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TERM PAPER FORMAT I. Text and Paragraph Formatting and Margins 1.

number your pages in the upper right hand corner 2. Margins: Left 1.5", Right 1", Top 1" and Bottom 1" 3. Font Size 12, Fontface Arial, Double-space, justify alignment 4. Minimum of 12 pages excluding the title page, table of content, bibliography and curriculum vitae II. Content 1. Title Page: this includes the following information

b. Summarize individual studies or articles with as much or as little detail as each merits according to its comparative importance in the literature, remembering that space (length) denotes significance. c. Provide the reader with strong "umbrella" sentences at beginnings of paragraphs, "signposts" throughout, and brief "so what" summary sentences at intermediate points in the review to aid in understanding comparisons and analyses. 3. Opinions : Indicate your agreement and disagreement 4. Conclusions a. Summarize major contributions of significant studies and articles to the body of knowledge under review, maintaining the focus established in the introduction. b.Evaluate the current "state of the art" for the body of knowledge reviewed, pointing out major methodological flaws or gaps in research, inconsistencies in theory and findings, and areas or issues pertinent to future study. c.Conclude by providing some insight into the relationship between the central topic of the literature review and a larger area of study such as a discipline, a scientific endeavor, or a profession. 5. Bibliography- with complete citations and references use APA Format Basics of APA 11.3.a. Books Author's last name, first initial. (Publication date). Book title. Additional information. City of publication: Publishing company. Examples: Allen, T. (1974). Vanishing wildlife of North America. Washington, D.C.: National Geographic Society. Boorstin, D. (1992). The creators: A history of the heroes of the imagination. New York: Random House.

Title of the document


Name of the Author Course Title/ Subject Name of the Professor Date of the submission 2. Table of Contents 3. Introduction : In the introduction, you should: a. Define or identify the general topic, issue, or area of concern, thus providing an appropriate context for reviewing the literature. b. Point out overall trends in what has been published about the topic; or conflicts in theory, methodology, evidence, and conclusions; or gaps in research and scholarship; or a single problem or new perspective of immediate interest. c. Establish the writer's reason (point of view) for reviewing the literature; explain the criteria to be used in analyzing and comparing literature and the organization of the review (sequence); and, when necessary, state why certain literature is or is not included (scope). 4. Body Paragraphs: a. Group research studies and other types of literature (reviews, theoretical articles, case studies, etc.) according to common denominators such as qualitative versus quantitative approaches, conclusions of authors, specific purpose or objective, chronology, etc.

Nicol, A. M., & Pexman, P. M. (1999). Presenting your findings: A practical guide for creating tables. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association. Searles, B., & Last, M. (1979). A reader's guide to science fiction. New York: Facts on File, Inc. Toomer, J. (1988). Cane. Ed. Darwin T. Turner. New York: Norton. 11.3.b. Encyclopedia & Dictionary Author's last name, first initial. (Date). Title of Article. Title of Encyclopedia (Volume, pages). City of publication: Publishing company. Examples: Bergmann, P. G. (1993). Relativity. In The new encyclopedia britannica (Vol. 26, pp. 501-508). Chicago: Encyclopedia Britannica. Merriam-Webster's collegiate dictionary (10th ed.). (1993). Springfield, MA: Merriam-Webster. Pettingill, O. S., Jr. (1980). Falcon and Falconry. World book encyclopedia. (pp. 150-155). Chicago: World Book. Tobias, R. (1991). Thurber, James. Encyclopedia americana. (p. 600). New York: Scholastic Library Publishing. 11.3.c. Magazine & Newspaper Articles Author's last name, first initial. (Publication date). Article title. Periodical title, volume number(issue number if available), inclusive pages. Examples: Harlow, H. F. (1983). Fundamentals for preparing psychology journal articles. Journal of Comparative and Physiological Psychology, 55, 893-896. Henry, W. A., III. (1990, April 9). Making the grade in today's schools. Time, 135, 28-31. Kalette, D. (1986, July 21). California town counts town to big quake. USA Today, 9, p. A1. Kanfer, S. (1986, July 21). Heard any good books lately? Time, 113, 71-72. Trillin, C. (1993, February 15). Culture shopping. New Yorker, pp. 48-51. 11.3.d. Website or Webpage

Online periodical: Author's name. (Date of publication). Title of article. Title of Periodical, volume number, Retrieved month day, year, from full URL 11.3.e. Online document: Author's name. (Date of publication). Title of work. Retrieved month day, year, from full URL Examples: Devitt, T. (2001, August 2). Lightning injures four at music festival. The Why? Files. Retrieved January 23, 2002, from http://whyfiles.org/137lightning/index.html Dove, R. (1998). Lady freedom among us. The Electronic Text Center. Retrieved June 19, 1998, from Alderman Library, University of Virginia website: http://etext.lib.virginia.edu/subjects/afam.html Ref: http://www.pinoyalert.com/news-blog/52-feature/127-cite-3s-termpaper-format.html