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Prelaunch Mission Operation No.

M-932-6911

Report

TO: FROM: SUBJECT:

A/Administrator MA/Apollo Apollo Program 11 Mission Director (AS-506)

8 July

1969

No

earlier

than This will

16 July be the

1969, fourth

we

plan and

to launch Saturn the third

Apollo V flight, flight

11 on the the fifth of a manned

first flight Lunar

lunar

landing

mission. Apollo Apollo Center. west include limitations, a laser vehicular in the samples conducted Documented

manned

of a manned Module.

Command/Service 11 will Lunar corner collection collection reflector activity Pacific to the under lunar and will Lunar be launched touchdown

Module,

from Pad A of Launch Complex 39 at the Kennedy Space is planned for Apollo Landing Site 2, located in the southThe planned Sample, for measuring deployment seismic lunar surface activities packages and collection wi I I and including of a assessment of astronaut activity, capabilities

of the

Sea of Tranquility. of a Contingency of Bulk instruments Soi I Sample. Samples,

of experiment

Ocean.

Photographic records will be obtained and extraThe 8-day mission will be completed with landing be televised. Recovery and transport of the crew, spacecraft, and lunar Laboratory procedures that at the provide Manned Spacecraft Center isolation. will be for biological

Receiving

quarantine

Lt.

General, Program

USAF Director

Apollo APPROVAL:

/Associate Manned

Administrator Space Flight

for

Report

No.

M-932-69-

11

MISSIONOPERATION REPORT

APOLLO(AS-501) 11 MISSION
OFFICE Prepared OF MANNED by: Apollo SPACE FLIGHT Program Office - MAO

fl[

HERE MEN FROM THE PLANET EARTH FIRST SET FOOT UPON THE MOON JULY 1969, A. D. WE CAME IN PEACE FOR ALL MANKIND

FOREWORD

MISSION Management, 15 August with . timely, establish

OPERATION as required 1963. official The complete, mission

REPORTS by the and purpose

are

published reports

expressly in NASA is to provide on flight the

for the Instruction NASA

use of NASA 6-2-10, Senior plans,

Senior dated

Administrator information which

of these definitive

Management and to of mission

mission

objectives

provide

basis

for assessment

accomplishment. Initial Following Management Instruction reports are prepared updating 10. orientation, distribution of these management responsibilities. series of prelaunch and available are published for general in two distribution. volumes: the REPORT, in the reports The and issued for each flight mission project are issued results just prior to launch. General in NASA

launch, currently 6-2-

reports

for each

mission

to keep

informed

of definitive

as provided

Because of their sometimes highly technical is provided to personnel having program-proiect Office reports APOLLO MISSION APOLLO document MOR, oriented and facilities. of Public on NASA MISSION OPERATION SUPPLEMENT. in the APOLLO reference associated MOR, Affairs flight publishes missions, which are

a comprehensive

postlaunch

OPERATION REPORT This with

REPORTS (MOR); format and

the MISSION to provide and facility

OPERATION description

was designed equipment APOLLO

a mission-oriented is a program-

supporting

SUPPLEMENT. document equipment;

The MOR,

SUPPLEMENT

with a broad technical the launch complex; and

description of the space vehicle mission control and support

Published PROGRAM EXECUTIVE and SPECIAL REPORTS - NASA SECRETARIAT

and

Distributed

by (XP)

DIVISION HEADQUARTERS

, .__.._.--1^-

M-932-69-

11

CONTENTS Page Apollo Program NASA Detailed Launch Detailed Back 11 Mission.. Development. OMSF Primary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ............................ Mission and and Mission Objectives for Apollo .................... Capability, ..................... AS-506 ........... 11 ........... 1 5 7 8 9 16 50 56 69

Objectives Countdown Flight

Experiments. Turnaround Description.

Contamination Operations

Program

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Contingency Configuration

........................... ..........................

Differences.

Mission
Recovery Flight Mission Program

Support.
Support Crew.

...............................
Plan ............................

71
76 90 ..................... 100 10 1 102

................................. Responsibility.

Management Management and

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Acronyms. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Abbreviations

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M-932-69-

11

LIST Figure 1 2 3 4 . 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 /-6/24/69 Apollo Summary 11 Flight Timeline,

OF Title

FIGURES Page 2 Lunar Surface EVA 3 10 11 AS-506 14 Matrix Launch Sites Windows 15 17 19 22 22 Ejection 22 22 24 25 25 Beam Configuration 26 27 27 Stay 29 30 32 33 34 Deployment 37 38 39 40 44 44 Radar Coverage 45 46 47 48 48 Program Events and 57-59 62 72 51 Package

Profile Nominal (AS-506) Scrub, AS-506 Possibilities,

Launch Countdown Turnaround From Scrub/Turnaround

July Launch Window Second Scrub/Turnaround Mission Apollo Durations, Lunar Landing July

Ascent Trajectory Earth Orbital Configuration Transposition, Translunar Lunar Descent Orbit Orbit Docking, Configuration Insertion Insertion

Lunar Module Descent Landing Radar-Antenna Landing Lunar Lunar Lunar Approach Contact Surface Surface Phase Sequence Activity Activity

Timeline

For 22-Hour

Removal of Stowed Tools Preparation of Hand Tool Deployed Early Apollo Deployed Solar Passive Wind Scientific Seismic

From MESA Experiment

Composition Experiments Experiment

Deployed Laser Ranging Retro-Reflector Documented Sample Collection Lunar Orbit Lunar Module Insertion Activities Vertical Phase Summary Maneuvers/ Configuration Phase to Earth Mission Back Contamination Rise Phase

Rendezvous Transearth Transearth Entry Apollo Apollo

& Descent 11 Nominal

Contingency Options Recovery Lines Apollo Earth Orbit Chart

(AEO)

ii

M-932-69-11

39 40 41 42 43 44

Apollo Radar

Lunar Coverage

Surface During

Communications Lunar Orbit and Periods for

74 75 77 79 Zones Area and 84 88 91 92 82

Launch Date of July 16 Apollo 11 Launch Site Area Launch Apollo Deep Force Typical Apollo Apollo Abort Space Area Typical and Force Orbit 11 Earth Parking

Force

Deployment

Deployment Recovery Landing and Force

Secondary Area

45 46 47

Deployment Primary Landing 11 Prime 11 Back-Up Crew Crew

Deployment

_-

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... III

M-932-69-

11

LIST Table 1 2 Mission Monthly Apollo Loose MSFN MSFN Recovery Recovery Recovery HC-130 Recovery Summary Launch 11 Weight Equipment Mobile

OF TABLES Title Page 4

Windows Summary Left Facilities Apollo 11 Mission on Lunar Surface

16 21 42 71 73 80 83 Deep Posture Space Phase 85 86 87

3 4

5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Configuration, Force Force Ship Minimum Force

Requirements Requirements Locations, Alert

I--

Requirements

6/24/69

iv

M-932-69-

11

APOLLO The primary purpose the and of the lunar and Apollo stay, of the limitations

11 MISSION is to perform be performed. and profile. Complex 39 at Kennedy Space Center be the a color a manned Data lunar will landing be obtained in the lunar and to

11 Mission limited lunar soil of the will

return. evaluation,

During

selenological of an astronaut flight

inspection,

photography,

survey,

sampling

assess the capability environment. Figure Apollo on operational 11 will

his equipment

1 is a summary from

be launched The Saturn

Pad A of Launch

16 July

1969.

configurations.

V Launch Vehicle and the The Command Module (CM)

Apollo Spacecraft will equipment will include

television camera and a Hasselblad include camera a lunar with

with zoom lens, a 16mm Maurer camera with 5, Lunar Module camera with 80 and 250mm lenses. television camera with wide angle with and lunar day lens, a Hasselblad camera 80mm

18, and 75mm lenses, (LM) equipment will lenses, a 16mm Maurer Surface Hasselof be in the accomduration time will located will (EVA). period of of on the

a 1Omm lens;

a Lunar

blad camera with the flight mission approximately southwest lunar plish IThe corner surface postlanding nominal feet. EVA

60mm lens, and a close-up stereo camera. The nominal Translunar flight wil I be approximately 8 days 3 hours. Lunar moons touchdown 21.5 hours. is planned During and 2, will with for The this Landing LM crew period, Site will the activity 2, crew of the and plan, Sea of Tranquility. procedures in Figure surface the

73 hours.

remain

for approximately pre-ascent as shown

extravehicular provide maximum will include (2) collection

for an exploration radius of operation

open-ended to 300 priority: Sample, (5) Bulk including associated samples records and rest and

duration

up to 2 hours lunar through

40 minutes activities

limited

The planned

(1) photography

LM window,

in the following order of a Contingency -

(3) assessment of astronaut capabilities and limitations, (4) LM inspection, (6) experiment deployment, and (7) lunar field geology Sampl e collection, collection with of a Documented Lunar Soil Sample. Priorities for activities Documented

with photography, will be obtained during eat flight several

Sample collection will be: (a) core sample, (b) bag sample, and (d) gas sample. Photographic (c) environmental Assessment of astronaut capabilities and EVA will be televised. will include The total quantitative lunar stay time measurements. There will be approximately Earth at landing 172OW will be two 59.5 hours. be in the and

limitations

EVA periods. time

The transearth

will

be approximately

60 hours. point located events.

will

Mid-Pacific recovery area with a target landing Table 1 is a summary of mission 1 1N latitude. Following be opened recovery helicopter, will I-Spacecraft logs will landing, and the swimmer. and will

longitude

the flotation collar will be attached to the crew will don Biological Isolation Garments then egress the CM, transfer Th e crew will immediately enter the Mobile Quarantine

CM, the CM hatch will passed in to them by the to the recovery ship by Facility (MQF). They

be transported

in the MQF to the Lunar Receiving The CM, Sample Return Containers, Center. also be transported to the LRL under quarantine

Laboratory (LRL) at the Manned film, tapes, and astronaut procedures.

6/24/69

Page

APOLLO FLIGHT 11 PROFILE


CSM/LM SEPARATION / . -a 1 CSI 45 NM

CM,SM SEPARATION

LM INSERTION (9X45- NM ORBIT)

:
DESCENT ORB11

S-IVB RESTART DURING 2ND OR 3RD ORBIT S-IVB 2ND BURN CUTOFF TRANSLUNAR INJECTION (TLI) S/C SEPARATION TRANSPOSITION, DOCKING, & EJECTION
n -. (D .

CM SPLASHDOWN &

PROPELLANT i i :

iPS EVASIVE MANEUVER FREE-RETURN TRAJECTORY

M-932-69-l

TABLE MISSION 16 JULY, FIRST TRANSLUNAR

SUMMARY AZIMUTH, OPPORTUNITY

72O LAUNCH INJECTION

I
LAUNCH EARTH ORBIT COAST TRANSLUNAR INJECTION TRANSLUNAR COAST LUNAR ORBIT INSERTION-l LUNAR ORBIT INSERTION-2 DESCENT ORBIT INSERTION
,-

DURATION (HR:MIN) 2:32

GET (DAYS:HR:MIN) .^ ----__-.-_*o:oo:oo 0:02:44

EDT (DAY:HR:MIN 16:09:32 16:12:16 19:13:26 19:17:41 20:15:11 20:16:19

73:lO 3:03:54 3:08:09 4:05:39 4:06:47 21~36

LUNAR LANDING LUNAR STAY ZXTRAVEHICULAR INITIATION ACTIVITY

4:16:39

21:20:11

LUNAR EXTRAVEHICULAR ?lCTIVITY ASCENT 1OCKING ;M JETTISON rOTAL LUNAR ORBIT PRANSEARTH INJECTION C'MSEARTH COAST ZARTH LANDING

f I

2:40 5:04:23 5:08:00 5:11:53 59:30 5:15:25 59:38 22:00:57 24:12:49 21:17:32 21:21:25

8:03:17

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M-932-69-

11

PROGRAM The first Saturn vehicle was successfully

DEVELOPMENT flown on 27 October 1961, initiating opera-

tions in the Saturn successfully flight and spacecraft (S-l, and S-IV). stages The

I Program. A total of 10 Saturn I vehicles (SA-1 to SA-10) was tested to provide information on the integration of launch vehicle to provide operational experience with large multiengined booster

next

generation first IB was and stage launched AS-202)

of vehicles, (S-IB) and

developed a more powerful 1966. the tested

under new

the

Saturn

IB Program, (S-IVB).

featured The first

an (AS-201, and

uprated Saturn AS-203, spacecraft

second

stage

on 26 February successfully

The first three Saturn IB missions performance of the launch vehicle

combination,

weightless environment, orbital entry conditions, The craft and planned first fire, severely fourth during Saturn

separation of the stages, behavior of liquid performance of the Command Module heat and recovery operations. IB mission flight. prelaunch spacecraft. (AS-204) scheduled for early

hydrogen in a shield at low earth

1967 was

intended

to be the

manned damaged 5 Mission.

Apollo the

a manned

This mission was not flown because of a spacetest, that took the lives of the prime flight crew The SA-204 Launch Vehicle was later assigned

to the Apollo The Apollo

4 Mission

was

successfully V Launch

executed Vehicle

on 9 November (SA-501) for this Module and mission

1967. required consisted (LTA).

This

mission re-

initiated the use of the start of the S-IVB third Command/Service Service Module heat rate, mission The This Module

Saturn stage.

an orbital The CSM

The spacecraft and a Lunar

of an unmanned

(CSM)

test article

Propulsion System (SPS) was exercised, including restart, and the Command Block II heat shield was subjected to the combination of high heat load, high and aerodynamic were loads successfully representative accomplished. launched Saturn Module Ascent were was also and completed (SA-204). on 22 January This flight 1968. provided of lunar return entry. All primary objectives

Apollo was the

5 Mission fourth

was successfully mission testing of the utilizing

IB vehicles

for unmanned orbital and proper operation Propulsion System the S-IVB/Instrument were achieved. The Apollo 6 Mission

of the Lunar Lunar Module restart, (IU) in orbit

(LM-1). Propulsion verified. demonstrated.

The LM structure, staging, System (APS) and Descent Satisfactory All performance primary objectives of

(DPS), Unit

including

V) was successfully launched on 4 April including oscillations reflecting 1968. Some flight anomalies were encountered, an imperfection in the Spacecraft-LM propulsion-structural Ilongitudinal coupling, and malfunctions of the J-2 engines in the S-II and Adapter (SLA) structural integrity, S-IVB stages. The spacecraft were flew the not achieved. planned trajectory, A majority of the but preplanned mission objectives high velocity for Apollo 6

(second

unmanned

Saturn

reentry conditions was accomplished.

6/24/69

Page

M-932-69-

11

The Apollo 7 Mission (first manned Apollo) 1968. This was the fifth and last planned Vehicle (SA-205). The Command/Service Module. plished. In addition, all originally The Apollo 27 December and the first were that moon were were scheduled, 8 Mission 1968. manned 1 l-day All planned mission primary detailed

was successfully Apollo mission provided mission test the first objectives objectives,

launched on 11 October utilizing a Saturn IB Launch orbital were plus tests of the successfully three that Block II accomnot

were

were was

satisfactorily successfully

accomplished. launched on 21 December and completed on

This was the flight to the scheduled, performed,

successfully

accomplished.

first manned flight of the Saturn V Launch Vehicle Al I primary mission objectives vicinity of the moon. In addition, all detailed test objectives plus four were successfully with the last eight was accomplished. at an altitude successfully Ten orbits of the of approximately out, with

not originally successfully

60 NM. telecasts The Apollo 1969. provided

Television and photographic coverage to the public being made in real time. 9 Mission the was successfully second Module, first manned manned and the LM systems launched Saturn first flight

carried

on 3 March the third of a manned

and Lunar

completed Module.

on

13 March Apollo flight

This was the

V flight,

flight

of a manned This primary were which and

Command/Service

objectives were successfully plished except two associated accomplished. LM rendezvous The S-IVB and docking

accomplished. with S-band second were orbital also

performance All restart, successfully

demonstration. All detailed test objectives communications transposition demonstrated. CSM

mission accompartially and

and VHF

were docking,

The Apollo 10 Mission was successfully launched This was the third manned Saturn 26 May 1969.

on 18 May 1969 and completed on V flight, the second flight of a manned

Lunar Module, and the first mission to operate the complete Apollo Spacecraft around This mission provided operational experience for the crew, space vehicle, the moon. and mission-oriented facilities during a simulated lunar landing mission, which followed planned Apollo 11 mission operations and conditions as closely as possible without All primary mission objectives and detailed test objectives were actually landing. successfully accomplished. The manned navigational, visual, and excel lent photographic coverage of Lunar Landing Sites 2 and 3 and of the range of possible landing sites Apollo in the Apollo 11 and other belt highlands lunar areas landing provided missions. detailed support information for future

6/24/69

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M-932-69-

11

NASA OMSF PRIMARY MISSION OBJECTIVES


FOR APOLLO PRIMARY . OBJECTIVE Perform a manned lunar landing and return. 11

Sam C. Lt. Apollo Date:

Phillips -USAF Director Associate Manned Administrator Space Flight for Program

General,

u, /

/969

6/24/69

Page

M-932-69-11

DETAILED OBJECTIVES AND EXPERIMENTS


The detailed Mission. principal objectives There detailed are and no launch objectives experiments vehicle assigned listed detailed to this below mission. NASA CENTER have been assigned to the mandatory Apollo and 11

objectives

or spacecraft

IDENTIFICATION
Col lect Egress a Contingency from the Sample. lunar and surface, into perform the LM lunar from A B

LM to the

surface EVA operations, the lunar surface. Perform Obtain on the landing Obtain effects Collect Determine Obtain conditions Demonstrate contamination Passive Laser Solar Lunar Obtain Obtain Seismic Ranging Wind Field data lunar data surface on effects

ingress

operations

with

the

EMU. impingement LM

C
D

of DPS and

RCS plume

LM and obtain data on the performance of the gear and descent engine skirt after touchdown. data of the lunar the on the LM Bulk lunar surface characteristics from

the

landing. Samples. of the LM on the lunar and surface. contrast F G H

position

on the on crew

effects visual

of illumination perception.

procedures of the

and earths

hardware biosphere.

used

to prevent

back

Experiment. Retro-Reflector.

s-031 S-078 S-080 s-059

Composition. Geology. coverage coverage during the lunar the stay period. stay period.

television photographic

L M

during

lunar

6/24/69

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M-932-69-

11

LAUNCH COUNTDOWN Countdown will (LV) holds; begin and one (CD) with S/C of spacecraft

COUNTDOWN

AND

TURNAROUND

CAPABILITY,

AS-506

for

launch (S/C)

of the period CD

AS-506 starting will

Space at T-93

Vehicle hours

(SV) during

for the which

Apollo launch

11 Mission vehicle Official

a precount and

activities

be conducted

independently.

coordinated 30 minutes.

11 hours Figure

LV CD will 32 minutes

begin at T-28 at T-9 hours,

hours and will contain and another of 1 hour CD events.

two built-in at T-3 hours

3 shows

the significant

launch

SCRUB/TURNAROUND A termination support SV and facilities, rescheduling time after (scrub) of the SV CD could occur at any point in the CD when launch

SV conditions, or weather the CD (turnaround) will

warrant. The process of recycling the begin immediately following a scrub. to recycle and count down hold time for launch window the SV

The turnaround to T-O (liftoff) synchronization. procedures minutes (S-II nect), then tions stated are

is the minimum time required a scrub, excluding built-in

For a hold that initiated from the start bottle chilldown)

results in a scrub prior point of hold. Should to T-16.2 seconds

to T-22 minutes, turnaround a hold occur from T-22 (S-IC forward umbilical discon-

a recycle to T-22 minutes, a hold, or a scrub is possible under the condiin the Launch Mission Rules. A hold between T-16.2 seconds and T-8.9 seconds (ignition) could result in either a recycle or a scrub depending on circumstances. An automatic or manual cutoff after T-8.9 seconds will result in a scrub. Although an indefinite been number selected of scrub/turnaround to provide the flexibility the turnaround launch attempts discussed below. cases could required be identified, to cover six probable base-

line cases have contingencies. the same six Case cases,

These cases identify confidence for subsequent shown in Figure 4, are

activities necessary to maintain as for the original attempt. The

\
1 - Scrub/Turnaround at Post-LV Cryogenic (CSM)/Lunar Module (LM) Cryogenic The scrub items Reservicing in addition Time: 28 hours crew occurs during CD between the Loading Reservicing. T-16.2 range - Command/Service Module

Condition: SV ordnance units. required

and safety

T-8.9 destruct

seconds safe (SHe)

and all and arm is (S&A)

remain

connected

except

of the CSM cryogenics and LM supercritical to the recycling of the LV. Turnaround for countdown would time. require The 65 hours time consisting

helium

Turnaround time from and flight

of 37 hours operations

for and

recycle results battery

required

for a Case

1 turnaround

egress,

LV cryogenic

unloading,

LV ordnance

6/24/69

Page

M-932-69-l

+ i

B 11 -00 3

,035

mANSI 1 1
--i
MOD A

.- -i:

6/24/69

Fig.

TURNAROUND FROMSCRUB,AS-506

IGNITION
T-8.9 T-28 T-9 SEC

PRIOR TO LV
PROPELLANT LOAD t 60-HR CSM/LM CASE 4 TURNAROUND

AFTER LV PROPELLANT LOAD

CASE 1 65-HR TURNAROUND 37-HR RECYCLE 1 X&t; 1

CRYOGENIC
RESERVICING

,":iY!,",

&ii&

32-HR

CASE 5 TURNAROUND

CASE 2 39-HR TURNAROUND 9-HR COUNT

LM CRYOGENIC RESERVICING

30-HR RECYCLE

23-HR

TURNAROUND

n -. ca . P

NO CSM/LM

CRYOGENIC RESERVICING

M-932-69-11

removal, installation, Case

LM SHe and

reservicing, CD resumption

CSM

cryogenic hours. Cryogenic

reservicing,

CSM

battery

removal

and

at T-28

2 - Scrub/Turnaround

at Post-LV

Loading T-16.2 within

- LM Cryogenic

Reservicing

Condition: The scrub vehicle activities are Reservicing Turnaround 15 minutes turnaround reservicing, Case of the Time: for

occurs during CD between minimized since they fall is required. would and require

and T-8.9 seconds. Launch allowable time constraints.

LM SHe Turnaround time

39 hours

15 minutes, The time

consisting requirement

of 30 hours for this LM SHe

recycle

9 hours

for CD time,

case results LV loading

from flight crew egress, and CD preparations, at Post-LV Cryogenic

LV cryogenic unloading, resumption at T-9 hours. Loading - No CSM/LM

3 - Scrub/Turnaround Reservicing

Cryogenic

Condition: vehicle straints. Turnaround sisting of for this umbilical T-9 Case

The scrub recycle activities LM SHe Time: 14 hours

occurs are

between minimized is not would for

T-16.2 since required. require and

and they

T-8.9 fall

seconds within

in the CD. allowable time

Launch con-

reservicing Turnaround 15 minutes

approximately 9 hours

23 hours for CD time.

15 minutes, The time

conrequired

recycle

case results installation

from flight crew egress, LV cryogenic unloading, S-IC forward and retest, LV propellant preparations, and CD resumption at

hours. 4 - Scrub/Turnaround Reservicing at Pre-LV Cryogenic Loading - CSM/LM Cryogenic

Condition: minimum cryogenics cryogenics Turnaround sisting this turnaround

The scrub recycle require require Time:

occurs

at T-8 due

hours point

15 minutes of scrub

in the

CD.

The in the

LV requires CD. The The CSM LM SHe

activities reservicing reservicing Turnaround 45 minutes from results

to the

occurrence

and the CSM batteries require inspection . S-l I servoactuator would CSM require and CD approximately 9 hours reservicing, resumption

changing. is waived. 59 hours

45 minutes, required and removal

confor

of 50 hours

for recycle cryogenic and

for CD. CSM at T-9

The time battery hours.

installation, Case

LM SHe

reservicing,

5 - Scrub/Turnaround The scrub out, except Structure occurs

at Pre-LV at T-8 of the pad gate

Cryogenic hours S-II for

Loading

- LM Cryogenic CD.

Reservicing remain

Condition: closed Service

15 minutes servoactuator

in the of the

The SV can and

inspection is at the

is waived LM SHe.

the Mobile

reservicing

6/24/69

Page

12

M-932-69-

11

Turnaround hours approximate capability for this Case

Time: l-day permits

Turnaround time and

would 9 hours

require for CD.

approximately This case provides

32 hours,. the

consisting

of 23 for an This required hours.

for recycle

capability

turnaround that a launch attempt results from

exists at T-8 hours 24 hours after the reservicing Cryogenic and Loading

15 minutes in the CD. original T-O. The time CD resumption LM/CSM at T-9

turnaround

LM SHe

6 - Scrub/Turnaround Reservicing

at Pre-LV

- No

Cryogenic

Condition: LM, and

A launch CSM can

window remain

opportunity out.

exists

1 day

after

the

original

T-O.

The

LV,

closed

Turnaround l-day hold

Time: Hold for the next launch window. may exist at T-8 hours 15 minutes in the the next possible attempt

The CD.

possibility

for an approximate

In the event of a scrub, on the following: 1. 2. 3. 4. Figure launch hold CD sidered. The type

at a given

launch

window

will

depend

of scrub/turnaround factors that may

case alter scrubs window

occurrence

and time. type

its time

duration.

Rea l-time The number

turnaround and the case

of successive launch

of each

scrub

occurrence.

Specific 5 shows window.

mission

opportunities. in the Apollo fall short and CD, possible launch and 11 Mission window at T-9 for a July a launch must hours window, be conin the

the scrub/turnaround Since the turnaround to reach are necessary

possibilities time the may recycle closest

of or exceed

capabilities

Possible hold points (as in the original CD). event of two successive

between

In the

scrub/turnarounds,

SV constraints

may

require

that

additional serial or parallel tasks be performed in the second scrub/turnaround case. The 36 possible combinations of the baseline cases and the constraints that may develop on the second turnaround case occurrence are shown in the second scrub/turnaround matrix be given (Figure either 6). A second scrub/turnaround task performance will require that waivers. real-time considerations to additional or to task

6/24/69

Page

13

--..-

SCRUB/TURNAROUND POSSIBILITIES, AS 506 JULYLAUNCHWINDOW


JULY 19

JULY 20

JULY

21

JULY

22

LAUNCH RESERVICE

Ob
SCRUB I I I I I I I I SCRUB SM/LM CRYOGENIC RESERVICE

-1 f I
Od
SCRUB : I L

LV BATTERY

REPLACEMENT

CSM/LM

CR\,

LV BATTERY

I
*TO "GUST LUNAR

OR SCRUB

INDOW
I

M-932-69,SECOND SCRUB/TURNAROUND MATRIX, AS-506

11

FIRST

SCRUB/TURNAROUND

CASE

CpyqiqE

CASE

YES

YES I

YES

YES

YES

YES

NO *,C,D

NO *,C,D
NO *,B,C

NO *,C,D
NO D

NO *,W
NO *,C

I:,,,

::C,D

!;B,C

CASE

YES

NO D

NO D

NO D

NO D

NO D

CASE

YES

-+

NO A,C,D

NO A,C

NO D

NO *,C

NO *,C

CASE

YES

NO *,C,D

!:B,C

NO D

NO *,C !:B,C

LEGEND A YES IN THE MATRIX ARE APPARENT. BLOCK INDICATES NO IDENTIFIABLE CONSTRAINTS

A NO FOLLOWED ONE OR MORELETTERS IN THE MATRIX BLOCK INDICATES BY


THAT SOME CONSTRAINT(S), A. !, DO AS IDENTIFIED BELOW, IS APPARENT: THE CSM CRYOGENICS MAY REQUIRE RESERVICING. THE LM SHE MAY REQUIRE RESERVICING THE CSM BATTERIES MAY REQUIRE CHANkNG THE LV BATTERIES WILL REQUIRE CHANGING: Fig. 6

6/24/69

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15

M-932-69-11

DETAILED FLIGHT MISSION DESCRIPTION LAUNCH WINDOWS Apollo


defines window, Monthly Since behind visibility during the days long, illuminated. the Apollo one 16th, a result the r elevation of these 18th, opening this the 11 has two the days defines Launch mission Lunar during types the of launch month when of these windows. launch days when The can first, a monthly and can the occur. launch second, window, a daily launch

of the

occur, launch

hours

Window includes Module the a lunar (LM) and landing, low the flight three is designed lunar Apollo horizon Lunar such that the Sites are sun is available 28 earth properly

on the eastern

in order Landing

to optimize

LM approach

to one of the

July monthly launch window. Since a lunar cycle is approximately there are only certain days of the month when these landing sites Only one launch day 11 launch must be timed days. and and angles. 21st closing Figure For a July days between of the 1969 the of the is available so that the launch, the for each spacecraft monthly

site for each month. Therefore, will arrive at the moon during launch window is open on the these dates are Table 2 shows sun duration. on mission

month.

of the spacing

The unequal periods between selected landing sites on the moon. launch impact TABLE windows of July 2 WINDOWS and launch the windows

monthly the

corresponding

7 shows

MONTHLY

LAUNCH

Site 2 -3 5

Date 16 18H* 21H

July (EDT) Open-Close** 09:32-13:54 11:32-14:02 12:09-14:39

SEA*** 10.8O ll.o" 9.1

Date 14H 16H 20H

August (EDT) Open-Close** 07:45-12:15 07:55-12:25 09:55-14:35

SEA 6.0' 6.0 lO.OO

*Hybrid (H) trajectory used. **Based on 108O launch azimuth upper limit. ***Sun Elevation Angle (SEA) - assumes launch ing and translunar injection at the first

at window opportunity.

open-

NOTE:

A hybrid descent

trajectory phase.

is

required

for the

a launch

on 18

July to make it station 210-foot

possible
antenna

for
to

the Goldstone
cover

tracking

LM powered

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16

M-932-69-l

MISSlONIlHTIOE6.JULYLALtKHWlEBlcks Daily Launch Windows to transfer parking the orbit S-IVB/spaceto a trans8*6' LAUNCH ON TIME. 1ST TRANSLUNAR INJECTION OPPORTUNITY

The maneuver craft from earth

lunar trajectory must be performed over a point called the moons antipode. This is a point on the earths surface where an imaginary * position line, drawn from the moons arrival
TOTAL MISSION TIME, 0AY:HA.

(at expected

spacecraft

d4'

time) through intersect the * words, exactly moon earth problem rendezvous

the center of the earth, will far side of the earth. In other it is the point on the earth that is opposite the moon. Since the around moving. the with the earth the This and the on its axis, antipode the the anti-

t3*+

revolves is spinning

d0'

is constantly

presents target,

LAUNCH AT CLOSE OF WINDOW, 2ND TLI OPPORTUNITY

of having

S-IVB/spacecraft
7*22' II 16 JULY 1969 18 LAUNCH DATE 21

a moving

pode, before it can perform the injection (TLI) burn. Additional on the Ocean, execution (2) it can of this occur maneuver over the no earlier (1) it will be performed

translunar constraints are: Pacific than revolution 3 because

Fig. of S-IVB allow systems only

lifetime. a very

These constraints, combined with a single short period of time each day that launch To increase to rendezvous The and This launch extends the variation the the amount with azimuth time the of time antipode, available a variable approximately by range rendezvous 4.5 hours. safety with

fixed launch azimuth, can be performed. each 8 the day, launch per and still azimuth hour during

maintain technique the

the capability will launch 72 be used. window, and 106O.

increases is limited when

considerations

to between

up to a maximum of approximately Apollo 11 is approximately 2.5 FREE-RETURN/HYBRID A circumlunar moon and magnitude skipping below spacecraft limits lunar the free-return

hours.

projected antipode The minimum daily

can be accomplished launch window for

TRAJECTORY trajectory, by definition, is one which circumnavigates the

The perigee altitude of the return trajectory is of such a returns to earth. that by using negative lift the entering spacecraft can be prevented from and the aerodynamic deceleration can be kept out of the earths atmosphere, Th us, even area with on the and a complete to earth. moon because would accessible return conditions safely propulsion system However, free-return of the very of the energy lunar failure following TLI, trajectory severely variation approach in allowable trajectory is the

10 gs.

because the

small

approach

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17

M-932-69-

11

relatively requirement

high. (AV)

The

high

approach

energy high.

causes

the orbit

insertion

velocity

change

to be relatively

Since the free-return flight plan is so constraining on the accessible lunar area, hybrid trajectories have been developed that retain most of the safety features of the free return, but do not suffer from the performance penalties. If a hybrid trajectory is used for Apollo 11, the spacecraft will be injected into a highly eccentric elliptical orbit without ellipse the will The which any until had the free-return maneuvers. ejection System approach characteristic; i.e., a return to the entry corridor further spacecraft Propulsion lunar by the to the same The spacecraft will not depart from the free-return from the launch vehicle has been completed. After (SPS) will limitations has been the checked out, a midcourse approach and maneuver trajectory. hence will spacecraft on a lunar geometry. latitudes will be achieved, inclined

Service resulting

be performed

SPS to place

not be on a free-return in trajectory sites

trajectory,

not be subject On future with little trajectory.

Apollo lunar missions, or no plane change,

landing

at higher the moon

by approaching

on a highly

LUNAR The Apollo Site 2

LANDING Lunar

SITES Landing Sites, as shown in Figure 8, are final choices for

following 11:

latitude longitude Site Mare

041 2343

North East on the east central part of the moon in southwestern

2 is located Tranqui

II itatis.

Site

latitude longitude Site

002 1 North lo1 8 West near the center Medii. of the visible face of the moon in the

3 is located part

southwestern Site 5 latitude longitude Site

of Sinus

lo41 North 4154 West on the west larum. central part of the visible face in southeastern

5 is located Procel

Oceanus

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18

M-932-69-

11

6/24/69 --......-*---

Page

19 --I

Fig.

M-932-69-11

The

final

site

choices

were

based few

on these craters and

factors: boulders). or deep landing craters radar). the least expenditure of spacecraft that could cause incorrect

0 0

Smoothness Approach altitude

(relatively (no signals large hills,

high

cliffs,

to the

Lunar

Module sites

a I
l

Propellant propellants). Recycle

requirements

(selected

require

(selected

sites

allow

effective is delayed). reach

launch

preparation

recycling

if the

Apollo/Saturn 0 Free-return translunar 0 Slope area). (there

V countdown (sites trajectory). is little slope are within

of the

spacecraft

launched

on a free-return

less than

2 degrees

in the approach

path

and

landing

FLIGHT
P

PROFILE to Earth Parkina Orbit is planned Center, breakdown shown a partial burn to be launched on a launch in Table consist stage EPO 9, will (NM) is shown at 09:32 azimuth 3. of a full of the (inclined EDT from Complex The space V boost of the V Launch 33 elapsed of the ground consists to

Launch

The Apollo 39A vehicle earth S-IC Vehicle. and at the (SV) parking

11 Space Kennedy launch orbit stages

Vehicle Space weight (EPO), and into

Florida, in Figure mile

of 72. burn

The Saturn Saturn

S-II

of the S-IV6

Insertion

a 103-nautical equator) will The vehicle

approximately

degrees from the time (GET) after S-IVB stage, the A&pter (SLA), and spacecraft lunar injection Figure 10. Translunar The S-IVB to inject TLI will burn

earths liftoff.

occur approximately combination placed the Lunar Module burn Module (CSM). of the

11.5 minutes in earth orbit

Instrument Unit (IU), and the Command/Service be readied burn. for the The earth

(LM), the Spacecraft-LM While in EPO, the S-IVB S-IVB to achieve the transin of the SV is shown

will (TLI)

second orbital

configuration

lniection J-2 the occur engine on the after will third be reignited into parking Service of the orbit. Propulsion LM/CSM during the second burn will parking The orbit second (first opportunity) for overwill

SV combination for the ejection

a translunar

trajectory. System from

opportunity for a small that

The TLI

be biased

to compensate

(SPS) evasive

maneuver

be performed

the S-lVB/IU/SLA.

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M-932-69-

11

TABLE

APOLLO 11 WEIGHT SUMMARY (Weight


in Pounds)

STAGE/MODULE S-IC Stage Interstage

CNERTWEIGHT 288,750 11,465 79,920

TOTAL ZXPENDABLES
4,739*320 -_--980,510 -m--w

TOTAL WEIGHT 5,028,07C 11,465 1,060,43C 8,08C 262,155 4,305

FINAL SEPARATION WEIGHT 363,425 v--m94,140 -m--B 28,275 -----

S-IC/S-II S-II Stage

S-II/S-IVB S-IVB Stage

Interstage

8,080 25,000

237,155 ---Be

Instrument

Unit

4,305

Launch Spacecraft-LM Lunar Service Module Module Adapter

Vehicle

at Ignition 4,045 9,520 10,555 12,250 8,910 _---23,680 40,605 ----e---m

6,374,505 4,045 33,200 51,160 12,250 8,910 s---m "33,635 11,280 11,020 (Landing) w---B

Command Module Launch Escape System

Spacecraft Space Vehicle S-IC Thrust at Ignition Buildup at Liftoff at Orbit

At Ignition

109,565 6,484,070 (-)85,845 6,398,325

Space Vehicle Space Vehicle

Insertion

292,865

* CSM/LM Separation

.,_.._

I ____-

I._-.~

ASCENTTRAJECTORY ALT (NM)


ORBITAL INSERTION (103 IIM) S-IVB IGNITION

TRANSPOSITION, DOCKING, EJECTION 7

LET JETTISON

S-II

IGNITION

I 1500

RANGE (NM)

Fig.

Fig.

11

EARTHORBITALCONF

TRANSLUNARCONFIGURATION

Fig.

IO

Fis.

12

M-932-69-

11

Translunar Within vehicle 2.5 and

Coast hours will after TLI, the CSM will be separated from the remainder of the of the CSM/LM to of a prescribed is designed

dock from the SLA/iU/S-IVB as shown magnitude for this transposition, the the sun over inertial the shoulders maneuver The pitch

transpose,

with the in Figure

LM, and initiate 11. A pitchdown

ejection maneuver phase

place interface. during

docking, and ejection of the crew, avoiding also provides continuous TD&E. after the by the TLI, S-IVB

(TD&E)

CSM shadow on the docking tracking and communications

attitude 1 hour the

hold,during 45 minutes

At approximately performed using

a spacecraft of S-IVB during LOX

evasive dump,

maneuver and

will

be ice an

SPS to decrease

probability

recontact,

to avoid to provide

particles expected to be expelled early SPS confidence burn. This duration evasive return into lunar and magnitude maneuver will circumlunar parking orbit that place cannot after maneuver. TLI,

SFS burn will be performed in a direction and of a will compensate for the TLI bias mentioned before. The the docked spacecraft, as shown in Figure 12, on a free A free return to earth be accomplished. the This moon residual slingshot and into results solar propellants maneuver in a trajectory orbit, thereby will be possible if the insertion

trajectory.

Approximately perform rS-IVB behind impact recontact

2 hours with

in the

S-IVB the will that

are

dumped the lunar

to of S-IVB

a retrograde the trailing and earth

reduces

probability take both

the spacecraft of the

edge impact.

avoiding

Passive thermal coast period. only plus These The Lunar if required. 24 hours, corrections translunar Orbit

control attitude Four midcourse They lunar coast are orbit phase

will be maintained correction maneuvers

throughout are planned

most of the translunar and will be performed TLI plus LOI minus (MSFN) 9 hours, 5 hours. TLI

scheduled insertion will span

to occur at approximately minus 22 hours, and (LOI) Space approximately Flight Network 73 hours.

wil I use the Manned

for navigation.

Insertion separate LOIthe maneuvers using be initiated 1, will line the SPS of the CSM after the spacecraft as shown in has passed

LOI will be performed in two Figure 13. The first maneuver, behind the moon and crosses moon at approximately maneuver that will 60 x 170 NM. date, antipode rendezvous Ispacecraft a second behind due After the This

imaginary

through the centers of the earth and


The SPS burn is a retrograde orbit that is approximately orbit and a navigation upas the spacecraft crosses the orbit time approximately of LM on the by the

80 NM above the lunar surface. place the spacecraft into an elliptical two moon orbit the effect revolutions burn become to place will the in the (LOI-2) 60 x 170-NM will be made

SPS retrograde

spacecraft circularized in the

in an elliptical at 60 NM lunar gravitational

55 x 65 NM.

to the

of variations

potential

as it orbits

moon.

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M-932-69-

11

LUNAR ORBIT INSERTION

ELLIPICAL ORBIT

CSM/LM After

Coast LOI-2,

to LM some

Powered

Descent will be accomplished in both the CSM and the LM.

housekeeping

Subsequently, a simultaneous rest and provided for the three astronauts prior (CDR) and Lunar all systems, and approximately for descent. imparts vehicles. about one-half perform toward distance will orbit revolution that in Figure Module undock

eat period of approximately 10 hours will be to checkout of the LM. Then the Commander enter the LM, perform a thorough check of Pilot (LMP) will from the CSM. During the 13th revolution after LOIand the LM and unlatching 0.5 feet at a distance CSM will undock of a spring-loaded per second of 40 feet, (fps) and the in preparation mechanism between LM the is rotated Approximately be used to that

2.5 hours before landing, The undocking is a physical velocity for CM of approximately is initiated Pilot Station-keeping

a relative its yaw hour axis after

undocking,

observation of the deployed landing gear. the SM Reaction Control System (RCS) will of approximately This maneuver NM at descent This

a separation maneuver the center of the moon. to approximately by a LM LM/CSM after 15. 2.2

2.5 fps directed radially downward increases the LM/CSM separation orbit insertion (DOI). The DOI maneuver

be performed

DPS retrograde separation. 60 NM

is approximately

burn, as shown in Figure 14, one-half maneuver places the LM in an elliptical The descent orbit events are by 50,000 feet.

shown

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24

M-932-69-

11

DESCENTORBITINSERTION

Fig.

14

__

LUNARMODULEDESCENT
CSM ORBIT

PDI

Fig.

15

EARTH
6/24/69 Page 25

M-932-69-

11

r Lunar The will phase orbital 45,000 * feet, begin attitudes forward . event begin visual attitude period. The and lunar which rdescent surface vertical continue surface. extend engine contact descent portion of the landing phase will at a rate of 3 fps until the probes on the The CDR will beyond cut off the the LM descent footpad, engine contact contact 68 inches start foot at an altitude of 12.5 feet pads of the LM contact the 1 second lunar lunar surface surface. after the The probes, the lunar although the Module LM powered descent Powered descent orbit and Descent maneuver approximately phase, will be initiated 14 prior phase, at the to the and 50,000-foot site. phase. altitude This The point braking LMs of

of the

landing

maneuver

consist

of a braking

an approach

a landing

will use maximum thrust velocity. The LM will feet. The use of the

from the DPS for most of this phase be rotated to a windows-up attitude landing radar can begin phase, from the visibility at an altitude

to reduce the at an altitude of about will

39,000

as depicted in Figure 16. The approach at approximately 7600 feet (high gate) during window. targeted at an altitude assessment and make this phase crew landing of 500 of the minor will can point feet landing permit appears (low site. gate) The crew The redesignate

as shown in Figure 17, lunar surface. Vehicle of the rough. landing lunar The area surface landing area

through phase

the in the will

to an improved excessively

and has been designed crew will take control in the rate

to provide continued of the spacecraft during this

adjustments

as required

of descent

within the the

can be left on until the footpads sequence is shown in Figure 18.

LANDINGRADAR-ANTENNA BEAMCONFI GURATI ON

APPROACH

PiiASE

LANDING

PHASE

6/24/69 Page 26

Fig.

I6

Y-

M-932-69-

11

LANDINGAPPROACHPHASE

HIGHGATE ALT- 7600 FT. RANGE- 26000FT


c 5
a c

FINALAPPROACH AND ALT- 500 FT RANGE-2OOOFT,

BRAKING

RANGE
Fig. 17

LUNARCONTACT SEQUENCE
l l

PROBECONTACTSLUNAR SURFACE LUNAR CONTACT I NDI CATOR ON CONTROLPANELLIGHTS DESCENT ENGINE IS SHUT DOWN BY CREW AFTER1 SECOND LM SETTLES LUNAR SURFACE TO

.6/24/69 Page 27

Fig.

18

M-932-69-11

Lunar

Surface

Activities to assess its launch for extravehicular before and after. capability. activity A timeline

Immediately after landing, the LM will be checked After the postlanding checks and prior to preparation there the pack (OPS). * will lunar be a 4-hour surface activity rest period, is shown Life with eat periods 19. System in Figure Support System

(EVA), for

consisting of a Portable The LM E nvironmental

Each crewman will then (PLSS) and an Oxygen and the Extravehicular

don a backPurge System Mobility

Contr0.J

(ECS)

Unit (EMU) will be checked egress to the lunar surface.

out, and the LM will be depressurized As the CDR begins to descend the LM

to allow the CDR to ladder, he will pull a

D ring which will lower the Modularized Equipment Stowage Assembly (MESA). This allows the TV camera mounted on the MESA access panel to record his descent to the
l

lunar the window)

surface. EVA and the

The

LMP will the CDRs

remain surface in the

inside activity

the

LM Ascent (including state.

Stage

during

the early through the

part LM

of

to monitor

photography

LM systems

depressurized

Commander Once on the

Environmental surface, the

Familiarization CDR will move.slowly to continue to perform lunar of a crewmans will assure tasks. the assigned EVA from the footpad to check ability within later the his to the in the LMP are

balance and determine his ability move and to see or, specifically, constraints evaluation timeline, capable of the and this initial EMU and the documentation familiarization

with the EVA - the the surface operations Although capabilities the CDR A brief will that check occur

environment.

a more he and

thorough

of accomplishing to extend the an important a full Sample

of the

LM status

will be made time, provide landing should

CDRs environment contribution to the LM inspection

familiarization and, postflight assessment not be accomplished

at the same of the LM later.

or nominal Collection

Contingency

A Contingency Sample of lunar surface material will assure the return of a small sample in a contingency

be collected. This will situation where a crewman One to four pounds of may remain on the surface for only a short period of time. loose material will be collected in a sample container assembly which the CDR The sample will be collected near the carries to the surface in his suit pocket. LM ladder and the sample bag restowed in the at the Sample suit pocket Ascent relative Stage when the CDR ingresses location of the Contingency end of the collection to be carried into the Figure 20 shows the EVA. and the other lunar surface

activities.

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M-932-69-

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LUNARSURFACEACTIVITY
TV CAMERA TRIPOD POSITION (30 FT. FROM LM)

+
BULK SAMPLE (NEAR MESA IN QUAD IV)

., SOLAR WIND COMPOSITION (FEW FEET FROM LM)

CONTINGENCY SAMPLE (NEAR LADDER)

\ \ \ \ \
S-Band Erectable that Antenna adequate antenna Deolovment margins may do not exist with the steerable the the these reduce antenna EVA period, This allocated for the the would to DOCUMENTED SAMPLE (WITHIN 100 FT. FROM LM)

:: cl
..

LASER RANGING RETRO-REFLECTOR (70 FT. FROM LM)

HI
spectrum 19 minutes (including be deployed and will erectable approximately probably events. Pilot Environmental Familiarization

PASSIVE SEISMIC EXPERIMENT (80 FT. FROM LM)

Fig.

20

In the event entire S-band require other Lunar

communications

television) to improve

during

margins. time

EVA

Module

After the CDR accomplishes the surface and spend a few capability Television The CDR, remove place operations. the the or limitations Camera after camera

the preliminary minutes in the further

EVA task, familiarization operations

the

LMP will descend to and evaluation of his lunar environment.

to conduct

in the

Deployment the the will LMPs egress Stage in this and MESA, position. descent obtain to the surface, a panorama, surface will and EVA

photographing from on its tripod

TV camera

Descent remain

in a position

to view

the subsequent

The TV camera

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30

M-932-69-11

Extravehicular

Activity

and

Environmental

Evaluation This involves a within the conditions of of the

The LMP will proceed to conduct the environmental evaluation. detailed investigation and documentation of a crewmans capability constraints of the EMU; the PLSS/EMU performance under varying sunlight, lunar Flag Early It will shadow, environment Deployment in the LMP EVA period the astronauts staff and will erect a 3 by 5-foot wire along The event be placed crewman which activity influence or inactivity; operations and the on the surface.

characteristics

America1 its top edge

flag. will

be on an 8-foot

aluminum

a spring-like of the moon. The flag will

keep it unfurled in the airless on television and transmitted distance Bulk from the LM to avoid

environment live to earth. damage

will be recorded a sufficient lunar takeoff.

by the ascent

engine

exhaust.at

Sample will at

Col lection collect a Bulk Sample of lunar surface material. In the Bulk Sample least 22 pounds, but as much as 50 pounds, of unsorted surface material rock chunks (SRC), Laboratory SRC, will near the will be placed a near in a special vacuum Lunar this container, environment a lunar Sample to the in the material removal to provide for its return

The CDR collection and Lunar MESA from of tools As each into directly seals. Solar The into Once simple Return

selected

Container Receiving with the the surface

(LRL). Apollo be used to collect MESA in Quad

Handtools (ALHT), stowed large sample of loose lunar LM. Figure 21 shows the

IV of the

stowed in the MESA. rock sample or scoop sample the bag. into

Figure 22 shows of loose material

the preparation is collected, rather possible

of a handtool for use, it will be placed loose material. to the container

a large

Placing the sealed SRC prevents contamination

bag, and

than the damage

Wind LMP will

Composition deploy consists the

Experiment Solar Wind of very

Deployment Composition thin aluminum container. staff and the (SWC) foil experiment. rolled and It is stowed equipment window foil The SWC assembled in the MESA. it is a shade, and

experiment

of a panel handling blanket

a combination the thermal task to remove

and deployment is removed


&ploy

from around the

the MESA

the SWC,

place it in direct sunlight where the foil will be exposed to the suns rays, as shown in Figure 23. TheSWC experiment is designed to entrap noble gas constituents of the solar wind, such as helium, neon, argon, krypton, and xenon. It is deployed early in the EVA period for maximum exposure time. At the conclusion of the EVA, the foil is rolled up, removed from the staff, and placed in a SRC. At the time the foil the lunar surface of penetration. to determine, is recovered, the astronaut will for postflight soil mechanics push the staff into analysis, the depth

6/24/69

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31

M-932-69-

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Fig. 21
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M-932-69-

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PREPARATION OFHANDTOOL
Fig. 22

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33

M-932-69-

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DEPLOYED SOLARWIND COMPOSITIONEXPERIMENT


6,24/69 Page 34

M-932-69-11

Lunar The

Module LMP will

Inspection begin the LM inspection and will be joined by the CDR after the

Bulk Samples have been collected. visually check and photographically landing on the lunar surface. The as a safe and effective vehicle for gain more knowledge of the inspection will of the and environment the status report

The purpose of the LM inspection is to document the external condition of the LM inspection data will be used to verify the LM lunar landings. The data will also be used to In general design and the will of the methodically LM which are visual They condition the results understanding inspect visible and

of the lunar surface characteristics. serve to advance the equipment in which of all it operates. external parts The and crewmen surfaces

to them. The still color for postflight engineering photograph and and Early When open using the landing Apollo the the RCS effects DPS effects struts. Scientific crewmen remove reach the and

photographs will supplement their analysis and design verification. on the surface LM, the interactions as the general as well

documentation wil I observe and of all

of the

surface

footpads, quadrants

on the

Experiments the Early scientific Apollo the

Package equipment Scientific as the LMPs CDR activity. bay in Quad the II, the LMP will and basic

it and prerigged

Experiments completes EASEP

Package consists

(EASEP)

straps

pulleys

LM inspection of two

photographically experiments: the Reflector (LRRR). weighing The a total

documents

Passive Seismic Both experiments of about

Experiment (PSE) and the Laser Ranging Retroare independent , self-contained packages and occupying and one 12 cubic short-period feet of space. vertical

170 pounds

PSE uses three

long-period

seismometers

seismometer information

for measuring on the moons

meteoroid impacts and moonquakes as well as to gather interior such as the existence of a core and mantle.

The Passive Seismic Experiment Package (PSEP) has four basic subsystems: the structure/thermal subsystem provides shock, vibration, and thermal protection; the electrical power subsystem generates 34 to 46 watts by solar panel array; the data subsystem receives and decodes MSFN uplink commands and downlinks handles power switching tasks; and the Passive Seismic Experiexperiment data, ment subsystem measures lunar seismic activity with seismometers which detect inertial mass displacement. package a minimum The aiming silica. origin motion, are 15-watt of 60F radioisotope during the lunar heaters night. array earth. will with a folding support structure for The array is bui It of cubes of fused be reflected distances, and back center to their point of of moons mass to maintain long-period and Also included the electronic short-period in this package at

LRRR experiment and aligning ranging radius, Laser lunar

is a retro-reflector the array toward from earth beams earth

for precise

measurement technology.

of earth-moon geophysical

information,

development

of space

communication 6/24,69

Page

35

M-932-69-

11

Earth stations at Fort Davis, Catalina plan Station to bounce

that will beam lasers to the Texas; the Lick Observatory of the laser University off the beams LRRR. in Figures storage will

LRRR include the McDonald Observatory in Mount Hamilton, California; and the Scientists in other countries also

of Arizona.

In nominal are site removed

deployment, individually

as shown from the The crewmen

24 through receptacle a level

26, and site,

the carried

EASEP to the

packages deployment +15of within

simultaneously.

select

nominally

the LM -Y axis on a compromise during the liftoff, LM Descent

and at least 70 feet from the LM. The selection of the site is based between a site which minimizes the effects of the LM ascent engine heat and contamination and a convenient by dust site and near insulation the scientific debris (kapton) from bay. Stage, equipment

Documented After and The lunar

Sample

Collection deploy samples, the EASEP, they will select, describe as necessary, the EVA. variety of Samples. It

the astronauts collect material lunar than Documented

Sample will

as shown will provide be obtained

in Figure 2;: until a more detailed from the

they terminate and selective and Bulk

Contingency

will include a core sample collected with a drive tube provided in the Sample Return Container, a gas analysis sample collected by placing a representative sample of the lunar surface material in a special gas analysis container, lunar geologic samples, and descriptive photographic coverage of lunar topographic features. Samples will be collected using will Return tools stored in the MESA and will be documented bags and the

Samples by photographs. bags placed in the Sample Television The primary and Photographic of the the exact

be placed Container.

individually

in prenumbered

Coverage TV LM is to provide and location on the environment, in providing telemetered a supplemental data surface, lunar real-time return. in evaluating data source the EMU

purpose or enhance the

to assure and mans collections. correlation graphic

scientific

operational

It may

be an aid

in determining

capabilities in the lunar The TV will be useful of crew activity with

and in documenting continuous observation data, voice comments,

the sample for time and photo-

coverage. consists the Maurer (ALSCC). of both still and sequence camera, will which lunar use the they coverage and using the Lunar extensively Additional will and the supplement astronauts Hasselblad Surface Closephotoother on the

Photography camera, Up Camera surface graphy, data such in the

data acquisition Th e crewmen each major and task of the

the Apollo Hassel blad

to document postflight

accomplish.

as panoramas analysis

scientific

documentation, environment

6/24/69

Page

36

EARLYAPOLLOSCIENTIFIC EXPERIMENTS PACKAGE DEPLOYMENT


KtMUVt

PSEP

1 / I l-7====i /,//lw+T-- I I II I II I - II TRAVERSE

DEPLOY DCED I JLI

5 657

REMOVE LRRR
n -. (Ll . E

DEPL; LRRR

&!j
FEB 69 2601 4.4

PSEP- PASSIVE SEISMICEXPERIMENTS PACKAGE LRRR-LASERRANGINGRETROREFLECTOR

DEPLOYED PASSIVESEISMICEXPERIMENT

M-932-6911

DEPLOYED LASERRANGINGRETRO-REFLECTOR
Fig. 6/24/69 Page 39 26

M-932-69-l

Vg.

27

6/24/69

Page

40

M-932-69-

11

capabilities a stereo surface

or limitations camera material. and will The data

in conducting be used acquisition

lunar camera

surface the fine

operations. textural camera)

The details view

ALSCC of the from the

is lunar

for recording

(sequence

LM Ascent Stage window will provide almost continuous coverage of the surface activity. The LMP, who remains inside the Ascent Stage for the first few minutes of the EVA, will use the sequence camera to document the CDRs initial surface Then, before he egresses, activities. the LMP will position the camera for optimum surface ingresses surface coverage he can activity . Activity ingress and Termination before will also and the SRCs are transferred to the check, to cover LM. the He will the SRC transfer assist and during the while use the both crewmen are on the surface. to provide After the of the first crewman(LMP) sequence camera coverage remaining

Extravehicular The the LMP will

SRC transfer

make

a LM systems the camera

change

sequence

camera CDRs As each will will can

film magazine, ladder ascent. man begins to brush and from

reposition

his EVA off the any boots there from distance

termination dust

he will

clean lunar from the ladder. will lowest

the material

EMU. from

Although their of the suit

the which

crew they they

have attempt reach EVA

a very

limited

capability on the are the from

to remove or particles footpad tasks

EMUs

portions

and that of the

In the The position

termination ascent vertical

two

require ladder

some rung. to the

increased In the lowest ladder

effort. unstroked rung

first

is the the

footpad

to the

the top

footpad

In a nominal level landing this distance will be decreased only about is 31 inches. 4 inches. Thus, unless the strut is stroked significantly the crewman is required to spring up using his legs and arms to best advantage to reach the bottom rung of the ladder The from the task footpad. will be the ingress or the crewmens movement through the hatch

second

opening to a standing position inside the LM. The hatch opening and the space inside the LM are small. Therefore, the crewmen must move slowly to prevent possible damage to their EMUs or to the exposed LM equipment. After need. the crewmen The items enter the LM, to be jettisoned they will jettison the equipment they are the used ECS canister and bracket, no longer OPS

brackets (adapters), and pressurize the start more boots, this initial will and crewmen doff

The crewmen will then close the hatch and three armrests. The EVA is considered to be terminated after the crewmen LM. After the cabin pressure has stabilized, the cabin pressurization. their PLSSs, connect need. they no longer to the LM ECS, and prepare to jettison The equipment, such as the PLSSs, lunar be repres-

equipment

cameras, wil I be stowed in two containers. The LM will again the containers jettisoned, and the cabin the hatch opened, depressurized, Table 4 shows the loose equipment left on the lunar surface. surized.

6/24/69

Page

41

M-932-69-

11

TABLE LOOSE EQUIPMENT

4 LUNAR SURFACE

LEFT ON

During

EVA TV equipment camera tripod handle/cable assembly MESA bracket Solar Wind Composition staff Apollo Lunar Handtools scoop

tongs extension handle hanruer gnomon Equipment stowed in Sample Return Containers extra York mesh packing material SWCbag (extra) spring scale unused small sample bags two core tube bits two SRC seal protectors environmental sample containers 0 rings

(outbound)

Apollo Lunar Surface Close-up Camera (film casette Hasselblad EL Data Camera (magazine returned) EVA termination Lunar equipment conveyor ECS canister and bracket OPS brackets Three armrests Post-EVA equipment jettison Two Portable Life Support Systems Left hand side stowage compartment lunar boots - inside) One armrest

returned)

(with

equipment - such as

6/24/69

Page

42

_I--.

--

M-932-69-11

Following the EVA and post-EVA activities, there wil I be another 4 hours 40 minutes duration, prior to preparation for liftoff. Command/Service The CSM will LM touchdown. Lunar Module Module perform This Ascent Plane Change

rest

period

of

a plane maneuver to Docking

change of 0.18Oapproximately 2.25 revolutions will permit a nominally coplanar rendezvous

after by the

LM.

After completion of crew rest and ascent preparations, be used for powered ascent, (APS) and the LM RCS will the CSM. Powered ascent maneuver shows the maneuver coelliptic concentric initiation performed performed, circularize that ascent engine. which sequence rendezvous sequence (TPI), and to establish TPI will the will The Stage will be performed first place through and After the phase the will the orbit coverage into which (CSI), to clear in two lunar phases during rise,

the LM Ascent Propulsion rendezvous, and docking

System with

a single as shown will

continuous in Figure

burn 28,

of the required insertion

be a vertical terrain.

for the Ascent

The second approximately Figure the 30 shows of the LM will consists delta height

be an orbital complete radar and major execute maneuvers:

LM in an orbit insertion. capability orbit, constant nominally

9 x 45 NM. the

LM ascent

Figure 29 rendezvous (RR) and the phase will CDH be is the

rendezvous compute of four (CDH),

MS FN tracking.

insertion sequence

initiation

terminal

terminal phase finalization (TPF). The CS I maneuver the proper phasing conditions at CDH so that, after occur at the 15 NM desired below time that and of the elevation CSM. angle. CSI is a posigrade

CSI wi II nominally maneuver

LM orbit

is scheduled to occur approximately at apolune. CDH nominally would be a small radial burn to make the LM orbit coelliptic with the orbit of the CSM. The CDH maneuver would be zero if both the CSM and LM orbits are perfectly circular at the time of CDH. The LM wil I maintain RR track attitude after CDH and continue to track the CSM. The minutes after Meanwhile will CDH. the Two CSM will maintain with the corrections sextant/VHF LM (MCC-1 and ranging MCC-2) tracking are of the 38 scheduled LM. TPI maneuver be performed midcourse RCS thrusters approximately

between TPI and TPF, but are nominally zero. TPF braking will begin approximately 42 minutes after TPI and end with docking to complete approximately 3.5 hours of rendezvous allow samples LM procedures. and activities. housekeeping Afterward, exposed 0 ne I unar activities the fi Im . revolution, primarily will recently associated transfer added with to the to the back CSM flight the plan, lunar will control contamination with

LM crewmen

6/24/69

Page

43

M-932-69-1

LUNARMODULE VERTICALRI SE PHASE


72061056070 480 400ALTITUDE, FT 320240MO15
16

l2 TIME FROM

ALTITUDE " RATE, FP! 10

LUNAR LIFr-OFF, SEC

50 GUIDANCE SWITCHTC 10 \--ORBIT


INSERTION

3 6 I D2 Fig. 28

PHASE

30

20 10 I DOWN-RANGE POSITION,FT

ORBIT I NSERTI PHASE ON


ORBIT INSERTION ASCENTBURN OUT

TOTALASCENT: BURNTIME - 7:15MIN:SEC AV REQUIRED= 6,056FPS


PROPELLANTREQUIRED -4,980 LBS

Fig. 29

6/24/69

Page 44

M-932-69-11

RENDEZVOUS MANEUVERSIRADARCOVERAGE

TATION CSM PARK ORBIT

KEEPING

c
-sIllI DOCKING

-Z-HZ

MSFN trackiny

t
Earth Fig. Lunar Module Jettison to Transearth Injection the CSM will jettison RCS maneuver. The for transearth lunar orbit from insertion the LM and then crew will then eat, (TEI). through transearth 30

Approximately separate from photograph Figure injection. Transearth

2 hours after hard docking, the LM by performing a l-fps of opportunity, a summary and of activities

targets

prepare

injection

31 presents

Injection on the far transearth

The burn will occur 59.5 hours after LOIas the CSM crosses the antipode Th e sp acecraft side of the moon. configuration for transearth injection and coast is shown in Figure 32.

6/24/69

Page

45

LUNAR
-7 310 - Le -

ACTIVITIES
I ,i" IF

SUMMARY

,/,
30

REV NO

E-t

,M KS

- -L

. LOI uLOI
.EA II I

1K c ( PHOT

iSM (CMP)

SLEEP GET

M-932-69-l

-Transearth During correction defined, maneuvers control following

Coast transearth (MCC) coast, d ecision three midcourse have been

TRANSEARTH CONFI GURATI ON


points 33. The for corridor at the

as shown in Figure will be targeted

only and will be made times if required: TEI plus Entry 15 hours

MCC-5 MCC-6 MCC-7 These

15 hours (El) minus Fig. for navigation. In the transearth phase 32 there

interface 3 hours. utilize

El minus will

corrections

the MSFN

will be continuous behind the moon spacecraft and cated Entry Prior from preferred by more Through attitude

communications coverage until about 1 minute prior timeline of MCCs. fuel slosh are thermal

from the time the spacecraft appears from to entry. The constraints influencing the control, communications, crew rest cycle, transearth phase is compliphases of the mission.

times severe

The attitu,de profile for the problems than for the other

Landing entry, the SM the final MCC will be made and the RCS. The spacecraft wi I I reach entry in Figure 34, with a velocity of 36,194 will E I. begin 18 seconds later followed CM will be separated interface (El) at fps. The S-band communication

to atmospheric the SM using feet,

400,000 blackout seconds after chute feet, will

as shown blackout from El.

communication after

by C-band

28 seconds

Th e rate of heating will The spacecraft will exit from C-band

reach a maximum 1 minute 10 blackout 3 minutes 4 seconds

entry and deployment followed occur will

from S-band will occur by main

blackout 3 minutes 30 seconds after entry. Drogue para8 minutes 19 seconds after entry at an altitude of 23,000 deployment 2 seconds at after 172OW launch. at El plus after and 9 minutes 1285 NM 7 seconds. downrange latitude and Landing from El. will

parachute 14 minutes Pacific

approximately be in the

Landing occur

Ocean 3 hours

longitude,

llN

approximately

8 days

6/24/69

Page

47

M-932-69-

11

TRANSEARTH PHASE
WI COURSE CORRECTIONS

INJECTION ENTRY CORRIDOR I

ENTRY&DESCENT

Fig. 6/24/69 Page 48

34

--

M-932-69-

11

Postlanding Following

Operations landing,

the recovery helicopter will drop swimmers who will install the flotation collar to the CM. A I arge, 7-man liferaft will be deployed and attached to the flotation collar. Biological Isolation Garments (BIGS) will be lowered into the raft, Two landing astronauts the hatch and other one swimmer will will don a BIG upwind be turned raft. while of the off, the CM the astronauts CM will will then don BIGs large inside raft. down, all the The and CM. the swimmers will area, egress and will will move on a second post-

ventilation

fan will to the the

be powered decontaminate

The swimmer

garments,

collar. the astronauts hanger and the recovery After physician on the riding recovery in the carrier,

The helicopter helicopter the helicopter will then physician the Lunar Houston, After flight to the CM. It will MQF/CM cedures through and from loaded In order material, approximately the then

recover any be towed

wil I provide

required to the

assistance. deck. Facility remain at the

landing

enter the Mobile Quarantine and recovery technician will Receiving Texas. crew The Laboratory (LRL)

The astronauts and the physician (MQF). The flight crew, recovery inside the MQF until it is delivered Spacecraft Center (MSC) in

to

Manned

pickup by the helicopter, CM will be retrieved and to the MQF

the auxiliary recovery loop will be attached placed in a dolly aboard the recovery ship. Transfer Tunnel. From will begin post-retrieval inside the pro-

be moved

containment envelope, (removal of lunar samples, the decontamination to the the ship LRL. ship recovery from lock. The SRC, Harbor

and mated to the the MQF engineer data, film, and equipment, will The data, then The CM to MSC.

etc.), passing the removed items remain sealed during RCS deactivation will be flown and spacecraft to the by air to the will LRL. by lunar for nearest be offairport MQF

delivery

etc.

for transport

at Pearl the risk

transported of the The earths crew

to minimize quarantine 2 1 days

of contamination wi II be enforced.

biosphere will

measures after

be quarantined

liftoff from the lunar surface. In addition, the CM will Termination of the CM quarantine period will be be q!Jarantined after landing. dependent on the results of the lunar sample analysis and observations of the crew.

6/24/69

Page

49

M-932-69-11

BACK The Apollo Back Contamination

CONTAMINATION Program can

PROGRAM be divided into three phases, as shown in

Figure 35. The first in flight to minimize

phase covers the procedures the return of lunar surface spacecraft spacecraft, encompasses

which are contaminants

followed by the crew while in the Command Module.

The second phase includes and transport of the crew, Center. analysis A primary cleanliness equipment, proper LUNAR The The in the step third phase Lunar

and crew recovery and lunar samples the quarantine (LRL). is careful

and the provisions for isolation to the Manned Spacecraft and preliminary sample

operations

Receiving

Laboratory back

in preventing

contamination operations. lunar-exposed

attention

to spacecraft

following stowage

lunar surface provisions for OPERATIONS (LM) h as b een surface Prior

This includes equipment,

use of special cleaning and crew procedures for

housekeeping. MODULE Module exploration. will They

Lunar

designed when

with the the

a bacterial atmosphere lunar LM after

filter

system is released

to prevent at the start the

contamination of lunar crewmen gloves. LM ladder

of the

lunar

cabin

to reentering

surface

exploration,

brush any lunar surface dust or dirt from the space suit using the suit will scrape their overboots on the LM footpad and while ascending the any clinging particles by a kicking action.. After entering the LM the cabin, the crew will System, lunar boots, EVA and spread bagged of lunar the the most contaminated items, particles. doff their Portable Life Support System, gloves, etc. The equipment to be jettisoned left on the LM lunar surface. and The docking lunar with to LM, one will be placed in a bag as early rendezvous as possible

dislodge

and pressurizing Oxygen Purge will boots, likely

be assembled

to be subsequently

to minimize

Following

the Command Module insure that an adequate space suits, and additional lunar The LM cabin lunar orbit

(CM), the CM tunnel will be pressurized and checks made pressurized seal has been made. During this period, the surface equipment will be vacuumed. has been added to the mission. will be circulated canister operation lo-l5 being will LM, this flow diffusion positive percent. transferred will from the from CM the into of dust LM atmosphere CM Since at the the the LM then to the start overboard flow from into the the CM, through the To accomplish this,

atmosphere

Environmental

Control

System

(ECS) suit A minimum airborne To prevent a constant LM/CM the will the always

circuit lithium hydroxide of 5 hours of weightless contamination dust flow particles of 0.8 relief the hatch CM will to about from lb/h

to filter particles from the atmosphere. and filtering will reduce the original

CM, through CM

r oxygen or through

be initiated

in the

of combined

operation. from

Oxygen valve to the After

LM cabin

spacecraft and gas flow

leakage. flow has been

of gas is

contamination established

be minimized, tunnel

be removed. Page 50

6/24/69

APOLLO BACK CONTAMINATION

PROGRAM

PHASE1 SPACECRAFT OPERATIONS

2 % tn

PHASED RECOVERY CREW RETRIEVAL

MQF

l-l -. ul . e

PHASEm LRL

SAMPLE CREW SPACECRAFT

w LRL

RELEASE

3 I zi CL p

M-932-69-

11

The CM Pilot
at a time. and logs. Following and the remainder COMMAND transferred equipment

will transfer The equipment back will into

the lunar transferred the CM

surface equipment stowage will then be bagged using the equipment will

bags into the LM one


the buddy system

where

be stowed.

The only

that

not be bagged at this time are the crewmens space suits and flight

the three

transfer crewmen lunar

of the will exposed

LM crew start the

and return

equipment, to earth.

the

spacecraft

will

be separated the

The separated

LM contains

of the

equipment.

MODULE

OPERATIONS and housekeeping procedures other particulate contamination while the LM is docked with the the CM prior cabin will be to earth atmosphere and continue through

Through the use of operational


purged entry. entry of lunar surface and/or start These procedures into the earths will suits atmosphere. doff will their

CM

The LM crewmen The space CM.


phase unless

space

suits and will

immediately not be used

upon again

separation during

of the the

LM and

be stowed occurs.

transearth

an emergency

Specific Visible crew

periods for cleaning the spacecraft liquids will be removed by the liquid to wipe surfaces at random clean positions of liquids around and the

using the vacuum dump system. dirt particles. to insure

brush

have

Towels will
positive

been established. be used by the hoses will

The three

ECS suit

be located

spacecraft

ventilation,

cabin atmosphere CM atmosphere

filtration, and will be continually

After about 63 hours operation, taminates will remain. RECOVERY Following

avoid partitioning. During the transearth phase, the filtered through the ECS lithium hydroxide canister. essentially none (lOMmpercent) of the original con-

OPERATIONS
landing and the attachment of the flotation open the Garment (BIG) will and close the hatch. into that collar to the CM, spacecraft hatch, the swimmer pass three

in a Biological BIGs into the

Isolation spacecraft,

The crew will don the BIGs and then egress Tests have shown immediately after egress. than 5 minutes under ideal sea conditions. a few a liquid minutes. The spacecraft and crew will

The

the liferaft. The hatch will the crew can don their BIGs spacecraft hatch will be open by

be closed in less only for

be decontaminated

the swimmer using


The

Crew retrieval will be accomplished agent. Subsequently, the crew will transfer to the carrier. spacecraft will be retrieved by the aircraft carrier.

by helicopter transport to the Mobile Quarantine Facility.

6/24/69

M-932-69-

11

BIOLOGICAL The BIGs will

ISOLATION
be donned crew

GARMENT in the CM just prior to egress and Facility helicopter aboard pickup the and will

be worn recovery The suit and serves plastic

until the ship. is fabricated

enters

the

Mobile

Quarantine

primary

of a light barrier. flapper inlet

as a biological air

weight cloth fabric which completely Built into the hood area is a face and an air outlet biological

covers the wearer mask with a

visor,

valve,

filter.

Two types of BIGs are used in the recovery operation. One is worn by the recovery In this type garment, the inflow air (inspired) is filtered by a biological swimmer, filter to preclude possible contamination of support personnel. The second type is worn e inflow gas is not filtered, but the outflow gas (respired) is by the astronauts. Th passed MOBILE The Mobile to .10 days. sleep/bath through a biological filter FACILITY Facility is divided facility (MQF) into is powered is equipped three sections through to house several six people area, for a period galley, and with tight. a up to preclude contamination of the air.

QUARANTINE Quarantine The area. interior The

lounge systems

to interface

various ships, The principal negative Non-fecal tainers. passed cations

aircraft, method

and transportation of assuring quarantine for biological

vehicles. The shell is to filter effluent containment in the

is air and water air and provide event of leaks.

pressure

differential

liquids from the trailer are chemically treated and stored in special conFecal wastes will be contained until after the quarantine period. Items are in or out system of the MQF through a submersible transfer lock. A complete communiis provided for intercom and external communications Emergency alarms are provided for oxygen alerts loss of power, and controlled and loss of negative pressure. where they immediate to land bases from while in transport by

ship or aircraft. aircraft, for fire, Specially

packaged

meals

will be prepared postlanding crew LUNAR The craft final RECEIVING phase

in a microwave oven. examination and tests LABORATORY Back Contamination

will be passed into the facility Medical equipment to complete are provided.

of the

Program

is completed released based

in the upon

Manned the

Space-

Center Lunar Receiving


of 21 days after test requirements will biological

Laboratory
lunar liftoff and results. tests. The

(LRL).
and

The crew and spacecraft


are

are quarantined
completion

for a minimum of prescribed The lunar results

samples

be quarantined

During for a period LRL serves

this time the CM will be disinfected. of 50 to 80 days depending upon the four basic purposes:

of extensive

6/24/69

Page

53

M-932-69-

11

The quarantine and lunar-exposed material of lunar

of the upon and

lunar

mission and

crew life.

and

spacecraft, testing

the to search

containment for adverse

of lunar effects

materials, terrestrial protection

quarantine

The The

preservation performance

of the

lunar

samples.

l 0

of time-critical examination to principal system with

investigation. of returned investigators. manually of lo-torr count material. operated an order that space gloves leading directly samples to assist in an intelligent distri-

The preliminary bution of samples

The into

LRL has a vacuum a vacuum facility chamber with

at pressures a background

(mm of mercury). of magnitude can handle

counting

It has a low-level better than other cabinets to contain

Additionally, known counters. extremely hazardous pathogenic The LRL covers 83,000 square

it is a facility

feet

of floor

space

and

includes

several

distinct

areas.

These are the Crew Reception Area (CRA), Vacuum Laboratory, Sample Laboratories (Physical and Bioscience), and an administrative and support area. Special building systems sterilize systems. The CRA provides biological containment for the the flight facility crew and 12 support and personnel. to are employed waste to maintain and air flow into sample handling air from areas the and the CRA to liquid to incinerate contamination primary containment

The nominal occupancy operate for considerably The effect upon Among A. biomedical of lunar which the laboratories samples to base tests: mice will

is about longer

14 days but if necessary. for the life. to release

is designed

equipped

provide

on terrestrial

required quarantine tests to determine the These tests are designed to provide data lunar material from quarantine.

the decision

Germ-free for any

be exposed changes.

2 1 days observation.

abnormal

to lunar Periodically,

materials and observed continuously for groups will be sacrificed for pathologic

Lunar material will be applied B. several environmental conditions. Detailed inventories fungal growth. have been maintained against this so that list any compared spacecraft. of potential

to 12 different culture media and maintained The media wil I then be observed for bacterial of the living microbial found taken flora of the to the spacecraft testing by the moon and can crew material contaminants in the sample

under or crew be or

6/24/69

Page

54

M-932-69-

11

C. Six laboratory Based lished present. D. Seed

types of human together and,

and animal tissue with embryonated

culture eggs,

cells will be maintained will be exposed to the of viral and material isolate the

in the lunar material. can type be estabof virus

on cellular and/or other so that special tests can

the changes, be conducted

presence to identify

Thirty-three
germination,

species growth

of plants

and

seedlings

will

be exposed

to lunar

material. then be will be

observed, and histological, used to determine the cause

of plant cells, microbiological, of any

or the health of seedlings will and biochemical techniques abnormality.

suspected be exposed

A number of lower animals will E. include fish, birds, oysters, shrimp, and euglena. if the condition STERILIZATION Postflight of anomalies testing analysis. taken The fined and of the The testing which timing If abnormalities is transmissible AND and RELEASE inspection and flights. for the and of the spacecraft fluid spacecraft.

cockroaches,

to lunar material. These specimens houseflies, planaria, paramecia, be conducted to determine

are noted, from one OF

further tests will group to another.

THE SPACECRAFT spacecraft flight. of certain testing is presently Generally, components so that limited to investigation this entails some specific of systems corrective for further action may be

of the during removal the

happened

spacecraft

of postflight

is important

for subsequent schedule to the placed calls flush exterior in a special

to be returned

to port

where

a team operation be flown

will

deactivate

pyrotechnics,

drain room

systems (except water), This The spacecraft wi II then sterilization, and

will be conto the LRL

for storage,

postflight

checkout.

6/24/69

Page 55

M-932-69-

11

CONTINGENCY GENERAL If an anomaly occurs after liftoff its nominal flight plan, an abort provide attempt options. ABORTS The CM following to earth phase sections safely describe flight they plan. could the abort emergencies The abort occur. for an acceptable to maximize flight crew flight and

OPERATIONS

that would prevent the space vehicle from following or an alternate mission will be initiated. Aborts will crew CM and CM recovery Figure while 36 shows alternate as well the Apol missions as providing will for of mission obiectives

the accomplishment recovery.

an acceptable

lo 11 contingency

procedures that would descriptions

that

may are

be used the space

to return vehicle in the

the from of

following

prevent

following mission Launch There the are launch Mode

its normal in which

presented

order

six

launch

abort and Mode jettison.

modes. a CM 1 abort

sequence I - The Tower the NM CM

The landing

first three would result in the in the launch abort areas. is designed Launch would and between Escape consist propelling the for safe System of the launch recovery arming Launch site and

termination

of

procedure between procedure vehicle lie would

of the CM and Launch Tower downrange. Escape

following Escape pulling The 520 Mode Tower

an abort off

initiated The the launch point

it a safe

distance

resulting

landing

approximately

downrange. Mode II abort early could be performed burn from until the time the the Launch CM Escape landing

II - The

is jettisoned

during

second-stage

full-lift

point reaches 3200 NM downrange. the CSM from the launch vehicle, letting range the CM free fall to entry. a landing trajectory, with

The procedure would consist of separating separating the CM from the SM, and then The entry would be a full-lift, or maximum on the ground track between 440 and 3200 NM

downrange. Mode full-lift achieved. vehicle and the half-lift III - The CM Mode III abort range would procedure 3200 consist could NM be performed downrange the until CSM from the time the the is

landing

reaches

orbital from

insertion launch

The procedure

of separating

then, if necessary, CM landing point

half-lift entry would be flown, NM south of the ground track

performing a retrograde burn with the SPS so that is no farther than 3350 NM downrange. Since a the CM landing point would be approximately 70 between 3000 and 3350 NM downrange.

6/24/69

Page

56

APOLLO11 NOMINALMISSION EVENTS AND CONTINGENCY OPTIONS

NOMINAL PROPULSION BURN MONITORING

I s-IC 1 , I I

1 S-II ESS S:I"B (1ST BURN) MODE IV SPS co1 ALTERNATE MISSION I

CONTINGENCY PROCEDURE OPTIONS

APOLLO11 NOMINALMI SSI ONEVENTS AND CONTINGENCY ONS OPTI KONTI NUED)

-TLI MAJOR MISSION EVENTS (BEGINNING WITH LO) ", ,u 4 4 NOMINAL PROPULSION BURN MONITORING

BURN-&

T AND z

TRANSLUNAR COAST

z - I I

z CJ-l I

I 2

I D I,

ln

CONTINGENCY PROCEDURE OPTIONS

APOLLO11 NOMINALMISSION EVENTS AND CONTINGENCY OPTIONS (CONTINUED)


LOIAND LOI-

.z NOMINAL PROPULSION BURN MONITORING LOII 1 SPS

i 0

=I;; I LOI-

rf, I I
MISSION i , I TEI SPS 1

z
I I qPs IlR Rr< Mri-'~

1 ALTERNATE MISSION I , I ,
# I I

I I , I MODE 1 SPS 15-MIN ABORT JONBOARD) CONTINGENCY PROCEDURE OPTIONS


I

ALTERNATE

SPS ABORT ~RTCC)

MODE I DPS MODE II DPS ABORT (RTCC ABORT (RTCC)

MODE III (RTCC~

DPS ABORT I

P37 DPS

SPS ABORT (P37)

*FUNCTION OF TEI

BURN TIME

M-932-69-11

These Aborts which The result used during

three from the

descriptions a dispersed various modes

are based on aborts initiated from the nominal trajectory will consist of the same procedures, become possible are into III above and the resultant landing

launch but the may

trajectory. times at vary. and be

points

following

launch

abort to Modes

procedures II 2nd

essentially earth unless

alternate orbit. immediate

launch These return

procedures would to earth

in insertion in preference the Mode parking insert launch IV and orbit the CSM

of the phase. Apogee and

spacecraft

a safe

procedures

is necessary

Kick orbit.

could

- The Mode IV abort procedure is an abort to earth be performed any time after the SPS has the capability Th IS capability begins approximately 8 minutes 30

to

into

seconds GET. The procedure consists of separating the CSM from and, shortly afterwards, performing a posigrade SPS burn to insert earth phase Apogee orbit. the kick This CSM means that any of the time Mode during the itself S-IVB into wherein burn orbit apogee. SPS burn the This that the S-IVB capability spacecraft portion has the capability to insert

the launch vehicle the CSM into of the launch fail. should to orbit

if the S-IVB the SPS burn

is a variation

IV abort

would be performed at, or near, the between the two is the time at which S-IVB with Early enough Staging fuel during the - Under to perform launch normal the phase

first spacecraft the posigrade conditions, to insure

The main difference is performed. is inserted can into orbit if into a has to

TLI maneuver.

be used, the S-IVB could then return

necessary, safe parking the capability remain the West S-IVB to the orbit. cedures. combination Earth Once would entry, cedure and Parking the

is inserted

orbit. After approximately to be staged early and orbit to carry after out one Ocean

6 minutes 30 seconds GET, achieve orbit. The CSM/LM mission, or,

in earth Atlantic

an alternate revolution.

if necessary,

Early CSM The

Staging S-II to allow procedure This means may

to Mode stage,

IV - Should

it become

necessary

to separate

from

malfunctioning

the S-IVB could impart sufficient velocity and altitude the SPS to be used to place the CSM into an acceptable earth is a combination of S-IVB early staging and Mode IV prothat at any time after the 5 minutes CSM into 30 seconds a safe earth GET orbit. the S-lVB/SPS to boost

be utilized

Orbit
is safely inserted into earth parking by separating the CSM from the S-IVB to place be guided to the the CM to a preselected deorbit and entry target

S-lVB/cSM burn would

orbit,
and

a return-to-earth
then utilizing trajectory. if available. This Apollo on the

abort
the SPS After pro7

be performed the Apollo CM

for a retrograde would

on an atmosphere-intersecting point, procedure performed

be similar 9 flights.

6/24/69

--

M-932-69-

11

Translunar Ten-Minute will become

Injection Abort -There is only during the a remote relatively possibility short period that be cut burn. vary an immediate return-to-earth

necessary

of the

if it should become necessary initiate an onboard-calculated formed minutes called tions. survival, ingful including and approximately time from to 5 hours, a midcourse Since the landing launch execution this landing point errors The elapsed S- IVB cutoff. abort

the S-IVB retrograde after on the would be used not can would initiation

burn would SPS abort TLI cutoff to landing

TLI maneuver. However, off early and the crew would The SPS burn would be perensure from of TLI, a safe performed a second entry respect No with the CM entry. 20 prior to condito crew meaninvolved to cutoff, SPS burn approximately

10 minutes depending correction abort would point

and would would

length the

of the TLI latter

maneuver

For aborts

initiated

during only

portion to correct

be necessary be considered be made

for dispersed abort.

in extreme because the duration

emergencies in executing of the of the multiple

predictions of the

variables prior

azimuth,

location of TLI, abort maneuvers.

TLI burn

Ninety-Minute maneuver would that that cutoff

Abort - A more probable be completed and then

situation the crew

than would

the previous case is that the TLI begin checking any malfunctions it becomes apparent at approximately TLI would be targeted to

may have been evident it is necessary to return plus 90 minutes. landing location

during the burn. If, after the check, to earth, an abort would be initiated the called previous procedure, this abort a recovery

Unlike

a preselected spaced around theMid-Pacific retrograde proper CM

the earth as shown in Figure 37. or the Atlantic Ocean recovery followed by a midcourse conditions.

line. There are three recovery lines This abort would be targeted to either line. The abort maneuver would be a the if necessary, to provide

SPS burn entry Coast will

correction,

Translunar The days. Abort be sent abort during line this two order CSM/LM

be in the procedure specifying

translunar during this

coast time

phase would

of the

mission time The and

for approximately 90-minute attitude of the fixed will abort. would landing times CSM

The abort information to the will

be similar time. trajectory. recovery

to the longitude

a combination of abort Because and of the

of SPS burn

crew by the result

to be performed time in a landing

at a specific the abort on theMid-Pacific

is determined that translunar

Therefore, line

of

be selected

coast.

can be accomplished reason, a time critical recovery of priority lines in order for the

only during situation to minimize recovery

earths rotation, a landing on theMid-Pacific For one time interval for each 24-hour period. may dictate targeting the abort to one of the other the elapsed time (1) Mid-Pacific the longitudes from abort to landing. The line, (2) Atlantic Ocean of the the recovery latitude lines are at which

line, and different, TLI occurred.

(3) Indian Ocean line. the latitude of landing

lines is: Although will

remain

at approximately

July

1969

Page

61

M-932-69-

11

Fig. 6/24/69 Page 62

37

M-932-69-11

As the distance return to earth the moons influence becomes Lunar Should

between increases. spacecraft

the spacecraft and the moon decreases, This continues until some time after (basically, equals abort that than the of the point earth) in the after which

the capability the spacecraft where return abort. the

for reaches the moons to earth

sphere on the

of influence

trajectory

less for a circumlunar Orbit early Insertion termination of the

for a direct

return-to-earth

LOI

burn

occur,

the

resulting

abort

procedure

would

be

one of three modes classified abort mode would normally These modes Mode ignition are briefly Mode

according to length result in return of the below. would minutes

of burn before termination. Each CM to the Mid-Pacific recovery line.

discussed I procedure 1.5

I - The

be used into the

for aborts LOI burn.

following This 2 hours

SPS cutoffs procedure after would cutoff

from to

to approximately

consist of performing a posigrade DPS burn put the spacecraft back on a return-to-earth Mode during ignition II - The Mode II procedure the interval approximately plus 3 minutes. would This abort be executed

approximately trajectory.

would be used for aborts following SPS shutdown between LOI ignition plus 1 .!I minutes and LOI maneuver the is performed lunar orbital in two period stages. and one orbit, trajectory. First, a to reduce to insure

a DPS burn

that the spacecraft does not impact on the second DPS burn would place the spacecraft Mode III - The Mode III procedure would burn been

lunar surface. After on a return-to-earth be used for aborts

following

shutdowns 3 minutes lunar orbit. one or This

from approximately of LOI burn, the Therefore, two would Pacific Lunar Orbit from an abort of the If the lunar mission, LM were of the lunar place the the revolutions recovery

3 minutes into the spacecraft will have procedure prior would to doing

until nominal inserted into the DPS burn trajectory

cutoff. After an acceptable go through targeted at pericynthion.

abort

be to let a posigrade

spacecraft

spacecraft I ine.

on a return-to-earth

to the Mid-

An abort Should phases CSM. perform

orbit the

would necessary

be accomplished during make case, the

by performing LM descent, ascent, necessary

the TEI burn to rendezvous

early. with the

become

or rendezvous

LM would In any I ine.

the burns

unable LM.

to complete

a rescue

the rendezvous, the CSM would, if possible, the early TEI would normally target the CM

to the Mid-Pacific

recovery

6/24/69

Page

63

M-932-69-

11

Lunar Aborts

Module for the

Powered powered

Descent descent abort the abort under PGNS or propellant phase status are of the controlled DPS and by the the either Primary Guidance System (AGS), and

Navigation depending and DPS are

System on the

(PGNS) operational

program

or the Abort

Guidance PGNS. the orbit

operational,

is initiated

by pushing

If both the PGNS Abort button. The insertion or engine

DPS abort will continue cutoff due to DPS failure

If DPS cutoff occurs and the velocity-to-be-gained (V,) is less than 30 fps, the DPS will be staged manually and the RCS will be used to complete the orbit insertion of the LM. If VG is greater than 30 fps, the Abort Stage button is pushed. This stages the Descent Stage,and ignites The desired insertion orbit will then be obtained using the using APS. the APS. As above, the

control until depletion.

the

APS engine.

If the DPS has failed, procedure is to push If the tional PGNS DPS,

the abort the Abort

will be performed Stage button. the abort

is not operational, the thrust level

is controlled manually, and

by the

AGS.

For an operais controlled by

is controlled

the steering

the AGS. If the DPS is not operational or becomes than 30 fps, the DPS will be staged manually, and the LM. If both angle Lunar After the PGNS and AGS will have failed, a manual

inoperative with a VG greater the RCS wi II be used to insert

abort

technique,

using

the

horizon

for a reference, Stav LM touchdown

be used.

if an early

abort

is required

there

are

two

preferred

liftoff

times. plus

The first is actually a 1%minute span of time beginning The second is at PDI plus touchdown plus 3 minutes).

at PDI (touchdown to 21 .5 minutes (touchdown

Both of these aborts will place the LM into a 9 x 30-NM orbit about 9.5 minutes). Here again, an extra orbit and CSM dwell acceptable for LM-active rendezvous. orbit are used to improve the rendezvous phasing and conditions in the former case and two revolutions times are may added in the latter case. in real-time to account for possible

The above

be adjusted

somewhat

variations in the CSM orbit. Subsequently during the lunar stay, the preferred liftoff time is whenever the phasing is optimum for rendezvous. This occurs once each revolution shortly after the CM has passed over the site. The nominal rendezvous is performed with this phasing. In the unlikely event of a catastrophic APS failure calling for an immediate within highly liftoff, and the

rendezvous following liftoff time constraints. However,

at any time could this contingency

be performed is considered

performance unlikely and

6/24/69

Page

64

M-932-69-l

rendezvous such Aborts trol event

phasing highly

is fairly

poor

during operational

some

periods. plans PG NS, backup

an abort,

developed under and the AGS

Due to the low probability of for such are not being promulgated. if operating, uses the the Flight horizon otherwise Director is used under Attitude for con-

wi I I proceed of both PGNS

control failure.

of the This reference;

of AGS.

A manual if available,

guidance for attitude

scheme

is being

developed

to provide

backup

in the

Indicator, reference.

otherwise,

*
Lunar Three the Module types will using crew using lniection procedures abort the 1.5 SPS. for early except Mode plus 1.5 Ill For SPS cutoff the cutoff that during LOI minutes abort and of the the the SPS during would interval TEI ignition the between would plus TEI burn are the inverse to ignition II and the of Powered of aborts require the capabi Ascent are available insertion If both control. the for the to the AGS. provided PGNS powered If the the and ascent engine AGS fail, phase. the the failure If the abort occurs abort will PGNS wi I I be within the be performed fails,

abort

switching RCS for I i ty .

APS fails,

performed RCS insertion by the

manual

Transearth The the plus LOI tion that abort LOI

procedures

abort

be performed be used. 2 minutes,

by attempting For SPS cutoff Mode

reignite between

TEI ignition

minutes, TEI ignition

procedure

abort procedure plus 2 minutes the 2-hour Coast entry

would be used. If the SPS should to nominal end of TEI, abort Mode period would be deleted.

be shut I would

down from TEI ignibe performed, except

coast

Transearth From tively

TEI until decrease

minus

is to use the

SPS or the

24 hours, the only abort procedure SM RCS for a posigrade or retrograde the

that burn

could be performed that would respec-

transearth flight time and change the longitude of no further burns to change the landing point landing. After entry minus 24 hours, This is to ensure that the CM maintains the desired entry velocity wi I I be performed. and flight path angle combination that will allow a safe entry. Entry If during guided crew landing 75 240 6/24/69 NM NM (constant would point north entry, entry the to the use their would Guidance, end-of-mission Entry Monitor track. would target be approximately entry guided Navigation, target System 39 If both be flown. point Page and point (EMS) NM the Control cannot to fly uprange System be flown. a 1285-NM of the guided (GNCS) In this range. target fails, case, The point and a the

or increase

of the ground of the

deceleration) uprange

GNCS and The landing NM

EMS fail, a constant g point would be approximately of the ground track.

and 75 65

north

M-932-69-l

ALTERNATE The Apollo several mission these Earth two

MISSION

SUMMARY of alternate orbital, upon status the in the depend systems is contained Missions Low Earth Orbit or S-IVB failed prior to 25,000-NM missions and of the nature that can be performed Both of these anomaly CSM. paragraphs. A brief causing during categories the description the have alternate of

general 11 Mission variations and the

categories are which resulting missions Alternate

(1) earth

(2) lunar. of the LM and

alternate Orbital

following

Al ternate

1 -

CSM-Only

Condition/Malfunction: apogee, Perform timeline recovery Al ternate : or SPS used SPS LOI and area. 2 CSM-Only

LM not extracted, to achieve earth (100 orbit.

simulation

x 400-NM IO-day mission

orbit), with

MCCs landing

to approximate in 150W Pacific

lunar

for an approximate

Semisynchronous S-IVB fails during TLI with apogee ~25,000 NM, LM

Conditon/MaIfunction: cannot Perform: maneuver synchronous Alternate be extracted.

SPS phasing maneuver to place perigee over orbit, and further Earth

for LOI tracking, Pacific recovery MCCs to approximate Combined not occur

LOI simulation, SPS phasing zone at later time, SPS semilunar timeline. with ~4000 SPS Deboost NM, TD&E

3 - CSM/LM

Orbit

Operations or TLI apogee

Condition/Malfunction: successful. Perform: SPS maneuver if necessary, simulated (in docked configuration), a limited rendezvous lunar mission timeline.

TLI does

to raise or lower apogee for orbit lifetime requirements LOI to raise or lower apogee to 400 NM, simulated DOI simulated PDI, SPS maneuver to circularize at 150 NM, (possibly CSM-active), and further SPS MCCs to complete

6/24/69

Page

66

M-932-69-l

Alternate

4 - CSM/LM

Earth S-IVB

Orbit fails

Combined during

Operations TLI, SPS and

with DPS

DPS/SPS

Deboost can

Condition/Malfunction: return 510,000 Perform : CSM/LM NM). SPS phasing to low

in combination (4000

earth

orbit

without

sacrificing

LM rescue

NM<apogee

maneuver,

simulated

DOI, maneuver a limited

PDI to lower

apogee

to about

4000 NM, SPS phasing (simulated MCC) SPS maneuver to circularize at 150 NM, SPS maneuver end-of-mission Pacific Alternate recovery to complete lunar mission, orbit for an approximate area. Semisynchronous SPS and without sacrificing mission. maneuver orbit, perigee MCCs (to place docked over

to insure tracking for LOI, rendezvous (possibly CSM-active),

timeline, and achieve nominal 90 x 240-NM, lo-day mission with landing in 15OOW

5 - CSM/LM

Condition/Malfunction: low earth orbit CSM/LM Perform: SPS LOI adjust orbit, Lunar circumlunar SPS phasing (app roximately to put further

DPS in combination LM rescue,

cannot

place

CSM/LM

in for

SPS propellant

not sufficient

a later

perigee docked

over maneuver

an MSFN

site), to

semisynchronous), or opposite

SPS phasing DPS DOI, lunar recovery mission

if necessary

semisynchronous and

DPS PDI simulation, SPS to semisynchronous timeline.

SPS phasing

zone,

to approximate

Al ternate la

Missions - DPS LOI Non-nominal CSM/LM LOI and TLI such TEI with that: SPS, continuation is No-Go; but of nominal CSM/LM LOI

Alternate

Condition/Malfunction: mission, Go with Perform LOI-2, landing three Alternate Condi : including DPS LOI-1. TD&E, plane sites, revolutions. lb - CSM Solo

SPS free-return change for site high- inclination

CSM/LM, coverage, orbit

DPS LOI-1, photography and

and

SPS LOI-2, of future CSM/LM with

after for

tracking

determination,

SPS DOI

Lunar

Orbit TLI such that: CSM/LM LOI No-Go,

tion/MaI LOI

function: Go.

Non-nominal

CSM-only

6/24/69

Page

67

M-932-69-

11

Perform: SPS plane tracking 8-NM Alternate Condition/Ma1 CSM/LM Perform: pericynthion, Alternate

TD&E, changes of future orbit lc

SPS free-return in lunar landing orbit sites,

CSM/LM, for additional high-inclination

LM testing site orbit

during

TLC

and

DPS staging, and SPS to 60 x

coverage,

photography

determination,

for three - CSM/LM function:

revolutions. Flyby Non-nominal CSM-only near and Lunar Failure lunar orbit LOI TLI, No-Go. docked return. DPS maneuver to raise such that: CSM/LM Flyby Go,

LOI TD&E,

No-Go,

LM testing DPS staging,

pericynthion, SPS for fast Orbit to TD&E. mission,

2 - CSM-Only

Condition/Malfunction: Perform: additional inclination Alternate CSM-only site orbit

SPS plane and tracking

change of future orbit

in lunar landing for three

orbit sites,

for high-

coverage,

photography

determination,

SPS to 60 x 8-NM

revolutions.

3a - DPS TEI LM to place No-Go CSM/LM for landing, but DPS Go orbit, three for a burn. revolutions orbit, of

Condition/Malfunction: Perform: SPS DOI

in 60 x 8-NM

tracking and photography, SPS MCC for fast return. Alternate 3b - DPS No-Go

SPS circularization

in 60 x 60-NM

DPS TEI,

for LM

Burn for landing, for site coverage. and DPS No-Go Then follow for a burn. same profile as

Condition/Malfunction: Perform: Al ternate Alternate CSM -only 1 b, above. plane

No-Go

change

4 - TEI With

Docked CSM

Ascent

Stage failure in lunar orbit.

Condition/Malfunction: TEI and keep Perform: DPS TEI as in Alternate Ascent Stage attached.

communications

LM as communication system. If DPS available, perform 3a. If Descent Stage jettisoned, perform SPS TEI with

July

1969

Page

68

M-932-69-11

CONFIGURATION The space and and those vehicle for Apollo gained between 11 varies

DIFFERENCES in its configuration from is a list that growth, of the flown on Apollo 10

to be flown

on subsequent on previous AS-505 and

missions missions. AS-506.

because Following

of normal

experience

planned changes, maior configuration

differences SPACE

VEHICLE Module a short (CSM-107) propellant sump To overcome availability insulation (Ascent for first on hatch Stane) usage tunnel.

REMARKS

Command/Service
l

Provided tank. Changed Module

SPS main

potential of scheduled

delay tank.

in

Lunar
l

(LM-5) antenna Required for lunar landing mission.

Provided (VW.

of EVA

Incorporated System (EVCS)

Extravehicular into the PLSS.

Communication

Provides telemetry members, between two

simultaneous from duplex earth and two voice one

and

continuous

extravehicular communication or both of the and

extravehicular

members,

uninterruptable between the 0 Provil ded a Liquid heat


l

voice communications crew members. success.

Cooling

Garment

(LCG)

Enhances

mission

remova fied

I subsystem. stress Staae) heat shield. Reduces touchdown mission the lunar problem. success. mission success. firing time landing fire-tocorrosion fittings. Enhances mission success.

Modi

22 critical (Descent the base

Lunar
l

Module

Modified

Enhances

l l

Modified Added lower

11 critical RCS plume four

stress deflectors

corrosion for each

fittings. of the

Enhances To withstand

increased

RCS thrusters.

for RCS. thrusters.

6/24/69

Page

69

M-932-69-11

Provided antenna

for first (S-band). a modified

mission

usage

of erectable

Lunar

landing

mission

requirement.

Provided (polarizer new brake

gimbal

drive

actuator added a

Enhances

system

performance.

and armature material and Adapter

removed, sleeve).

Spacecraft-LM

(SLA-14)

(No

significant VEHICLE Unit significant Stage

differences.) REMARKS

LAUNCH Instrument
l

(S-IU-506) differences.)

(No

S-IVB
l

(SA-506) differences.)

(No

significant (S-11-506) research

S-II a

Stage Deleted

and and only.

development retained

(R&D)

Basic

requirement.

instrumentation instrumentation S-IC


l

operational

Stage Retained

(SA-506) operational instrumentation only. Weight results reduction of 5900 pounds from deletion of R&D

instrumentation.

6/24/69

Page

70

M-932-69-11 MISSION GENERAL Mission Center The LCC support (MCC), is provided the M anned by the Space Launch Flight with Control Network prelaunch Center (MSFN), checkout, (LCC), and the Mission the recovery and Control forces. with mission of a SUPPORT

is essentially

concerned

countdown,

launching the SV, control from I iftoff Communications, plex (RTCC); Operations systems * allow V oice Control the

while MCC located through recovery. Command, and Communications Room (MOCR) flight control

at Houston, Texas, The MC& functions System (CCATS); Display/Control by Staff Support

provides centralized within the framework

Telemetry System; supported personnel

Real-Time Computer ComSystem; and a Mission Rooms (SSRs). with the by the CCATS The MOCR Mission Director These and is staffed and Flight spacecraft,

to remain

in contact

receive telemetry and operational data RTCC for verification of a safe mission, with specialists with in all real-time FLIGHT aspects of the Director MANNED The MSFN the MCC evaluation NETWORK

which can be processed or compute alternatives. who provide the progress.

mission of mission

SPACE

is a worldwide during Apol

communications and The network lo missions.

tracking network which is controlled is composed of fixed stations (Figure optimally to 40 located within north latitude. communications

by 38) a

and is supplemented global band extending Station during capabilities lunar surface of these both these (NASCOM). many

by mobile stations from approximately are summarized operations. stations are

(Table 5) which are 40 south latitude 6. Figure

in Table

39 depicts

The functions munications between Network

to provide and

tracking, and support 5 FACILITIES

telemetry, on a downlink

updata,

and

voice

com-

on an uplink

to the spacecraft the MCC on mission TABLE MS FN MOBILE

to the MCC. Supplement.

Connection

MSFN stations M ore detail

is provided

by NASA

Communications

is in the MOR

Ships US NS VANGUARD USNS USNS USNS APOLLO Eight Apollo _translunar recovery Apollo MERCURY REDSTONE HUNTSVILLE RANGE Range injection of the INSTRUMENTATION Instrumentation in the spacecraft Pacific and on revolution

Location 25N 49OW

Support Insertion Injection Injection Entry (tentative)

lOoN 175.2OW 2.25OS 166.8OE 3.0N 154E AIRCRAFT

11 Mission

sector. crew

(ARIA) wil I be available to support the The mission plan calls for ARIA support of 2 or 3 and from entry (400,000-foot altitude) to after landing.

Aircraft

6,24/69

Page

71

TABLE 6

MSFN CONFIGURATION,APOLLO MISSION 11

TELEMETRY VHF Links USB Data Processor Dota Remoting Bio-Med Display COMMAND USB Updata cmd Rocerw Cmd Remoting Cmd Destruct A/G VOICE VHF USB TV USB --X x --xx x*xX X x x*x X x xk x *xx x iz i xx xx IL p x X X X xxx xxxxx x x x xxxxxx X x x xxx x x xx xxxx xxxx x x X Remoting x xx xx xx X x x x X X X X xxx XxXxX xxxxx xxx,+?x xxxxx X x x x x xx xxxxxx xxxx xxxx xxxx x x x x x xxx xxx xxx xxx x x xx x x x XxXx xxxx xxx x xxx X x x x x x

X X X X

X x X xx

X xxxxx xxxxx x

xxx

x x x

XxXx xxxx xxxx

x x x

xxx x xxx XX

x x x

x xxx xxx

xx

SPAN

APokO LUNAR SURFACE CUMMUNlCATlUNS

YMIW,

TELEVISION

\
/-

--

VOICE

M-93

2-69- 11

i
i i

33fl HlflWIZW H3NtlW-l


Fig. 6/W 169 Page 75 40

M-932-69-

11

RECOVERY GENERAL The Apollo after first recovery and drogue 11 flight landing, flight consideration first-level parachutes, of the crew while crew,

SUPPORT

PLAN

and Command
observing CM, will medical and and aid CM. be given

Module the materials when

(CM) removed required.

will

be recovered to maintain the CM. condition second main

as soon as biological After locating will apex

possible isolation the . and cover, w CM,

constraints to determining Retrieval

required from the The

of the astronauts consideration parachutes,

to providing

be the

of the astronauts

of the CM

Special clothing, procedures, to provide biological isolation also be isolated and returned specified by NASA. will also failure stage the

in that order, and the Mobile of the astronauts to the Manned

is highly desirable if feasible Quarantine Facility (MQF) and Spacecraft CM. The Center lunar within sample

and practical. wiII be used rocks as will

30 hours

The recovery forces case of a catastrophic to be recovered as portions found, or unsafe recovery LAUNCH During required abort Launch The Figure in the to any the they for of the should retrieval, will

be capable of salvaging in the vicinity of the after launch Control the fact. vehicle Center of the Mission

portions of the space vehicle in Specific components launch site. After or the will a normal Launch that the launch, Escape items if items System are too such large before (LES) are

be identified be recovered

first

if possible.

If it appears

be contacted

for guidance

is attempted. PHASE time between support LES arming for landings and parking that would orbit insertion, a Mode the I, recovery II, or III forces launch are

to provide

follow

Site

Area site area the includes launch will area. site all possible area and CM landing and force points which would 90 seconds Recovery occur GET. forces

launch

following

aborts 41 shows launch point site

initiated area liftoff.

between

LES arming

approximately deployment.

recovery

in the after

be capable This support prior

of meeting is required

a maximum access time of 30 minutes from the time the LES is armed until the launch site forces are

90 seconds

However,

to LES arming,

if needed, to the Pad Egress Team, and, required to be ready to provide assistance, after T plus 90 seconds, they are required to be prepared to provide assistance to the launch abort area recovery forces. In addition to the 30minuteaccess time, the launch site recovery forces are required to have the capability to:

6/24/69

Page

76

APOLLO 11 LAUNCH SITE AREA AND FORCE DEPLOYMENT


29'00'
UNCHSITE AREA iOR ~~"LAU~JCHAZIMU~HI,

28'50'

28'40'
NORTH LATITUDE

28"30'

......... .......... .......... .......... .......... .......... .......... .... , . . . . . ... .......... . ......... .......... .......... .......... .......... .......... .......... .......... .......... .......... .......... .......... .......... .......... .......... .......... ..........

..... . . . ....

.... .

28'20'

............ . . ........... .......... ..... .. .............. . . . . ..............

CONTAINI NG

ALL

2810

80'40'

80'30'

80'20'

80'10'

80'0'

79"50'

79%'

WEST LONGITUDE

M-932-69-l

a. b.
C.

Provide Upright Transport Transport Provide Abort

firefighting the the the debris Area abort area the from A and shown any B. CM. flight CM

units

that

are

capable

of containing

hypergolic

fuel

fires.

crew

from

any

point site. and

in the area

to the

Patrick

AFB

hospital.

d. e. Launch The

to a deactivation mapping,

location,

recording

assistance

for a salvage

operation.

launch abort

is the area launch phase in Figure launch These

in which of flight,

the after

CM all

would possible abort

land CM

following 90 seconds landing area level the

an abort GET. is divided of recovery that is B is all of the The into points following

initiated launch a launch two support between the area launch The and occur times

during area abort available

opproximately

42 includes The used are

azimuth. sectors

launch

landing

sectors:

to differentiate

in the area.

41 and 1000 nautical in the launch abort site . responsibility the listed CM within abort 7. launch

Sector A is all the area in the launch abort area miles (NM) downrange of the launch site. Sector area that is between 1000 and 3400 NM downrange

primary retrieve in the are

of launch the area.

abort

forces access

is to locate and retrieval their

and times staging

recover should bases,

the astronauts a landing and access

required

Th e f orces

required,

in Table

Two secondary recovery ships and three search the launch abort area as shown in Figure 42. abort azimuth area will sweep from to the south each day changes 72O to 106. Recovery

and

rescue

aircraft

will

be positioned in the launch as the launch

in

Ship during ships

and aircraft the launch and aircraft

stations window are

positioned

for optimum

coverage of the 72 launch azimuth. Launch abort 4-hour access time to any launch azimuth. Retrieval Sector as soon landing after EARTH Earth target B will time. translunar PARKING parking points orbit and be considered HC-130 forces (TLI). PHASE Recovery injection ORBIT (EPO) as a contingency aircraft providing will as possible.

aircraft are required to provide a time in Sector A will be 24 hours. retrieval area; therefore, retrieval will be ten minutes abort prior support to predicted will be released launch

be on station immediate

secondary landing associated dispersion areas

areas (SLAs) are configured with low-speed entries from recovery The 78 SLA support at suitable long is a 210-NM

to include near-earth time intervals wide

orbits. These areas are selected to provide throughout the EPO phase of the mission. 6/24/69

by 80-NM

Page

LAUNCH ABORT AREA AND FORCE DEPLOYMENT

TABLE

RECOVERYFORCE REQUIREMENTS
LAUNCHABORT AREA

OR ZONE

DESCRIPTION Sector A: From launch site to 1000 NM downrange. 50 NM north of 072O azimuth and 50 NM south of 106' azimuth.

TIME (HR) SHIP 24

TIME (HR) A/C 4

STA 1

SHIP POSm 28'00'N 7000'W

HC-130 AIRCRAFT TYPE STA m DD Al 1 32'35'N 71OOO'W

Sector B: From 1000 NM to 3400 NM downrange. 50 NM north of 072' azimuth and 50 NM south of 106O azimuth. I NOTE 1: NOTE 2: I

ASAP

25'00'N 49OOO'W I

AIS

Bl

35OOO'N 49OOS'W

27'35'N I c1 , l I 2825w

I
7 s CL p

Ship positions shown are for 072' azimuth launch on 16 July. As launch azimuth increases, ships will proceed south. Aircraft positions shown are for 072O azimuth launch on 16 July, As launch azimuth increases, aircraft will proceed south and maintain their relative position to the changing ground track.

M-932-69-l

dispersion ellipse oriented For the Apollo 11 Mission, selected in two general

along EPO locations

the

entry

ground

track

and

centered

on the

target

point.

Table 8 for access and retrieval completed and a long duration East Atlantic mission, The 34N and and DEEP Deep with one Ocean, HC-130 will aircraft area except planned listed also

SLAs will be required for four revolutions and are called recovery zones. See Figure 43 for locations and times and forces required. If the TLI maneuver is not earth orbital mission is flown, Zone 2, located in the be activated. be stationed phase launch area. 8. For landings during this phase of the 50 NM abeam of the target point. includes abort, The all earth forces the earths surface and deep their between space staging SLAs, bases,

will

contingency and the access SPACE space 34s times

landing latitude, are

for this the landing

orbital, required,

end-of-mission

in Table

PHASE SLAs are entry intervals Deep to provide 11 Mission, translunar after TLI (HC-130s) designed from space to include space. SLAs varying these coast targeted are are These the located return are the target are point and dispersion to provide area associated support

a high-speed

areas

selected

recovery

at suitable time of the mission. which are spaced

throughout

translunar, along times defined

lunar orbit, and transearth phases or near ship-supported recovery lines in Figure areas where Line (line for moons of this 44. a landing (MPL) 1). area could (line 4), for The two in

as shown as the to the Mid Ocean Line

For the Apollo occur and and following any two abort aircraft

areas aborts required

targeted

Pacific (AOL)

to the Atlantic

USS HORNET support

to provide

secondary

landing required of the will

the MPL, ships will the days opposite

and USS OZARK move along lines hemisphere. window. task time time force Actual

are and two aircraft (HC-130s) 1 and 4 to maintain the latitude Table 9 shows positions order. the approximate required for each

the AOL. declination point

location day

for each in the

launch

be published

appropriate The only minimum 11 hours becomes entry released. Aborts made

operations

the ships position is critical between abort initiation and

is during the first few hours after TLI. The landing for these aborts will be approximately time point. be At

for the AOL and 13 hours greater leaving sufficient 35 hours, if the CM

for the MPL. After these times, the return time to position the ship at the CM target targeted to the MPL, USS OZARK will

minus

is still

to the

MPL

or AOL and

after retrieval

TLI

require, time

within

the

high-speed point

entry

footprint,

an access For deep range and one abeam

time space

of 14 hours

of 24 hours

to any

in the area. upand

aborts to the MPL, one HC-130 aircraft one 200 100 NM north of the ground track, of the target point and 50 NM north of the

will be stationed 200 NM NM north of ground track, ground track. Minimum

alert

6/24/69

Page

81

M-932-69-l

.w

.I

. .

-.

Fig.

43

6/24/69

Page

82

TABLE 8

RECOVERY FORCE REQUIREMENTS


EARTH ORBITAL
PHASE

SECONDARYLANDING AREAS

Hickam AFB, Hawaii

EARTH ORBITAL AND DEEP SPACE CONTINGENCY LANDING AREA A/C READINESS See Tab A to Appendix VII STAGING BASES Bermuda (May be released after TLI) Ascension Island Lajes/Moron (May be released after TLI) Mauritius Island Hickam AFB, Hawaii Andersen AFB, Guam (SAR Alert) Howard AFB, Canal Zone

DESCRIPTION All area outside the launch site, launch abort, primary and secondary landing areas between 40N 15Os. For earth orbital phase, latitude limits are 34N and 34S,

HR

A/C 18

NO.

2 2 2

DEEP SPACE TYPICAL SECONDARY LANDING AREA AND FORCE DEPLOYMENT

3 ca . %

M-932-69-

11

posture times The very only. around areas.

for and

HC-130 forces

aircraft required landing

is listed to support area for

in Table the deep

10. space

Table SLAs.

11 shows

the access

and

retrieval

contingency low probability For Apollo the earth The forces

the deep and

space requires

phase

of the

mission recovery

is associated aircraft

with support

of a CM 11, the deep between 40N required,

landing

land-based

space contingency and 15OS outside staging bases,

landing area is all the area in a band the primary and secondary landing and access times are shown in Table 8.

their

TABLE RECOVERY SHIP LOCATIONS, Mid-Pacific Launch 16 July 18 July Date

9 DEEP SPACE Line PHASE Atlantic Ocean Line

USS HORNET 030005, 0930N, 25O30N, 16500W 17110W 1753OW

USS OZARK olOoos, 1 lgON, 2400 N, 26O25W 303OW 3OOOW

21 July

END-OF-MISSION The normal

PHASE (EOM) landing area will be selected on or near the MPL Ocean as shown in Figure 45. The latitude of declination of the moon at transearth injection and for the July entry launch point. window. Forces access prior will and The be retrieval CM target of the later

end-of-mission

(line 4) located the target point will point assigned times. landing be in the will normally

in the Mid-Pacific will depend on the general be will range 1285 as listed NM

of 1 lo N to 29ON downrange in Table not

to this area, These time. forces

11, to meet than

the specified 10 minutes

be on station

to predicted

If the entry target point

range and

is increased contains all

to avoid the high

bad

weather,

the area landing points times 2000

moves

along

with

the entry

probability

as long

as the

range does not exceed 2000 NM. Access and retrieval landing area will not apply if entry ranges greater than mission.

quoted for the primary NM are flown during the

6/24/69

Page

85

TABLE

10

HC-130 MINIMUM ALERT POSTURE


STAGING BASE Pease LAUNCHTO PARKING ORBIT INSERTION Aircraft A airborne in Launch Abort Area Aircraft B airborne in Launch Abort Area Aircraft C airborne in Launch Abort Area Not Required PARKING ORBIT INSERTION TO TLI 1 aircraft with l/2 hr reaction Aircraft time. A or B can provide support while returning to home base Aircraft turning base reto home AFTER TLI* Aircraft released TLI Aircraft released TLI Aircraft released TLI can be after can be after can be after Aircraft can return to home base after TLI + 35 hours. Aircraft can be released at entry minus 37 hours if CM is still targeted to MPL. Aircraft can be released at entry minus 56 hours if CM still targeted to MPL. REMARKS

Kindley

Lajes

Ascension

1 aircraft with 2 hr reaction time

2 aircraft with l/2 hr reaction time until TLI + 4 hrs

Mauritius

Not Required

1 aircraft with 2 hr reaction time

1 aircraft with 6 hr reaction time until TLI plus 14 hrs

*Reaction times are designed to provide required support during first few hours after TLI for any possible mission launched during the July launch window. After TLI the mission trajectory will have been established and more relaxed reaction times will be possible based on the miniThese minimum return times will be passed to recovery forces as they are mum return time. identified,

TABLE

11

RECOVERYFORCE REQUIREMENTS
DEEP SPACE PHASE MID-PACIFIC LINE 4

A 125

NM circle centered 275 NM uprange A 125 circle cenuprange tered 25

NM NM

downrange of TP and 100 NM north of ground track. ATLANTIC OCEAN LINE 1

Same as Mid-Pacific Line

24

14

MCS-2

Same as MidPacific Line

Ascension. One HC-130 200 NM uprange at TP and 100 NM north of ground One HC-130 abeam track. of TP and 50 NM north of ground track.

DEEP SPACE PRIMARY LANDING AREA RETRIEVAL TIME (HR) SHIP Crew CM 16 24 ACCESS TIME (HR) h/C 2 1 DEPLOYMENT AIRCRAFT SHIP TYPE POSITION NO. POSITION CVS At TP, latitude dependent on launch day (as updated: 4 2 1 Helos (*) HC-130 (1 E-1B (AIR BOSS)

!@L

DESCRIPTION

Same as MidPacific line

EC-135 (ARIA)

TYPICAL PRIMARY LANDING AREA AND FORCE DEPLOYMENT

OF

ENTRY

GROUNDTRACK

I-+--

-n -. cn . &

1 -I

175 w 170 w

5 IH

M-932-69-l

The 0 0
l

recovery A maximum A maximum A marimum recovery

forces

in the time

primary

landing

area

will point

be capable in the area. point point are:

of meeting:

access crew CM forces

of 2 hours time time to the

to any

retrieval retrieval assigned

of 16 hours of 24 hours primary target

to any to any

in the area. in the area.

L The
0 0

landing point.

area

USS HORNET

will

be on the EOM

each carring Three SARAH-equipped helicopters, conduct electronic search are required. At least wi I I be equipped with an underwater the equipment and film and will brief coverage required. to carry

a three-man one

swimmer

team, on each

to team

of the swimmers

(Calypso) 35mm camera. the swimmers concerning

NASA wi II furnish employment and

0 .0

One Leader One

helicopter assigned aircraft

photographers as designated by the NASA in the vicinity of the target point. to USS HORNET as communications relay, stationed overhead

Recovery

Team

to function

at the

scene

of action.
0

One

fixed-wing

or rotary-wing

aircraft

over

USS

HORNET

to function

as on-scene

commander.
0

One rescue range

HC-130 team, from the

aircraft and target

with point

operational Apollo and 100 NM

AN/ARD-17 recovery equipment north of the

(Cook will CM

Tracker), ground track

3-man 200

paraNM upfeet.

complete

be stationed

at 25,000

One HC-130 aircraft with complete Apollo recovery target point and 100 NM

operational equipment north

AN/ARD-17, will be stationed ground Range for network track

3-man 200

pararescue team, and NM downrange from the feet. Aircraft will be on

of the CM

at 25,000

Prior to CM station near

one EC-135Apollo reentry, the primary landing area

Instrumentation support.

6/24/69

Page

89

M-932-69-11

.FLIGHT FLIGHT Prime CREW Crew ASSIGNMENTS 46) - Neil Pilot (LMP) A. (CMP) Armstrong - Michael (Civilian) Collins Jr. (Lt. Colonel, USAF) USAF) (Colonel, CREW

(Figure

Commander Command Lunar Backup


l

(CDR) Module Pilot

Module (Figure

- Ed win

E. Aldrin,

Crew

47) - J ames Pilot (LMP) closely A. Lovell, Jr. A. (Captain, Anders Jr. Haise, schedule are out fully the USN) (Lt. Colonel, USAF) (Civilian) prime Two, foundation unavailable, to launch. ground team crew they for and who functions help the assign-

Commander Command Lunar The backup Module crew

(CDR) Module Pilot follows

(CMP)

I - W-11 iam

- Fred Wallace the One, and which training they check

for the informed

in three significant prime crew organize nearly complete

categories. the mission training

assistants

hardware.

receive later they are During the and that the

mission

becomes

a valuable

ments as a prime crew. prepared to fly as prime final ground flight repeated and time require PRIME weeks before and crew that flight will launch, crew and software,

Three, should crew up until the and flight ground tests the

the prime crew become the last few weeks prior hardware crews work upcoming take and software, mission. as an integrated

hardware

to perform

simulations

other

of the mission

It is necessary

conduct

for the benefit of the backup crew. consuming period to the prelaunch rescheduling for a later lunar DATA launch

part in these activities, which are not To do so would add an additional costly which for a lunar mission would schedule, window.

CREW

BIOGRAPHICAL (CDR) Neil A. AND Armstrong DATE:

Commander NAME:

(Mr.) Wapakoneta, Blond hair; Ohio; blue 5 August eyes; height: 1930. 5 ft. 11 in.; weight:

BIRTHPLACE PHYSICAL 165 lb. EDUCATION: from

DESCRIPTION:

Received Purdue . University

a Bachelor in 1955.

of Science Graduate

degree School

in Aeronautical - University

Engineering of Southern

Cal i fornia

6/24/69

Page

90

APOLLO11 PRIME CREW

NEIL A. ARMSTRONG

MICHAEL COLLINS

EDWIN E. ALDRIN JR.

APOLLO11 BACK-UP CREW

JAMES A. LOVELLJR.

IAM A. ANDERS

FREDW. HAISE JR.

M-932-69-

11

ORGANIZATIONS:

Associate

Fellow

of the

Society

of Experimental and

Test

Pilots;

Associate Fellow of the American and member of the Soaring Society SPECIAL HONORS: Award; Medal; Recipient the and the of the 1962 John

Institute of Aeronautics of America. 1962 J. aviator Institute Montgomery from (then NASA Force 1949 NACA High Base, of Aerospace Award; the Award.

Astronautics;

Sciences

Octave

Chanute Service EXPERIENCE: joined Flight nautical Laboratory)

1966 AIAA

Astronautics

NASA

Exceptional

Armstrong NASAs and research project miles 4000 airplane, drop Research Lewis later

was a naval Research transferred at Edwards for

to 1952. Lewis Speed California, Flight

In 1955 Flight Station

he (now

Center to the Air

Propulsion as an aerofeet he performed and approxithe X-l the

Center) pilot pilot,

as an X-15 mately rocket the CURRENT flight B-29

NACA and NASA. flying that aircraft Other F-101, and others. flight F-102, test

In this capacity, to over 200,000 work included F-5D, F-104,

per hour. the F-100, airplane,

piloting B-47,

paraglider,

ASSIGNMENT: 1962. .

in September

Mr. Armstrong was selected as an astronaut by NASA He served as the backup Command Pilot for the Gemini

As Command Pilot 1966, he performed flight, originally malfunctioning piloting landing. He subsequently and backup skill

which was launched on 16 March for the Gemini 8 Mission, the first successful docking of two vehicles in space. The due to a exceptional to a safe

scheduled to last 3 days, was terminated early but the crew demonstrated attitude system thruster, in overcoming this problem and bringing

the spacecraft

served

as backup for the

Command Apollo

Pilot

for the

Gemini

11 Mission

Commander

as Commander for the Apollo to set foot on the moon. Command NAME: Module Pilot (CMP) Collins (Lieutenant

11 Mission,

8 Mission. he will

In his current assignment probably be the first human

Michael

Colonel,

USAF)

BIRTHPLACE AND DATE: PHYSICAL DESCRIPTION:


165 lb. EDUCATION: Military Received Academy

Rome, Italy; Brown hair;

31 October
brown eyes;

1930.
height: 5 ft. 11 in.; weight:

a Bachelor at West Point,

of Science New York,

degree in

from 1952.

the

United

States

6/24/69

Page

93

M-932-69-

11

ORGANIZATIONS: SPECIAL HONORS:


Force EXPERIENCE: Point. Test Center, iet Command Collins He served

Member

of the

Society

of Experimental

Test

Pilots.

Awarded the NASA Exceptional Pilot Wings, and the Air Force chose Air an Air Force and Force Base, career flight California. characteristics

Service Medal, the Air Distinguished Flying Cross. graduation at the Air capacity, Force aircraft In that of Air from Force West Flight -

following test officer

as an experimental control

Edwards stability, fighters.

he tested

performance, primarily CURRENT backup

ASSIGNMENT: named Pilot for the

Lt. by NASA Gemini

astronauts

Colonel Collins was one of the third group of in October 1963. His first assignment was as 7 Mission. Gemini 10 Mission, launched 18 July Pilot John Young in the accomplishments rendezvous and, using another orbit landed 2.6 in the recovery on the forced Gemini ship. prime crew for the Apollo 8 and docking with a the power of the Agena, for a rendezvous with miles from the USS Program to land

As Pilot of the 3-day, 44-revolution 1966, Collins shares with Command of that record-setting flight separately maneuvering

a successful

a second, GUADALCANAL within eye

launched Agena target vehicle the Gemini spacecraft into passive Agena . The spacecraft and and camera became range the second of a primary Module spinal Pilot

He was assigned Mission Lunar Module NAME: Pilot Edwin but was (LMP)

as Command replaced when

surgery

a lengthy

recuperation.

E. Aldrin, AND DATE:

Jr.

(Colonel,

USAF) New Jersey; eyes; 20 January height: 5 ft. 1930. 10 in.; weight:

BIRTHPLACE

Montclair, Blond hair;

PHYSICAL DESCRIPTION:
165 lb.

blue

EDUCATION:
Military degree recipient College

Received a Bachelor of Science degree from the United New York, in 1951 and a Doctor Academy at West Point, in Astronautics of an Honorary in 1967. from the Massachusetts of Science Institute degree of Technology from Gustavus Doctorate

States of Science in 1963; Adolphus

ORGANIZATIONS:
nautics; member

Fellow of the American


of the Society

Institute

of Aeronautics Test Pilots, Sigma

and

AstroTau

of Experimental

Gamma

6/24/69

Page

94

M-932-69-

11

(aeronautical and Sigma advanced

Xi

engineering (national the

society), Tau science research Commandery and

Beta Pi (national engineering society); and a 32nd Degree Shrine. Flying Clusters, and Cross the Air Award

society), Mason

through

SPECIAL HONORS: Cluster, the Air Medal, Astronaut the NASA Wings,

Awarded the Distinguished Medal with two Oak Leaf Exceptional the NASA Service Group

with one Oak Leaf Air Force Commendation Force for Command Rendezvous Pilot OperaAssociain the

Medal

Achievement

tions Planning Team, an Honorary tion of Machinists and Aerospace Aerospace EXPERIENCE: Military at Bryan, He flew Fighter aerial the Air Medical Aldrin Academy Texas combat Interceptor gunnery University, in Association. was graduated at West 1952. in F-86 At and then Air as Aide flew Wing and Office DOD Colonel in October prime for the DATA Pilot Point

Life Membership in the International Workers, and an Honorary Membership

third

in a class

of 475

from

the

United

States

in 1951 and

subsequently

received

his wings

missions Wing. instructor

aircraft Air attended Force to the F-100 at Bitburg, was then

while Force the Base, Dean aircraft his thesis

on duty Base, Alabama. of Faculty Squadron

in Korea Nevada, Officers

with

the

51st as an at

Nellis

he served School

Maxwell

Following Air the Force 36th

his assignment Academy, Tactical orbital Force to the a doctorate Space Field Aldrin Fighter after rendezvous, USAF

at the

United MIT,

States with for Office transwas

as a flight concerning to the California. Spacecraft into the NASA

commander guidance Gemini Center Gemini Target He was

Germany. assigned

He attended

receiving manned ferred of the Air responsible CURRENT named the Command BACKUP Commander NAME: CREW

completing

Division,

Los Angeles, at the Manned experiments Aldrin 1963. Pilot Apollo

later which

for integrating

flights.

ASSIGNMENT: by NASA Module Gemini 9 Mission,

was one of the third group of astronauts He has since served as backup Pilot for Gemini 12 Mission, and backup 8 Mission.

for the

BIOGRAPHICAL

(CDR) James A. Lovell, DATE: Jr. (Captain, USN) Ohio; blue 25 March eyes; height: 1928 5 ft. 11 in.; weight:

BIRTHPLACE PHYSICAL 170 lb.

AND

Cl eveland, Blond hair;

DESCRIPTION:

M-932-69-

11

EDUCATION: Bachelor ORGANIZATIONS: Explorers

Attended of Science

the University degree from

the

received a of Wisconsin for 2 years; United States Naval Academy in 1952. of Experimental Test Pilots and the

Member Club.

of the Society

SPECIAL HONORS: Awarded the NASA Distinguished Exceptional Service Medals, the Navy Astronaut Flying Greece); Achievement Crosses, and Award the and 1957 of the the FAI Delavauly and co-recipient 1966 American Harmon

Service Wings, Gold

Medal, two Navy Medals Society Trophy

two NASA Distinguished (Athens, Flight in 1966 Plate Gold

Space

Astronautical Aviation

International

and 1967; and recipient of the American Academy of Achievement Award and the New York State Medal for Valor in 1969. EXPERIENCE: He has had Lovell received flight training including following a 4-year graduation tour from

Annapolis. pilot at the

numerous

assignments

as a test

Naval Air Test Center, Patuxent River, Maryland. While program manager for the F4H weapon system evaluation. Aviation served the CURRENT Naval Safety as a flight Air School Station, of the Oceana, Captain University safety Virginia. Lovell was selected Pilot of Southern officer with instructor and Fighter

there he served as A graduate of the he also 101 at Squadron

California,

ASSIGNMENT:

as an astronaut for the Gemini

by NASA 4 flight

in September and as backup

He has served as backup 1962. Command Pilot for Gemini 9. Command Gemini

On 4 December 1965, he and into space on the history-making

Pilot Frank 7 Mission.

Borman were launched The flight lasted 330 were accomplished: maneuverable multimanned

hours 35 minutes, during which the following longest manned space flight; first rendezvous spacecraft, space The began Gemini Lovell Apollo flight. Gemini on 12 Mission, 11 November Program served 8with 1966. Command This 4-day close. Pilot to the Pilot as Gemini 7 was joined by Gemini

space firsts of two manned 6; and longest

Lovell and 59- revolution

Pilot flight

Edwin Aldrin, brought the

to a successful Module voyage

as Command mans maiden

for the

epic

6-day

journey

of

moon - 21-27 to be I ifted Apollo 8 was the first manned spacecraft by a 7.5 million pound thrust Saturn V Launch Vehicle, the mission went smoothly from liftoff to landing.

December 1968. into near-earth orbit and every aspect of

6/24/69

Page

96

M-932-69-11

Having record Command NAME: Module

completed for time Pilot A.

three in space

space with

flights, a total

Captain of 572

Lovell

holds

the

endurance

hours

10 minutes.

(CMP) Anders DATE: (Lieutenant Hong Brown Kong; hair; Colonel, 17 October blue eyes; USAF) 1933. height: 5 ft. 8 in.; weight:

William AND

BIRTHPLACE

PHYSICAL DESCRIPTION: 145 lb. EDUCATION: Naval Received Academy in

a Bachelor 1955 and Institute

of Science a Master

degree

from degree

the

United Air

States Engineering Force Base,

of Science

in Nuclear

from the Air Force Ohio, in 1962. ORGANIZATIONS: SPECIAL HONORS: Astronaut Wings, State EXPERIENCE: Naval in all-weather After pilot Mexico, nuclear CURRENT Medal

of Technology

at Wright-Patterson

Member

of the

American

Nuclear

Society

and

Tau

Beta

Pi.

Awarded the Air Force the NASA Distinguished

Commendation Medal, Air Service Medal, and the

Force New York

for Valor. Anders was commissioned After Air Force interceptor squadrons in the Air Force upon graduation from the flight training, he served as a fighter pilot of the Air Defense Command. and instructor Base, New

Academy.

he served as a nuclear his graduate training, at the Air Force Weapons Laboratory, Kirtland where power he was reactor responsible shielding Lt. by NASA Colonel and for technical radiation Anders effects

engineer Air

Force

management programs. third

of radiation

ASSIGNMENT: selected for the Gemini served as Lunar 1968.

was one of the 1963.

group served

of as back-

astronauts up Pilot Anders launched

in October

He has since

11 Mission. Module 1968 and This epic Pilot 6-day for the flight Apollo was 8 Mission, around maiden which the voyage was moon to the on

21 December

returned

from

its voyage mans

27 December moon. Lt. Colonel

Anders Secretary

has recently of the

been

nominated Aeronautics

by the

President Council,

to be

Executive
.a..

National

and Space

6,24/69

Page

97

M-932-69-

11

..Lunar Module NAME: Pilot (LMP) Haise, Jr. (Mr.) Mississippi; hair; brown 14 November eyes; height: 1933. 5 ft. 9.5 in.;

Fred Wallace AND

BIRTHPLACE PHYSICAL weight: EDUCATION: a Bachelor University ORGANIZATIONS: Pi, Sigma SPECIAL

DATE:

Biloxi, Brown

DESCRIPTION: 150 lb. Attended of Science of Oklahoma.

Perkinston with

Junior

College

(Association Engineering

of Arts); from

received the

honors

in Aeronautical

Gamma

Member of the Society of Experimental Tau, and Phi Theta Kappa. Reci p ient 64A from Award began Naval and of the A. B. Honts and the Trophy Society

Test

Pilots,

Tau

Beta

HONORS: of class the

as the Pilot

outstanding in 1964; Test

graduate awarded Pilots EXPERIENCE: Aviation He served

the Aerospace Ribbon for 1966.

Research

School

American

Defense

of Experimental

Ray E. Tenhoff Mr. Cadet Haise at the

his military Air Station

career

in October

1952 Florida. in the

as a Naval

in Pensacola, flight instructor

as a tactics

all-weather

U.S.

Navy

Advanced Training Command at NAAS Kingsville, Texas, and was assigned as a U.S. Marine Corps fighter pilot to VMF-533 and 114 at MCAS Cherry Point, North Carolina, from March 1954 to September 1956. From March 1957 to September 1959, he was a fighter-interceptor pilot with the 185th Fighter Interceptor with fighter of the the pilot 164th Squadron U.S. and Tactical pilot coming 1959 Center which Flying Use Flying Air in the Force Fighter at the Oklahoma from of the October 164th Air National 1961 Guard. 1962 as a

He served tactical Flight Haise from Lewis following Evaluation NASA SAE Aviation TND

to August Ohio. Center Spacecraft pilot

as Chief

Standardization-Evaluation at Mansfield, Research Manned During a NASA

Squadron NASA and Ohio. published: of Seven Flight the

was a research before September Research papers of the 3380, Aircraft

at Edwards, Center; NASA the An he authored entitled Aircraft; May 1966; of Generala paper and at the

California,

to Houston 1963, been

to March have

he was a research this

in Cleveland, Qualities of Aircraft Qualities,

time

TND,

General-Aviation

Business

Conference

for Zero Gravity Environment, entitled An Evaluation Paper, 30 March-l April 1966; and

Aircraft

6/24/69

Page

98

M-932-69-

11

delivered entitled Seven CURRENT NASA Apollo

at the tenth symposium A Quantitative/Qualitative General-Aviation Aircraft, Mr. Haise Haise

of the

Society Handling

of Experimental Test Qualities Evaluation

Pilots, of

1966. is one of the 19 astronauts Lunar Module selected Pilot for by

ASSIGNMENT: in April 8. 1966.

served

as backup

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99

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MISSION Title Director, Director, Saturn Apollo c Apol lo Prog. Director Mission Mission of Launch of Flight Operations Directors Director Director Operations Operations Manager Manager KSC Apollo Mission V Vehicle Spacecraft Program Operations Prog. Prog. Mgr. Mgr.

MANAGEMENT Name Lt. Maj. Mr. Mr. Gen. Gen. Lee

RESPONSIBILITY Organization Sam C. John Phillips D. Stevenson (Ret) NASA/OMS NASA/OMS NASA/MS Low 0. Middleton NASA/MSC NASA/KSC NASA,OMS (Ret) NASA/OMS NASA/OMS NASA/KSC Kraft NASA/MSC NASA/KSC NASA/MSC F F F F F FC

B. James M.

George

R. Adm. Mr. Capt. Col. Mr. Mr. Mr. Mr. Mr. Mr. Mr.

Roderick

Mission Assistant Assistant Director Director Launch Flight

George Chester Thomas Rocco

H . Hage M. H. Petrone C. Donnelly E. Charlesworth F. Kranz S. Lunney L. Windier A. Armstrong A. Lovell, Jr. Lee

McMullen

Christopher Paul Clifford Eugene Glynn Milton Neil C.

Spacecraft Spacecraft

Commander Commander

(Prime) (Backup)

Mr.

NASA/MSC NASA/MSC

Captain

James

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100

M-932-69-11

PROGRAM

MANAGEMENT

NASA HEADQUARTERS
Office of Manned Spacecraft Space Flight Space Flight

Manned Marshall

Center Center

Kennedy

Space

Center

LAUNCH

VEHICLE

SPACECRAFT

TRACKING

AND

DATA

ACQUISITION Marshall Space Flight Center Manned Spacecraft Center North American Rockwel Corp. I (LES, Department MSFN of Defense CSM, SLA) Grumman Aircraft Engineering Corp. W-4) Kennedy Goddard Space Space Center Flight Center

The Boeing Co. North American Corp. McDonnel (S-IVB) IBM Corp. (IU)

(S-IC) Rockwell

(S-II) I Douglas

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M-932-69-11

ABBREVIATIONS AND ACRONYMS

AGS ALHT ALSCC AOL AOS APS APS ARIA AS AS BIG BPC CCATS CD CDH CDR CES CM CMP co1 CRA CSI CSM DO1 DPS DS EASEP ECS EDS EDT EI EMU EMS EOM EPS EPO EVA EVCS GET GHe GNCS GOX H IMU IS IU KSC
6/24/69

Abort Guidance System Apollo Lunar Handtools Apollo Lunar Surface Close-up Camera Atlantic Ocean Line Acquisition of Signal Ascent Propulsion System (LM) Auxiliary Propulsion System (S-IVB) Apollo Range Instrumentation Aircraft Ascent Stage Apollo/Saturn Biological Isolation Garment Boost Protection Cover Communications, Command, and Telemetry System Countdown Constant Delta Beight Commander Control Electronics System Command Module Command Module Pilot Contingency Orbit Insertion Crew Reception Area Concentric Sequence Initiation Command/Service Module Descent Orbit Insertion Descent Propulsion System Descent Stage Early Apollo Scientific Experiments Package Environmental Control System Emergency Detection System Eastern Daylight Time Entry Interface Extravehicular Mobility Unit Entry Monitor System End-of-Mission Electrical Power System Earth Parking Orbit Extravehicular Activity Extravehicular Communication System Ground Elapsed Time Gaseous Helium Guidance, Navigation, and Control System Gaseous Oxygen Hybrid Trajectory Inertial Measurement Unit Instrumentation System Instrument Unit Kennedy Space Center
Page 102

M-932-69-

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LC LCC LCG LES LET LB2 LiOH LM LO1 LOX LPO LRL LRRR LTA LV MCC MCC MESA MOCR MOR MPL
MQF

MSC MSFN MSS NASCOM NM OPS PC PDI PGNS PLSS PRS PSE PTP RCS RR R&D RTCC S&A SAR s/c scs SEA
SEQ SEQ

SHe s-IC

Complex Launch Launch Control Center Liquid Cooling Garment Launch Escape System Launch Escape Tower Liquid . Hydrogen . _ Lithium Hydroxide Lunar Module Lunar Module Pilot Lunar Orbit Insertion Liquid Oxygen Lunar Parking Orbit Lunar Receiving Laboratory Laser Ranging Retro-Reflector Lunar Module Test Article Launch Vehicle Midcourse Correction Mission Control Center Modularized Equipment Stowage Assembly Mission Operations Control Room Mission Operation Report Mid-Pacific Line Mobile Quarantine Facility Manned Spacecraft Center Manned Space Flight Network Mobile Service Structure NASA Communications Network Nautical Mile Oxygen Purge System Plane Change Powered Descent Initiation Primary Guidance and Navigation System Portable Life Support System Primary Recovery Ship Passive Seismic Experiment Preferred Target Point Reaction Control System Rendezvous Radar Research and Development Real-Time Computer Complex Safe and Arm Search and Rescue Spacecraft Stabilization and Control System Sun Elevation Angle Sequential System Scientific Equipment Supercritical Helium First Stage

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103

_--..-- __-_

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S-II s-IVB SLA SLA SM SPS SRC SRS SSR sv SXT swc TB TD&E T/C TEC TEI TLC TLI TPF TPI T-time TV USB VAB VG VHF

Second Stage Third Stage Spacecraft-LM Adapter Secondary Landing Area Service Module Service Propulsion System Sample Return Container Secondary Recovery Ship Staff Support Room Space Vehicle Sextant Solar Wind Composition Time Base Transposition, Docking, and Ejection Telecommunications Transearth Coast Transearth Injection Translunar Coast Translunar Injection Terminal Phase Finalization Terminal Phase Initiation Countdown time (referenced to liftoff time) Television Uniform S-band Vehicle Assembly Building Velocity-to-be-Gained Very High Frequency

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104

_-.

a
SUMMARY TIMELINE Lwun SmFuE E. M-932-69-1 I

6124169

Page 3

L- Th

b/24/,69

LUNAR SURFACE ACTIVITY TIMELINE FWI 22-HOUR STAY

M-932-69-1,

-.

.--l_..

.-,

-..

___.__

-__---

_-

----

--.-.-

__-.

,.

-__---

1__1_-

,1-d

:_ -_

. ..

. * ., .\ * I .. 1

.._

M-932-69-

II

xc,

.55w

90-e Fig.

iSW 38

APOLLO

EARTH ORBIT CHART (AEO)