh (TN) d. Rehn 6-3, 6-3; Ciambrone
(S) d.CameronLangsjoen6-0,6-3;Self (S) d.Becken
6-0,6-4; Clark (S) d.Stephnes 6-2,6-4.DOUBLES
Hilbert-Newman (S) d. Steinberg-Godsoe 6-0, 6-
0; Karditzas-Lauese (S) d. Saupe-Ruiz 6-0, 6-0;
Cunningham-Johal (S) d. Sanlippo-Dionisio 6-1,
6-0.
GIRLSVOLLEYBALL
SacredHeartPrepdef.SanMateo25-15,25-22,
25-17 (Highlights: SM Petelo 7 kills; B.Mauricio
6 kills; Ho 5 kills,ace; Ghiorso 3 aces.SHP Abuel-
Saud 17 kills,10 digs; Gannon 12 digs; Marshall 22
assists).Records Sacred Heart Prep 8-1 overall;
San Mateo 0-2.
NotreDame-Belmontdef.WillowGlen25-7,25-
14, 25-14 (Highlights: Tealdi 11 kills; Latchford 11
kills; Santana 21 digs). Records Notre Dame-
Belmont 6-4 overall.
BOYSWATERPOLO
Serra14, Carlmont 2
Carlmont 0 1 0 1 2
Serra 7 1 5 1 14
Goal scorers: S Buljan 6; Yee 3; Blais 2; Kmak,
Mirt.C Callahan 2.Goaltender saves:S Olu-
jic 12; C Shrek 9.
CROSSCOUNTRY
PALMeet at Half MoonBay, 2.33miles
BOYS
Top10
1) Bereket (Cmont) 11:58; 2) Murphy (Mills) 12:13;
3) Dickson (Cmont) 12:16; 4) Madison (Cmont)
12:17; 5) Layten (Cmont) 12:24; 6) Marshall (HMB)
12:30;7) Dimuck(Cmont) 12:35;8) Schulte(Cmont)
12:39;9) Cooper (Aragon) 12:40;10) Cardiel (West-
moor) 12:44.
GIRLS
Top10
1) Goo (Westmoor) 14:11; Fortnam (M-A) 15:27;
3) Anderson (HMB) 15:33; 4) Bouchard-Hall (Se-
quoia) 15:34; 5) Hall (Terra Nova) 15:36; 6)
Guillermo (Terra Nova) 15:43; 7) Freeburg (HMB)
15:47; 8) Barrie (Aragon) 15:54; 9) Crowe (M-A)
15:59; 10) Worden (M-A) 16:00.
LOCAL SCOREBOARD
AMERICAN CONFERENCE
East
W L T Pct PF PA
N.Y. Jets 1 0 0 1.000 48 28
New England 1 0 0 1.000 34 13
Miami 0 1 0 .000 10 30
Buffalo 0 1 0 .000 28 48
South
W L T Pct PF PA
N.Y. Jets 1 0 0 1.000 48 28
New England 1 0 0 1.000 34 13
Miami 0 1 0 .000 10 30
Buffalo 0 1 0 .000 28 48
North
W L T Pct PF PA
Baltimore 1 0 0 1.000 44 13
Cincinnati 0 1 0 .000 13 44
Cleveland 0 1 0 .000 16 17
Pittsburgh 0 1 0 .000 19 31
West
W L T Pct PF PA
Denver 1 0 0 1.000 31 19
San Diego 1 0 0 1.000 22 14
Oakland 0 1 0 .000 14 22
Kansas City 0 1 0 .000 24 40
NATIONAL CONFERENCE
East
W L T Pct PF PA
Dallas 1 0 0 1.000 24 17
Washington 1 0 0 1.000 40 32
Philadelphia 1 0 0 1.000 17 16
N.Y. Giants 0 1 0 .000 17 24
South
W L T Pct PF PA
Dallas 1 0 0 1.000 24 17
Washington 1 0 0 1.000 40 32
Philadelphia 1 0 0 1.000 17 16
N.Y. Giants 0 1 0 .000 17 24
North
W L T Pct PF PA
Detroit 1 0 0 1.000 27 23
Chicago 1 0 0 1.000 41 21
Minnesota 1 0 0 1.000 26 23
Green Bay 0 1 0 .000 22 30
West
W L T Pct PF PA
Arizona 1 0 0 1.000 20 16
San Francisco 1 0 0 1.000 30 22
St. Louis 0 1 0 .000 23 27
Seattle 0 1 0 .000 16 20
SundaysGames
Chicago 41, Indianapolis 21
Minnesota 26, Jacksonville 23, OT
Houston 30, Miami 10
New England 34,Tennessee 13
Washington 40, New Orleans 32
Atlanta 40, Kansas City 24
N.Y. Jets 48, Buffalo 28
Detroit 27, St. Louis 23
Philadelphia 17, Cleveland 16
Arizona 20, Seattle 16
San Francisco 30, Green Bay 22
Tampa Bay 16, Carolina 10
Denver 31, Pittsburgh 19
MondaysGames
Baltimore 44, Cincinnati 13
San Diego 22, Oakland 14
Thursday, Sep. 13
Chicago at Green Bay, 5:20 p.m.
Sunday, Sep. 16
Tampa Bay at N.Y. Giants, 10 a.m.
New Orleans at Carolina, 10 a.m.
Arizona at New England, 10 a.m.
Minnesota at Indianapolis, 10 a.m.
Baltimore at Philadelphia, 10 a.m.
Kansas City at Buffalo, 10 a.m.
Cleveland at Cincinnati, 10 a.m.
Houston at Jacksonville, 10 a.m.
Oakland at Miami, 10 a.m.
Dallas at Seattle, 1:05 p.m.
Washington at St. Louis, 1:05 p.m.
Tennessee at San Diego, 1:25 p.m.
N.Y. Jets at Pittsburgh, 1:25 p.m.
Detroit at San Francisco, 5:20 p.m.
Monday, Sep. 17
Denver at Atlanta, 5:30 p.m.
NFL
Rockies
7:10p.m.
CSN-BAY
9/18
@Colorado
6p.m.
CSN-CAL
10/6
Galaxy
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
10/21
@Portland
3:30p.m.
NBC
10/27
@Chivas
7:30p.m.
CSN+
9/15
vs.Timbers
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
9/19
@Seattle
7p.m.
CSN-CAL
9/23
@Dbacks
1:10p.m.
CSN-BAY
9/16
vs.FCDallas
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
9/29
Orioles
7:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
9/14
@Tigers
4:15p.m.
CSN-CAL
9/18
Orioles
6:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
9/15
@Rockies
5:40p.m.
CSN-BAY
9/12
@Angels
7:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
9/12
Orioles
1:15p.m.
CSN-CAL
9/16
Rockies
7:15p.m.
CSN-BAY
9/17
@Dbacks
6:40p.m.
NBC
9/14
Rockies
7:10p.m.
CSN-BAY
9/19
@Angels
12:35p.m.
CSN-CAL
9/13
@Dbacks
1:10p.m.
CSN-BAY
9/15
@Tigers
4:15p.m.
CSN-CAL
9/11
@Jets
10a.m.
FOX
9/30
vs.Seattle
5:20p.m.
NFL-NET
10/18
vs.Bills
4:25p.m.
CBS
10/7
@Arizona
5:30p.m.
FOX
10/29
vs.Giants
1:25p.m.
FOX
10/14
vs.Lions
5:20p.m.
NBC
9/16
@ Vikings
10a.m.
FOX
9/23
@Broncos
1:05p.m.
CBS
9/30
vs.Jaguars
1:25p.m.
CBS
10/21
BYE
10/7
@Chiefs
1:15p.m.
CBS
10/28
@Falcons
10a.m.
CBS
10/14
@Miami
10a.m.
CBS
9/16
vs.Steelers
1:25p.m.
CBS
9/23
18
Wednesday Sept. 12, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
NATION
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Nationwide Mortgage Licensing System ID #348288 650-348-7191
By Jennifer Peltz
and Meghan Barr
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK There were still
the tearful messages to loved ones,
clutches of photos and owers, and
moments of silence. But 11 years
after Sept. 11, Americans appeared
to enter a new, scaled-back chapter
of collective mourning for the worst
terror attack in U.S history.
Crowds gathered, as always, at
the World Trade Center site in New
York, the Pentagon and a
Pennsylvania memorial Tuesday to
mourn the nearly 3,000 victims of
the 2001 terror attacks, reciting
their names and remembering with
music, tolling bells and prayer. But
they came in fewer numbers, cere-
monies were less elaborate and
some cities canceled their remem-
brances altogether. A year after the
milestone 10th anniversary, some
said the memorials may have
reached an emotional turning point.
Its human nature, so people
move on, said Wanda Ortiz, of
New York City, whose husband,
Emilio Ortiz, was killed in the trade
centers north tower, leaving behind
her and their 5-month-old twin
daughters. My concern now is ...
how I keep the memory of my hus-
band alive.
It was also a year when politicians
largely took a back seat to grieving
families; no elected ofcials spoke
at all at New Yorks 3 1/2 -hour cer-
emony. President Barack Obama
and Republican Mitt Romney pulled
negative campaign ads and avoided
rallies, with the president laying a
wreath at the Pentagon ceremony
and visiting wounded soldiers at a
Maryland hospital. And beyond the
victims of the 2001 attacks, attention
was paid to the wars that followed in
Iraq and Afghanistan.
In Middletown, N.J., a bedroom
community that lost 37 residents in
the attacks, town ofcials laid a
wreath at the entrance to the park in
a small, silent ceremony. Last year,
3,700 people attended a remem-
brance with speeches, music and
names read.
This year, said Deputy Mayor
Stephen Massell, I think less is
more.
Some worried that moving on
would mean Sept. 11 will fade from
memory.
Its been 11 years already, said
Michael Reneo, whose sister-in-
law, Daniela Notaro, was killed at
the trade center. And unfortunately
for some, the reality of this day
seems to be fading as the years go
by. ... I hope we never lose focus on
what really happened here.
Thousands had attended the cere-
mony in New York in previous
years, including last years mile-
stone 10th anniversary. In New
York, a crowd of fewer than 200
swelled to about 1,000 by late
Tuesday morning, as family mem-
bers laid roses and made paper rub-
bings of their loved ones names
etched onto the Sept. 11 memorial.
A few hundred attended ceremonies
at the Pentagon and in Shanksville,
Pa., fewer than in years past.
Smaller memorials on 9/11 anniversary
REUTERS
An American ag stands stuck in a plaque of names of the victims of the
Sept. 11 attacks at North Pool of the 9/11 Memorial during ceremonies
marking the 11th anniversary of the attack on the World Trade Center in
New York.
By Jim Kuhnhenn
and Ben Feller
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON President
Barack Obama and challenger Mitt
Romney declared a eeting truce for
partisan digs Tuesday as the nation
remembered the 9/11 terrorist
attacks, but campaign politics crack-
led through even their somber
observances.
The campaigns pulled their nega-
tive ads and scheduled no rallies.
But both candidates stayed in the
public eye as the nation marked the
11th anniversary of the jetliner
crashes that left nearly 3,000 dead.
Obama observed a White House
moment of silence, attended a
memorial service at the Pentagon,
visited Arlington National Cemetery
and then met privately with wound-
ed soldiers and their families at
Walter Reed
National Military
Medical Center.
But former
President Bill
Clinton carried
on with a cam-
paign stop for
Obama in
Florida, and the
D e m o c r a t s
camp issued reg-
istration appeals
under rst lady
Michelle Obamas name.
In an echo of his usual campaign
speech, Obama noted that the war in
Iraq is over and troops are on track
to leave Afghanistan in 2014.
Al-Qaidas leadership has been
devastated, and Osama bin Laden
will never threaten us again,
Obama said at the Pentagon. Our
country is safer and our people are
resilient.
Romney, in Reno, Nev., to
address a meeting of the National
Guard, indirectly but clearly drew
distinctions with Obama by spelling
out his own national security goals.
I wish I could
say the world is
less dangerous
now, he said.
After declar-
ing that the day
was not the
proper moment
to address differ-
ences with the
p r e s i d e n t ,
Romney took issue with threatened
cuts in defense and the handling of
disability claims and called for more
assertive international leadership.
This century must be an
American century, Romney said.
It is now our duty to steer it onto
the path of freedom, peace and pros-
perity. America must lead the free
world, and the free world must lead
the entire world.
He alluded to his criticism of
Obama over threatened cuts in mili-
tary spending that would kick in if
Congress and the president dont
find agreement on major federal
decit reductions.
Jibes on hold for 9/11 but not politics
Barack Obama Mitt Romney
Unfortunately for some, the reality of this
day seems to be fading as the years go by. ... I hope
we never lose focus on what really happened here.
Daniela Notaro
FOOD 19
Wednesday Sept. 12, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Sara Moulton
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Many people like the idea of cook-
ing with whole grains They are so
healthful! but refrain from actually
plunging in because so many of them
are unfamiliar.
What is the ratio of liquid to grain?
Dont you need to rinse them, soak
them or toast them rst? How long do
you cook them? Dont they take for-
ever to cook?
For too long, I shied away from
whole grains, too, especially because
nobody seemed to agree on the
answers to these questions. Then I did
something really smart. I read the
back of the package. And, duh! Its all
right there. After all, who knows bet-
ter how to prepare these products than
the company that did the harvesting?
Product by product, and brand by
brand, the instructions on the pack-
ages set me free to start cooking with
many new whole grains.
One of my rst and most gratifying
discoveries was that most of these
grains are pretty durable. You can boil
up a huge batch during the weekend,
then freeze them in 1-, 2- or 3-cup
containers. All you need to do is
reheat them with a bit of liquid or
steam them over simmering water.
And they are versatile, too. You can
use them in any recipe that calls for
cooked rice.
Which brings me to this recipe. My
family loves regular risotto made with
arborio or carnaroli rice. I was hope-
ful that I could prepare the same kind
of recipe using farro.
A kind of hulled wheat, farro was
rst cultivated in the ancient Near
East some 10,000 years ago. After a
while, it started showing up in ancient
Egypt and Israel. Today, its grown in
Morocco, Spain, Albania, Turkey,
Switzerland and Italy. Recently, its
been gaining popularity right here in
America because its so nutritious.
Happily, farro also happens to be
delicious. It has a full-bodied taste
and a pleasant, slightly chewy texture.
Its less starchy than short grain rice,
which means that this risotto is not as
creamy as rice-based versions. But it
still gets plenty creamy, especially
with the addition of a little freshly-
grated Parmesan.
I simmered the farro rst to give it
a jump start because it takes 50 to 60
minutes to get tender, and who wants
to be stirring all that time?
Traditionalists making the standard
risotto contend that youre supposed
to add the liquid in numerous small
increments, which can get pretty
tedious.
But I was liberated several years
ago by Andrew Carmellini, who adds
liquid to his risotto fewer times in
larger amounts. I gured if it was all
right for this celebrated Italian restau-
rant chef, I could get away with it, too.
I nish off my farro risotto with
sauteed mushrooms, but youre wel-
come to substitute any kind of cooked
vegetable carrots, peas, eggplant or
chunks of butternut squash. And
adding a little cooked protein to it,
such as shrimp, for example, or chick-
en, or Canadian bacon, easily turns
this dish into an entree. It is the per-
fect base for repurposed leftovers, but
your family also will love it straight
up.
MUSHROOM FARRO RISOTTO
If you can only nd parcooked
farro (partially cooked), skip the ini-
tial step of the recipe (which calls for
boiling the farro for 25 minutes).
Instead, proceed to the next step.
When the recipe directs you to sim-
mer the broth and reserved farro
cooking liquid, instead bring 2 1/2
cups of broth to a simmer, then pro-
ceed with the recipe and add the par-
cooked farro when it calls for drained
farro.
If you grate the cheese on a wand-
style grater, you will get about 3/4
cup. If you use the ne side of a box
grater, you will get about half as much
volume, or about 3/8 cup.
Start to nish: 50 to 60 minutes (25
minutes active)
Servings: 8
1 1/2 cups farro
3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil,
divided
1 medium yellow onion, nely
chopped (about 1 cup)
1 large clove garlic, nely chopped
2 teaspoons chopped fresh thyme
leaves
1 1/2 cups chicken or vegetable
broth
4 ounces fresh mushrooms (white
button, cremini, shiitake, oyster or a
mix)
1/2 cup dry red wine
1 ounce freshly grated
Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese
Kosher salt and ground black pep-
per
Bring a large pot of salted water to
a boil. Add the farro and simmer for
25 minutes. Drain the farro, reserv-
ing 1 cup of the cooking liquid.
Meanwhile, in a medium saucepan
over medium, heat 2 tablespoons of
the oil. Reduce the heat to medium-
low, then add the onion and cook for
5 minutes, or until it has softened.
Add the garlic and the thyme and
cook for 1 minute more.
In a medium skillet over medium,
heat the remaining tablespoon of oil
until hot. Reduce the heat to medi-
um-low, then add the mushrooms
and saute for about 5 minutes, stir-
ring occasionally, until the liquid
they give off has evaporated. Set
aside.
In a medium saucepan, combine
the broth and the reserved farro
cooking liquid. Bring the mixture to
a simmer. Turn down the heat to low.
Add the drained farro to the onion;
cook, stirring constantly, for 1
minute. Add the wine to the farro and
simmer 1 to 2 minutes, until it is
absorbed.
Add the hot stock mixture to the
farro in 3 increments, letting it sim-
mer until almost all the liquid has
been absorbed before adding each
new batch of stock. This should take
about 25 minutes. When the farro is
tender, stir in the mushroom mixture
along with the cheese, then season
with salt and pepper.
Nutrition information per serving:
230 calories; 60 calories from fat (26
percent of total calories); 7 g fat (1 g
saturated; 0 g trans fats); 5 mg choles-
terol; 32 g carbohydrate; 5 g ber; 1 g
sugar; 8 g protein; 290 mg sodium.
Getting tothe whole-grainside of risotto
A kind of hulled wheat, farro was rst cultivated in the ancient Near East some 10,000 years ago. After a while, it
started showing up in ancient Egypt and Israel.Today, its grown in Morocco, Spain, Albania,Turkey, Switzerland
and Italy. Recently, its been gaining popularity right here in America because its so nutritious.
FOOD 20
Wednesday Sept. 12, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
EXPIRES: September 30, 2012
JACKS RESTAURANT & BAR: SAN BRUNO
1050 Admiral Court, Suite A
San Bruno, CA 94066
Phone: (650) 589-2222 | Fax: (650) 589-5042
iLoveJacks.com
EVERY
THURSDAY
THURS SDDAAA GHT GGGHT T H GGGHT T YY WINE NIGHT AAA THURSDAY WINE NIGHT
E V EV EV E E E E V VE VVV EV EVERR RRRRRRRR RRYYYYY Y YY RRRRR RRR
S S RS RS RS RS R R U UR U HU H H T TH TT T S SS SS S S U U URR RR R T T THH H HUU U SSS S RR R HH H DD DDD DD DDD DA AA A A DDDDAA AAAAA AAA AY YY AYYY AAY AAYYY Y A AA AAAA AAAA AA
EVERY
THURSDAY
M
ost people consider polenta
a restaurant food. Thats
because as good as this
creamy, cheesy Italian staple is, few of
us have the hour
needed to crank it
out.
But hidden on
the grocers
shelves is a short-
cut that can help
get polenta on
your dinner table
any day of the
week in minutes
prepared polen-
ta. This is different
and far better
than a related product known as
instant polenta. But rst, some polenta
basics.
Polenta is a traditional starch in
Italian cooking, an alternative to pasta,
rice and potatoes that pairs deliciously
well with robust sauces and meats.
Polenta is made by slowly simmering
and stirring cornmeal with chicken
broth or water. It usually also is sea-
soned with Parmesan cheese and butter.
Freshly made, polenta resembles a
thick porridge. This variety often is
topped with thick sauces, especially
meaty ones. But if you let the polenta
set up or chill a bit it becomes rm
enough to cut into grill-worthy slabs or
wedges. The trouble is the slowly sim-
mering and stirring part of making it.
While there is a dry product called
instant polenta (just add water!) that
promises results in 5 minutes or less, it
tends to be grainy and avorless. The
better choice is tube-style pre-cooked
polenta, usually sold in the grocers nat-
ural foods section. This product is ready
to slice and toss on the grill, under the
broiler or into a skillet to pan-fry.
It also can be reconstituted to its soft
(porridge-like) form by heating it with a
bit of liquid, such as milk or broth. For
ideas for using prepared polenta, check
out the Off the Beaten Aisle column
over on Food Network:
http://bit.ly/Nfg8Ka.
SPICY PORK WITH POLENTA
For the crushed pepper sauce, I used
Pastenes Crushed Peppers. Youll nd
jars of it alongside other Italian ingredi-
ents or next to the jarred peppers. If you
cant nd that, substitute any jarred
crushed pepper sauce, such as sambal.
Start to nish: 45 minutes
Servings: 4
1/2 cup mirin
1/4 cup crushed pepper sauce
1/4 cup seasoned rice vinegar
2 tablespoons soy sauce
1 pound thinly sliced pork cutlets
18-ounce tube prepared polenta, cut
into chunks
1 cup milk
2 tablespoons toasted sesame oil
4 ounces crumbled feta cheese
Salt and ground black pepper
In a large glass or stainless steel
bowl, stir together the mirin, crushed
pepper sauce, vinegar and soy sauce.
Add the pork, toss, then refrigerate for
20 minutes.
Meanwhile, in a medium saucepan
over medium heat, combine the polenta
and milk. Stir until soft and heated
through, 6 to 7 minutes. Cover and set
aside.
In a large skillet, heat the oil over
medium-high. Remove the pork from
the marinade (reserve the marinade)
and add to the pan. Brown the cutlets
on each side for 3 to 4 minutes. Add the
marinade from the bowl to the skillet
and bring to a boil.
Stir the feta cheese into the polenta,
then season with salt and pepper. To
serve, spoon polenta onto each plate,
then top with pork cutlets and sauce
from the pan.
Nutrition information per serving
(values are rounded to the nearest
whole number): 490 calories; 180 calo-
ries from fat (37 percent of total calo-
ries); 21 g fat (8 g saturated; 0 g trans
fats); 95 mg cholesterol; 34 g carbohy-
drate; 34 g protein; 1 g ber; 1,890 mg
sodium.
Prepared polenta: What
it is and how to use it
Polenta is a traditional starch in Italian cooking, an alternative to pasta, rice and
potatoes that pairs deliciously well with robust sauces and meats.
J.M. HIRSCH
Finns open pop-down
restaurant in old mine
By Matti Huuhtanen
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LOHJA, Finland An award-winning chef has opened a
new restaurant in Finland that turns the idea of pop-up eater-
ies upside down: its located 260 feet underground.
Discerning food lovers are being served salted salmon, veal
tenderloin, snails cooked in Pernod and apple crumble in the
pop-down restaurant in a limestone mine in the small, south-
ern town of Lohja, 40 miles west of Helsinki.
A four-course evening meal costs $160, including drinks
and transportation from Helsinki to the mine and back.
In major cities around the world pop-up restaurants
temporary eateries often located in underused kitchens are
allowing young chefs with experience to experiment without
risk of bankruptcy.
But Finnish chef Timo Linnamaki said the idea of preparing
food down a mine was all part of being close to the earth.
Pop-down is such a unique idea that I just had to do it,
Linnamaki said Monday, a few hours before the rst guests
arrived. Its great working down here because you are totally
cut off from the world, so nothing distracts from the cooking.
Eerie blue lights cut deep shadows into the ceiling of the
large, dim, underground cavern, a former smithy where drills
were hammered to dig into the bowels of the Earth.
FOOD 21
Wednesday Sept. 12, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL


Open for Dinner
Wednesday to
Sunday
5PM to 9PM
Borel Shopping Center
59 Bovet Road San Mateo
650-525-1941
Now Serving
Fresh Homemade Pasta
with our Family Sauces.
Charlie The Meatball" Esposto
loves it, so will you!
U.S. rum subsidies
hammer Caribbean
By David McFadden
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
KINGSTON, Jamaica Rum, the sugar-based liquor that
has fueled the development of the Caribbean for centuries, has
become the focus of an increasingly bitter dispute with the
U.S.
Small producers in countries such as Antigua, Guyana and
Jamaica complain they are being punched by unfair trade and
marketing advantages for global beverage corporations operat-
ing in U.S. territories, and say U.S. rum subsidies threaten to
drive some beloved top-shelf Caribbean labels out of business,
or force them to sell out.
The amounts that are being doled out now are staggering,
said Frank Ward, chairman of the West Indies Rum & Spirits
Producers Association. We were able to live with the level of
U.S. subsidies as they once were. But the massive increases,
we believe, have skewed the market.
Its a high stakes battle because rum, rst developed on
Caribbean sugar plantations in the 17th century and deeply
engrained in local culture and history, is one of the few com-
petitive industries for the tourism-dependent regions tiny, vul-
nerable economies. The tipple, which can range from colorless
to coppery, from almost tasteless to richly layered, generates
roughly $500 million in foreign exchange for independent
Caribbean countries and more than $250 million in tax rev-
enue.
The subsidies come from money raised through an excise
tax on liquor sold in the United States. Under an obscure fed-
eral law, almost all of the money generated by rum goes to the
treasuries of Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Those
tropical territories in turn hand a share of it to the producers as
a subsidy to do business there.
Distillers in other countries say they lived fairly comfortably
with the U.S. subsidies for decades, even if they thought the
rebates gave advantages to rum giant Bacardi Limited in
Puerto Rico and Cruzan Rum, a U.S. Virgin Islands brand now
owned by Beam Inc., the U.S. maker of spirits such as Jim
Beam and Makers Mark.
But they are alarmed by recent deals that sharply increased
the subsidies for already powerful corporations in the two ter-
ritories.
In the Virgin Islands, London-based Diageo PLC signed a
long-term lease in 2009 to build a rum distillery on St. Croix
making the Captain Morgan brand in exchange for a chunk of
the excise-tax revenue estimated at $2.7 billion over 30 years.
It will start full production next scal year. Diageo also gets
government marketing support and generous subsidies for
molasses, the syrupy byproduct of sugar rening that is a key
ingredient in most rum.
Puerto Rico, in response, has increased the amount it spends
to promote its rum industry, from 10 percent to 25 percent of
the excise tax money it gets back. It has also awarded Bacardi
a $95 million grant to renovate its production plant in
exchange for maintaining a minimum level of production for
the next 20 years. That translates into more than $230 million
in yearly revenue from excise taxes
The moves have prompted some competing Caribbean dis-
tillers to urge their governments to complain to the World
Trade Organization, fearing that the U.S. subsidies may under-
mine age-old rum operations in the Caribbean, the global cen-
ter of production, and motivate other multinational distillers to
relocate to U.S. territories.
Our Caribbean distilleries need to export rum in order to
survive. But bigger subsidies in the U.S. islands means we
dont get a level playing eld for our exports, and its going to
affect both small and large producers here, said Anthony
Bento, managing director of the 80-year-old Antigua company
that makes English Harbour Rum in copper stills and ages it in
oak barrels.
Clifton Shillingford of Shillingford Estates Ltd, a small
Dominica distiller that makes its Macourcherie rums from
local sugar cane juice instead of molasses, said the subsidies
for big global brands in the U.S. islands will destroy his rum
business.
Diageo argues the complaints of smaller producers are
overblown. Spokesperson Brooke Lawer says the subsidies the
British company receives are similar to incentives from U.S.
states or other countries to attract industry and do not create a
competitive disadvantage.
By J.M. Hirsch
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Several thousand years ago, people
discovered that exposing sh to intense
amounts of salt and smoke was a great
was of preserving the catch for later.
Today, our smoking techniques are
considerably more rened, and we do it
more for avor than as a means of
preservation. And that makes it a shame
more people dont think to reach for
smoked sh as an effortless way to add
gobs of avor to the foods they love.
But rst, a primer on smoked sh.
There are two ways to smoke sh
cold and hot. Salmon, trout, haddock
and mackerel are the most common
choices.
In cold smoking, the sh are brined in
a heavy salt solution, then exposed to
cool smoke (85 F max) for up to several
days, then frozen to kill parasites. Cold
smoked sh which is essentially raw
has a soft, delicate texture, an
assertive saltiness and a pleasant, but not
overwhelming, smoky avor.
Hot smoked fish is more lightly
brined, then smoked for a shorter time at
a higher temperature (as high as 170 F),
effectively cooking the sh. Hot smok-
ing produces a sh with a more assertive
smoky flavor and a meatier texture
(though the lighter brine means it isnt as
salty).
Both varieties often are seasoned,
sometimes with just a bit of sugar, but
also with black pepper, dill or other
herbs.
As long as you keep in mind the dif-
ferences in saltiness and smokiness, hot
and cold smoked sh often can be used
interchangeably in recipes. Generally,
neither variety should be exposed to
long cooking times, especially hot
smoked sh, which already is cooked.
The exception to this is certain baked
recipes, such as shcakes and sh pot
pies, which usually contain enough
moisture to prevent the sh from getting
tough.
Grocers generally sell a wide variety
of both types of smoked sh. Salmon,
for example, can be found with different
seasonings and cuts, including thinly
sliced, thick slabs and whole sides.
Smoked salmon is particularly good for
making dips and pates. When doing so,
look for cheaper packages labeled trim-
mings, which are small pieces. Thinly
sliced salmon is delicious topped with
poached eggs and fresh dill.
Hot smoked sh, such as trout and
mackerel, are delicious aked into sal-
ads or tossed with warm pasta, especial-
ly with a cream sauce.
For more ideas for using smoked sh,
check out the Off the Beaten Aisle col-
umn over on Food Network:
http://bit.ly/RsyCqE.
SMOKED TROUT NOODLE SOUP
Not as strange as it sounds. Smoked
trout has a meaty texture similar to
chicken. And the rich, smoky avor is
the perfect match for a soup thick with
noodles.
Start to nish: 30 minutes
Servings: 6
2 tablespoons olive oil
1 clove garlic, minced
3 medium carrots, peeled and chopped
1 large yellow onion, diced
2 stalks celery, chopped
1 cup frozen peas
1 tablespoon chopped fresh thyme
Large sprig fresh rosemary
6 cups (1 1/2 quarts) chicken broth
2 cups elbow pasta
2 cups baby spinach
2 scallions, whites and greens,
chopped
Salt and ground black pepper
8-ounce package smoked trout
In a large saucepan over medium-
high, heat the oil. Add the garlic, carrots,
onion, celery, peas, thyme and rosemary.
Saute for 5 minutes.
Add the chicken broth and bring to a
simmer. Add the pasta and cook for 7 to
8 minutes, or until barely tender.
Remove and discard the rosemary stem.
Add the spinach and scallions and heat
for 30 seconds. Season with salt and
pepper.
Using a fork, ake and break up the
trout into large bite-size chunks. Ladle
the soup into serving bowls, then pile a
bit of the trout in the center of each.
Why you should love smoked fish
As long as you keep in mind the differences in saltiness and smokiness,hot and cold
smoked sh often can be used interchangeably in recipes.
LOCAL
22
Wednesday Sept. 12, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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Together well go far
this November but Jack Hickey, who already
sits on the board and whose seat does not
expire for another two years, jumped into the
race to force a $160,000 election in an effort
to gain the most votes and to prove with his
victory that residents want to see the district
dissolved.
The election is about dissolution. A vote
for Hickey is a vote for dissolution, Hickey
told the Daily Journal. He intends to get the
most votes, he said.
All three candidates visited the Daily
Journal ofce Tuesday for a question and
answer session.
Kane, who has served on the board since
1992, is seeking re-election so that the district
will continue to serve the health care needs for
its most vulnerable residents. Sequoia serves
most of southern San Mateo County.
She touts the districts support of the
Samaritan House Free Clinic and county-run
Fair Oaks Clinic, support for physical educa-
tion teachers and nutrition programs in public
schools that the district helps fund with its
$8.6 million in annual property taxes it col-
lects.
The district will become even more vital,
she said, as the Patient Protection and
Affordable Care Act and its many reforms are
instituted.
There will be a great need to help people
access care, she said.
Hickey, however, said the district should not
be subsidizing schools and that with dissolu-
tion, the millions in property taxes the district
collects would go to other tax districts, such as
schools.
We are doing a lot of
things that would be done
without us, Hickey said
about the programs the dis-
trict supports. Hickey was
rst elected to the board in
2002. Although his seat is
not up for re-election until
2014, he is running now to
try and force one of the
incumbents to lose their
seat.
Grifn was elected to the board in 2008.
The job is a lot more work that I thought it
would be. But Im passionate about my job to
keep people healthy and care for the sick,
said Grifn, a registered nurse at Childrens
Cardiology of the Bay Area.
With the economic downturn, Grifn said,
many district residents are going without
health care. With a shortage of primary care
physicians in the area, residents who get
insurance through the Affordable Care Act
will need help accessing care, she said.
Grifn, the boards president, would like to
see the board put more money into schools
and elder care in the coming years.
There are a lot of seniors out there who
really need help, Grifn said.
Currently, the Fair Political Practices
Commission is investigating two members of
the board, Vice President Dr. Gerald Shefren
and Director Art Faro, for conicts of interest
related to board votes.
Grifn called the conicts honest mis-
takes and Kane called Shefren and Faro
upfront and honorable people.
Even Hickey said he had no major concerns
related to the investigation.
The district also supplies automated exter-
nal debrillators to re departments and other
agencies that Grifn and Kane call a good
investment since they save lives.
But Hickey said provid-
ing the devices is not a
proper function of the dis-
trict to be involved in.
With dissolution,
Hickeys main goal, more
taxpayer money would go
directly to local schools, he
said.
The money should go
directly where it belongs,
Hickey said.
But Kane said that if the district were to dis-
solve, all the programs it supports would stop
and health care services for the most needy
would not be met.
We are providing services beyond what the
hospital can do, said Kane, a human resource
consultant.
If Hickey loses in November, he will still
hold his current seat, which expires in 2014.
In 1946, voters approved a tax assessment
for the construction, maintenance and opera-
tion of a hospital. The district, formerly the
Sequoia Hospital District, sold Sequoia
Hospital, however, to Catholic Healthcare
West in 1996. It started supporting nonprots
and county programs after that with the prop-
erty tax it collects but Hickey contends that is
not what voters approved when the tax assess-
ment passed.
We shouldnt be engaged in philanthropy,
he said.
While Hickey has made himself out to be a
tax advocate, his opponents question why he
would want to spend $160,000 of district
money to force an unneeded election.
That money could be used to fund meals
for seniors and a lot of other services, Grifn
said. Its shameful.
The election would have been uncontested
without Hickey jumping into the race, she
said.
He nickels and dimes
everything. It is self-serv-
ing of him to spend the
money, Kane said about
Hickey forcing an election.
Hickey told the Daily
Journal he would like to
retire in a couple of years
but wants the district dis-
solved before he does.
Hickey ran against a
slate of candidates that included Frederick
Graham and Michael Stogner in 2010 to try to
take control of the board. While Hickey won
his seat, Graham and Stogner failed miserably
at the polls.
Hickey hoped to take control of the board
and start the dissolution process. He also tried
to nd other suitable candidates to run for the
seats this November but was unable, he said.
Kane was instrumental in developing a part-
nership with Caada College, San Francisco
State University and Sequoia Hospital that has
produced more than 400 medical nurses with
masters degrees, with priority given to dis-
trict residents and hiring at Sequoia Hospital.
The health care district provides $1 million
annually in support of the program.
In running for the four-year seat, Hickeys
candidate statement said he is giving voters
an opportunity to cast a single vote in sup-
port of dissolution.
For his part, Hickey said many of the chari-
table organizations receiving grants from the
district are worthy of support. However, he
said, it should be up to residents to support the
organizations out of their own pockets and not
through a tax assessment.
The election is Nov. 6
Bill Silverfarb can be reached by email: silver-
farb@smdailyjournal.com or by phone: (650) 344-
5200 ext. 106.
Continued from page 1
RACE
Kim Grifn Jack Hickey Kathleen Kane
Alfaour was assaulted with rocks, bottles and
tools and once a dead mouse was placed in his
lunch sack.
Alfaour repeatedly reported the harassment
but UPS failed to take action and instead
chose to transfer him to a new work station
where he was scrutinized closely, the suit
alleges.
EEOC District Director Michael Baldonado
said punishing an employee like Alfaour for
speaking up about discrimination is not only
illegal under the Civil Rights Act but also poi-
sons the work environment.
It sends the message to your staff that an
employee complains at his or her own risk and
it can encourage harassers to continue,
Baldonado said.
The EEOC reported trying to reach a settle-
ment voluntarily with UPS but, failing to do
so, led the suit in the U.S. District Court for
Northern California.
UPS has yet to be served with the suit so it
cannot comment on the specic allegations,
said Public Relations Director Susan
Rosenberg.
However, she said UPS has a zero tolerance
policy regarding discrimination.
We take claims of discrimination of any
form very seriously. They are stated implicit-
ly in our policies and training and we will
investigate them thoroughly, Rosenberg said.
According to the EEOC, retaliation claims
represented 37.4 percent of all charges led
with the commission in scal year 2011 the
highest percentage of any claim that year and
the highest number of retaliation charges ever
by the EEOC in any given year.
Michelle Durand can be reached by email:
michelle@smdailyjournal.com or by phone: (650)
344-5200 ext. 102.
Continued from page 1
UPS
DATEBOOK 23
Wednesday Sept. 12, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 12
Internet Marketing Seminar and
Small Business Fair. 8 a.m. to 1 p.m.,
San Mateo County Event Center, 1346
Saratoga Drive, San Mateo.
Community event for small business
owners, self-employed professionals
and marketing professionals. Learn
effective ways to market your
business via websites, social media
and blogs. Network with other
professionals. Lunch is included.
Sponsored by the Daily Journal. Bring
business cards. Free. For more
information visit
www.smdailyjournal.com/b2breg.
Mental Health First Aid Instructor
Certification Training for the
Public. 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday
through Friday. Locations will be sent
to participants once they register.
Free. For more information or to
request an application call 573-2541.
Free Marketing Seminar and Small
Business Fair. 8 a.m. registration, 9
a.m. seminar, noon networking and
lunch. San Mateo event Center,
Meeting Pavilion, 2495 S. Delaware
St., San Mateo. Internet marketing
success. One attendee will win
$5,000 advertising schedule in the
Daily Journal. For more information
call 344-5200 ext. 121.
City Talk Toastmasters Club Open
House. 12:30 p.m. to 1:30 p.m.
County Building, 455 County Center,
Room 402, Redwood City. Learn to
improve your communication and
leadership skills. For more
information call 743-2558.
Seniors Classics Dance Party. 1:30
p.m. to 4 p.m. Boogie Woogie
Ballroom, 551 Foster City Blvd., Suite
G, Foster City. Advanced Beginner
Level Night Club Two Step Lesson
and dance party. $5. For more
information call 627-4854.
Healing Clinic. 7 p.m. Mills-Peninsula
Health Services, fourth floor
conference room, 100 S. San Mateo
Drive, San Mateo. Meditation, energy
cleansing and slow, easy movements.
Small donations for supplies
welcome. Wear loose clothing, do not
wear scents and arrive promptly. Not
affiliated with any religious group.
Meets second Wednesday of every
month at Mills-Peninsula Health
Center. Free. To RSVP email
weissb@sutterhealth.org.
Presentation by Marty Brounstein.
7 p.m. San Carlos Library, 610 Elm St.,
San Carlos. Author of Two Among
the Righteous Few: A Story of
Courage in the Holocaust gives a
presentation on his true experience.
Free. For more information call 591-
0341.
Club Fox Blues Jam: Daniel Castro.
7 p.m. Club Fox, 2209 Broadway,
Redwood City. $5. For more
information call 369-7770.
Phase2Careers Presentation. 7 p.m.
South San Francisco Conference
Center, 255 S. Airport Blvd. South San
Francisco. Author Susan RoAne will
be presenting her book, How to
Work a Room: Savvy Networking in a
Digital Age. $20 pre-registration
before Sept. 5, $25 pre-registration
after Sept. 5. For more information
call 483-1704.
Total Healing: The Meditation
Prescription. 7 p.m. Millbrae Library,
1 Library Ave., Millbrae. The
presentation will be given by Dr.
Marshall Zaslove. Free. For more
information call 697-7607.
Argentine Tango and Bachata
Classes. 7:30 p.m. to 10:30 p.m.
Boogie Woogie Ballroom, 551 Foster
City Blvd., Suite G, Foster City.
Beginning Argentine Tango Class,
Intermediate Argentine Tango Class
and Argentine Tango Practica. For
more information call 627-4854.
THURSDAY, SEPT. 13
The New HR: Authentic Leadership.
7:30 a.m. to 9:30 p.m. Sequoia, 1850
Gateway Drive, Suite 600, San Mateo.
Presented by Northern California
Human Resources Association. $35
for general admission. Free for
NCHRA members. For more
information and to register visit
m360.nchra.org/event.aspx?eventID
=37092&instance=0.
Mental Health First Aid Instructor
Certification Training for the
Public. 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday
through Friday. Locations will be sent
to participants once they register.
Free. For more information or to
request an application call 573-2541.
Health screening for seniors. 9 a.m.
to 11:30 a.m. Martin Luther King
Center, 725 Monte Diablo Ave., San
Mateo. For ages 60 and older. Those
who plan to participate should only
consume water and medicine 12
hours before blood tests (if
prescribed, diabetes medicines
should be delayed but blood
pressure medicines should be taken).
Exercise should not be participated
in the morning of the screening.
Appointments should be made with
the community center. Free. For more
information 696-3660.
RPEA Meeting. 10:30 a.m. San Mateo
Elks Lodge, 229 W. 20th Ave. Guest
speaker Lily Apt, outreach and
program coordinator for Rebuilding
Together Peninsula. This organization
provides free home repairs for
income-qualified homeowners in
San Mateo and Northern Santa Clara
counties. Lunch is $14. For more
information and to make
reservations call 207-6401.
Narfe Meeting. 11:30 a.m. Beresford
Recreation Center, 2720 Alameda de
las Pulgas, San Mateo. Terry Nagel will
give a talk on citizen and
neighborhood action. Free. For more
information call 345-5001.
Burlingame Lions Club
Membership Drive. Noon. 900
Burlingame Ave., Burlingame. Join
the Lions Club for lunch and see
what they are about. Free. For more
information call 245-2993.
Conservatorship. Noon. San Mateo
County Law Library, 710 Hamilton St.,
Redwood City. Attorneys Paul J.
Constantino and Colleen McAvoy will
provide an overview of what you
need to know regarding
conservatorship. Open to the public.
Free. For more information call 363-
4913.
Movies for School Age Children
presents Pirates: Band of Misfits.
3:30 p.m. San Mateo Public Library,
55 W. Third Ave., San Mateo. The
movie is rated PG and lasts 88
minutes. Popcorn from Whole Foods
will be provided before the movie.
Free. For more information call 522-
7838.
Things That Fly and Why presented
by CuriOdyssey. 4 p.m. Hillsdale
Shopping Center, Macys Center
Court, 60 31st Ave., San Mateo.
Children are invited to explore
mobile exhibits, as well as learn
about the forces behind the flight of
mini-rockets, paper helicopters and
gliders. Free. For more information
call 345-8222 or visit hillsdale.com.
South San Francisco Dental Cares
Free Dental Implant Seminar. 6
p.m. to 7 p.m. South San Francisco
Dental Office, 2400 Westborough
Blvd., Suite 205, South San Francisco.
Dr. Stanley Sun will host this free
seminar on dental implants. Space is
limited to 15 seats. For more
information and to reserve a spot call
763-8792.
Calendar
For more events visit
smdailyjournal.com, click Calendar.
Way in Redwood City after several years of
planning, community meetings and debate
over location. The mens Maguire
Correctional Facility is chronically over-
crowded and the womens jail is antiquated,
often ooding during winter months.
Currently, the new jail is expected to open in
2015 with a roughly $155 million construction
price tag followed by $25 million to $27 mil-
lion in annual operating expenses. Ground
broke in June and jail planners and architects
are narrowing down a design.
The preferred option so far is a mid-rise
building configuration with
administrative/support services in a two-story
structure separate from inmate housing which
will be located in a three-story building. Both
that design and another option separate male
and female inmates and take into considera-
tion the needs of inmates with longer or
extended stay lengths under the state realign-
ment. Realignment shifted some low-level
offenders from state prison to county jails and
kept some convicts local rather than sending
them to prison.
But for opponents, any jail is the wrong
option.
Im concerned that our countys justice
system is headed off in a costly and ineffective
direction, said Sabrina Brennan, a candidate
for the San Mateo County Harbor District
Board of Commissioners.
Many speakers said the overcrowding can
be addressed by releasing inmates on their
own recognizance prior to trial or offering
alternatives to sentencing. Defense attorney
Richard Keyes called the amount of money to
be spent outlandish and cited both a high
bail schedule and policy of detaining non-citi-
zens for immigration ofcials as crowding
contributors that can be xed.
Redwood City resident James Lee said the
womens jail need not be replaced but shut
down completely because most of the female
inmates are incarcerated for drug or non-vio-
lent offenses.
While the Board of Supervisors is not obli-
gated to respond to public comment because
the jail was not an agenda item, board
President Adrienne Tissier and others tried
clarifying the limits of its responsibility for
the population.
We dont send people to jail. We dont
arrest them. We dont send them there, she
said. What we want to do is, if they are there,
help them the best we can while they are
there.
Tissier also pointed out that the county does
not control school funding so is not choosing
a jail over education.
County Manager John Maltbie tried temper-
ing the dissent by saying that decisions lead-
ing to the increased jail populations like laws
or limits on inmate release are often made by
the judiciary or Legislature rather than local
supervisors.
If were serious about reducing the popula-
tion of the jail, we need to have conversations
with those who make those decisions, he
said.
He also said that simply not building a jail
wont reduce the population or prevent incar-
ceration.
The crowd appeared unmoved, loudly
changing No more jails as they left board
chambers.
Michelle Durand can be reached by email:
michelle@smdailyjournal.com or by phone: (650)
344-5200 ext. 102.
Continued from page 1
JAIL
on Ralston leading to Davis. It would need,
however, to purchase a property to construct
the lane and if the property owner is not open
to selling, eminent domain would be needed.
That fact did not sit well with Councilwoman
Coralin Feierbach, who also chastised school
officials for distributing misleading fliers
related to the property and the schools plan.
Feierbach said a simple photograph depict-
ing the propertys current state on a ier sent
to Belmont residents did not show the true
character of the building. The vacant ofce
building, she said, is worthy enough to be
showcased in Sunset Magazine. The picture
the private school used showed an empty park-
ing lot with weeds growing, she said.
You showed the current site in its poorest
form. Why not show the real picture of the
property? Why the distortion? It is hard for me
to believe what you are saying, Feierbach
said directly to school head Amy Richards.
But at least one Belmont resident, Charles
Stone, said Feierbach was also in the distor-
tion game.
Feierbach distributed an email to Belmont
residents that said the school may have violat-
ed the national Do Not Call law last week that
Stone said was a distortion on the council-
womans part. Surveys are exempt from Do
Not Call laws.
The school wants to purchase a vacant ofce
building on 6-8 and 10 Davis Drive, demolish
it and build a new school campus with a turfed
athletic eld and one day a pool.
The plan has the full support of the Belmont
Chamber of Commerce. Chamber President
George Burgess said the school would attract
more business to Belmont and that sales tax
receipts would climb.
The project did not pass muster with the
citys Planning Commission, however, so the
school decided to offer the city even more
benets for allowing it to move to Belmont,
including a one-time $1 million payment and
a $250,000 annual payment to the city since it
is a nonprot agency exempt from paying
property taxes.
Currently, the vacant ofce buildings gener-
ate about $150,000 annually in property taxes,
with the city and Belmont Fire Protection
Agency getting about a third of it and other
taxing agencies, such as local school districts,
getting the rest. The buildings ownership has
been unable to lease the space and has
expressed desire to sell to Crystal Springs
Uplands School.
The private school rst came to the city with
an early plan to relocate to Belmont in April
2011.
School officials said the City Council
offered early support for the plan then and sent
them on a path to purchase the Davis Drive
property.
Crystal Springs Uplands is a private school
which currently has a 10-acre suburban cam-
pus in Hillsborough serving 350 students in
sixth through 12th grades. The school is hop-
ing to expand by opening a middle school
serving up to 240 students in sixth through
eighth grades on Davis Drive.
Currently, about 83,000 square feet of com-
mercial/ofce and warehouse buildings and
165 parking spots are situated at 6-8 and 10
Davis Drive that has stood vacant for years.
CSUS wants to demolish the current buildings
and construct a 52,000-square-foot middle
school with a 60-space parking lot, gymnasi-
um/theater/multi-purpose room and an all-
weather synthetic turf playing eld.
Jolie hears horrific
accounts of Syrian refugees
ZAATARI, Jordan Her eyes welling up
with tears, actress Angelina Jolie said she heard
horric and heartbreaking accounts from
Syrian refugees she met Tuesday during a visit
to a camp in Jordan that has provided shelter for
those eeing the civil war in the neighboring
country.
The Hollywood star, who is also the U.N.
refugee agencys special envoy, spoke after
meeting a group of women refugees at the
Zaatari camp, which hosts about 30,000 Syrians
displaced by the 18-month conict.
I am very concerned, the world is very con-
cerned, Jolie said during a high-prole visit
U.N. refugee agencys special envoy aimed at
focusing international attention on the plight of
Syrian refugees and attracting more funding to
help them. What is very heartbreaking is when
Syrian people ask you why you think no one is
able to nd a solution for them.
Jolie met separately with the Syrian refugee
women as U.N. High Commissioner for
Refugees Antonio Guterres and Jordanian
Foreign Minister Nasser Judeh toured the
sprawling tent city. She also went to the border
late Monday and met with Syrian refugees as
they crossed into Jordan.
Continued from page 1
SCHOOL
People in the news
WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2012
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -- An important commer-
cial involvement is not likely to be conducted along
conventional lines. However, this departure from
traditional methods could present you with a great
opportunity.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -- Although you might get
paired up with a new and unfamiliar partner in order
to pursue a mutual interest, youll enjoy every minute
of it.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -- Your chances for suc-
cess will be greatly enhanced if you truly enjoy what
you are doing. It will be up to you, however, to make
the love of your task the motivating factor.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -- Establish lofty
objectives for yourself, regardless of how far-fetched
they may appear to be to your companions. Youll
perform better if you feel you have to push yourself
a bit.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -- Dont lose faith,
even if the going gets tough. Things should work out
to your ultimate advantage, but only as long as you
keep your focus on victory.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -- Decisions you make
in which you are looking out for a loved ones inter-
ests along with your own have excellent chances of
working out the way youre hoping.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) -- Your chances for
personal gain are much stronger than usual today,
especially if you get involved with some type of com-
mercial arrangement with an infuential friend.
ARIES (March 21-April 19) -- It is smart not to del-
egate an assignment to others that youre capable of
doing better than anybody else. You work on it -- let
them work on everything else.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20) -- Youre a resourceful
person to begin with, so it isnt unlikely that youll
come up with one of your better ideas today. It not
only could be proftable for you, but for everybody
else involved as well.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20) -- You should take ad-
vantage of a social invitation that gives you an oppor-
tunity to meet new people. There is a strong chance
that you could link up with someone exceptional.
CANCER (June 21-July 22) -- Lady Luck is in your
corner where your fnancial interests are concerned.
Chances are she will be arranging something quite
unique, but it will require your immediate attention.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) -- It doesnt matter if your tac-
tics appear to be strange to your associates. As long
as they are tailored to suit your needs, everything
should work out to your satisfaction.
zzzzzz
COPYRIGHT 2012 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
COMICS/GAMES
9-12-12
TUESDAYS PUZZLE SOLVED
PREVIOUS
SUDOkU
ANSWERS
Want More Fun
and Games?
Jumble Page 2 La Times Crossword Puzzle Classifeds
Tundra & Over the Hedge Comics Classifeds
kids Across/Parents Down Puzzle Family Resource Guide


Each row and each column must contain the numbers 1
through 6 without repeating.

The numbers within the heavily outlined boxes, called
cages, must combine using the given operation (in any
order) to produce the target numbers in the top-left corners.

Freebies: Fill in single-box cages with the number in the
top-left corner.
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ACROSS
1 Enough
6 Style of necklace
12 While
14 Midnight rider
15 Ms. Earhart
16 Popular watches
17 Woodworking tool
18 EMT technique
19 Cul-de- --
21 Goddess of dawn
23 LP spinners
26 Tarboosh kin
27 Wane
28 Eats sparingly
30 Open meadow
31 London lavatory
32 Just right
33 Globe substitute
35 Not up to snuff
37 Estuary
38 Strangers query
39 My gal of song
40 High school subj.
41 Teacup handle
42 Common abbr.
43 Visa and passport
44 It gives a hoot
46 Rural lodging
48 Was on the team
51 Time of the mammals
55 Let go by
56 Band crew member
57 Yellowstone sight
58 Hillock
DOWN
1 Nabokov novel
2 Fall fower
3 Opposite of post-
4 Fragrant shrub
5 Novelist -- Bagnold
6 Gator cousins
7 Rope fber
8 Went to extremes
9 Barbecue extra
10 Pitchers stat
11 Legal matter
13 Summerhouse
19 Barely boil
20 Funnel-shaped fower
22 Orchestra member
24 Yelled insults
25 Laundry problems
26 Defect
27 Threat ender
28 Pickling herb
29 Steel mill refuse
34 Dry gullies
36 More frilly
42 Of greater age
43 Early Peruvian
45 As it --
47 Cozy corner
48 Porker
49 Size above med.
50 Have you -- wool?
52 Tokyo, once
53 Zilch
54 Electric swimmer
DILBERT CROSSWORD PUZZLE
fUTURE SHOCk
PEARLS BEfORE SWINE
GET fUZZY
24 Wednesday Sept. 12, 2012
THE DAILY JOURNAL
25 Wednesday Sept. 12, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
DELIVERY DRIVER
ALL ROUTES
Wanted: Independent Contractor to provide deliv-
ery of the Daily Journal six days per week, Mon-
day thru Saturday, early morning. Experience
with newspaper delivery required.
Must have valid license and appropriate insurance
coverage to provide this service in order to be eli-
gible. Papers are available for pickup in San Ma-
teo at 3:00 a.m. or San Francisco earlier.
Please apply in person Monday-Friday only, 10am
to 4pm at The Daily Journal, 800 S. Claremont St
#210, San Mateo.
104 Training
TERMS & CONDITIONS
The San Mateo Daily Journal Classi-
fieds will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion, and its lia-
bility shall be limited to the price of one
insertion. No allowance will be made for
errors not materially affecting the value
of the ad. All error claims must be sub-
mitted within 30 days. For full advertis-
ing conditions, please ask for a Rate
Card.
105 Education/Instruction
CALVARY
PRESCHOOL
OPEN
ENROLLMENT
Little Learners: age 2.5-3.5
Big Explorers: age 3.5-5
calvarypreschoolmillbrae.com
(650)588-8030
106 Tutoring
TUTORING
English Language & Literature
History & Social Studies
Grades 7-12
Essay Writing
Reading Comprehension
(650)579-2653
106 Tutoring
TUTORING
Spanish,
French,
Italian
Certificated Local
Teacher
All Ages!
(650)573-9718
110 Employment
ADELINE DELI- Experience Sandwhich
Maker needed. P/T, Call (650)343-2252
CASHIER - PT/FT, will train. Apply at
AM/PM @ 470 Ralston Ave., Belmont
DISHWASHER - Full time - hours
7.00am to 3.30pm - MUST WORK
WEEKENDS - needed for Assisted
Living Facility located in South San
Francisco. Apply in person to West-
borough Royale, 89 Westborough
Blvd., South San Francisco.
HOME CARE AIDES
Multiple shifts to meet your needs. Great
pay & benefits, Sign-on bonus, 1yr exp
required.
Matched Caregivers (650)839-2273,
(408)280-7039 or (888)340-2273
JEWELRY SALES
FUN! No Nights! Benefits & 401K!
(650)367-6500 FX:(650)367-6400
jobs@jewelryexchange.com
110 Employment
WEEKLY
SALARY + BONUS
Flexible Hour,
Outside Position,
Full Training
NO EXPERIENCE REQUIRED
to $38.75 per hour
Call Mr. Cannon
(650)372-2810
VETERANS WELCOME
RESTAURANT -
Experienced line cook, Night / Week-
ends. Apply in person,1201 San Carlos
Ave., San Carlos.
110 Employment
SALES/MARKETING
INTERNSHIPS
The San Mateo Daily Journal is looking
for ambitious interns who are eager to
jump into the business arena with both
feet and hands. Learn the ins and outs
of the newspaper and media industries.
This position will provide valuable
experience for your bright future.
Email resume
info@smdailyjournal.com
RESTAURANT -
Authentic Syrian Chef, minimum 3 years
exp. Full-time, starting at $12-14 per
hour. Send resume to
tastein2009@att.net
Taste in Mediterranean ,
1199 Broadway Burlingame.
(650) 348-3097
110 Employment
NEWSPAPER INTERNS
JOURNALISM
The Daily Journal is looking for in-
terns to do entry level reporting, re-
search, updates of our ongoing fea-
tures and interviews. Photo interns al-
so welcome.
We expect a commitment of four to
eight hours a week for at least four
months. The internship is unpaid, but
intelligent, aggressive and talented in-
terns have progressed in time into
paid correspondents and full-time re-
porters.
College students or recent graduates
are encouraged to apply. Newspaper
experience is preferred but not neces-
sarily required.
Please send a cover letter describing
your interest in newspapers, a resume
and three recent clips. Before you ap-
ply, you should familiarize yourself
with our publication. Our Web site:
www.smdailyjournal.com.
Send your information via e-mail to
news@smdailyjournal.com or by reg-
ular mail to 800 S. Claremont St #210,
San Mateo CA 94402.
RESTAURANT -
Cooks, Cashiers, Avanti Pizza. Menlo
Park. (650)854-1222.
WAREHOUSE/DRIVER - P/T Distributor
in San Carlos seeks employed person
with Van, SUV or covered Truck. Ware-
house work and delivery. (650)595-1768
203 Public Notices
CASE# CIV 515368
AMENDED ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE
FOR CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Douglas Mark Brenner
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Douglas Mark Brenner filed a
petition with this court for a decree
changing name as follows:
Present name: Douglas Mark Brenner,
Douglas Mark McShane, Douglas M.
Brenner
Proposed name: Douglas Mark McShane
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on October 18,
2012 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room 2E, at
400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 09/05/2012
/s/ Beth Freeman/
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 09/05/2012
(Published, 09/12/12, 09/19/12,
09/26/12, 10/03/12)
CASE# CIV 515771
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Mabel Esmel da Betancourth Casco
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Mabel Esmel da Betancourth
Casco filed a petition with this court for a
decree changing name as follows:
Present name: Mabel E. Betancourth
Casco, aka Mabel E. Calvario
Proposed name: Mabel Esmelda Calvar-
io
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on September
26, 2012 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room 2E,
at 400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 08/16/2012
/s/ Beth Freeman/
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 08/15/2012
(Published, 08/22/12, 08/29/12,
09/05/12, 09/12/12)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #251923
The following person is doing business
as: KT Nails, 1045 Laurel St., SAN CAR-
LOS, CA 94070 is hereby registered by
the following owner: Jennifer Trinh, 1480
Cypress Ct., Gilroy, CA 95020. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on
/s/ Jennifer Trinh /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/20/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/22/12, 08/29/12, 09/05/12, 09/12/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #251817
The following person is doing business
as: 411 Information Services, 932 Penin-
sula Ave., #411, SAN MATEO, CA
94401 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Stannie Holt, same address.
The business is conducted by an Individ-
ual. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on
04/19/2007.
/s/ Stannie Holt /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/13/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/22/12, 08/29/12, 09/05/12, 09/12/12).
26 Wednesday Sept. 12, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Tundra Tundra Tundra
Over the Hedge Over the Hedge Over the Hedge
REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS
SAN MATEO COUNTY FAIR
Stages and Lights RFP #101-2012
Sound Equipment RFP #102-2012
The San Mateo County Event Center is seeking responses to
a Request for Proposal for Stage and Light Services for the
San Mateo County Fair and Sound Equipment for the San
Mateo County Fair. Both contracts are for the 2013, 2014
and 2015 Fairs which takes place in June of each year.
The following schedule will be followed:
Release of RFP September 10, 2012
Proposers Question Deadline September 21, 2012
Proposal Due Date September 28, 2012
Recommendation to Fair Oversight Committee October 4,
2012
Decision by Board of Directors October 24, 2012
Notification of Proposal Status October 25, 2012
To receive a proposal packet, please contact:
Matt Cranford, Fair & Festival Event Manager
San Mateo County Event Center
2495 South Delaware Street
San Mateo, CA 94403
mcranford@smeventcenter.com
650-574-3247 ext. 305
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #251417
The following person is doing business
as: Ondvirg Entertainment Productions,
63 Yacht Lane, DALY CITY, CA 94014
is hereby registered by the following
owner: Virgilio B. Casanada, same ad-
dress. The business is conducted by an
Individual. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Virgilio B. Casanada /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 07/17/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/22/12, 08/29/12, 09/05/12, 09/12/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #251815
The following person is doing business
as: Dimples and Kisses, 41 Commons
Lane, FOSTER CITY, CA 94404 is here-
by registered by the following owner:
Cathy J. Freeman, same address. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on
/s/ Cathy J. Freeman /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/13/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/22/12, 08/29/12, 09/05/12, 09/12/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #251924
The following person is doing business
as: Broadway Prime, 1316 Broadway
Avenue, BURLINGAME, CA 94010 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Tianmar, Inc., CA. The business is con-
ducted by a Corporation. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on
/s/ Tian-Hong Tan /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/20/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/22/12, 08/29/12, 09/05/12, 09/12/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #251781
The following person is doing business
as: Soccer Pro RC, 2737 El Camino Re-
al, REDWOOD CITY, CA 94061 is here-
by registered by the following owner:
Norma P. Zapien, 37168 Walnut St.,
Newark, CA 94560. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on
/s/ Norma P. Zapien /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/09/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/29/12, 09/05/12, 09/12/12, 09/19/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #251691
The following person is doing business
as: J & M Painting, 815 Humboldt St.,
#207, SAN MATEO, CA 94401 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Jona-
than Brandan, same address. The busi-
ness is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on
/s/ Jonathan Brandan /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/02/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/29/12, 09/05/12, 09/12/12, 09/19/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #251589
The following person is doing business
as: Playful Planner, 724 Fiesta Drive,
SAN MATEO, CA 94402 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Megan
Sandoval, same address. The business
is conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on
/s/ Megan Sandoval /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 07/27/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/29/12, 09/05/12, 09/12/12, 09/19/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252012
The following person is doing business
as: Hillsdale Market, 212 E. Hillsdale
Blvd., SAN MATEO, CA 94403 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Man-
ubhai B. Tandel, 336 Alden St., Red-
wood City, CA 94063. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on September. 1, 2012
/s/ Manubhai B. Tandel /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/27/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/29/12, 09/05/12, 09/12/12, 09/19/12).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #251771
The following person is doing business
as: Shy July, 274 Harbor Way, SOUTH
SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94080 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Shy
July, LLC, CA. The business is conduct-
ed by a Limited Liability Company. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on
/s/ Jimmy Zhirong Yu /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/09/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/29/12, 09/05/12, 09/12/12, 09/19/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252092
The following person is doing business
as: Pak Chiropratic 520 S. El Camino
Real, Ste. 520, SAN MATEO, CA 94402
is hereby registered by the following
owner: Jin Pak, 2250 Monroe St. #283,
Santa Clara, CA 95050. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 09/01/2012
/s/ Jin Pak /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/30/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/05/12, 09/12/12, 09/19/12, 09/26/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252093
The following person is doing business
as: The Animal Connection II, 1429 Bur-
lingame Ave., BURLINGAME, CA 94010
is hereby registered by the following
owner: Peter Weaver, 980 Teresita Blvd.,
San Francisco, CA 94127. The business
is conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on
/s/ Peter Weaver /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/30/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/05/12, 09/12/12, 09/19/12, 09/26/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252125
The following person is doing business
as: Alban Interior Plant Service, 215 2nd
Ave. Apt. 233, SAN MATEO, CA 94401
is hereby registered by the following
owner: Moises Ubaldo Alban Lozano,
same address. The business is conduct-
ed by an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on 10/01/2012.
/s/ Moises Ubaldo Alban Lozano /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/04/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/05/12, 09/12/12, 09/19/12, 09/26/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252089
The following person is doing business
as: Angry Bicycle Press, 301 Hillcrest
Road, SAN CARLOS, CA 94070 is here-
by registered by the following owner:
Wendy Diane Walter, same address.
The business is conducted by an Individ-
ual. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on
/s/ Wendy D. Walter /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/30/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/05/12, 09/12/12, 09/19/12, 09/26/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252242
The following person is doing business
as: BN Jabba Consulting, 144 Oakdale
Street, REDWOOD CITY, CA 94062 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Barbara N. Jabba, same address. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on 07/01/2012.
/s/ Barbara N. Jabba /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/10/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/12/12, 09/19/12, 09/26/12, 10/03/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #251918
The following person is doing business
as: Twin Star Flowers, 2323 Flores St.,
#203, SAN MATEO, CA 94403 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Rox-
anne Baumann, same address. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on
/s/ Roxanne Baumann /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/20/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/12/12, 09/19/12, 09/26/12, 10/03/12).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252137
The following person is doing business
as: The Chateau, 1422 Bellevue Ave.,
BURLINGAME, CA 94010 is hereby reg-
istered by the following owner: 1422 Bel-
levue Avenue, LP, CA. The business is
conducted by a Limited Partnership. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on 07/30/2012.
/s/ Carl Goldstone /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/05/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/12/12, 09/19/12, 09/26/12, 10/03/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252179
The following person is doing business
as: Law Center, 1660 S. Amphlett Blvd.,
Ste. 116, SAN MATEO, CA 94402 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Andrew M. Agtagma, A Law Corporation,
CA. The business is conducted by a Cor-
poration. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
08/12/2003.
/s/ Andrew M. Agtagma /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/06/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/12/12, 09/19/12, 09/26/12, 10/03/12).
NOTICE OF PETITION TO
ADMINISTER ESTATE OF
Mary A. Marshall
aka Mary Albertina Marshall
Case Number 122657
To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, con-
tingent creditors, and persons who may
otherwise be interested in the will or es-
tate, or both, of: Mary A. Marshall aka
Mary Albertina Marshall. A Petition for
Probate has been filed by Marilyn M.
Moon in the Superior Court of California,
County of San Mateo. The Petition for
Probate requests that Marilyn M. Moon
be appointed as personal representative
to administer the estate of the decedent.
The petition requests the decedents will
and codicils, if any, be admitted to pro-
bate. The will and any codicils are avail-
able for examination in the file kept by
the court.
The petition requests authority to admin-
ster the estate under the Independent
Administration of Estates Act. (This au-
thority will allow the personal representa-
tive to take many actions without obtain-
ing court approval. Before taking certain
very important actions, however, the per-
sonal representative will be required to
give notice to interested persons unless
they have waived notice or consented to
the proposed action.) The independent
administration authority will be granted
unless an interested person files an ob-
jection to the petition and shows good
cause why the court should not grant the
authority.
A hearing on the petition will be held in
this court as follows: October 2, 2012 at
9:00 a.m., Dept. 28, Superior Court of
California, County of San Mateo, 400
County Center, 1st Floor, Redwood City,
CA 94063. If you object to the granting
of the petition, you should appear at the
hearing and state your objections or file
written objections with the court before
the hearing. Your appearance may be in
person or by your attorney. If you are a
creditor or a contingent creditor of the
decedent, you must file your claim with
the court and mail a copy to the personal
representative appointed by the court
within four months from the date of first
issuance of letters as provided in Pro-
bate Code section 9100. The time for fil-
ing claims will not expire before four
months from the hearing date noticed
above. You may examine the file kept by
the court. If you are a person interested
in the estate, you may file with the court
a Request for Special Notice (form DE-
154) of the filing of an inventory and ap-
praisal of estate assets or of any petition
or account as provided in Probate Code
section 1250. A Request for Special No-
tice form is available from the court clerk.
Attorney for Petitioner:
Alexandra Gadzo, #209127
Gadzo Law, P.C.
2600 El Camino Real, Suite #412
Palo Alto, CA 94306
(650)321-3050
Dated: 08/30/12
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
on September 5, 12, 19, 2012.
SUMMONS
(CITACION JUDICIAL)
CASE NUMBER: CIV508028
NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: (Aviso Al
Demandado): WELLS FARGO BANK,
N.A., SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO
WELLS FARGO BANK SOUTHWEST,
N.A. F/K/A WACHOVIA MORTGAGE,
FSB, F/K/A WORLD SAVINGS BANK,
FSB; and/or WELLS FARGO BANK,
N.A., AND F/K/A WACHOVIA MORT-
GAGE, FSB; WASHINGTONMUTUAL
BANK, a Federal Association, A/K/A
WASHINGTON MUTUAL, INC., A/K/A
J.P.MORGAN CHASE; NDEx West,
L.L.C., a Texas Limited Liability Compa-
ny; LILIAN LUM; RENE WAN LO; DAN-
IEL C. YEE; and DOES 1-20, Inclusive,
YOU ARE BEING SUED BY PLAIN-
TIFF: (Lo esta demandando el deman-
dante): JAMES LUM
NOTICE! You have been sued. The
court may decide against you without
your being heard unless you respond
within 30 days. Read the information be-
low.
You have 30 calendar days after this
summons and legal papers are served
on you to file a written response at the
court and have a copy served on the
plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not pro-
tect you. Your written response must be
in proper legal form if you want the court
to hear your case. There may be a court
form that you can use for your response.
You can find these court forms and more
information at the California Courts On-
line Self-Help Center
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), your
county law library, or the courthouse
nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing
fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver
form. If you do not file your response on
time, you may lose the case by default,
and your wages, money, and property
may be taken without further warning
from the court.
There are other legal requirements. You
may want to call an attorney right away.
If you do not know an attorney, you may
want to call an attorney referral service.
If you cannot afford an attorney, you may
be eligible for free legal services from a
nonprofit legal services program. You
can locate these nonprofit groups at the
California Legal Services Web site
(www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the Califor-
nia Courts Online Self-Help Center
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by
203 Public Notices
contacting your local court or county bar
association. NOTE: The court has a stat-
utory lien for waived fees and costs on
any settlement or arbitration award of
$10,000 or more in a civil case. The
courts lien must be paid before the court
will dismiss the case.
AVISO! Lo han demando. Si no re-
sponde dentro de 30 dias, la corte puede
decidir en su contra sin escuchar su ver-
sion. Lea la informacion a continuacion.
Tiene 30 dias de calendario despues de
que le entreguen esta citacion y papeles
legales para presentar una respuesta por
escrito en esta corte y hacer que se en-
tregue ena copia al demandante. Una
carta o una llamada telefonica no lo pro-
tegen. Su respuesta por escrito tiene
que estar en formato legal correcto si de-
sea que procesen su caso en la corte.
Es posible que haya un formulario que
usted pueda usar para su respuesta.
Puede encontrar estos formularios de la
corte y mas informacion en el Centro de
Ayuda de las Cortes de California
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp/espanol/),
en la biblio teca de leyes de su condado
o en la corte que le quede mas cerca. Si
no puede pagar la cuota de presenta-
cion, pida al secretario de la corte que le
de un formulario de exencion de pago de
cuotas. Si no presenta su respuesta a
tiempo, puede perder el caso por incum-
plimiento y la corte le podra quitar su su-
eldo, dinero y bienes sin mas adverten-
cia. Hay otros requisitos legales. Es re-
comendable que llame a un abogado in-
mediatamente. Si no conoce a un abo-
dado, puede llamar a de servicio de re-
mision a abogados. Si no puede pagar a
un abogado, es posible que cumpia con
los requisitos para obtener servicios le-
gales gratuitos de un programa de servi-
cios legales sin fines de lucro. Puede
encontrar estos grupos sin fines de lucro
en el sitio web de California Legal Serv-
ices Web site
(www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), en el Centro
de Ayuda de las Cortes de California,
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp/espanol/)
o poniendose en contacto con la corte o
el colegio de abogados locales. AVISO:
Por ley, la corte tiene derecho a reclamar
las cuotas y costos exentos por imponer
un gravamen sobre cualquier recupera-
cion de $10,000 o mas de valor recibida
mediante un acuerdo o una concesion
de arbitraje en un caso de derecho civil.
Tiene que pagar el gravamen de la corte
antes de que la corte pueda desechar el
caso.
The name and address of the court is:
(El nombre y direccion de la corte es):
San Mateo County Superior Court, Hall
of Justice, 400 County Center, Redwood
City, CA 94063-1655
The name, address, and telephone num-
ber of the plaintiffs attorney, or plaintiff
without an attorney, is: (El nombre, direc-
cion y numero de telefono del abogado
del demandante, o del demandante que
no tiene abogado, es):
John H. OReilly #072145
244 Kearny St., #900
San Francisco, CA 94108
(415)392-2860
Date: (Fecha) Aug. 29, 2011
John C. Fitton, Clerk, Deputy (Adjunto)
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
September 5, 12, 19, 26, 2012.
SUMMONS
(CITACION JUDICIAL)
CASE NUMBER: CIV511223
NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: (Aviso Al
Demandado): BRUCE E. ROBINSON
YOU ARE BEING SUED BY PLAIN-
TIFF: (Lo esta demandando el deman-
dante): PRIDE ACQUISITIONS LLC
NOTICE! You have been sued. The
court may decide against you without
your being heard unless you respond
within 30 days. Read the information be-
low.
You have 30 calendar days after this
summons and legal papers are served
on you to file a written response at the
court and have a copy served on the
plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not pro-
tect you. Your written response must be
in proper legal form if you want the court
to hear your case. There may be a court
form that you can use for your response.
You can find these court forms and more
information at the California Courts On-
line Self-Help Center
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), your
county law library, or the courthouse
nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing
fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver
form. If you do not file your response on
time, you may lose the case by default,
and your wages, money, and property
may be taken without further warning
from the court.
There are other legal requirements. You
may want to call an attorney right away.
If you do not know an attorney, you may
want to call an attorney referral service.
If you cannot afford an attorney, you may
be eligible for free legal services from a
nonprofit legal services program. You
can locate these nonprofit groups at the
California Legal Services Web site
(www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the Califor-
203 Public Notices
nia Courts Online Self-Help Center
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by
contacting your local court or county bar
association. NOTE: The court has a stat-
utory lien for waived fees and costs on
any settlement or arbitration award of
$10,000 or more in a civil case. The
courts lien must be paid before the court
will dismiss the case.
AVISO! Lo han demando. Si no re-
sponde dentro de 30 dias, la corte puede
decidir en su contra sin escuchar su ver-
sion. Lea la informacion a continuacion.
Tiene 30 dias de calendario despues de
que le entreguen esta citacion y papeles
legales para presentar una respuesta por
escrito en esta corte y hacer que se en-
tregue ena copia al demandante. Una
carta o una llamada telefonica no lo pro-
tegen. Su respuesta por escrito tiene
que estar en formato legal correcto si de-
sea que procesen su caso en la corte.
Es posible que haya un formulario que
usted pueda usar para su respuesta.
Puede encontrar estos formularios de la
corte y mas informacion en el Centro de
Ayuda de las Cortes de California
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp/espanol/),
en la biblio teca de leyes de su condado
o en la corte que le quede mas cerca. Si
no puede pagar la cuota de presenta-
cion, pida al secretario de la corte que le
de un formulario de exencion de pago de
cuotas. Si no presenta su respuesta a
tiempo, puede perder el caso por incum-
plimiento y la corte le podra quitar su su-
eldo, dinero y bienes sin mas adverten-
cia. Hay otros requisitos legales. Es re-
comendable que llame a un abogado in-
mediatamente. Si no conoce a un abo-
dado, puede llamar a de servicio de re-
mision a abogados. Si no puede pagar a
un abogado, es posible que cumpia con
los requisitos para obtener servicios le-
gales gratuitos de un programa de servi-
cios legales sin fines de lucro. Puede
encontrar estos grupos sin fines de lucro
en el sitio web de California Legal Serv-
ices Web site
(www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), en el Centro
de Ayuda de las Cortes de California,
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp/espanol/)
o poniendose en contacto con la corte o
el colegio de abogados locales. AVISO:
Por ley, la corte tiene derecho a reclamar
las cuotas y costos exentos por imponer
un gravamen sobre cualquier recupera-
cion de $10,000 o mas de valor recibida
mediante un acuerdo o una concesion
de arbitraje en un caso de derecho civil.
Tiene que pagar el gravamen de la corte
antes de que la corte pueda desechar el
caso.
The name and address of the court is:
(El nombre y direccion de la corte es):
San Mateo County Superior Court, Hall
of Justice, 400 County Center, Redwood
City, CA 94063-1655
The name, address, and telephone num-
ber of the plaintiffs attorney, or plaintiff
without an attorney, is: (El nombre, direc-
cion y numero de telefono del abogado
del demandante, o del demandante que
no tiene abogado, es):
Michael W. Reich, Esq. #268525
Baker, Sanders, Barshay, Grossman,
Fass, Muhlstock & Neuwirth, LLC
4300 Redwood Highway, Ste. 100
San Rafael, CA
(877)741-7370
Date: (Fecha) January 20, 2012
John C. Fitton, Clerk, Deputy (Adjunto)
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
September 12, 19, 26, October 3, 2012.
210 Lost & Found
FOUND - Evan - I found your iPod, call
(650)261-9656
FOUND- LITTLE tan male chihuahua,
Found on Davit Street in Redwood
Shores Tuesday, August 28th. Please
call (650)533-9942
LOST - 2 silver rings and silver watch,
May 7th in Burlingame between Park Rd.
& Walgreens, Sentimental value. Call
Gen @ (650)344-8790
LOST - Small Love Bird, birght green
with orange breast. Adeline Dr. & Bernal
Ave., Burlingame. Escaped Labor Day
weekend. REWARD! (650)343-6922
210 Lost & Found
LOST CHIHUAHUA/TERRIER mix in
SSF, tan color, 12 lbs., scar on stomach
from being spade, $300. REWARD!
(650)303-2550
LOST SIAMESE CAT on 5/21 in
Belmont. Dark brown& tan, blue eyes.
FOUND!
LOST, SUNGLASSES at Bridge Point
Shopping Center. Reward,
(650)726-9160
LOST: SMALL diamond cross, silver
necklace with VERY sentimental
meaning. Lost in San Mateo 2/6/12
(650)578-0323.
294 Baby Stuff
B.O.B. DUALLIE STROLLER, for two.
Excellent condition. Blue. $300.
Call 650-303-8727.
BABY BJORN potty $10 (650)595-3933
BABY CAR SEAT AND CARRIER $20
(650)458-8280
DEX SAFE Sleeper Ultra bed rail $10
(650)595-3933
295 Art
WALL ART, from Pier 1, indoor/outdoor,
$15. Very nice! (650)290-1960
296 Appliances
HAIR DRYER, Salon Master, $10.
(650)854-4109
HUNTER OSCILLATING FAN, excellent
condition. 3 speed. $35. (650)854-4109
MIROMATIC PRESSURE cooker flash
canner 4qt. $25. 415 333-8540
RADIATOR HEATER, oil filled, electric,
1500 watts $25. (650)504-3621
ROTISSERIE GE, US Made, IN-door or
out door, Holds large turkey 24 wide,
Like new, $80, OBO (650)344-8549
SHOP VACUUM rigid brand 3.5 horse
power 9 gal wet/dry $40. (650)591-2393
SMALL SLOW cooker. Used once, $12
(650)368-3037
SUNBEAM TOASTER -Automatic, ex-
cellent condition, $30., (415)346-6038
VACUUM CLEANER excellent condition
$45. (650)878-9542
WASHER AND Dryer, $200
(650)333-4400
WATER HEATER $75, (650)333-4400
297 Bicycles
BIKE RACK Roof mounted, holds up to
4 bikes, $65 (650)594-1494
298 Collectibles
1982 PRINT 'A Tune Off The Top Of My
Head' 82/125 $80 (650) 204-0587
2 FIGURINES - 1 dancing couple, 1
clown face. both $15. (650)364-0902
67 OLD Used U.S. Postage Stamps.
Many issued before World War II. All
different. $4.00, (650)787-8600
ANTIQUE TRAIN set from the 40's com-
plete set in the box $80 OBO (650)589-
8348
ARMY SHIRT, long sleeves, with pock-
ets. XL $15 each (408)249-3858
BAY MEADOWS bag - $30.each,
(650)345-1111
BEAUTIFUL RUSTIE doll Winter Bliss w/
stole & muffs, 23, $90. OBO, (650)754-
3597
CASINO CHIP Collection Original Chips
from various casinos $99 obo
(650)315-3240
CHILDHOOD COMIC book collection
many titles from the 70's & 80's whole
collection $50 OBO (650)589-8348
COLORIZED TERRITORIAL Quarters
uncirculated with Holder $15/all,
(408)249-3858
FIVE RARE Non-Mint 1954 Dan Dee
Baseball Cards (Lemon, Wynn, Schoen-
dienst, Mitchell, Hegan), Each $20, All
$95, (650)787-8600
GAYLORD PERRY 8x10 signed photo
$10 (650)692-3260
JOE MONTANA signed authentic retire-
ment book, $39., (650)692-3260
27 Wednesday Sept. 12, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ACROSS
1 Rumble in the
Jungle champ
4 Hanging on every
word
8 Crumb bum
14 Actor Chaney
15 Dot on a map
16 Delphis claim to
fame
17 Perspective-
bending artist
19 Beau Geste
novelist
20 Grade for a tween
21 Scottish hillside
23 Convent
residents
24 Runner Sebastian
et al.
26 Second and third
in a sequence
28 Port relative
30 Sears rival
34 Subdue with a
stun gun
35 Final Four initials
37 Mercy!
38 Penn Sta. users
39 Blues standard
first recorded by
Ma Rainey
41 KGB counterpart
42 Prettify
44 Roots author
Haley
45 Game with a 32-
card deck
46 Never Give a
Sucker an Even
Break star
48 How some beer is
sold
50 Mil. plane for
small runways
51 Civil wrong
52 Barbershop
member
55 CNBC
interviewees
58 Reverends
residence
61 Pepsi alternative
63 Justice League
publisher
65 Charm
66 Entry point
67 Kite on the links
68 Who wants ice
cream? reply
69 Lid malady
70 Lamb mom
DOWN
1 Poor box
donations
2 Focal points
3 More than
4 Having deeper
pockets
5 Hibachi residue
6 Roman
commoner
7 Okla. or Dak.,
once
8 Inept sheep
keeper
9 Circle part
10 Beginning
11 Color of raw silk
12 Narrow valley
13 Mil. bigwigs
18 Five-and-dime,
e.g.
22 Game players
haunts
25 iPad-to-iMac
activity
27 Fourth prime
minister of Israel
28 It may be bendy
29 One of three in
Coca-Cola
30 Locks up
31 Cable venue for
vintage sitcoms
32 Poland Spring
competitor
33 Dublin-born poet
36 Pacifier site
39 Online tech news
site
40 Parkway off-
ramp
43 Meat- or fish-
filled pastry
45 Vamoose!
47 Pin down
49 Mercy!
52 Dracula novelist
Stoker
53 Peak
54 Fountain build-
up
56 Track numbers
57 St. Andrews Day
celebrant
59 Garbage barge
60 Salinger heroine
62 Apollo lander,
briefly
64 Affectedly shy
By Gareth Bain
(c)2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
09/12/12
09/12/12
ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:
Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
xwordeditor@aol.com
298 Collectibles
MARK MCGUIRE hats, cards, beanie
babies, all for $98., (650)520-8558
ORIGINAL SMURF FIGURES - 1979-
1981, 18+ mushroom hut, 1 1/2 x 3 1/2,
all $40., (650)518-0813
POSTER - New Kids On The Block
1980s, $12., call Maria, (650)873-8167
RARE BASEBALL CARDS
Five Non-Mint 1954 Dan Dee Baseball
Cards (Lemon, Wynn, Schoendienst,
Mitchell, Hegan), All $95, (650)787-8600
ROCK MEMORABILIA Rolling Stones
Tour Guide, From 70s. $50 obo
(650)589-8348
SPORTS CARDS 50 Authentic Signa-
tures $60 all, (650)365-3987
STACKING MINI-KETTLES - 3
Pots/cover: ea. 6 diam. Brown speckle
enamelware, $20., (650)341-3288
VINTAGE HOLLIE HOBBIE LUNCH-
BOX with Thermos, 1980s, $25., Call
Maria 650-873-8167
VINTAGE TEEN BEAT MAGAZINES
(20) 1980s $2 each, Call Maria 650-873-
8167
WANTED:
OLDER PLASTIC MODEL KITS.
Aurora, Revell, Monogram.
Immediate cash.
Pat 650-759-0793.
YUGIOH CARD 2,000 some rare 1st
Edition, $60 all, (650)365-3987
299 Computers
HP PRINTER Deskjet 970c color printer.
Excellent condition. Software & accesso-
ries included. $30. 650-574-3865
300 Toys
AMERICAN FLYER train set $75 OBO
SOLD!
ANTIQUE ELECTRIC train set with steel
engine full set from the 50's $75 OBO
(650)589-8348
300 Toys
BILINGUAL POWER lap top
6 actividaes $18 SOLD!
PLASTIC TOY army set from the 70's
many pieces $50 (650)589-8348
TONKA BULL Dozer from the 50's or
60's $50 obo (650)589-8348
302 Antiques
1912 COFFEE Percolator Urn. perfect
condition includes electric cord $85.
(415)565-6719
ANTIQUE BEVEL MIRROR - framed,
14 x 21, carved top, $45.,
(650)341-7890
ANTIQUE ITALIAN lamp 18 high, $70
(650)387-4002
ANTIQUE WASHING machine, some
rust on legs, rust free drum and ringer.
$45/obo, (650)574-4439
CHINA CABINET - Vintage, 6 foot,
solid mahogany. $300/obo.
(650)867-0379
J&J HOPKINSON 1890-1900's walnut
piano with daffodil inlay on the front. Ivo-
ries in great condition. Can be played as
is, but will benefit from a good tuning.
$600.00 includes stool. Email
frisz@comcast.net for photos
STICKLEY STYLE solid oak Mission
Chair, SOLD!
303 Electronics
3 SHELF SPEAKERS - 8 OM, $15.
each, (650)364-0902
32 TOSHIBA Flat screen TV like new,
bought 9/9/11 with box. $300 Firm.
(415)264-6605
46 MITSUBISHI Projector TV, great
condition. $400. (650)261-1541.
BIG SONY TV 37" - Excellent Condition
Worth $2300 will Sacrifice for only $95.,
(650)878-9542
FLIP CAMCORDER $50. (650)583-2767
NIGHT STANDS $20, obo (650)952-
3063
303 Electronics
HOME THEATRE SYSTEM - 3 speak-
ers, woofer, DVD player, USB connec-
tion, $80., (714)818-8782
LEFT-HAND ERGONOMIC keyboard
with 'A-shape' key layout Num pad, $20
(650)204-0587
LSI SCSI Ultra320 Controller + (2) 10k
RPM 36GB SCSI II hard drives $40
(650)204-0587
PROSCAM 36" color TV with cabinet
and 2 glass doors like new $90 obo
(650)952-3063
304 Furniture
2 DINETTE Chairs both for $29
(650)692-3260
2 END Tables solid maple '60's era
$40/both. (650)670-7545
4 DRAWER metal file cabinet, black, no
lock model, like new $50 (650)204-0587
AFGAN PRAYER rug beautiful original
very ornate $100 (650)348-6428
ALASKAN SEEN painting 40" high 53"
wide includes matching frame $99 firm
(650)592-2648
ARMOIRE CABINET - $90., Call
(415)375-1617
CHAIR MODERN light wood made in Ita-
ly $99 (415)334-1980
CHANDELIER WITH 5 lights/ candela-
bre base with glass shades $20.
(650)504-3621
COFFEE TABLE - 30 x 58, light oak,
heavy, 1980s, $40., (650)348-5169
COFFEE TABLE set (3piece) mint con-
dition, dark wood, coffee table 53x24x16
high, end tables 27x22x22, $99.00,
(650)578-9208
COMPUTER DESK from Ikea, $40
(650)348-5169
COUCH-FREE. OLD world pattern, soft
fabric. Some cat scratch damage-not too
noticeable. 650-303-6002
DESK SOLID wood 21/2' by 5' 3 leather
inlays manufactured by Sligh 35 years
old $100 (must pick up) (650)231-8009
304 Furniture
DINING ROOM SET - table, four chairs,
lighted hutch, $500. all, (650)296-3189
DISPLAY CASE wood & glass 31 x 19
inches $30. (650)873-4030
DRUM TABLE - brown, perfect condi-
tion, nice design, with storage, $45.,
(650)345-1111
END TABLES (2) - One for $5. hand
carved, other table is antique white mar-
ble top with drawer $40., (650)308-6381
END TABLES (2)- Cherry finish, still in
box, need to assemble, 26L x 21W x
21H, $100. for both, (650)592-2648
FOLDING PICNIC table - 8 x 30, 7 fold-
ing, padded chairs, $80. (650)364-0902
FUTON DELUXE plus other items all for
$90 650 341-2397 (U haul away)
HAND MADE portable jewelry display
case wood and see through lid $45. 25 x
20 x 4 inches. (650)592-2648.
HAWAIIAN STYLE living room chair Re-
tton with split bamboo, blue and white
stripe cushion $99 (650)343-4461
KITCHEN TABLE walnut with chrome
legs. 36x58 with one leaf 11 1/2. $50,
San Mateo (650)341-5347
LOUNGE CHAIRS - 2 new, with cover &
plastic carring case & headrest, $35.
each, (650)592-7483
LOVE SEAT. Like New. Olive/green.
33" High, 60" wide, 42" deep. Very com-
fortable. $20.00 or B/O (650)578-1411
MODULAR DESK/BOOKCASE/STOR-
AGE unit - Cherry veneer, white lami-
nate, $75., (650)888-0039
NIGHT STANDS $35, (650)952-3063
OFFICE LAMP, small. Black & white with
pen holder and paper holder. Brand new,
in the box. $10 (650)867-2720
PAPASAN CHAIRS (2) -with cushions
$45. each set, (650)347-8061
PEDESTAL DINETTE 36 Square Table
- $65., (650)347-8061
RATTAN PAPASAN Chair with Brown
cushion excellent shape $45 (650)592-
2648
RECLINER CHAIR very comfortable vi-
nyl medium brown $70, (650)368-3037
ROCKING CHAIR - excellent condition,
oak, with pads, $85.obo, (650)369-9762
ROCKING CHAIR - Traditional, full size
Rocking chair. Excellent condition $100.,
(650)504-3621
SMALL STORAGE/ Hutch, Stained
Green, pretty. $40, (650)290-1960
SOFA/LOVESEAT SET, mint condition,
7-ft sofa, 58 inch loveseat, brown, 6
matching pillows $99.00, (650)578-9208
STEREO CABINET walnut w/3 black
shelves 16x 22x42. $30, 650-341-5347
STIFFEL LAMPS (2) mint condition,
brass base, beige shade, includes easy
tap on/off $50.00, (650)578-9208
STORAGE TABLE light brown lots of
storage good cond. $45. (650)867-2720
TEA CHEST , Bombay, burgundy, glass
top, perfect cond. $35 (650)345-1111
TRUNDLE BED - Single with wheels,
$40., (650)347-8061
VANITY ETHAN Allen maple w/drawer
and liftup mirror like new $95
(650)349-2195
VINTAGE UPHOLSTERED wooden
chairs, $25 each or both for $40. nice
set. (650)583-8069
VINTAGE WING back chair $75,
(650)583-8069
306 Housewares
"PRINCESS HOUSE decorator urn
"Vase" cream with blue flower 13 inch H
$25., (650)868-0436
28" by 15" by 1/4" thick glass shelves,
cost $35 each sell at $15 ea. Five availa-
ble, Call (650)345-5502
6 BOXES of Victorian lights ceiling & wall
$90., (650)340-9644
BEDSPREAD - queen size maroon &
pink bedspread - Fairly new, $50. obo,
(650)834-2583
CANDLEHOLDER - Gold, angel on it,
tall, purchased from Brueners, originally
$100., selling for $30.,(650)867-2720
IRONING BOARD $15 (650)347-8061
306 Housewares
COCKTAIL GLASSES - beautiful, rich,
smokey hue, oak tree design, wide base,
set of 12, $25., (650)341-8342
DINING ROOM Victorian Chandelier
seven light, $90., (650)340-9644
DRIVE MEDICAL design locking elevat-
ed toilet seat. New. $45. (650)343-4461
ICE CREAM MAKER - 4 qt. electric,
never used, still in box, Elite Cuisine by
Maxi-Matic, $40., San Mateo, (650)341-
5347
PERSIAN TEA set for 8. Including
spoon, candy dish, and tray. Gold Plated.
$100. (650) 867-2720
SOLID TEAK floor model 16 wine rack
with turntable $60. (650)592-7483
SUNBEAN TOASTER excellent condi-
tion (415)346-6038
307 Jewelry & Clothing
BRACELET - Ladies authentic Murano
glass from Italy, vibrant colors, like new,
$100., (650)991-2353 Daly City
GALLON SIZE bag of costume jewelry -
various sizes, colors, $100. for bag,
(650)589-2893
LADIES GOLD Lame' elbow length-
gloves sz 7.5 $15 New. (650)868-0436
308 Tools
3 ALUMINUM ladders 8', 16', & 28' good
condition all for $90 SOLD!
49 TOOLS Varity of tools all for $98,
SOLD!
CIRCULAR SAW, Craftsman-brand, 10,
4 long x 20 wide. Comes w/ stand - $70.
(650)678-1018
CRAFTSMAN 3/4 horse power 3,450
RPM $60 (650)347-5373
CRAFTSMAN ARC-WELDER - 30-250
amp, and accessories, $275., (650)341-
0282
DAYTON ELECTRIC 1 1/2 horse power
1,725 RPM $60 (650)347-5373
FMC TIRE changer Machine, $650
(650)333-4400
GENERATOR 13,000 WATTS Brand
New 20hp Honda $2800 (650)333-4400
LAWN MOWER reel type push with
height adjustments. Just sharpened $45
650-591-2144 San Carlos
MICRO METER Set, 0 to 12. 12 mikes
Total, $75, SOLD!
SCNCO TRIM Nail Gun, $100
(650) 521-3542
STADILA LEVEL 6ft, $60
(650) 521-3542
TABLE SAW 10", very good condition
$85. (650) 787-8219
TABLE SAW- Craftsman 10" saw. brand
new, never used $85. SOLD!
309 Office Equipment
ELECTRIC TYPEWRITER Smith Corona
$60. (650)878-9542
310 Misc. For Sale
1 PAIR of matching outdoor planting pots
$20., (650)871-7200
10 PLANTS (assorted) for $3.00 each,
(650)349-6059
14 PLAYBOY magazines all for $80
(650)592-4529
14 SEGA genius games 2 controllers
$20 SOLD!
300 HOME LIBRARY BOOKS - $3. or
$5. each obo, World & US History and
American Novel Classic, must see to ap-
preciate, (650)345-5502
3D MOVIE glasses, (12) unopened,
sealed plastic, Real 3D, SOLD!
4 IN 1 STERO UNIT. CD player broken.
$20., (650)834-4926
40 ADULT VHS Tapes $100,
(650)361-1148
5 PHOTOGRAPHIC CIVIL WAR
BOOKS plus 4 volumes of Abraham Lin-
coln books, $90., (650)345-5502
7 UNDERBED STORAGE BINS - Vinyl
with metal frame, 42 X 18 X 6, zipper
closure, $5. ea., (650)364-0902
9 CARRY-ON bags (assorted) - extra
large, good condition, $10. each obo,
(650)349-6059
ADULT VIDEOS - (3) classics featuring
older women, $25. each, (650)212-7020
ARTIFICIAL FICUS Tree 6 ft. life like, full
branches. in basket $55. (650)269-3712
310 Misc. For Sale
AMERICAN HERITAGE books 107 Vol-
umes Dec.'54-March '81 $99/all
(650)345-5502
ARTS & CRAFTS variety, $50
(650)368-3037
BARBIE BEACH vacation & Barbie prin-
cess bride computer games $15 each,
(650)367-8949
BEADS - Glass beads for jewelry mak-
ing, $75. all, (650)676-0732
BLUETOOTH WITH CHARGER - like
new, $20., (415)410-5937
BOOK "LIFETIME" WW1 $12.,
(408)249-3858
BOOK NATIONAL Geographic Nation-
al Air Museums, $15 (408)249-3858
BOOK SELECTION, Mystery, Romance,
Biography, many authors, hard cover,
paperbacks, many authors, mint condi-
tion. 50 cents each (650) 578-9208.
BOOKS 20 HARDCOVER WW2 USMC
Korea, Europe. SOLD!
BROADWAY by the Bay, Chorus Line
Sat 9/22; Broadway by Year Sat. 11/10
Section 4 main level $80.00 all.
(650)578-9208
CLEAN CAR Kit, unopened sealed box,
7 full size containers for leather, spots,
glass, interior, paint, chamois, $25.00
(650)578-9208
DELONGHI-CONVENTION ROTISSER-
IE crome with glass door excellent condi-
tion $55 OBO (650)343-4461
DOOM (3) computer games $15/each 2
total, (650)367-8949
DVD'S TV programs 24 4 seasons $20
ea. (650)952-3466
ELECTRONIC TYPEWRITER good con-
dition $50., (650)878-9542
EXOTIC EROTIC Ball SF & Mardi gras 2
dvd's $25 ea. (415)971-7555
FOLDING LEG table 6' by 21/2' $25
(415)346-6038
GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858
GEORGE Magazines, 30, all intact
$50/all OBO. (650)574-3229, Foster City
HARDCOVER MYSTERY BOOKS -
Current authors, $2. each (10), (650)364-
7777
HARLEY DAVIDSON black phone, per-
fect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720
HYPO ALERGETIC Pillows (2) Great for
those with alergies, easy to clean,
$10.00 both, (650)578-9208
ICE CHEST $15 (650)347-8061
INFLATED 4'6" in diameter swimming
pool float $12 (415)346-6038
JAMES PATTERSON books 2 Hard
backs at $3 ea. (650)341-1861
JAMES PATTERSON books 5 paper
backs at $1 ea. (650)341-1861
MENU FROM Steam Ship Lurline Aug.
20 1967 $10 (650)755-8238
MIRROR, ETHAN ALLEN - 57-in. high x
21-in. wide, maple frame and floor base,
like new, $95., (650)349-2195
NATURAL GRAVITY WATER SYSTEM
- Alkaline, PH Balance water, with anti-
oxident properties, good for home or of-
fice, brand new, $100., (650)619-9203.
NELSON DE MILLE -Hardback books 5
@ $3 each, (650)341-1861
NEW LIVING Yoga Tape for Beginners
$8. 650-578-8306
OBLONG SECURITY mirror 24" by 15"
$75 (650)341-7079
OLD 5 gal. glass water cooler bottle $20
(650) 521-3542
OUTDOOR SCREEN - New 4 Panel
Outdoor Screen, Retail $130 With Metal
Supports, $80/obo. (650)873-8167
PICTORIAL WORLD History Books
$80/all (650)345-5502
PROFESSIONAL BEAUTY STYLING
STATION - Complete with mirrors, draw-
ers, and styling chair, $99. obo,
(650)315-3240
PUNCH BOWL - 10 cup plus one extra
nice white color with floral motif, $25.,
(650)873-8167
QUEEN SIZE inflatable mattress with
built in battery air pump used twice $40,
(650)343-4461
QUEEN SIZE inflatable mattress with
built in battery air pump used twice $40,
(650)343-4461
SESAME STREET toilet seat excellent
condition $12 650 349-6059
SF GREETING Cards (300 w/envelopes)
factory sealed $10. (650)365-3987
SHOWER DOOR custom made 48 x 69
$70 (650)692-3260
SPECIAL EDITION 3 DVD Set of The
Freeze. English Subtitles, new $18
(650)871-7200
STEP 2 sandbox Large with cover $25
(650)343-4329
STUART WOODS Hardback Books
4 @ $3.00 each. (650)341-1861
TIRE CHAINS - brand new, in box, never
used, multiple tire sizes, $25., (650)594-
1494
TIRE CHAINS - used once includes rub-
ber tighteners plus carrying case. call for
corresponding tire size, $20.,
(650)345-5446
TOILET SINK - like new with all of the
accessories ready to be installed, $55.
obo, (650)369-9762
28 Wednesday Sept. 12, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
310 Misc. For Sale
VAN ROOF rack 3 piece. clamp-on, $75
(650)948-4895
VASE WITH flowers 2 piece good for the
Holidays, $25., (650) 867-2720
VIDEO CENTER 38 inches H 21 inches
W still in box $45., (408)249-3858
VOLVO STATION Wagon car cover $50
650 888-9624
WALKER - brand new, $20., SSF,
(415)410-5937
WALKER - never used, $85.,
(415)239-9063
WALL LIGHT fixture - 2 lamp with frost-
ed fluted shades, gold metal, never used,
$15., Burl, (650)347-5104
311 Musical Instruments
2 ORGANS, antique tramp, $100 each.
(650)376-3762
3 ACCORDIONS $110/ea. 1 Small
Accordion $82. (650)376-3762.
HAMMOND B-3 Organ and 122 Leslie
Speaker. Excellent condition. $8,500. pri-
vate owner, (650)349-1172
HOHNER CUE stick guitar HW 300 G
Handcrafted $75 650 771-8513
PIANO ORGAN, good condition. $110.
(650)376-3762
312 Pets & Animals
PETMATE DOG CARRIER - XL size,39
1/2 L x 27 W x 30 like new, $95. firm,
SSF, (650)871-7200
REPTILE CAGE - Medium size, $20.,
(650)348-0372
SMALL DOG wire cage; pink, two doors
with divider $50. (650) 743-9534.
315 Wanted to Buy
GO GREEN!
We Buy GOLD
You Get The
$ Green $
Millbrae Jewelers
Est. 1957
400 Broadway - Millbrae
650-697-2685
WILL PAY Cash for vintage designer
handbags. Louis Vuitton, Chanel, Gucci,
etc. (650)593-0757
2. WOMEN'S Pink & White Motocycle
Helmet KBC $50 (415)375-1617
A BAG of Summer ties $15 OBO
(650)245-3661
BATHROBE MENS navy blue plush-ter-
ry and belt. Maroon piping trim, 2 pock-
ets. Medium. $10., (650)341-3288
BLACK Leather pants Mrs. size made in
France size 40 $99. (650)558-1975
BLACK LEATHER tap shoes 9M great
condition $99. (650)558-1975
BLOUSES SWEATERS and tops. Many
different styles & colors, med. to lrg., ex-
cellent condition $5 ea., have 20,
(650)592-2648
COWBOY BOOTS size 9 Black - superb
condition $40 (650)595-3933
COWBOY BOOTS size 9 Silver.gray
good condition $30 (650)595-3933
EUROPEAN STYLE nubek leather la-
dies winter coat - tan colored with green
lapel & hoodie, $100., (650)888-0129
316 Clothes
GEORGE STRAIT Collection Resistol
oval shape, off white Hat size 7 1/8 $40
(650)571-5790
HARDING PARK mens golf dress shirts
(new) asking $25 (650)871-7200
LADIES BOOTS, thigh high, fold down
brown, leather, and beige suede leather
pair, tassels on back excellent, Condition
$40 ea. (650)592-2648
LADIES COAT Medium, dark lavender
$25 (650)368-3037
LADIES FAUX FUR COAT - Satin lining,
size M/L, $100. obo, (650)525-1990
LADIES JACKET size 3x 70% wool 30%
nylon never worn $50. (650)592-2648
LADIES PLUS Clothing - mint condition,
Fancy/plain sweaters, tops, dresses, out-
fits, summer and winter. $4.00 each,
(650)578-9208
LEATHER COAT medium size (snake
skin design) $25 (650)755-8238
MEN'S SUIT almost new $25.
650-573-6981
NEW BROWN LEATHER JACKET- XL
$25., 650-364-0902
REVERSIBLE, SOUVENIR JACKET
Weatherproof 2-tone tan.; Inner: navy
fleece, $15. (650)341-3288
SNOW BOOTS, MEN'S size 12. Brand
New, Thermolite brand,(with zippers),
black, $18. (510) 527-6602
TUXEDOS, FORMAL, 3, Black, White,
Maroon Silk brocade, Like new. Size 36,
$100 All OBO (650)344-8549
VINTAGE 1930 Ermine fur coat Black full
length $35 650 755-9833
VINTAGE 1970S Grecian Made Size 6-7
Dresses $35 each, Royal Pink 1980s
Ruffled Dress size 7ish $30, 1880s Re-
production White Lace Gown $150 Size
6-7 Petite, (650)873-8167
WESTERN/COWBOY SHIRTS
7 pearl snap front, snap pockets XL and
XXL, $12 - $15 (650)595-3933
WOMENS SUMMER 3 pc.SUIT:
blue/white stripe seersucker, size 12,
$10., (650)341-3288
317 Building Materials
(1) 2" FAUX WOOD WINDOW BLIND,
with 50" and 71" height, still in box, $50
obo (650)345-5502
FLUORESCENT LIGHT Fixture, New in
Box, 24, $15 (650)341-8342
TILES, DARK Red clay, 6x6x1/2 6
Dozen at 50 ea (650)341-8342
WHITE STORM/SCREEN door. Size is
35 1/4" x 79 1/4". Asking $50.00. Call
SOLD!
"EVERLAST FOR HER" Machine to
help lose weight $40., (650)368-3037
13 ASSORTED GOLF CLUBS- Good
Quality $3.50 each. Call (650) 349-6059.
BACKPACK - Large for overnight camp-
ing, excellent condition, $65., (650)212-
7020
BASKETBALL RIM, net & backboard
$35/all 650-345-7132 Leave message.
BOYS BICYCLE with Helmet. Triax,
Good Condition, SOLD!
COLEMAN "GLO-MASTER" 1- burner
camp stove for boaters or camping. Mint
condition. $35.00 (650)341-3288
COMPLETE PORTABLE BASKET-
BALL SYSTEM - by Life Time, brand
new, $100., Pacific, SOLD!
318 Sports Equipment
DARTBOARD - New, regulation 18 di-
meter, Halex brand w/mounting hard-
ware, 6 brass darts, $16., (650)681-7358
EXERCISE MAT used once, lavender
$12, (650)368-3037
GIRLS BIKE, Princess 16 wheels with
helmet, $50 San Mateo (650)341-5347
GOLF BALLS - Many brands, 150 total,
good buy, San Mateo, $30., (650)341-
5347
GOLF CLUBS Driver, 7 wood, putter, 9
irons, bag, & pull cart. $99
(650)952-0620
PING CRAZ-E Putter w/ cover. 35in.
Like New $75 call(650)208-5758
THULE BIKE RACK - Fits rectangular
load bars. Holds bike upright. $100.
(650)594-1494
TREADMILL PROFORM 75 EKG incline
an Staionery Bike, both $400. Or sepa-
rate: $150 for the bike, $350 for the
treadmill. Call (650)992-8757
TWO YOGA Videos. Never used, one
with Patrisha Walden, one by Rebok with
booklet. Both $6 (650)755-8238
335 Garden Equipment
CRAFTSMAN 4 HP ROTARY LAWN-
MOWER - 20 rear discharge, extra new
grasscatcher, $85., (650)368-0748
340 Camera & Photo Equip.
HONEYWELL PENTAX 35mm excellent
lens, with case $65. SOLD!
SONY CYBERSHOT DSC-T-50 - 7.2 MP
digital camera (black) with case, $175.,
(650)208-5598
YASAHICA 108 model 35mm SLR Cam-
era with flash and 2 zoom lenses $99
(415)971-7555
380 Real Estate Services
HOMES & PROPERTIES
The San Mateo Daily Journals
weekly Real Estate Section.
Look for it
every Friday and Weekend
to find information on fine homes
and properties throughout
the local area.
440 Apartments
BELMONT - prime, quiet location, view,
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom, New carpets,
new granite counters, dishwasher, balco-
ny, covered carports, storage, pool, no
pets. (650) 591-4046
IN-LAW STUDIO - 1 person, garden
view, street level, near Mills Peninsula
Hospital and SFO Intl Airport, $1400.,
Contact Anne (650)375-5847
470 Rooms
HIP HOUSING
Non-Profit Home Sharing Program
San Mateo County
(650)348-6660
Rooms For Rent
Travel Inn, San Carlos
$49-59 daily + tax
$294-$322 weekly + tax
Clean Quiet Convenient
Cable TV, WiFi & Private Bathroom
Microwave and Refrigerator
950 El Camino Real San Carlos
(650) 593-3136
Mention Daily Journal
620 Automobiles
2005 SCION TC $6,000, 100k Runs
Excellent, (650)583-1543
93 FLEETWOOD Chrome wheels Grey
leather interior 237k miles Sedan $ 2,500
or Trade, Good Condition (650)481-5296
CHEVY HHR 08 - Grey, spunky car
loaded, even seat warmers, $9,500.
(408)807-6529.
HONDA 10 ACCORD LX - 4 door se-
dan, low miles, $19K, (650)573-6981
MERCEDES 06 C230 - 6 cylinder, navy
blue, 60K miles, 2 year warranty,
$18,000, (650)455-7461
625 Classic Cars
DATSUN 72 - 240Z with Chevy 350, au-
tomatic, custom, $3,600 or trade.
(415) 412-7030
635 Vans
NISSAN 01 Quest - GLE, leather seats,
sun roof, TV/DVR equipment. Looks
new, $15,500. (650)219-6008
640 Motorcycles/Scooters
BMW 03 F650 GS, $3899 OBO. Call
650-995-0003
HARLEY DAVIDSON 83 Shovelhead
special construction, 1340 ccs,
Awesome! $5,950/obo
Rob (415)602-4535.
645 Boats
BANSHEE SAILBOAT - 13 ft. with ex-
tras, $750., (650)343-6563
650 RVs
73 Chevy Model 30 Van, Runs
good, Rebuilt Transmission, Fiber-
glass Bubble Top $1,795. Owner
financing.
Call for appointments. (650)364-1374.
CHEVROLET RV 91 Model 30 Van,
$9,500., (650)591-1707 or
(650)644-5179
655 Trailers
TENT TRAILER - Good Condition
Sleeps 6. Electric, Water Hook-ups,
Stove, $1,700 obo, (650)345-7750
670 Auto Service
MB GARAGE, INC.
Repair Restore Sales
Mercedes-Benz Specialists
2165 Palm Ave.
San Mateo
(650)349-2744
ON TRACK
AUTOMOTIVE
Complete Auto Repair
foreign & domestic
www.ontrackautomotive.com
1129 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)343-4594
People you can trust;
service you can trust
NORDIC MOTORS, INC.
Specializing in Volvo, Saab,
Subaru
65 Winslow Road
Redwood City
(650) 595-0170
www.nordicmotors.com
SAN CARLOS AUTO
SERVICE & TUNE UP
A Full Service Auto Repair
Facility
760 El Camino Real
San Carlos
(650)593-8085
'91 TOYOTA COROLLA RADIATOR.
Original equipment. Excellent cond. Cop-
per fins. $60. San Bruno, (415)999-4947
670 Auto Parts
2 SNOW/CABLE chains good condition
fits 13-15 inch rims $10/both San Bruno
650-588-1946
5 HUBCAPS for 1966 Alfa Romeo $50.,
(650)580-3316
67-68 CAMERO PARTS - $85.,
(650)592-3887
CAMPER/TRAILER/TRUCK OUTSIDE
backup mirror 8 diameter fixture. $30.
650-588-1946
CAR COVER / CAMRY, not used, in
box. $12. SOLD!
MAZDA 3 2010 CAR COVER - Cover-
kraft multibond inside & outside cover,
like new, $50., (650)678-3557
SHOP MANUALS 2 1955 Pontiac
manual, 4 1984 Ford/Lincoln manuals, &
1 gray marine diesel manual $40 or B/O
(650)583-5208
TRUCK RADIATOR - fits older Ford,
never used, $100., (650)504-3621
672 Auto Stereos
MONNEY
CAR AUDIO
We Sell, Install and
Repair All Brands of
Car Stereos
iPod & iPhone Wired
to Any Car for Music
Quieter Car Ride
Sound Proof Your Car
31 Years Experience
2001 Middlefield Road
Redwood City
(650)299-9991
680 Autos Wanted
DONATE YOUR CAR
Tax Deduction, We do the Paperwork,
Free Pickup, Running or Not - in most
cases. Help yourself and the Polly Klaas
Foundation. Call (800)380-5257.
Wanted 62-75 Chevrolets
Novas, running or not
Parts collection etc.
So clean out that garage
Give me a call
Joe 650 342-2483
Cabinetry
Contractors
HUSHER CONSTRUCTION
Full Service General Contractor
Remodels and Additions
Residential, Commercial
Lic #789107
www.husherconstruction.com
(650)873-4743
NORTH HOMES
Additions, Baths, Kitchens,
Driveways, and Decks.
(650)232-1193
www.northhomes.biz
Lic.# 97583
Contractors
J & K
CONSTRUCTION
GENERAL
CONTRACTOR
Additions & Carpentry,
Kitchen & Bath remodeling,
Structural repair, Termite &
Dry Rot Repair, Electrical,
Plumbing & Painting
(650)548-5482
neno.vukic@hotmail.com
Lic# 728805
Cleaning
Cleaning
GALA MAIDS
Residential & Commercial
14 Years Experience
Excellent References
(650)773-4516
www.galamaids.com
Concrete
POLY-AM
CONSTRUCTION
General Contractor
Free Estimate
Specializing in
Concrete Brickwork Stonewall
Interlocking Pavers Landscaping
Tile Retaining Wall
Bonded & Insured Lic. #685214
Ben: (650)375-1573
Cell: (650) 280-8617
Construction Construction
650 868 - 8492
PATRICK BRADY PATRICK BRADY
GENERAL CONTRACTOR
ADDITIONS WALL REMOVAL
BATHS KITCHENS AND MORE!
PATBRADY1957@SBCGLOBAL.NET
License # 479385
Frame
Structural
Foundation
Roots & ALL
I make your
life better!
LARGE OR SMALL
I do them all!
Decks & Fences
MARSH FENCE
& DECK CO.
State License #377047
Licensed Insured Bonded
Fences - Gates - Decks
Stairs - Retaining Walls
10-year guarantee
Quality work w/reasonable prices
Call for free estimate
(650)571-1500
29 Wednesday Sept. 12, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Electricians
ALL ELECTRICAL
SERVICE
650-322-9288
for all your electrical needs
ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP
Gardening
Servicing Hillsborough,
Burlingame, Millbrae,
and San Mateo
We are a full service
gardening company
650 218-0657
Quality
Gardening

Weekly Lawn Care
Hedges, Fertilizing,
Leaf Blowing
Rose Care
Get ready for
Fall planting

Gutters
O.K.S RAINGUTTER
New Rain Gutters
Down Spouts
Gutter Cleaning & Screening,
Roof & Gutter Repairs
Friendly Service
10% Senior Discount
CA Lic# 794353/Bonded
(650)556-9780
Handy Help
CONTRERAS
HANDYMAN
Fences Decks Patios
Power Washes Concrete
Work Maintenance Clean
Ups Arbors
Free Estimates!
Call us Today!
(650)350-9968
contreras1270@yahoo.com
DISCOUNT HANDYMAN
& PLUMBING
Carpentry Plumbing Drain
Cleaning Kitchens Bathrooms
Dry Rot Decks
Priced for You! Call John
(650)296-0568
Free Estimates
Lic.#834170
FLORES HANDYMAN
Serving you is a privilege.
Painting-Interior & Exterior Roof Re-
pair Base Boards New Fence
Hardwood Floors Plumbing Tile
Mirrors Chain Link Fence Window
Glass Water Heater Installation
Bus Lic# 41942
Call today for free estimate.
(650)274-6133
HONEST HANDYMAN
Remodeling, Plumbing.
Electrical, Carpentry,
General Home Repair,
Maintenance,
New Construction
No Job Too Small
Lic.# 891766
(650)740-8602
PAYLESS
HANDYMAN
Kitchen & Bathroom Remodels
Electrical, Roofing.
Fences, Tile, Concrete, Painting,
Plumbing, Decks
All Work Guaranteed
(650)771-2432
SENIOR HANDYMAN
Specializing in Any Size Projects
Painting electrical
Carpentry Dry Rot
Carpet Installation
40 Yrs. Experience
Retired Licensed Contractor
(650)201-6854
Hardwood Floors
KO-AM
HARDWOOD FLOORING
Hardwood & Laminate
Installation & Repair
Refinish
High Quality @ Low Prices
Call 24/7 for Free Estimate
800-300-3218
408-979-9665
Lic. #794899
Hauling
CHEAP
HAULING!
Light moving!
Haul Debris!
650-583-6700
Landscaping
COMPLETE TREE
SERVICE
Stamp Concrete
Brick Work
BEST PRICES!
Licensed & Insured
(650)222-4733
LEAKPROFESSIONALS
LEAKS? SAME DAY SERVICE!
Valves Sprinklers
Wiring Broken Pipes
Retrofits
(800)770-7778
CSL #585999
Landscaping
New Lawns
Lawn Renovations
Sprinklers
General CleanUp
Commercial
& Industrial Maint.
Fisher Garden
& Landscape
Since 1972
(650) 347-2636
sher-garden-landscape.com
FREE ESTIMATES QAC. Lic. C24951
Moving
Bay Area
Relocation Services
Specializing in:
Homes, Apts., Storages
Professional, friendly, careful.
Peninsulas Personal Mover
Commercial/Residential
Fully Lic. & Bonded CAL -T190632
Call Armando (650) 630-0424
Painting
CRAIGS PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Quality Work w/
Reasonable Rates
Free Estimates
(650)553-9653
Lic# 857741
GOLDEN WEST
PAINTING
Since 1975
Interior/Exterior,
Complete Preparation.
Will Beat any
Professional Estimate!
CSL#321586
(415)722-9281
JON LA MOTTE
PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Pressure Washing
Free Estimates
(650)368-8861
Lic #514269
Painting
LEMUS PAINTING
650.271.3955
Interiors / Exteriors
Residential / Commercial
Free Estimates
Reasonable Rates
Lic#913961
MTP
Painting/Waterproofing
Drywall Repair/Tape/Texture
Power Washing-Decks, Fences
No Job Too Big or Small
Lic.# 896174
Call Mike the Painter
(650)271-1320
Plumbing
Remodeling
CORNERSTONE HOME DESIGN
Complete Kitchen & Bath Resource
Showroom: Countertops Cabinets
Plumbing Fixtures Fine Tile
Open M-F 8:30-5:30 SAT 10-4
168 Marco Way
South San Francisco, 94080
(650)866-3222
www.cornerstoneHD.com
CA License #94260
KITCHEN & BATH
REMODELING
50% off cabinets
(manufacturers list price)
CABINET WORLD
1501 Laurel St.
San Carlos
(650)592-8020
Home Improvement
CINNABAR HOME
Making Peninsula homes
more beautiful since 1996
* Home furnishings & accessories
* Drapery & window treatments:
blinds & shades
* Free in-home consultation
853 Industrial Rd. Ste E San Carlos
Wed Sat 12:00- 5:30pm, or by appt.
650-388-8836
www.cinnabarhome.com
Tile
CUBIAS TILE
Marble, Stone & porcelain
Kitchens, bathrooms, floors,
fireplaces, entryways, decks,
tile, ceramic tile
repair, grout repair
Free Estimates Lic.# 955492
Mario Cubias
(650)784-3079
JZ TILE
Installation and Design
Portfolio and References,
Great Prices
Free Estimates
Lic. 670794
Call John Zerille
(650)245-8212
Window Coverings
RUDOLPHS INTERIORS
Satisfying customers with world-
class service and products since
1952. Let us help you create the
home of your dreams. Please
phone for an appointment.
(650)227-4882
Window Fashions
247 California Dr
Burlingame 650-348-1268
990 Industrial Rd Ste 106
San Carlos 650-508-8518
www.rebarts.com
BLINDS, SHADES, SHUTTERS, DRAPERIES
Free estimates Free installation
Window Washing
Notices
NOTICE TO READERS:
California law requires that contractors
taking jobs that total $500 or more (labor
or materials) be licensed by the Contrac-
tors State License Board. State law also
requires that contractors include their li-
cense number in their advertising. You
can check the status of your licensed
contractor at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800-
321-CSLB. Unlicensed contractors taking
jobs that total less than $500 must state
in their advertisements that they are not
licensed by the Contractors State Li-
cense Board.
Attorneys
* BANKRUPTCY *
Huge credit card debt?
Job loss?
Foreclosure?
Medical bills?
YOU HAVE OPTIONS
Call for a free consultation
(650)363-2600
This law firm is a debt relief agency
Attorneys
BUSINESS
TRANSACTIONS
Robert Preskill, Esq.
Tech & Media Contracts
Franchise and Licensing
Call (415) 377-3919
robert@preskilllaw.net
CBN# 221315
Attorneys
Law Office of Jason Honaker
BANKRUPTCY
Chapter 7 &13
Call us for a consultation
650-259-9200
www.honakerlegal.com
Beauty
GRAND OPENING SPECIALS:
Facials , Eyebrow Waxing ,
Microdermabrasion
Full Body Salt Scrub &
Seaweed Wrap
Le Juin Day Spa & Clinic
155 E. 5th Avenue
Downtown San Mateo
(650) 347-6668 (650) 347-6668
Beauty
KAYS
HEALTH & BEAUTY
Facials, Waxing, Fitness
Body Fat Reduction
Pure Organic Facial $48.
1 Hillcrest Blvd, Millbrae
(650)697-6868 (650)697-6868
Dental Services
DR. SAMIR NANJAPA DDS
Family Dentistry &
Smile Restoration
UCSF Dentistry Faculty
Cantonese, Mandarin &
Hindi Spoken
650-477-6920 650-477-6920
320 N. San Mateo Dr. Ste 2
San Mateo
30 Wednesday Sept. 12, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Food
AYA SUSHI
The Best Sushi
& Ramen in Town
1070 Holly Street
San Carlos
(650)654-1212
BROADWAY GRILL
Express Lunch
Special $8.00
1400 Broadway
Burlingame
(650)343-9733
www.bwgrill.com
FIND OUT!
What everybody is
talking about!
South Harbor
Restaurant & Bar
425 Marina Blvd., SSF
(650)589-1641
GOT BEER?
We Do!
Steelhead Brewing Co.
333 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)344-6050
www.steelheadbrewery.com
GULLIVERS
RESTAURANT
Early Bird Special
Prime Rib Complete Dinner
Mon-Thu
1699 Old Bayshore Blvd. Burlingame
(650)692-6060
JACKS
RESTAURANT
Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner
1050 Admiral Ct., #A
San Bruno
(650)589-2222
JacksRestaurants.com
NEALS COFFEE
SHOP
Breakfast Lunch Dinner
Senior Meals, Kids Menu
www.nealscoffeeshop.com
1845 El Camino Real
Burlingame
(650)692-4281
Food
SUNDAY CHAMPAGNE
BRUNCH
Crowne Plaza
1221 Chess Dr., Hwy. 92 at
Foster City Blvd. Exit
Foster City
(650)570-5700
SUNSHINE CAFE
Breakfast Lunch Dinner
1750 El Camino Real
San Mateo
(Borel Square)
(650)357-8383
THE AMERICAN BULL
BAR & GRILL
19 large screen HD TVs
Full Bar & Restaurant
www.theamericanbull.com
1819 El Camino, in
Burlingame Plaza
(650)652-4908
Financial
RELATIONSHIP BANKING
Partnership. Service. Trust.
UNITED AMERICAN BANK
Half Moon Bay, Redwood City,
Sunnyvale
unitedamericanbank.com
San Mateo
(650)579-1500
Fitness
DOJO USA
World Training Center
Martial Arts & Tae Bo Training
www.dojousa.net
731 Kains Ave, San Bruno
(650)589-9148
Fitness
STAND UP &
TRAIN!
Train at Home & Reach your
Fitness Goals
Group Classes or
One On One
using TRX Suspension &
Kettlebell training ,
Custom Designed fitness
program
Call Chris Nash
(650)799-0608
alternativewayfitness@gmail.com
Furniture
Bedroom Express
Where Dreams Begin
2833 El Camino Real
San Mateo - (650)458-8881
184 El Camino Real
So. S. Francisco -(650)583-2221
www.bedroomexpress.com
Health & Medical
BACK, LEG PAIN OR
NUMBNESS?
Non-Surgical
Spinal Decompression
Dr. Thomas Ferrigno D.C.
650-231-4754
177 Bovet Rd. #150 San Mateo
BayAreaBackPain.com
General Dentistry
for Adults & Children
DR. ANNA P. LIVIZ, DDS
324 N. San Mateo Drive, #2
San Mateo 94401
(650)343-5555
SLEEP APNEA
We can treat it
without CPAP!
Call for a free
sleep apnea screening
650-583-5880
Millbrae Dental
Health & Medical
STRESSED OUT?
IN PAIN?
I CAN HELP YOU
Sessions start from $20
Call 650-235-6761
Will Chen ACUPUNCTURE
12220 6th Ave, Belmont
www. willchenacupuncture.com
TOENAIL FUNGUS?
FREE Consultation for
Laser Treatment
(650)347-0761
Dr. Richard Woo, DPM
400 S. El Camino Real
San Mateo
Home Care
CALIFORNIA HOARDING
REMEDIATION
Free Estimates
Whole House & Office
Cleanup Too!
Serving SF Bay Area
(650)762-8183
Call Karen Now!
Insurance
AARP AUTO
INSURANCE
Great insurance
Great price
Special rates for
drivers over 50
650-593-7601
ISU LOVERING
INSURANCE SERVICES
1121 Laurel St.,
San Carlos
BARRETT
INSURANCE
www.barrettinsuranceservices.net
Eric L. Barrett,
CLU, RHU, REBC, CLTC, LUTCF
President
Barrett Insurance Services
(650)513-5690
CA. Insurance License #0737226
HEALTH INSURANCE
Paying too much for COBRA?
No coverage?
.... Not good!
I can help.
John Bowman
(650)525-9180
CA Lic #0E08395
Jewelers
KUPFER JEWELRY
We Buy
Coins, Jewelry,
Watches, Platinum,
& Diamonds.
Expert fine watch
& jewelry repair.
Deal with experts.
1211 Burlingame Ave.
Burlingame
www.kupferjewelry.com
(650) 347-7007
Legal Services
LEGAL
DOCUMENTS PLUS
Non-Attorney document
preparation: Divorce,
Pre-Nup, Adoption, Living Trust,
Conservatorship, Probate,
Notary Public. Response to
Lawsuits: Credit Card
Issues,Breach of Contract
Jeri Blatt, LDA #11
Registered & Bonded
(650)574-2087
legaldocumentsplus.com
"I am not an attorney. I can only
provide self help services at your
specific direction."
Loans
REVERSE MORTGAGE
Are you age 62+ & own your
home?
Call for a free, easy to read
brochure or quote
650-453-3244
Carol Bertocchini, CPA
Marketing
GROW
YOUR SMALL BUSINESS
Get free help from
The Growth Coach
Go to
www.buildandbalance.com
Sign up for the free newsletter
Massage Therapy
ASIAN MASSAGE
$48 per Hour
New Customers Only
For First 20 Visits
Open 7 days, 10 am -10 pm
633 Veterans Blvd., #C
Redwood City
(650)556-9888
GRAND OPENING
ASIAN MASSAGE
$50 for 1 hour
Angel Spa
667 El Camino Real, Redwood City
(650)363-8806
7 days a week, 9:30am-9:30pm
GRAND OPENING!
CRYSTAL WAVE SPA
Body & Foot Massage
Facial Treatment
1205 Capuchino Ave.
Burlingame
(650)558-1199
HAPPY FEET
Massage
2608 S. El Camino Real
& 25th Ave., San Mateo
(650)638-9399
$30.00/Hr Foot Massage
$50.00/Hr Full Body Massage
SUNFLOWER MASSAGE
Grand Opening!
$10. Off 1-Hour Session!
1482 Laurel St.
San Carlos
(Behind Trader Joes)
Open 7 Days/Week, 10am-10pm
(650)508-8758
Massage Therapy
TRANQUIL
MASSAGE
951 Old County Road
Suite 1
Belmont
650-654-2829
YOU HAVE IT-
WELL BUY IT
We buy and pawn:
Gold Jewelry
Art Watches
Musical Instrument
Paintings Diamonds
Silverware Electronics
Antique Furniture
Computers TVs Cars
Open 7 days
Buy *Sell*Loan
590 Veterans Blvd.
Redwood City
(650)368-6855
Needlework
LUV2
STITCH.COM
Needlepoint!
Fiesta Shopping Center
747 Bermuda Dr., San Mateo
(650)571-9999
Real Estate Loans
REAL ESTATE LOANS
We Fund Bank Turndowns!
Direct Private Lender
Homes Multi-family
Mixed-Use Commercial
WE BUY TRUST DEED NOTES
FICO Credit Score Not a Factor
PURCHASE, REFINANCE,
CASH OUT
Investors welcome
Loan servicing since 1979
650-348-7191
Wachter Investments, Inc.
Real Estate Broker #746683
Nationwide Mortgage
Licensing System ID #348268
CA Dept. of Real Estate
Real Estate Services
ODOWD ESTATES
Representing Buyers
& Sellers
Commission Negotiable
odowdestates.com
(650)794-9858
Seniors
AFFORDABLE
24-hour Assisted Living
Care located in
Burlingame
Mills Estate Villa
&
Burlingame Villa
- Short Term Stays
- Dementia & Alzheimers
Care
- Hospice Care
(650)692-0600
Lic.#4105088251/
415600633
LASTING IMPRESSIONS
ARE OUR FIRST PRIORITY
Cypress Lawn
1370 El Camino Real
Colma
(650)755-0580
www.cypresslawn.com
STERLING COURT
ACTIVE INDEPENDENT &
ASSISTED LIVING
Tours 10AM-4PM
2 BR,1BR & Studio
Luxury Rental
650-344-8200
850 N. El Camino Real San Mateo
sterlingcourt.com
WORLD 31
Wednesday Sept. 12, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Maggie Michael and Sarah El Deeb
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
CAIRO A movie attacking Islams
prophet Muhammad sparked assaults on U.S.
diplomatic missions in Libya and Egypt on
Tuesday. A Libyan security ofcial reported
an American was shot to death as protesters
burned the U.S. consulate in Benghazi, and in
Cairo, protesters scaled the walls of the U.S.
embassy walls and replaced an American ag
with an Islamic banner.
It was the rst such assaults on U.S. diplo-
matic facilities in either country, at a time
when both Libya and Egypt are struggling to
overcome the turmoil following the ouster of
their longtime leaders, Moammar Gadha
and Hosni Mubarak in uprisings last year.
The protests in both countries were sparked
by outrage over a video being promoted by an
extreme anti-Muslim Egyptian Christian
campaigner in the United States.
In the eastern Libyan city of Benghazi, a
large mob stormed the U.S. Consulate, with
gunmen ring their weapons, said Wanis al-
Sharef, an Interior Ministry official in
Bengazi. A witness said attackers red auto-
matic weapons and rocket-propelled grenades
at the consulate they clashed with Libyans
hired to guard the facility.
Outnumbered by the crowd, Libyan securi-
ty forces did little to stop them, al-Sharef
said.
The crowd overwhelmed the facility and set
re to it, burning most of it and looting the
contents, witnesses said.
One American was shot to death and a sec-
ond was wounded in the hand, al-Sharef said.
He did not give further details, and there was
no immediate U.S. conrmation of the death.
Hours before the Benghazi attack, hundreds
of mainly ultraconservative Islamist protest-
ers in Egypt marched to the U.S. Embassy in
downtown Cairo, gathering outside its walls
and chanting against the movie and the U.S.
Most of the embassy staff had left the com-
pound earlier because of warnings of the
upcoming demonstration.
Say it, dont fear: Their ambassador must
leave, the crowd chanted.
Dozens of protesters then scaled the
embassy walls, and several went into the
courtyard and took down the American ag
from a pole. They brought it back to the
crowd outside, which tried to burn it, but fail-
ing that tore it apart.
The protesters on the wall then raised on
the agpole a black ag with a Muslim decla-
ration of faith, There is no god but God and
Muhammad is his prophet. The ag, similar
to the banner used by al-Qaida, is commonly
used by ultraconservatives around the region.
The crowd grew throughout the evening
with thousands standing outside the embassy.
Dozens of riot police lined up along the
embassy walls but did not stop protesters as
they continued to climb and stand on the wall
- though it appeared no more went into the
compound.
The crowd chanted, Islamic, Islamic. The
right of our prophet will not die. Some
shouted, We are all Osama, referring to al-
Qaida leader bin Laden. Young men, some in
masks, sprayed grafti on the walls. Some
grumbled that Islamist President Mohammed
Morsi had not spoken out about the movie.
A group of women in black veils and robes
that left only their eyes exposed chanted,
Worshippers of the Cross, leave the Prophet
Muhammad alone.
By midnight, the crowd had dwindled. The
U.S. Embassy said on its Twitter account that
there will be no visa services on Wednesday
because of the protests.
A senior Egyptian security ofcial at the
embassy area said authorities allowed the
protest because it was peaceful. When they
started climbing the walls, he said he called
for more troops, denying that the protesters
stormed the embassy. He spoke on condition
of anonymity because he was not authorized
to speak to reporters.
Anti-Islam film sparks Libya, Egypt protests
REUTERS
Egyptian protesters scaled the walls of the U.S.embassy on Tuesday,tore down the American
ag and burned it during a protest over what they said was a lm being produced in the
United States that insulted Prophet Muhammad.
32 Wednesday Sept. 12, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL