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Issue 172 aprIl - june 2011

An offcial publication of the New Zealand


Deerstalkers Association Incorporated
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COver phOTO
Transit Valley stag photographed by Paul Peychers,
Nelson Branch, Game Animal (Section A), 2009
FeaTures
Easter up the Greenstone/Caples Pete Henderson .......................................................... 10
Obituary - John Henderson .................................................................................................................. 12
Lock, Stock & Barrell Corrosive Primers - Chaz Forsyth .............................................. 15
Young Hunter First Blood Alec Asquith ............................................................................... 17
take me hunting Kids Page win a free Kilwell prize ................................................ 19
Black Bear Hunt, North Carolina - Paul Anderson ................................................................. 20
Origins of the Otago Red Deer - D Bruce Banwell ............................................................ 24
Son of Moose - Howard Egan ............................................................................................................ 26
Gisborne HUNTS Course Mike Spray ...................................................................................... 28
Two trophies in one trip - Ron Poskit ............................................................................................ 30
Game Bird Hunting ................................................................................................................................. 31
Blast from the Past Jap Valley Norman Douglas ........................................................... 34
reGulars
Presidents Report Alec McIver .................................................................................................. 2
Editorial Is it time? ............................................................................................................................. 4
HUNTS Report Bill OLeary Getting the balance right .................................................. 6
Letters to the Editor ......................................................................................................................... 7-8
Tip Offs Steve Barclay Head skinning a trophy ............................................................... 9
DOC Update National Hunting Advisor, Brent Beaven ................................................... 16
Bush Telegraph News from around the Traps ........................................................... 32-33
Stalkers Table Grannie Olives Recipes .................................................................................. 36
Swazi Junior Shoots ........................................................................................................................... 37
Heritage John Forbes, Photographic Slide Collection .................................................... 38
Places to Hunt Wakatipu Region .............................................................................................. 40
Book, DVD & Product Reviews ...................................................................................................... 42
Poetry Styag Royal Bill Ross .................................................................................................. 43
Points of Envy More in the series - 2010 AHT Competition Winners ..................... 44
On Target Shooting Results and News .................................................................................. 46
FEATURES
CONTENTS
1 NZ Hunting & Wildlife 172 - Autumn 2011
First and foremost in this report, I would like
to offer my heartfelt condolences and support
to all our members and indeed all the people
of the Christchurch region in the wake of the
devastating earthquake on February 22nd
2011. I would imagine that all of you have
been affected in some degree whether losing
friends or loved ones, losing homes or jobs
or just the sheer devastation around you at
this time. I would like you to know that NZDA
national offce can be contacted if you need
any support, and we will do all that we can to
help you through this time.
It is with a degree of sadness, that we heard
one of our longest serving members, and a
national life member, John Henderson passed
away recently. John, or JBH as many knew
him, was instrumental in beginning and
developing many of the projects and plans
that we are currently working on. He was a
hunter with passion and believed deeply in the
NZDA. He will be missed by many and I would
like to acknowledge all of his fne work. JBH
was farewelled in a private ceremony as per
his wishes.
Many of you will have seen on the television
news, or heard on the radio at the beginning of
February that Andrew Mears was sentenced in
the Rotorua High Court to two and a half years
imprisonment for the shooting of Rosemary
Ives. NZDA feels that the decision was fair
and just for the circumstances. Personally, I
am still not satisfed that justice has truly been
done, as Mr Mears three companions are
yet to be charged with any criminal offence.
Granted, they did not fre the fatal shot, but
they were equally guilty in my view of being
party to the events that unfolded. I am going
to be speaking with members of the New
Zealand Police to fnd out why no charges
have been laid at this stage, and if any will be
laid. It is simply not good enough to charge
one member of the party and let the others off
scot-free. At the very least they were breaking
the conditions on the DOC permits surely
something needs to be done about that to
send a message out to hunters that rules (and
permits) are there for a very good reason!
Talking of permits, the most important
development in the hunting world since my last
report relates to heli-hunting and permits.
Canterbury conservator, Mike Cuddihy recently
confrmed to a tahr liaison group meeting, that
he has received applications for heli-hunting
concessions within the Fiordland Wapiti area.
However he will not allow hunters or the
general public at large to see his decisions on
them, or other sensitive applications, until heli-
hunters themselves have commented on yet
another short-term, non-notifed heli-hunting
permit (version 3 in fact). This reckless and
wilful failure to observe standard legally
defensible practice in terms of this permit
application and others, leads us to believe
they are likely to be allowed to heli-hunt in
Fiordland. Certainly it appears to be this
conservators wish to allow it, and to conceal
his permission from responsible recreational
hunters. We understand that DOC Canterbury
is likely to contemplate further innovations
which would allow wilderness areas, currently
exempt from all forms of aircraft access, into
the heli-hunters basket of lands on which they
can slaughter at will.
These permits have the potential to put an
end to six years of dedicated hard work by
the Fiordland Wapiti Foundation and hunters
to bring good Wapiti herds back into the
Fiordland area.
Furthermore, it opens the door to unethical
helicopter operators to do the same in other
areas ie the Kawekas (Sika), Ureweras
(Rusa), Rakaia (Reds) and many more. We
cannot allow this to happen.
Adding to this potential debacle, the
Canterbury conservancy is now contemplating
charging professional hunting guides with
concessions, a $500-per-animal-shot fee.
This is a joke at the moment they appear
to want to have their cake and eat it too, by
wanting to make a buck (pun intended!) out
of animals that they call a pest. As is always,
the case in a situation like this is, the only
people who are going to pay the fee are going
to be the honest and ethical professional
guides (and their customers) and the rest will
carry on as usual. Canterbury DOC needs to
open its eyes and see that this will never work
and they should stick to what they know
conservation.
In actual fact, the Fiordland heli-hunting
concessions and this potential fee, may have
done us a favour by calling the minister of
conservations bluff. (As per her promise in
the address to conference 2010.) She will
now have to change the legislation and take
the handling of concessions etc out of the
Canterbury conservancys hands.
The minister has been looking into changes
to the legislation and how to speed up the
process of any such change. She has asked
that NZDA work with her staff to identify
those operators who are slaughtering animals
and are a problem. We will be liaising with
the department on the identifcation and
prosecution of these heli-slaughterers.
Snow Hewetson and I met with Hon Kate
Wilkinson, Minister of Conservation at the
conclusion of our March executive meeting to
discuss this issue and more. I put pressure on
her to make a change quickly.
I also asked for the date that she will be
announcing her decision on the Game Animal
Council (GAC), as it is now more than eight
months overdue.
Now for the really exciting bit. Yes, at long last,
I can tell you - that we will be getting our
Game Animal Council.
Snow and I were very excited about this
confrmation from the minister and from
Hon Peter Dunne. The format and proposal
still needs to pass through parliamentary
procedures, but Kate has confrmed that the
GAC will be going ahead and that it will be a
statutory body.
I would like to
take this time
now to thank Ms
Wilkinson, and Mr
Dunne for their efforts
thus far. Adding to that,
I will be contacting
members of the
opposition, especially
the Labour party, to talk to
them about their views after all, Labour was
in government at the time that all of this was
instigated.
Bill OLeary and I then met with the
Parliamentary Commissioner for the
Environment, Dr Jan Wright and her staff. We
discussed NZDAs current view and objections
surrounding the processes and use of 1080.
This was to provide information for a national
report to parliament she is writing on 1080
and its alternatives, due out sometime in April
or May. She expressed that she was very
satisfed with the information we provided
and has requested that we continue to provide
information into the future. This could be very
valuable to us as hunters, as we can watch
and see what she does with this information.
As a side note, I would like to thank both Snow
Hewetson and Bill OLeary for attending these
meetings with me.
We also met with Bryce Johnson, CEO of
Fish & Game NZ regarding exclusive capture
and private selling of rights for sports fsh,
game birds and wild animals. The point
of this meeting was to see if there are any
ways in which F&GNZ, NZDA and other NGOs
like NZ Freshwater Fishermens Association
can work together to put effective pressure
on politicians and bodies like the Law
Commission to clear this area up. This is only
exploratory, and nothing has been committed
to at this stage.
Well, as I wrap things up for this issue, as
always I wish you all good luck during the roar
and duck shooting season. I will be heading
down to Fiordland in mid-March as I have been
very lucky to draw Wild Natives in the frst
period of the Wapiti ballot. Hopefully I will see
that nice ffty inch bull!
Safe hunting, stay safe and identify your target
beyond all doubt.
PRESIDENTS REPORT
presIDenTs
repOrT
A l e c M c I v e r - N a t i o n a l P r e s i d e n t
N e w Z e a l a n d D e e r s t a l k e r s A s s o c i a t i o n
... we will be getting our Game animal Council.
3 NZ Hunting & Wildlife 172 - Autumn 2011 NZ Hunting & Wildlife 172 - Autumn 2011 2
Co-founders: Dr G B Orbell MBE, Arthur Hamilton
Patron: Hong Tse
National President: Alec McIver
National Vice President: Tim McCarthy
North Island Members of the National Executive:
Steve Corlett, Sandi Curreen

South Island Members of the National Executive:
Chaz Forsyth, Snow Hewetson
Chief Executive Offcer: Dianne Brown
National Treasurer: John Crone
Advisor to the National Executive: Matthew Lark
Honorary Solicitor: Peter Barrett
Auditor: Chris Hurley
lIFe MeMBers:
R Badland QSM, M St J, J Bamford, D Bruce Banwell,
W J I Cowan, M Dunajtschik, A S D Evans MNZM, J B Henderson,
J H McKenzie MBE, R McNaughton MNZM, W OLeary,
G Smith, H Tse, I D Wright

nZDa reCOGnIseD spOnsOrs 2010:
Ampro Sales Tasco, Belmont Ammunition, The Game Butcher,
Halcyon Publishing, Kilwell, Hunting & Fishing NZ, Malcolm Perry,
NZ Guns & Hunting, NZ Mountain Safety Council,
NZ Wines and Spirits, Shooters Word Ltd Gore,
Stoney Creek (NZ) Ltd, Swazi Apparel

aFFIlIaTeD TO:
Council of Licensed Firearm Owners (COLFO),
NZ Mountain Safety Council (NZMSC),
Outdoors New Zealand (ONZ),
Sporting Shooters of Australia Association Inc (SSAA),
Shooting Sports Pacifc Forum (through COLFO),
International Hunter Education Association (IHEA)
BranChes:
Ashburton, Auckland, Bay of Plenty, Blue Mountains, Bush,
Direct, Eastern Bay of Plenty, Golden Bay, Gore & Districts,
Hastings, Hutt Valley, Kapiti, Kaweka, Malvern, Manawatu,
Marlborough, Napier, Nelson, North Auckland, North
Canterbury, North Otago, Northland, Otago, Palmerston,
Porirua, Rakaia, Rotorua, Ruahine, South Auckland, South
Canterbury, South Waikato, Southern Lakes, Southland,
Taihape, Taranaki, Taupo, Te Awamutu, Thames Valley, Tutira,
Upper Clutha, Waikato, Waimarino, Wairarapa, Wairoa & Districts,
Wellington, West Coast, Western Southland, Whangarei
All rights reserved
opinions expressed in this magazine are not necessarily those of the
New Zealand Deerstalkers Association Inc
INTERNATIONAL STANDARDS SERIAL NUMBER
977 1171 656 006
A particular virtue in wildlife ethics is that the
hunter ordinarily has no gallery to applaud or
disapprove of his conduct. Whatever his acts, they
are dictated by his conscience.

Aldo Leopald
New Zealand Deerstalkers Association Inc,
formed July 1937
EDITORIAL
NZDA began in 1938 with the purpose of
looking after the interests of deerstalkers
and, in particular, in response to the
Governments extermination policy of the
time. By 1951 it had over 17 branches
throughout New Zealand, with 5,000 -
6,000 members. In its history since then
it has provided a voice for hunters on
issues such as opposing the selling of
Crown public lands, foreign ownership,
the destruction of the Wapiti herd and the
attitude of DOC in its extermination policies
re deer and tahr, to name a few major
battles.
In the 1970s, NZDA was a potent advocate
for the recreational hunting public and
at one stage its membership was almost
10,000. It was feared by politicians for
its political impact and respected for its
political lobbying.
However, the journey has not been without
its low points, and the acrimony of some
NZDA members towards other hunters
in the commercial hunting era of the 60s
and later was strong. Even so, some NZDA
members wanted a stronger code of ethics
and an anti-commercial hunting stance,
and the NZ Big Game Hunters Association
(totally opposed to hunters selling venison),
was formed.
Also it has to be said that the infghting
at the national conferences and beyond
has become a part of the legend, if only to
highlight the bloody-mindedness of a good
number of Kiwi hunters. While infghting
is destructive and negative, given human
nature it seems almost inevitable, but it is a
miracle that the organisation has continued
to have a valued infuence and has hung
together.
However, all organisations go through
certain life cycles. They begin with the
zest of youth and then mature, and will
eventually die unless they rediscover or
re-capture their reason for existence.
To put it another way, times change and
unless organisations adapt and change
they will be left as historic relics. However,
if organisational leaders understand the
nature of each of these cycles, and the
challenges in moving from one cycle to
another, then they can successfully help an
organisation to remain current and indeed
grow. A key is an open and fexible mind.
Some of the signs of an organisation in
decline are the following:
Preservingthepastismoreimportant
than the future.
Acorrespondinglackofvisionforthe
future.
Anunwillingnesstochangestructures-
weve always done it this way becomes
more important than the purpose of the
organisation.
Anunwillingnesstolistentograssroots
members and those on the fringe, the very
people who are essential for change.
Anunwillingnesstofaceuptofaultsand
at times unpleasant facts and a continuing
blind belief that it will all work out in the
end.
These comments can apply to other
organisations as I have seen even in
churches as well as voluntary organisations
and businesses. To comment on a few of
these signs in regard to NZDA:
There seems to be no vision for the future,
or not one I can see.
In many areas NZDA seems to struggle to
keep up with the present, let alone be pro-
active about creating a new future.
There seems to be an overloading of rules
and regulations and an unwillingness to
change.
There is certainly an unwillingness to listen
to grass roots people and those on the
fringe.
The Hunting and Wildlife magazine,
supposed to be the fagship of NZDA, and
20 years ago a top publication is now
arguably the poorest of several hunting
magazines and not a good advertisement
for NZDA.
The website is uninspiring and unhelpful
and needs a complete revamp.
In a signifcant number of branches a high
proportion of active members are solely
range shooters, hardly the focus of the
original vision of a hunters organisation.
Range shooting is a fne asset, but it should
be complementary, not dominant.
NZDA, in its current form, does not seem to
Is IT TIMe?
B y : A l e x G a l e
attract a signifcant majority of hunters. There
may be several reasons for that, but it is a
concern.
NZDA, as an advocacy and a public voice,
has been mute in the last 12 months. This
is in contrast to its success in the 1970s, as
mentioned earlier.
So, is it time for NZDA to have a complete
and independent review of its reason
for existence, its purpose, its vision, its
structures and its marketing?
Is it time to go back to square one and ask
some hard questions?
One Id ask is this: if we were to begin a
hunting organisation today, given the current
scenario in New Zealand, and in particular
with the new Game Council, what kind of
organisation would we design?
Other questions:
Whatwouldbethemissionofthenew
organisation?
Whowouldbetheircustomers?
Whatdothesecustomersvalue?
Whatstructuresareneededtofulflthis
mission?
Whatistheplanforthefuture?
These questions are not asked to either
devalue NZDA, its history, the work of those
in the past or the present. I have paid tribute
to its past successes and high points as in the
1970s and we can be proud of and grateful for
much of that.
And, if I didnt care I wouldnt bother asking
the questions - they are raised because I
believe there are deep-seated issues in NZDA
that need to be addressed and will not be
changed by passing a few more, mostly trivial
remits, at conference. We are facing a new
future today. We need a hunting organisation
equipped to meet the new challenges. The
Game Council, despite a minor voting pattern
for recreational hunting, may well take over
some of the role of NZDA. The designation of
deer etc as game animals rather than pests
will change things and, as our population
grows, we will have more hunters seeking
good hunting on the same size area of land,
with increasing competition from other users.
We may end up having hunting seasons for
deer and pay a licence. What will NZDAs role
be in this?
Do the current leadership have the courage to
face up to necessary change? Do they have
the skills, abilities and vision needed for a
new generation? At the very least they should
be asking the hard questions or encouraging
members to debate rather than stifing
discussion.
So where to from here? I have raised the
issues. Change isnt an option - change is
inevitable; change will occur anyway. I believe
we need powerful and far reaching change
that positions NZDA to play an increasingly
effective and positive role in the changing
hunting scene in New Zealand. Is it time?
Is IT TIMe?
IT Is TIMe!!!
By Alec McIver, national president
Alex Gale has raises some very pertinent issues with regard to the
current direction of hunting in New Zealand, and in particular the
current and future directions of NZDA.
He asks Is it time? We, as the national executive of NZDA, answer
that with a resounding yes - It is time.
As a matter of fact, I will address some of the points Alex raises.
Alex refers to signs of an organisation being in decline and suggests
that these signs are evident in NZDA - I dont believe that for a second.
Membership numbers have continued to increase over the last ten
years.
If preserving our past was more important to us than looking to the
future, why would we have had such a huge involvement with the
Game Animal Council? Why do we constantly work to reduce the
poisoning operations around the country and get our branches to put
submissions in on things that will negatively affect our members
rights and ability to hunt?
I also dont see that there is an unwillingness to listen to grass roots
members we hold a national conference every year run by and for
our grass roots members we are all grass roots members when you
break it down! I must say that I cant recall when I last saw Alex Gale
at a national conference.
Speaking of our conference, Alex calls our remits trivial. These are
the remits put to conference by the same grass roots members we
apparently do not listen to.
We do have a vision for the future it is called our business plan. Alex
asks, Is it time for a review?
Well, yes it is and we would like to ask Alex to undertake this review
for us. NZDA is at the threshold of a new era in New Zealand hunting,
and a comprehensive review of how we do what we do is timely.
The advent of the Game Animal Council (GAC) heralds big changes
in the way Kiwis hunt, and it is natural to assume that this will
necessitate changes to the way NZDA runs as an organisation. The
GAC will enable NZDA to step back from the high level advocacy
we have undertaken over the last two decades or so. We will have
representatives on the GAC that will be working at that high level to
ensure that the big picture is not forgotten about, or left in the hands
of others to take care of. This will allow us to focus on assisting our
branches with local advocacy issues instead getting back to our
grass roots if you will. This can only be a good thing for NZDA and I for
one am very excited about it!
Our HUNTS programme will continue to improve and will become the
bench mark for all hunting safety accreditation in New Zealand an
initiative that will continue to build and grow our branches.
In terms of the target shooting fraternity, of our 9,500 capitated
members, only a very small percentage is solely target shooters who
do not hunt. Therefore, it is not something that has been a focus of
our organisation.
NZDA is indeed at a turning point and a review is needed. As I have
previously stated, we would like to invite Alex to lead this review and
report to our conference this year in Tuatapere, providing workshop
type forums to get down to the nitty-gritty of what our members want.
Is it time? Yes, it is time to move forward, support the initiatives
being put in place and get back to what we are here for hunting and
hunters in New Zealand.
5 NZ Hunting & Wildlife 172 - Autumn 2011 NZ Hunting & Wildlife 172 - Autumn 2011 4
HUNTS REPORT
GeTTInG The BalanCe
rIGhT
B i l l O L e a r y , N a t i o n a l C o o r d i n a t o r , H U N T S
LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
Bill OLeary
National Coordinator,
HUNTS
Dear Sir,
It might be of interest to know, in the knee-
jerk call for tougher gun laws, (typically by
people who have no idea what the existing
gun laws actually are), that last years
Labour weekend death is already punishable
by at least a seven-year sentence, (Section
198, Crimes Act). If tougher gun laws
are the answer, then it would mean that
judges have been constrained from giving
out longer sentences in the past. In fact,
I cannot think of any example where the
maximum sentence has been given for such
an accident. So if anything, it is tougher
enforcement that is needed.
A judge would look at whether ruining
the life of the culprit would serve justice
well, by locking him away for such a long
period. If the object is to bring about the
offenders remorse and re-educating him,
he has very probably already reached this
state before appearing in court and has the
rest of his life to live with his conscience
and his actions. The judge would also have
to weigh up sending a message to other
potential offenders to think twice. My guess
is that since this individual deliberately broke
several laws all at the same time, he will
struggle to come out lightly.
Most hunting accidents are one hunter
shooting another hunter by mistake, or
sometimes a hunters bullet landing very
far from where it was launched to kill
someone entirely out of the hunters view.
So it is perhaps true that this accident was
unusual because it was a hunter shooting
a non-hunter. However, it was certainly
avoidable in a number of ways. If anything
good comes of this sad tragedy, it will
be that shooting safety programmes and
perhaps even the Arms Code will now look
at these circumstances and incorporate into
their teaching the skills that might prevent
this happening again. For instance, the
different colours of various animals eyes in
a spotlight come to mind.
While NZ has a very low number of hunting
accidents considering how many people
actually go hunting, its perhaps part of our
mindset too that possums, deer and so on
are just pests. The fact that introduced
animals can be 1080ed and otherwise
destroyed with little regard for their clean
or humane death has been an offcially
mandated part of our culture since the
game law changes of the 1930s. As such,
a shooter in NZ (as compared to overseas),
might have scant regard for killing a possum
cleanly and so taking his time to identify a
clean kill isnt necessary. Just a few seconds
more thought might have made a huge
difference in this instance.
John Dyer
Editors note:
Since the writing of this letter the
offender has appeared before the
court and received two and a half years
imprisonment plus $10,000.00 reparation.
Tougher Gunlaws
National competition records
Dear Sir
The late Norman Douglas in correspondence 24 May 1988, intimated that the national part
of NZDA was causing him concern again. They were still committing embezzlement of his
name on their tusk formula.
27 May 1988, Norman Douglas provided an analysis on The 1964 Wanganui pig tusk
infringement come New Zealand Deerstalkers Associations (undrawn pig tusks) formula.
The analysis was completed by the following. Treasure your 1959 original handbook. It is
the frst in the world. You will not always have me but you will have wreckers.
I have raised this point because of an item contained in NZ Hunting and Wildlife issue 171,
page 44. Putaruru Branch Trophy. The 23 should be NZDA score not a Douglas Score.
G R Bennett
Editors note:
Mr Bennett is correct in that the undrawn pig tusks are scored using a NZDA score and
not the Douglas Score. This was overlooked in the publishing of the results. NZDA also
notes that during the reprint of the undrawn pig tusks score pad the printers overlooked
the change of description when doing these pads.
Feral deer
Dear Sir
Feral deer in New Zealand are multiplying
to the extent that deer control measures
will probably have to be introduced in order
to reduce their burgeoning numbers.
This scenario would consist of poisoning
methods being implemented, in order to
eradicate a high percentage of deer in their
feral range.
It is also highly likely that deer eradication
will be undertaken by people employed to
shoot deer.
Nick Parftt
Ashley putting her
butchering lesson into
practice
Knife sharpening is an aspect covered during the
HUNTS course
The fner points of butchering is identifying and
preparing the various cuts of meat
The frst area is ETHICS.
NZDA promotes ethical behavior in hunting
and HUNTS introduces new hunters to that
concept. Recent events, some tragic, have
generated plenty of discussion on the legal and
moral implications of some hunting practices.
Throughout the world hunters have needed
to withstand criticism of recreational hunting
and respond with intelligent argument. NZDA
and Fish & Game are two organisations that
represent hunters in the eyes of the general
public and their advocacy for hunting will
be strengthened when our hunter training
courses incorporate ethical considerations and
respect for the law.
The second area is BUSH SKILLS.
HUNTS provides the basic skills to enable
new hunters to operate safely in the
outdoor environment. These skills and the
accompanying technology are constantly
evolving. What this means for HUNTS is that
the courses must incorporate current best
practice in river safety and navigation. Maps
should be the new NZ Topo 50 series and
time allocated to the use of GPS and the use of
personal locator beacons (PLB).
Instructors must be current in their instruction,
or use the expertise of others.
The third area is FIREARM TRAINING.
Training must deliver profciency with the
hunting frearm. This means more than just the
basic principles of marksmanship. Instructor
end-of-course reviews have identifed
shortcomings in trainee performance on the
hill as distinct from on the range. Basic frearm
operations such as charging the magazine,
chambering and reloading and unloading need
practice, and with an element of pressure to
simulate the hunting situation.
The ability to adopt a shooting position
under hunting conditions requires practice in
prone, sitting and standing positions and the
utilisation of available support in the form of a
back pack or convenient natural object.
In conclusion we need to constantly review and
improve our programmes. We have a limited
amount of time to deliver the total HUNTS
package and within each course we have to
get the balance right. Trainee performance
on the hill, trainee feedback
and instructor review and
refection are indicators that
we can use both at branch
and national level to gauge our
success in delivering a quality
programme.
HUNTS is a national training scheme delivered at NZDA branch level. It has a standardised syllabus that has stood the test of time, but
like all training programmes needs review, and if necessary, some occasional redirection. At the present moment, my observation and
consultation with instructors has identifed several areas of the programmme that need some attention. A major revamp is not needed,
but some tweaking, and it is a case of getting the balance right in delivering HUNTS courses.
7 NZ Hunting & Wildlife 172 - Autumn 2011 NZ Hunting & Wildlife 172 - Autumn 2011 6
LETTERS TO THE EDITOR TIP OFFS
heaD skInnInG
a TrOphy
B y S t e v e B a r c l a y , t a x i d e r m i s t
The days are getting shorter, the evenings cooler;
soon it will be autumn. For many hunters this is
the best time of the hunting year. The stags will
be getting fdgety and the hinds will be starting to
group up. It is the time of the year when hundreds
of hunters wait in eager anticipation for the fast
approaching roar.
Many hope to shoot that ever elusive trophy stag,
hoping to secure a good set of antlers to take along
to the taxidermist to be made into an attractive
shoulder mount to proudly display on the wall.
Well as the saying goes, Perfect taxidermy begins
with the perfect specimen. While Mother Nature is
not usually ever perfect, there are several simple but
yet important steps a hunter can take to ensure he
delivers a head skin and antlers to the taxidermist
that is suitable for mounting.
For me personally, I try to ensure my clients get
the best possible mount returned. So if the cape
is cut too short, or too damaged, or cut around the
throat etc, I advise the client to consider using a
replacement head skin. To use a head skin that is
not suitable will result in a poor quality mount and
refect badly on the art and on my ability.
So when you fnally do shoot a trophy and wish to
have it mounted just follow the simple instructions
included here and it will be a great start to successful
taxidermy.
It is always a good idea to visit a taxidermist and get
educated on proper feld care. Most taxidermists are
only too happy to do demonstrations at hunting club
meetings etc.
An important step to remember is that once you
have removed the cape from your trophy head, make
sure you lay the cape out, fesh side up to cool off.
Usually ten minutes is all that is needed, but once
back at your vehicle lay the cape out again during
transporting. It lets the air get around it. A bunched
up cape can get really warm and may result in hair
slip; an unnecessary disappointment easily avoided.
Good luck for the coming roar and remember, if you
want to preserve those magical moments of hunting,
use proper feld care of your trophy. Next issue I will
write about head skinning a wild boar.
SKINNING GAME HEADS FOR WALL MOUNTS
The most common mistake made by hunters
removing a cape is not allowing enough shin behind
the shoulders to work with. Proper feld care on the
hunters part ensures a good job by the taxidermist.
Try to avoid shooting a potential mount in the head.
The damage done by the bullet is hard and often
impossible to repair.
1. Do not cut the animals throat.
2. Make all cuts neat and accurate as possible.
3. The frst cut is down along the spine starting
between the ears.
4. Then go around the circumference of the animal
followed by going around the leg joint, up the
back of the leg and across to the circumference
cut as shown.
5. Neatly skin off the body starting at the back and
work your way forward.
6. Sever the head off at the neck joint.
7. Once off, lay out to cool off for ten minutes.
8. Most taxidermists prefer to skin out the face
themselves.
Fallow, an example of Steves work. Sambar, a further example of Steves work.
Pest tag
Dear Editor
Reminiscent of the noxious animal tag that government applied to
deer, is the latest announcement by the Minister of Conservation Kate
Wilkinson that Canada geese are to be declared a pest.
While I do not go duck or game bird shooting, I regard Wilkinsons action
as born of archaic thinking, a throwback to the noxious animal days of
about half a century ago.
I have advocated before that the word pest is totally wrong in the
vocabulary and fawed in its execution with inevitable extermination
attempts. Any enlightened government would not use the word pest and
instead would regard any wildlife as a resource to be managed. If
numbers are too high, the annual harvest is adjusted.
Possums are another case in point. They are not a pest, sometimes a
nuisance locally, but a resource and a valuable one as currently shown by
the fur at $110/kg fetching over 30 times the price of cross-bred wool.
I have informed Kate Wilkinson that I will not be voting National with
either my party or candidate vote based on her bombshell decision as
regards Canada geese plus a few other National bungles such as the
fsheries mismanagement and the foreshore and seabed fasco.
Tony Orman
Access charges
Dear Sir
The proposal by Timberlands to charge Kaingaroa forest
hunters a $50.00 access fee is an imposition when
there is no formal provision for meaningful and powerful
management input by the persons paying, and there are no
other assurances or guarantees for any access ongoing.
Insistence on insurance cover could be justifed, and a
minor administration fee. However, the proposal seems
discriminatory, selective, and exclusive because it
confers no rights, and can only be viewed as extortion for
recreational opportunity.
If hunting and fshing organisations at all levels are not
supported by government to put a stop to this trend
immediately, then pity help all New Zealanders who have
thus far enjoyed relatively unrestricted access to all the
large landholdings in New Zealand. This includes public
and private lands, our coast and mountains. Pity help our
kids, and their issue.
Graham A Sperry
Hon Peter Dunne and other recipients.
NZ Hunting & Wildlife 172 - Autumn 2011 9 NZ Hunting & Wildlife 172 - Autumn 2011 8
HABITAT STORY
Southern Lakes Branch members at the Stoats Nest
My partner, Jane and I had decided that we
would head off up to the Greenstone Valley to
the Southern Lakes Branch's (SLB) hut (this is
the old Mid Greenstone hut, now renamed 'the
Stoats Nest'). Over this period a group of us
would be re-baiting about seventy odd stoat
traps which our branch has put in place. The
object is to try and help the Blue duck (Whio)
as they have had a bit of a hiding from stoats.
We've been catching stoats, possums and
rats; so its agreat thing for all the bird life in
the area.
Just a note on the traps, they are the large
wooden box type baited with eggs and a bit of
salted rabbit. If anyone out there is interested,
we are currently sponsoring out the traps. For
a one off payment of $150 you get a trap for
the next 9 years, which is about $16.00 per
year, plus a framed certifcate and regular
updates on how the project is going. Don't be
shy give Dave Rider a call on 021 969 350 or
Email daveridge@ihug.co.nz and sponser one
or two.
Our plan was to head up to the hut on the
Friday morning, then up Steele Creek on the
Saturday re-baiting as we went, then staying
at the Steele Creek biv. Sunday, we would
continue up Steele Creek and over the saddle
to the Upper Caples hut, then out the next
day. The weather was going to be marginal on
the Saturday but clearing on the Sunday. We
weren't too concerned if we did this round trip,
but it was a trip I've often thought of doing and
it would be nice to fnally say, 'thats one off
the list'.
Friday morning in Queenstown was grey
and overcast and while heading towards the
Greenstone/Caples car park the weather,
looking up the headwaters, looked very dark,
and it looked like it wouldn't be long before
we'd be putting on our rain gear. We ended
up getting right to the hut with just as a few
spits starting to fall.Two other memders of
SLB had gone in the previous evening, and by
the time we arrived the hut fre was on and it
was time to settle in for the night. We were
just sitting around in the hut; it was just about
dark, but still just enough light to see. So I
said to the others, I'll spot you a deer from the
hut window, picked up my bino's and within
about three seconds spotted a Fallow deer, (a
complete and utter fuke). I tried to pass this
off as skill, but the others knew it was just
plain tin arse. The forecast was spot on, as
later that night the heavens opened and the
volume of rain that fell was truely amazing. It
continued all Saturday so we had a very lazy
hut day and by late evening it was beginning
to clear.
Next morning, Sunday, was clear and crisp,
so four of us headed up to re-bait the traps up
Steele creek also we were going to take some
details of the Steele creek bivy as sometime
in the next few months a team of workers
are going to go in and do some maintainace.
We continued checking and baiting up to the
bivy which is about a two hour walk. After a
morning tea break we continued on up the
valley, eventually getting to the junction of
where the track continues up the valley and
the Steele Creek heads left up to a little lake.
This was were we said goodbye to the other
two and Jane and I continued up towards the
saddle.
It's not a bad walk up to the saddle, but with
full packs and lugging a doom stick it was
just hard enough. If you were ever thinking of
doing this walk it does give some spectaticual
veiws, but it would be adviseable to do so
in the summer so you had the longer hours
of daylight and better temperatures as this
is an alpine track and is quite a walk. I also
suggest an above level of ftness, good gear
and be prepared to camp. The views from
the saddle looking back down Steele Creek
are great and its very satisfying when you
eventaully get to the top. From the other side,
amazing views looking up the side creeks of
Kay and Frazer Creeks and also looking right
down the Caples towards Lake Wakatipu. We
were nearly at the saddle when I spotted three
Chamois, wephotographed them, watched
them for awhile, then continued on down to
the Upper Caples hut. Even though you can
see the hut from up above the bush its still at
least one and a half to two hours walk down
a very steep track to the hut. Just the other
side of the saddle I found some very fresh boot
prints and thought someone has been up here
not long ago. I found out a few days later who
they belonged to
Upper Caples hut is a large DOC hut which
can sleep about sixteen or eighteen and I think
there was twentyfour staying that night. We
got there just in time to get the last empty
spots, they were all trampers and when I made
a public anouncement that I had a frearm and
that I was brining it in. There were a few light
hearted remarks, but all in all, everyone was
good and later a number of the trampers we
talked with were very interested it what we
were doing, where we had been and what we
had seen.
Monday morning dawned fne and after
breakfast we packed up and left. I noted that
we were about the third party to leave the
hut. After a kilometre or two we stopped to
easTer up The
GreensTOne/Caples
B y P e t e H e n d e r s o n . S o u t h e r n L a k e s B r a n c h
take a few photos just inside the bush edge
While Jane was doing this I headed out on to
the bush edge of a very large clearing and
about 700 metres down stream a Fallow buck
and three spikers were running about and had
been disturbed fmost probably by some of
the earlier groups that left the hut. The fact
that they were looking back indicated that
something had set them off. We managed to
get a few photos of them running for it and
crossing the Caples River.
I've often made the comment that trampers,
(I'm sure not all), have the idea that the object
of tramping is to get from point A to point B or
this hut to that hut, and are not as observant
as hunters. I'll give you a few examples. About
another two or three kilometres further on as
we were going along the track both Jane and
I looked out onto a large clearing through the
open gaps in the bush and there on one of
the clearings were a dozen Fallow does and
yearlings about two hundred metres out, and
right in the middle of the tusock covered river
clearing. We were both watching them and
getting some photos when this tramper come
barrelling along the track. On reaching us he
could see we were taking some interest in
something and said "what are you looking at",
we pointed the deer out and he was amazed
and revealed that in all the years he'd been
tramping they were the frist deer he had ever
seen.
Upon reaching the Mid Caples hut we caught
up with the other groups of trampers and
we were all commenting on the scenery etc,
I said "wasn't it great to see those deer on
the clearings back up the valley", and all six
of them had not seen any of the deer, so we
had to show them the photos we had taken,
because I don't think they believed us.
The next couple of hours out to the car park
dragged on and it was great to eventaully
reach it and have a well deserved cold one.
The whole round trip was about fftyfour
kilometres.
Interestingly, on the way out we meet the hut
warden and we told her about the deer and
chamois we had seen, she informed us of a
hunter who had been camping up the valley
and for the last three or four days and the only
deer he had seen was one which was on the
track but didn't shoot. Due to the weather he
had got the sh#t's and walked out, the hut
warden had said to him wait one more day.
Afew days later a good friend of mine called
and told me how his cold and very wet trip
went up the Caples valley. He had said that on
the Sunday morning had got up really early and
walked up the track to nearly the saddle then
had turned and walked back down, packed
up and had left, so explained the tracks we
had seen. I then procceded to tell him about
the chamios just the other side of the saddle
and the deer we had seen on the way out, his
exact words were, no!, No, your kidding !
NO! Thats hunting.If he'd only taken the hut
wardens advice.
Both Jane and I were sitting on the tailgate
of the truck when down the track come the
other two SLB members Pam and Aaron, good
timing so we all had a good yarn about the
weekends adventure and all agreed a great
place togo for a walk and spend afew days,
the (SLB) hut is fully kitted out, good fre, gas
cooker, all your cooking utensiles,plates,cups,
knives, forks,spoons etc and is for hire at
a good cheap rate, which again, contact
Dave.If you've never been for a walk up the
Greenstone its well worth it. Even though the
weather was mixed you have to take the good
and bad and make the most of it. Like they say
you can't help the weather and when your in
the middle of the Southern Alps you have to be
prepared for anything, thats hunting, but with
good company, agood warm hut any day on
the hill is better than working.
Fallow in the Caples
Pete and Jane from the saddle looking
back down Steel Creek
Pete, Jane, Pam and Aaron outside Steel Creek Biv
11 NZ Hunting & Wildlife 172 - Autumn 2011 NZ Hunting & Wildlife 172 - Autumn 2011 10
In the 1970s John Henderson was one of the
leading lights in Save Manapouri, the fght to
stop Lake Manapouri being raised to supply a
foreign consortium with cheap power. It was
a victory in terms of saving the lake and its
surrounding environs but Comalco still got
power heavily discounted and subsidised by
the taxpayer. Besides Save Manapouri, John
was chairman of the conservation council
COENCO, served on the Wellington and
NZ Acclimatisation Society councils and other
outdoor sporting organisations such as the NZ
Federation of Rife, Rod and Gun Sportsmen.
In forthright, direct manner, he took on
governments for faulty policy and in particular,
a 1970s senior cabinet minister Duncan
McIntyre for selling public lands to a rich
American who wanted to exploit the trout
fshing and hunting values with a luxury lodge.
John Hendersons debating style was always
based on facts rather than opinion or dogma.
His son, Dr Ian Henderson now a lecturer at
Massey University, remembers how his father
did his homework gathering facts before
debate. Thats why politicians like Duncan
MacIntyre and Rob Muldoon refused to debate
with him - because he always had the facts
ready.
John once explained to Ian of how and why he
memorised the calculations of fow rates (in
cubic metres per second) in the Waiau River
and what was going to be diverted through
the Manapouri power station, how much
power that would produce and how much
aluminium could be made. Because he knew
how to do the calculations in his head - not
just memorising the fnal fgures - he could
always deal with any revised fgures that might
be sprung on him during a debate or in an
interview. And if anyone tried the put-down
of I think you have your fgures wrong he
could go through the calculations in front
of an audience or camera - and make his
opponent look foolish. Such was his debating
skill that cabinet minister Duncan MacIntye
refused to debate with him. On Radio Windy,
talkback host MP Rob Muldoon after a few
encounters with John, refused to allow him
to participate. My observations were that
during such encounters JBH never lowered
himself to personal attacks and playing the
man, although his opponents often did. He
debated the issue, the facts and the illogic of
bureaucratic policies with an incisive style.
In personality JBH was modest and with a
quick sense of humour which were so obvious
in his skilled limericks and verse - doggerel
he called them - often about his hunting
friends. A devoted husband, father and
grandfather he loved horses, almost became
a jockey and trainer, enjoyed jazz and swing
music and was adept on the piano.
Within Wellington NZDA, John Henderson
implemented a data collection scheme where
hunters measured the fat around a deers
kidney (an indication of the deers condition
factor) and aged the animal from teeth and jaw
bones.
His son Ian observed, Through his conference
papers overseas he brought NZ game
management - or the absence of it - to the
attention of the world. His attempts to set
up a nation-wide data collection system (and
database) got the Forest Service really worried
and they tried to discredit it, but also spurred
them into doing their own research - which
opened up career paths for people like Graeme
Caughley.
The necessity JBH saw to collect scientifc
data on game animals also spurred the
development of the Paxarm tranquilizer gun
and he was involved in its early development,
making darts and testing propulsion systems
and drug formulations. During his time on the
Wellington Acclimatisation Society Council
he was instrumental in employing the frst
scientifc staff to do research, not just on
game bird and trout populations, but also
water quality and pollution detection - long
before regional councils or NIWA existed.
John Henderson played a major part in the
1970s battle against trout farming - probably
the issue with the most lasting success. And
he was involved in the earliest battles against
1080 including presenting the then biggest
signature petition - 80,004 - to parliament.
The 1972 election was a major victory for
outdoor sports and the environment. The
National Government had supported raising
Lake Manapouri, trout farming and selling
public crown land at Te Anau to Stockton
Rush, an affuent American. Sportsmen
organised with John Henderson at the helm,
and lobbied the Labour leader, Norman Kirk,
who also opposed trout farming and raising
Manapouri. On election night, Norman Kirk
swept to power with newspapers such
as NZ Herald acknowledging the outdoor
sporting public had been a major factor in the
governments defeat.
The years of commitment by John Henderson
resulted in a recommendation going forward
that John should receive a New Years honour
but he politely declined any suggestion of
offcial honours.
Yet he had his critics too and not just MPs or
bureaucrats. Some within the outdoor ranks
who belonged to the National Party then
in power, struggled whether their personal
loyalties lay with NZDA or the government.
At the Ashburton NZDA conference, Duncan
McIntyre in what seemed an orchestrated
betrayal, called on conference to move a vote
of no confdence in the NZDA president.
Quickly the late Bruce Candy of Ashburton
countered with a motion of confdence in John
Henderson as president. It was resoundingly
carried.
When hearing critics of such a dedicated man
to a cause, Im reminded of the words of a US
president (1901-1909) Theodore Roosevelt
who fttingly was also an avid big game hunter
and conservationist; It is not the critic who
counts, not the man who points out how the
strong man stumbled or where the doer of
deeds could have done them better.
The credit belongs to the man who is actually
in the arena, whose face is marred by dust
and sweat and blood, who strives valiantly,
who knows the great enthusiasm, the great
devotion and spends himself in a worthy
cause, who at the worst, if he fails, at least
fails while daring greatly.
Far better it is to dare mighty things, to win
glorious triumphs even though chequered by
failure than to rank with those poor spirits who
neither enjoy nor suffer much because they
live in that grey twilight that knows neither
victory nor defeat.
John Henderson was and is an inspiration to
all New Zealanders who love fshing, hunting
and the environment.
John JBH Henderson, actually
in the arena for half a century, on
behalf of outdoor sportsmen.
jBh a ChaMpIOn
OuTDOOrs aDvOCaTe
B y T o n y O r m a n
jOhn henDersOn 13 nOveMBer 1925 - 16 FeBruary 2011.
John Henderson, former New Zealand Deerstalkers Association (NZDA)
national president and national life member recently passed away,
drawing to a close half a century of battling for the outdoors and in
particular deer and deerstalkers.
John Hendersons advocacy was unselfsh, untiring, and at great
personal cost in terms of time and expense. His political battles went far
beyond New Zealands outdoor sport and embraced the environment and
the countrys society. JBH, as his friends knew him, was often 20 years
ahead of the present with his foresight and perception and back in the
1970s, spoke on crucial issues like population growth and a population
limit for New Zealand. By invitation, he addressed international wildlife
conventions in Finland, USA, Australia and Europe.
I frst met JBH in the mid-1950s, when as a teenager embarking on a
land surveying degree, I attended Wellington branch NZDA meetings.
With me was school friend Graeme Caughley who was studying at
Victoria University and later would become one of the worlds foremost
ecologists and an invaluable contributor to the deer management debate.
John Henderson invited me on hunting trips with his friends Bill Cowan,
Keith Seagar and Tig Johnston. Also I fshed the Wairarapas trout
streams such as the Makuri and Makakihi with him for he was a skilled
fy fsherman, as was his wife Winnie.
I came to know JBH as a man of great principle, integrity and a
passion to reverse crazy bureaucratic policies like deer extermination,
the spreading of toxins and the sale of resources for short-sighted
exploitation particularly by foreign interests.
Underlying his arguments was a well educated and extremely intelligent
man, who attained 90 percent of a science degree, its completion being
prevented by his fathers sudden death and the urgent need to take over
the family printing business.
John Henderson served on the NZDAs national executive and was
national president in two terms, 1968-1972 and 1981-1983
As national president of NZDA, John delivered strong and stirring
conference addresses, building on the style he had delivered as
Wellington NZDA president. His editorials in Roaring Stag the Wellington
Branchs newsletter can be seen by the titles - Deerstalking a Sport
Ignored, The Great 1080 Square-off and Deer Extermination - a Dream in
Desperation.
His writings and speeches often went beyond deer and deer hunting to
the wider picture. In 1970 at NZDAs national conference at Taupo he
advocated planning a population limit for New Zealand. There can be
no cause for satisfaction in covering our land with urban sprawl--it is
witless to stress human populations by crowding when many populations
are already largely irrational and unstable.
Then he delivered his punch line, It is high time New Zealanders set
themselves an upper limit---my own estimate is 5 million people.
Governments policies were called to account. In one address, JBH
accused governments and departments of dereliction of duty and
many glaring cases of deceit. In a 1972 address, Man and his
Environment, John urged his audience at Wellingtons Victoria University
Winter Term Lecture Series to political awareness and action and to
never be duped into believing that politics and the environment are other
than cause and effect.
JBH crossing the Otaki River en route to the
Tararua tops (1960) with his Mannlicher
stocked Brno 7 x 57.
CHARTERS BLUFF
Scenic Trips Fishing Hunting Diving Tramping
Hunt Stewart Island
Contact: Bob & Chris Hawkless
Ph: (03) 212 7254 - Fax: (03) 212 8321 - Mob: 0274 335 801
Email: mana.charters@xtra.co.nz
Web: www.manacharters.com
47ft Morgan Hull charter vessel, 650hp V8 Fiat
engine, cruises at 12-13 knots.
Bob Hawkless: ex commercial fisherman for 25 years
plus 20 years hunting experience on Stewart Island.
Hire equipment: 12ft Stabi Crafts, 12ft dinghys,
outboard motors, camping equipment,
gas bottles & dive bottles.
OBITUARY
13 NZ Hunting & Wildlife 172 - Autumn 2011 NZ Hunting & Wildlife 172 - Autumn 2011 12
Some of our members and friends, in
their quest for cheap ammo, may buy old
military ammunition. Military ammunition is
sometimes primed with primers that actively
invite or assist corrosion of the bore, or
(additionally) may release mercury which
causes embrittlement of the brass so it is
no longer ductile. Firing it may be extremely
dangerous and is to be avoided.
Quite apart from its value to cartridge
collectors (who will swap at least round
for round if you have desirable cartridges),
older ammunition is usually less reliable,
less precise and more prone to defective
performance. In short, it may display
hangfres (delays in ignition upon fring),
acting as if it is inert or even splitting the web,
the solid brass surrounding the primer pocket
(which will dump propellant gases into your
action or worse, your face and eyes). The
duds may help show if you have a finching
problem, but otherwise will do little for your
marksmanship skills. More serious case
failures could damage your rife, YOU, or your
friends.
How do you know if the ammunition you are
fring is corrosive? Here is a list from the
American Rifeman issue of April 1969 (pages
34, 35) of the non-corrosive rife loadings. If
there is any doubt, clean initially with boiling
water, then use solvent and fnally oil.
COrrOsIve prIMers
- hOw TO IDenTIFy TheM
B y C h a z F o r s y t h
LOCk, STOCk & BARRELL
aMerICan aMMunITIOn:
Generally, all military .3006 small arms ammunition manufactured
from 1953 onwards is non-corrosive.
The major exception is that from Frankford Arsenal, (FA) . Small lots
of.3006 ammunition made in 1953, 1954 and 1956 are corrosive.
These are all the 172 gn boat tail loads in MATCH cartons with red,
purple and green primer waterproofng respectively.
All 7.62 mm NATO (except FA56 MATCH) is non-corrosive.
All .30 m1 carbine ammo of American manufacture is non-corrosive.
BrITIsh aMMunITIOn:
Generally, those cartridges with brass coloured primers are non-
corrosive. (All with copper primers are chlorate primed and may
contain mercury fulminate.) Usually, post 1958 manufacture will be
non-corrosive. (Kynoch ceased production of metallic ammunition in
1958, so those military loadings headstamped K wont be common in
New Zealand.)
BelGIan aMMunITIOn:
All rife ammunition made from 1958 onward is non-corrosive.
Headstamp is FN.
CanaDIan aMMunITIOn:
DA or DAQ all ammunition post-1950 is non-corrosive. .3006 marked
VC 45 is also non-corrosive.
GerMan aMMunITIOn:
The widespread use of non-corrosive (Sinoxid) priming developed and
used by RWS from 1911 means that all post-World War II (after 1946)
small-arms ammunition is non-corrosive.
IsraelI aMMunITIOn:
all loadings from Tel Aviv Arsenal are non-corrosive.
NZ Hunting & Wildlife 172 - Autumn 2011 15 NZ Hunting & Wildlife 172 - Autumn 2011 14
DOC upDaTe
NATIONAL HUNTING ADVISOR
Brent Beaven is DOCs national hunting advisor. This is a new role that is focussed
on encouraging hunting and improving the hunting experience. Prior to this, Brent
had been DOCs biodiversity manager on Stewart Island for ten years.
Contact Brent on 027 2664079 or email bzbeaven@doc.govt.nz
Before we knew it the three-day hunting
trip had arrived. A group of twenty-four
had joined the New Zealand Deerstalkers
Associations Hutt Valley Branch annual
HUNTS course. A group of people from
all walks of life coming together with one
common goal; to successfully stalk, kill and
butcher our own meat.
The course was incredible value consisting
of seven, two to three-hour evening classes
which varied in content from map and
compass work, species identification to first
aid. Also, two days were spent at the Kaitoke
shooting range to improve our aim and
confidence firing different firearms.
Before the hunting weekend, we spent a
separate day in the Tararuas doing map and
compass work and learning bush survival
skills. Making fires out of wet wood was a
smoky highlight, and setting up make shift
shelters from tarps were just some of the
skills taught to us.
The course hunt was to take place at a
private property near Stratford in Taranaki.
We set off early in convoy and arrived at the
property mid morning. After making camp,
the group was split into small groups of three
to four people. Each group was led by two
experienced hunters. Due to the size of the
property it was possible to spread ourselves
quite far apart from other groups. Everyone
put on a bright orange vest for safety reasons
before we set off.
Everybody in the group had different levels
of experience; some were brought up on
farms, some had hunted previously but
lost their enthusiasm, and the rest of us
were city slickers who had never killed an
animal before. It was wonderful to see a
large percentage were fathers and sons,
obviously bonding in this wonderful outdoor
environment. The dress of the group was
also diverse; some wore gum boots and
flannelette shirts, while it looked like others
had just stepped off a Rambo movie set.
Whatever works I suppose.
YOUNG HUNTER
FIrsT BlOOD
B y A l e c A s q u i t h
New National Park Plan Approved
for Stewart Island
On 9th February, the NZ Conservation
Authority approved the new Stewart
Island/Rakiura Conservation management
Strategy (CMS) and Rakiura National
Park Management Plan (NPP). These
documents set out both the overarching
direction for the management of
conservation lands on Stewart Island
(CMS) and the more detailed management
direction for Rakiura National Park (NPP)
for the next 10 years.
NZDA was heavily involved in the
formulation of this plan at both the local
and national level, so I wanted to take the
time to look at what the plan says about
the future of Whitetail deer on Stewart
Island.
What do the plans say about Whitetail deer?
The Department of Conservation does not
currently undertake any control of deer
species within Rakiura National Park.
Work on deer is focused on monitoring the
health of the forests to keep track of the
impacts of deer.
In the table below is a list of the key
hunting related policies from the plan,
along with a brief description on what they
mean to the future of hunting white-tail
deer on Stewart Island.
POLICY WHAT DOES IT MEAN FOR HUNTING?
Will encourage recreational hunting on public conservation lands
and encourage hunters to target areas that are identifed as having
high deer numbers or areas that are most at risk from the presence
of deer.
Recreational hunting should continue to
be supported on the island for the next 10
years, as it has for the last 10 years.
Should liaise with, coordinate and inform local authorities,
adjacent landowners such as the Rakiura Maori Land Trust,
Tangata Whenua, commercial and recreational hunters and the
community through the Stewart Island/Rakiura Pest Liaison Group
to effectively eradicate, control and manage impacts of introduced
animals.
Hunters will continue to be informed and
involved around pest control operations
(eg the possum control programme on the
island)
Should facilitate the wider distribution of information about the
Stewart Island/Rakiura Pest Liaison Group and Department of
conservation meetings and initiatives to a national audience
through the web and other appropriate channels.
Information on DOCs animal control
programmes will be more widely available
than previously.
Should consult with the community, through the Stewart Island/
Rakiura Pest Liaison Group and Tangata Whenua, prior to
undertaking introduced animals control operations where the
operations involve the use of previously unused toxins or biocontrol
agents and methods.
If the possum control methods were
changed, then the liaison group would be
consulted.
Should continue to undertake monitoring, through the use of
representative exclusion plots, with the aim of better understanding
how deer, possums and rats interact to affect forest ecology
Continue to determine the actual impact of
deer versus possums versus rats so we can
make informed decisions on where money
and effort is best spent.
Should aim to control (where eradication is not possible) the impact
of introduced animals within Rakiura National Park to a level where
they are not having unsustainable effects on native species and
vegetation within Rakiura National Park.
Control is focused on impacts of animals, so
that we keep a healthy forest long term.
Should, through the review of the Stewart Island/Rakiura
Biodiversity Action Plan, work with the Stewart Island/Rakiura
Pest Liaison Group to establish specifc control measures for the
purposes of implementing and achieving the objectives and policies
in this section.
Hunters will continue to be involved in
planning how we will achieve our animal
control operations on Stewart Island.
Should undertake deer control in accordance with the following
priorities:
a) maintaining deer-free areas (such as existing deer-free islands)
b) preventing the colonization and establishment of new deer
species not presently found within Rakiura National Park.
c) to maintain the general welfare of the parks indigenous species,
habitats and ecosystems and to maintain scenic and landform
values; by controlling deer where necessary.
No new control proposed here.
Should consult with the Stewart Island/Rakiura Pest Liaison Group
and the wider community to determine appropriate methods for
control for those sites identifed above.
The idea that hunters and others be involved
in planning activities that might affect their
sport is strongly represented in this plan.
Plain English summary
No formal control of Whitetail deer proposed.
DOC to continue monitoring and if it
was proven that the impact of deer was
unsustainable, undertake other means of
control after consultation with the Stewart
Island/Rakiura Pest Liaison Group.
In other words, Whitetail deer have no planned
control or plans to eradicate them within the
10 year life of this plan. Any ideas for deer
control would need to be discussed with the
community and NZDA via the established
liaison group. This means that you would have
input right from the start in all management
decisions around Whitetail deer.
A full copy of the plan can be viewed on-line
at www.doc.govt.nz (http://www.doc.govt.
nz/publications/about-doc/role/policies-and-
plans/conservation-management-strategies/
stewart-island-rakiura/).
A successful hunter proudly
shows off his goat.
Pre hunt briefng. (Note the use of the high visibility safety vests.) Learning the fner points of using a frearm on the range in a controlled
environment.
17 NZ Hunting & Wildlife 172 - Autumn 2011 NZ Hunting & Wildlife 172 - Autumn 2011 16
Our group was allocated a ridge and valley to
hunt in. Using all the knowledge we gained
prior to the hunt, we looked for animal sign
and faeces. Staying down wind and low so
not to expose our silhouettes above the ridge
line, we came across a couple of goats on the
far hill side.
Here we go boys, was the call from our
experienced group leader. The goats were
about 200 metres away. I quickly lay down
with my .270 and lined up one of the goats.
Having never killed anything before, except a
couple of magpies my heart was racing. I held
my breath and squeezed the trigger. Got him.
I quickly reloaded and tried for the second,
but it was long gone. I felt surprisingly proud
of myself, but unfortunately, the job wasnt
quite finished.
As I excitedly walked towards my prize I could
see it was still alive. I looked towards the
group leader for guidance. Finish it off.
I was going to shoot it, but was told the
bullet could ricochet of a hidden rock. Use
your knife, he said. My pride and excitement
quickly disappeared as I unsheathed my
knife. The technique was to stick the knife
through the middle of the throat, then push
outwards, severing its windpipe. Contrary
to the World War II movie techniques of ear
to ear. This was certainly much harder than
shooting it from 200 metres away.
I grabbed the goats head and did as I was
told. I did it with the false confidence of
someone who doesnt want to look soft
in front of tough seasoned hunters. After
finishing it off, we then got down to the
skinning and butchering part. I took the back
steaks, back legs and skin as a trophy. One
thing that wasnt taught on the course was
how to get rid of the smell of blood on your
hands.
We continued until almost sunset. Everybody
in our group had successfully stalked, killed
and butchered at least one goat by the end
of the day. It was amazing; by the time I
had killed my third goat my sensitivity had
almost disappeared. It had now become a
job. I wanted to be as efficient as possible in
killing, skinning and butchering.
There was a great sense of camaraderie
amongst the group, as we hiked back down
the ridge. We all had meat bags full of
fresh organic fare and a sense that we had
achieved something special.
In the evening we sat around our camp telling
tales of hunting and gathering, whilst eating
our goat stew. I was amazed how such a
basic instinct such as hunting could bring
out a feeling of real contentment. After all,
its something weve been doing since the
beginning of mankind.
Thank you to the NZDA Hutt Valley Branch as
I now have the skills and the confidence to
keep my freezer stocked up for many years
to come.
YOUNG HUNTER
Hanging the carcass from a tree makes skinning easier. Two of the girls clean up a skin in preparation to preserve with salt for
tanning later.
Our camp site was set up on a
property near Stratford, Taranaki.
Jack Wilson 6 years old, North Taranaki Branch
with 5 hares he shot with Dads Norinco .22
magnum on Uncle Ians farm. The meat later
made delicious hare and ham patties.
James Denholm, Manawatu Branch with his frst deer.
Charlotte Flanagan,15 years old, Hutt Valley Branch
with her frst two goats shot 3 January 2011 with
Dads Remington .22 magnumwhile on a friends
farmlooking for pigs, rabbits, hares and deer.
Riley Smith, 7 years old, Gore & Districts Branch,
had a successful Christmas hunt.
Ella Wilson, Wellington Branch started hunting
rabbits two years ago and has now moved on
to bigger game by getting her frst deer on 23rd
December 2010.
Jabe Radich, North Taranaki Branch with his 58.6
kg boar which has a good looking set of tusks.
NZ Hunting & Wildlife 172 - Autumn 2011 18
The late afternoon found me back on the
ladder stand looking for Whitetail with
Mickeys instructions to get a nice deer for
meat so that he and the boys could take it
with them on their Illinois hunt. An hour later
a nice fat doe came out and started feeding;
one shot from the 7mm magnum got Mickey
and his mates their venison. The calibre
used was probably a bit on the large side for
Whitetail, but as this was my bear hunting
rifle I wanted to try it and get a bit more
familiar with its dynamics.
Day 3, 9/11/08
Up around 7.00 am, another great day, eight
degrees Celsius and a clear sky. Mickeys
pond was next on the agenda to ascertain
if there were any raccoons in the traps the
caretaker had set the previous day, (after he
had found thirty-seven dead mallard ducks
of his original fifty that had been due to be
released.) There were two racoons, one in
each cage trap. I killed the larger of the two
to bring home and Mickeys friend took the
younger one for meat.
Over to Poplar Ridge in the afternoon to join
the guys sighting in their muzzleloaders and
shotguns for their Illinois Whitetail hunting
trip. High powered rifles are not allowed
where they were going; in addition to their
firearms they would each use compound
bows. It was surprising how accurate the
shotguns and muzzleloaders were; these
guys were shooting two to three inch groups
at 150 metres with both types of firearms. I
got my first shot out of a muzzleloader and
even managed to hit the target! I put half
a dozen shots through the 7mm which was
shooting good. All ready for the first day of
bear season tomorrow!
Day 4, 10/11/08
Opening day for the bear hunting season,
and up at 4.30 am to be greeted with great
weather. Breakfasting with Mickey, I had to
admit to being both anxious and excited about
what the day may bring. Work commitments
meant Mickey was heading back to
Wilmington, so after goodbyes I headed to
Poplar Ridge (remembering which side of
the road I should be driving on). There I met
Abel and two other American blokes, Ryan
and Frankie, who would be hunting on the
same property. I was dropped off at a stand
on the bush edge; a steel ladder going up to
a platform about three metres off the ground.
It is illegal to hunt bears over bait in NC, so it
is really a matter of hunting the right areas at
the right time.
On daybreak I looked around, and in front
of me was a cut corn field with thick bush
and 50 feet high trees behind me. As stated
previously, these areas are very wet and
some of the trees grow roots up through the
water to breathe. Knee length waterproof
footwear is desirable (so I found out). These
wet areas are called bays.
There were a lot of ducks flying over me
and I thought to myself that I could possibly
shoot more out of the stand than I shot from
the impoundment the other morning. Twenty
minutes later saw my first bear about 400
metres in front of me, quartering away from
my right to left; I managed to get some
footage of him before he disappeared. Half
an hour later, a noise behind me and to the
right, a young bear around 125 pounds (60
kgs) came running past me panting. I got
a feeling that he was scared of something,
but managed to get him on film before he
was swallowed up by the bush. A while
later another young bear came past me,
also puffing and again I thought something
bigger could be chasing them. Nothing more
appeared, but it was great to see these little
guys meaning a great morning. At 11.00 am,
Abel and I collected Frankie and Ryan who
hadnt seen any bears, but had seen a lot of
Whitetail. Food and a discussion regarding
the evening hunt followed.
That evening Abel took me to a different
location to a tripod stand three metres above
the ground. Just before dark another bear
around the 125 pound (60 kg) mark visited
me. He came along an overgrown track
straight towards me, walked up to the ladder,
put his two front paws on the bottom rung
and looked straight up at me. I was sitting
dead still and even though he was close, I am
sure he didnt see me. As he took his paws
down and sat right underneath me, I tried
to get my camera into action but he heard
me and wandered off looking back trying to
figure out what was going on. I headed out
after dark to find Frankie had shot a bobcat
that had disappeared into the thick scrub and
was unable to be found. At Mickeys place
over tea and a couple of beers we discussed
the mornings agenda; Ryan and Frankie
would go in stands and I would hunt the bush
edge with Abel.
Day 5, 11/11/08
We rose again at 4.30 am and off to Poplar
Ridge; another brisk morning with a little
fog about. We dropped off Ryan and Frankie
before Abel and I headed for the bush edge.
Only just out of the truck we saw the first
bear crossing some open ground to our right
before quartering away from us. A nice bear,
200 - 250 lb (100 -120 kg), but Abel thought
we would find something bigger if we waited.
A short time later another smaller bear
headed away from us about 300 metres off
along an impoundment bank towards where
Ryan was. The bear went out of sight and we
heard a shot from that direction. Thinking
that Ryan had shot the bear, Abel contacted
him on his cell; Ryan confirmed that he had
shot a bear but a different and bigger bear
than the one we spied. (Great stuff Ryan).
When we thought it was too late for more
hunting, a bear suddenly appeared across
to our right preparing to cross open ground.
STORY
I was guiding a party of four from North
Carolina, USA at Holyburn near Tuatapere,
hunting Red stag, Fallow, bull Elk (Wapiti),
goats and Arapawa rams.
I mentioned that I had been on a couple of unguided
hunts for black bear in the USA, and although I had
some great video footage of bears, and my friend
Patrick from Australia had shot a nice colour phase
one, I was yet to get one myself.
Immediately this great bunch of guys offered me
the opportunity to go bear hunting on their friends
property in North Carolina, maybe shoot a duck
or two and possibly a Whitetail deer. I didnt think
about it for very long before taking them up on their
kind offer; the excitement and anticipation started
right then!
I contacted my friends who own and operate Neves
Taxidermy, Bethel, New York and explained I was
coming over on a bear hunt and might have a skin
for mounting. Then it was time to organize fights,
hunting licences, insurance etc. All done, and now
the only problem was the three months waiting time
until I left.
November 6th fnally arrived and I was on my way to
the States, arriving in Wilmington, North Carolina on
Friday 7th around 10.00 am.
Day 1, 7/11/08
I was greeted at the airport by Mickey and Vann
Fogleman and great weather. Mickey had organized
this part of my trip to hunt on a friends property.
Supplies were obtained for the week before the
three to four hour 185 miles (297 kms) drive to his
place in Swan Quarter, Hyde County, North Carolina,
(NC). The terrain was fat, quite wet, with thick
undergrowth most of the way. The land is mainly
used for agriculture, predominately cotton, grain
crops and pine plantations. Lake Mattamuskeet, the
biggest natural lake in NC is abundant with water
fowl and just down the road from Mickeys twenty
hectares; his retreat from the city for himself and
his family - an awesome spot. Settling in, Mickey
offered a Whitetail hunt as the bear hunting season
didnt start until the following Monday.
We headed out in the late afternoon to a spot
leased by my host in corn felds, surrounded by
state forest, other private land and a lot of pine
plantations. I waited for my buck for a couple of
hours in a tree stand and saw three doe come and
go, but no Whitetail this time. Half an hour before
dark a young black bear, around 125 lbs (60 kgs)
caught my attention. He was about 200 metres
away on the edge of the bush and quartered to
my left, before he headed out of sight. Waiting a
short time in the fading light, I then returned to
Mickeys for tea and refreshments. (An eventful frst
afternoon).
Day 2, 8/11/08
Up early the frst morning of duck shooting, off to
the duck blind (maimai); a wooden platform with an
entry point at each end sited in a corn feld with a
ffty-metre harvested strip on either side. The whole
feld had been fooded to about knee depth and
decoys placed where the corn had been harvested
from. Just before daylight we settled into our
impoundment, (name for the area used for duck
hunting in NC.)
Shooting is allowed from 6.04 am, and it started
right on cue with lots of ducks (the main species
teal) fying around. The weather was great, and
just like New Zealand, this kept the ducks nice and
high. Over an hour and a half I managed to shoot a
couple. The limit is six each per day; we shot about
a dozen all together, so I think it was a win to the
ducks.
The shooters from the area headed to the local
diner for a great breakfast and catch-up on the
mornings shoot, where the general consensus
was that, although we were a bit shy of the limit,
it would get better. Then it was to bear hunting
country; Poplar Ridge, (a great place for bears I am
told). Owned by Randy Hignite, the place is mostly
swampy with some higher ground and covered in
thick scrub. I also met Abel, who worked for Randy;
fortunately I hit it off with Randy and Abel straight
away as I would hunt with them all week.
An elated Paul with his black bear
Ryan (left) and Abel with Ryans black bear
that weighed in at 193 kgs
BlaCk Bear hunT -
nOrTh CarOlIna 2008
B y P a u l A n d e r s o n , W e s t e r n S o u t h l a n d B r a n c h
21 NZ Hunting & Wildlife 172 - Autumn 2011 NZ Hunting & Wildlife 172 - Autumn 2011 20
Abel liked this bear and told me to shoot him
if I could. As he was going away from us, I
headed along the bush edge about 50 metres
to shorten the distance between us to get a
shot. When the bear turned slightly to cross
in front of me, I lay down on a track to sight
him through the scope, only to discover he
was in line with where we thought Ryan was
(bugger, no chance of a shot here).
The bear had to cross my track to get the
thick cover; the adrenalin started to pump.
He disappeared from sight then reappeared
again 130 metres away. I got the bear in the
scope and squeezed off a shot. He hesitated
slightly, and then took off to the left. I took
another shot, only to be a bit late getting it
away; which meant he was out of sight when
the rifle went off.
Now the anxiety started as we ran down
an old overgrown track through the bush
to ascertain if the bear had crossed it. We
were about 150 metres in with thick bush
on our left, a water course where the depth
was over my head, and more thick bush on
my right. We waited, and noticing the water
hadnt been disturbed, didnt think the bear
had crossed the track. Five minutes later we
heard something crashing around in the bush
to our right on the other side of the water
course. The bear was now between us and
where he was shot, about 100 - 150 metres
further over. He sounded like he was around
50 metres or so into the scrub, but because
of the thick foliage we could only see in about
30 40 metres, therefore he was out of
sight. It was a good time to play the waiting
game while I went over the shot in my mind.
Every few minutes we heard him crunching
sticks and his coarse breathing, which
sounded like he was hit in the lungs and
would die. While we waited, Ryan arrived
and followed the blood trail from the other
side and confirmed pinky looking blood. The
waiting continued until we heard the bear
again, indicating he might be a bit closer now.
Crouching in the bush Abel was sure he could
see the bear. I bent down beside him and yes,
there was the bear; but I couldnt make out
which part of him was in view. Deciding to
get some more lead into him, two more shots
were fired through the bush to finish the job. I
was pretty sure they both connected.
Everything went quiet and thinking he was
done, we waited and then headed back out
to where the hunt began. We followed the
blood trail, me with the gun, and Abel the
camera, (no prizes for guessing who was in
front.) The blood trail went through the scrub
to approximately 50 metres into the bush to a
black shape in front and to the left of us.
It was the bear, sitting on his haunches in
foot deep water. I couldnt believe it when
he stood up and lifted his head to look
around at us 25 metres away, his breathing
audible. Without taking my eyes off the bear,
I stepped closer, took my time to get within
about 6 metres, then stopped to finish the job
that started an hour and a half earlier (dead
at last!). With a wounded bear in thick scrub
one must avoid risks. Only then was the
realisation of how big this bear was and the
language and comments on the video would
back this up. What a magnificent animal! I
had never seen any animal soak up lead like
that, and was pleased to see him dead. At
this point I was a pretty elated and happy
Kiwi.
Now the fun began; it took five of us to drag
the bear along the ground. A considerable
amount of effort was expended getting him
the 50 metres out to the edge of the bush. An
open area provided photo opportunities and
after a spell we carried him out to his entry
spot. With 30 metres of swamp to cross after
the bush, Abels great idea was to use a 25
tonne digger and a tandem trailer. We picked
up Ryans bear too, and with the two bears on
the trailer it was off to the local crab factory
for the weigh in.
An example of an impoundment used for duck shooting in North Carolina
We rolled Ryans bear onto a pallet on the
forklift to deposit him on the scales where
he weighed in at 426 lbs (193 kgs). A great
bear and a very happy Ryan. Then it was
my turn and my bear tipped the scales
at a huge 576 lbs (261 kgs), WOW. What
an awesome bear. It was then back to
Mickeys to skin the bears out. It took me
two and a half hours to get the hide off
mine and with the feet still in it weighed 80
pounds (36 kgs). We quartered the bears
and packed the meat in ice for transport. I
kept my back steaks to slice up for the guys
going to Illinois. Bear meat is very popular
and tastes great! The rest of the bear was
given to Randys friends; nothing was
wasted.
What an awesome time I had with these
guys in North Carolina and the great bear
was the icing on the cake. I knew he would
look awesome as a life size mount in my
lounge in Tuatapere! From here it was back
to Wilmington to spend a couple of days
with two more friends of mine, Eddie and
Steve, shooting a nice big male fox as a
bonus.
I would like to emphasise that if you are
intending to hunt overseas please make
sure you have the right permits etc to get
your animals home. I very nearly lost this
trophy of a lifetime because I never had
all of the required documentation on my
return. In fact I am sure if it had not been
for friends of mine pointing me in the right
direction and helping me out I would still be
without it. Thanks guys.
A proud Paul Anderson beside his 261 kg full mount black bear on display in his Tuatapere lounge
The grey fox that was a bonus while at Wilmington
23 NZ Hunting & Wildlife 172 - Autumn 2011 NZ Hunting & Wildlife 172 - Autumn 2011 22
No. 1
A IAN McLEOD.
MacFARLANE VALLEY, 1924.
LENGTH - left - 44 inches, right - 43 inches.
SPREAD - 39 inches, SPAN - 28 inches.
BEAM - 5 inches.
A fne example of Scottish-style trophy, it was
secured on Two Stag Flat in the MacFarlane
River Valley. The stalking party consisted of
McLeod, Frank Kitto, Archie Kitto and John
Ross. After considering retreating from the
valley due to threatening weather conditions,
Archie Kitto and Ian McLeod decided to take
a last look at the fat they later named Two
Stag Flat. It proved to be a wise decision,
McLeod securing this fne trophy which was
located with hinds and roaring on the fat.
In the opinion of the writer, this trophy would
compare favourably with any antlers produced
by Red deer anywhere in the world.
No. 2.
ARCHIE D KITTO.
ALBERT BURN, 1921 The Big Chief.
LENGTH - left - 38 inches, right - 38 in.
SPREAD - 39 inches, SPAN - 30 inches.
BEAM - 6 inches. POINTS - 19.
Archie Kitto always considered this his
best trophy, although a number of his
contemporaries preferred his Junction
Stag. This animal was located rutting on the
upper fats of the Albert Burn after the party,
consisting of Archie Kitto and his father, Frank
Kitto, had endured a long trek into that valley
from Mill Creek, a tributary of the Matukituki
River. A long stalk from high above where
the stag was seen holding a harem of hinds,
demanded a long shot over some considerable
distance and downhill. An unexpected
encounter with a young 8-pointer during the
stalk almost cost Kitto his trophy.
No. 3.
ARCHIE D KITTO.
MINARET BURN, 1922 - The Junction Stag.
LENGTH - left - 47 inches, right - 44 inches.
SPREAD - 39 inches, SPAN - 32 inches.
BEAM - 5 inches. DOUGLAS SCORE - 353.
POINTS - 13.
A very cunning stag, this animal took Archie
Kitto for a ride on a couple of occasions
before the persistent sportsman eventually
caught up with him high on the tops above
a branch of the Minaret Burn, there managing
to secure him while he was lying down. It had
begun to snow and weather conditions were
threatening. A symmetrical trophy of typical
Highland Scottish style, he is an epitome of
his race and a very attractive trophy. Kitto
was rather disappointed when he eventually
realised the stag carried thirteen points, at
frst convinced he had shot the longest royal
taken from the Otago herd up until that time.
FrOM The wIlD hIlls
OF sCOTlanD...
...TO The ruGGeD MOunTaIns
OF a sCOTTIsh COlOny. The OrIGIns
OF The OTaGO reD Deer herD
B y D B r u c e B a n w e l l
ARTICLE
There are only two elements required for
a stag to produce frst-class antler; frst-
class genetics and a suitable environment
which is capable of providing the necessary
sustenance and minerals. Perhaps one of the
more phenomenal examples of this process
moving up to a higher level was the transition
of Highland Scottish Red deer from the hills of
Scotland to the mountains of a far off colony,
those of the Province of Otago. Incidentally,
the name Otago is a pidgin English term for
the Maori name, Otakou, the pronunciation of
which, of course, is similar.
Having observed and studied Red deer antlers
across the entire spectrum of the species,
including many park-bred examples, it is the
opinion of the writer that two of the greatest
Otago sets are among the fnest in the world
for sheer beauty and symmetry. Because
of their traditional pattern, comprising in
general a lower number of tines, and the fact
that symmetry fails to provide points in the
current forms of scoring systems including
the Douglas, in many cases they do not score
as high as more multi-pointed specimens but
less attractive trophies taken from alternative
herds.
For many centuries the forebears of the
Otago herd had roamed the Highlands of
Scotland, in more recent times because of
the destruction of the Caledonian Forest were
forced to occupy a hostile environment, both
terrain and climate, which eventually failed
to supplement what eventually proved to be
a case of latent, quality genetics. When the
mountain ranges of Otago and South Westland
provided the necessary minerals through the
medium of lush vegetation, the transformation
was tremendous, the genetics once again
coming to the fore and we were presented
with antlers of classic Scottish form, but of
a quality undreamed of by those responsible
for the relocation and acclimatisation. The
ultimate result was a high standard of wild,
trophy-class Red deer probably unsurpassed
anywhere across the entire spectrum of the
Holarctic region (temperate zone), particularly
in regard to the form of antler, size in
proportion to body weight and their symmetry,
Sportsmen from all over the world focked
to Otago, particularly from Britain and as a
consequence, many of the great heads found
their way to the British Isles.
When Sir Edwin Landseer created his famous
painting, Monarch of the Glen, little did he
realise by exaggerating the quality of the
antlers, he was merely pre-empting what
was going to be produced by the stags of
the Otago herd. Painted with a background
depicting part of Black Mount Forest it was
perhaps a little ironic that those Otago stags
owed around 50% of their origin to that very
forest. Adding further interest was the fact that
it was thought the body of the stag had been
modelled from a stag at Stoke Park, the origin
of another signifcant local population, the
Rakaia herd, and neighbouring the range of the
Otago animals.
Perhaps one of the more interesting factors
arising from the antler production of the Otago
stags is the two identifable confgurations that
occur even after one hundred and thirty years,
these clearly displaying the forms traditional to
the two forests used to afforest Invermark in
1853, namely Black Mount and Glen Avon, The
traditional sweeping form of the Black Mount
style in contrast to the more V-shaped Glen
Avon style with its strong, clustered tops are
both still obvious in Otago specimens, although
some quite naturally display intermediate form.
When the writer arrived at the national
conference of 2000, on entering the judging
room was astonished to see two lovely
trophies entered for competition leaning
against a wall alongside of each other. Both
were traditional Otago-style heads. One was
a typical example of Black Mount form, while
the other resembled the confguration of Glen
Avon. One had been taken in the Burke Valley,
the other at the head of Lake Ohau.
The original stock liberated at Morven Hills in
the Lindis Valley, once becoming established,
eventually dispersed, occupying the mountains
of Otago Province and much of those of South
Westland over the next ffty years. This herd
arose from a gift of seventeen calves from
Invermark Forest made by the 11th Earl of
Dalhousie to the people of Otago, the initial
eight in October of 1870, arriving at the port of
Otago, Port Chalmers, during January of 1871,
the second shipment thirty-six days later.
Invermark was, prior to 1853 when it was
afforested (restocked) by the two sources
already mentioned, although the situation is
hard to understand considering the areas it
bounded, was apparently only supporting one
lone hind, evidently a wanderer from Deeside.
The calves were captured during the months
of May and June under the direction of the
head stalker, Archibald Campbell, assisted by
one of his staff, Donald Cameron. Sixty were
taken, but because of feeding diffculties only
seventeen survived. According to Cameron, the
calves were wild at frst, but became so tame
that after a time they would follow the stalkers
around like dogs.
In the forest register of Invermark appears the
following entry: In 1870, the frst Red deer
sent to New Zealand were given by the Earl of
Dalhousie and Mark Forest and milked by me
at Gleneffack, Arch Campbell, Forester. By the
term frst Red deer Campbell was obviously
referring to them as being the frst lot of calves
bound for Otago and not suggesting they were
the frst of the species to go to New Zealand,
that occurring in 1854 and consisting of
Richmond Park animals to Nelson.
During July of 2009, North Otago Branch
were about to host national conference and
asked for a display of available Otago trophies
to be displayed at the venue. A collection of
eighteen frst-class samples were gathered
and displayed. These, of course, constituted
a mere handful of what has been secured
over the years. Many have disappeared with
time and many found their way to Britain.
Two magnifcent examples taken by Lord
Belper during the season of 1925 hang today
in Beauly Castle, seat of the Lovat Frasers,
near Inverness. Nothing is known of the
whereabouts of a lot of fve taken by one
Captain J Haggas in 1933, incorporating what
was described as the best bag of four royals
ever taken from the Otago herd and secured
in the MacFarlane Valley. Nevertheless,
the display at Oamaru was described as
a sensation for sportsmen and created
considerable interest for those attending.
Last year, while visiting Scotland, including
visits to several Highland forests, a collection
of photographs taken by the writer of the
individual trophies displayed at the conference
created great interest, in particular with some
of the local stalkers with whom the writer
was fortunate in meeting and all concerned
expressed the opinion they had never ever
sighted anything of such quality before.
More heads will be featured in future issues.
NZ Hunting & Wildlife 172 - Autumn 2011 NZ Hunting & Wildlife 172 - Autumn 2011 24 25
sOn OF MOOse
W i n n e r o f t h e T o n y O r m a n S h i e l d 2 0 1 0
B y H o w a r d E g a n , W a i r a r a p a B r a n c h
I live in a farming area near the Wairarapa
coast hill country, made up of what they call
limestone. The area that my whanau and
friends roam over is owned by four families of
humans. They call us Fallow deer. Our tribe
has generally been persecuted by humans, but
in this little area, its not too bad. There was
one tragedy a year or two back though, when
two of our leaders (Monster and Moose) were
killed by humans with their bang-sticks. We try
to live for the present, so I mustnt talk about
that.
My life has been good. At fve and a half years
old, I am big and strong, my antlers are heavy,
long and well spread. Thirty inches by thirty-
two inches in human fgures. I have beautiful
palmations which I know are attractive to the
does. I know how to use them too; in fact I
killed a three and a half year buck last week.
I only have two does, and this stranger tried
to intrude. He had broken one of his antlers
above the brow tine, so perhaps I was a bit
harsh but I got angry. His dead carcass looked
like a pincushion. Usually if I give a croak
over one of my scrapes, the young bucks will
run away. This one should have, but its not
my problem. I need to mate, but neither of
my does is ready yet, and that big old white
throated buck is holding most of the does in
the next valley.
The kanuka valleys are what make our tribes
home country so good. We will never leave,
as Fallow deer do not roam, we are home-
bodies. In fact, our family groups of does
raising their fawns, and the young boy spikers,
will live in the same gullies all year round. It
is fertile grassland, with plenty of food and
the lush grass grows beneath the high canopy
of the kanuka trees. The families can hide
there when they need to. Personally, I only
spend half of the year with the family. In the
springtime, after my antlers have dropped off,
I always team up with a couple of the other
bucks of a similar age to me. We move away
to an area of rough, less accessible country
where we can feel safe. It doesnt take much
food to keep two or three of us going. If we
have to, we can travel fast to food because we
dont have the distractions of fawns and does.
I enjoy those boy-zone periods; we stay there
until mid-autumn when its time to go back to
the doe country for a bit of nooky. Our new
antlers have of course grown by then. We
polish them in late February.
We were late coming back from our boy-zone
country this year and only got here a fortnight
ago. The weather was kind, feed was plentiful
and lush. We knew there was no hurry as the
does would cycle late this year. White throat,
the herd buck, arrived back at the same time.
Hes older than me at six and a half, and hes
real big. Caution required. Ive set up at this
steep bush covered slope at the head of the
gully, watered by a stream. Its the home of
this fruity looking big ginger doe and that black
girl has come to my croaks. Im two kilometres
away from the herd bucks stand, with his
group of twelve does and fawns. Ill be OK. I
fxed that one-antlered buck didnt I?
The suns getting a bit low, 5.30pm in human
terms. Maybe its time for a nibble. Perhaps
soon, but its comfortable here in the scrub.
Bark, bark, bark. Bark, bark, bark. What
the hell is wrong with black doe? Shes been
barking like that for about two tui songs. Id
better just wander out and have a look.
Meanwhile, the old Fallow fella is hunkered
down on a sheep track one hundred and
ffty metres away, cammo clad, very still and
camera ready. Hes been there for ffteen
minutes, since he heard one single croak from
the mature buck at 5.15pm. The melanistic doe
scented him when she crested the hill above.
Bark, bark, bark. She didnt stop for at least
two minutes, and was largely hidden by a tea
tree bush. Not a photo prospect but out of the
corner of an old eye, the hunter saw the huge
ginger buck walk out of the scrub. Superb, a
top class trophy; Douglas Score 240+. Click,
click, click. The middle photo was good.
Discovered he is the son of Moose, as the right
antler clearly identifes him.
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27 NZ Hunting & Wildlife 172 - Autumn 2011 NZ Hunting & Wildlife 172 - Autumn 2011 26
All other thirteen HUNTS trainees shot animals on Makapua that day;
three more deer and ten goats. So the following day there was plenty of
meat to process.
Makapua is a working farm with a wonderful environment that entices
and holds a number of game animals. There are large areas of native
rewarewa, manuka groves, and pastoral land. The topography varies
from hilly to steep terrain. The Makapua Stream has cut a deep papa
valley through the property and is a delightful place for an early morning
stalk. Colin and Marg run cattle, sheep and deer. During the roar Colin
leads clients on hunts where all animals taken are free range and fair
chase. The farmed deer paddocks are exclusion zones for hunters.
Colin and Marg are very proud to have a visitors book with over two
hundred signatures of people who have shot their frst deer ever. This
extraordinary privilege for new hunters is testament to the value Colin
and Marg place on recreational harvesting and the incredible enjoyment
it brings to those who love to hunt.
Gisborne HUNTS are incredibly fortunate to be hosted by Colin and Marg.
The four deer taken is a limit. The names of the fourteen trainees go
into a hat and four are drawn. Those four can hunt deer. All four deer
hunters are paired with a goat hunter; that way eight get to share the
experience of shooting both goat and deer.
For the past two years Gisborne HUNTS has offered a prize to trainees
for the best photo of a live wild deer taken during the HUNTS weekend.
The prize was put up by Shane Kapene from Gisbornes Hunting and
Fishing outlet. We are fortunate to have Shanes support and his interest
in HUNTS through him being a Mountain Safety frearms instructor and
HUNTS instructor trainee. The prize, a Hunter Elements skinning knife
(nice prize Shane), encouraged all trainees to stalk deer and get that
best photo. It soon becomes apparent to all, that hunting deer with
a camera can be a lot more challenging than hunting with a rife
especially if you do not have zoom function on your lens. We had a
few nice photos entered but one beauty of a yearling hind took the frst
prize.
Much of the Sunday of the HUNTS weekend was spent sharpening
knives, skinning and processing game ready for the freezer. For most
of the trainees this is a new experience but one that holds huge interest.
We spent allot of time on this phase, demonstrating, and helping trainees
break down their animals. I must say it is a wonderful thing to watch as
fourteen trainees work with care and pride. We put a fair bit of meat in
Colin and Margs freezer as a huge thank you. The rest, once bagged,
was shared amongst the trainees so all took home venison and goat to
cook and serve as a meal for their family.
Camaraderie on hunts is a wonderful thing. The success of a hunt which
is later celebrated by all comrades is a moment worth capturing. I got it
on flm.
They reckon you get out of it what you put into
it. Well that certainly was the case with the
last lot of fourteen spirited Gisborne HUNTS
course trainees. Go getters all of them.
I begin by telling you about a hunt with
HUNTS trainee Logan who I had the privilege
of tagging behind. You could say I was the
offcial cameraman. My job was to capture the
moment so the video was at the ready. Logan
was a happy sort of a fellow and most of the
time he had a big grin. He was pretty ft as
well. Logan was a bit nervous as we snuck
around the hills on Makapua Station searching
for deer. Logan had never shot an animal
before and he quietly tippy toed behind his
guide, Colin Baynes who was leading the hunt,
following his every instruction. Colin and his
wife Marg own Makapua. In the late evening
we spotted two deer, a hind and yearling, who
were some distance off and unaware of our
stalk.
The back side of a spur enabled us to close the
distance and I flmed Colin and Logan peering
up over the hump to see the two deer standing
broad side on about 60 metres away. Colin
whispered instructions to Logan who loaded
and closed the bolt on the .243. Colin stuck
his fngers in his ears and I kept on flming
thinking, dont jump when he fres and ruin
the flm. After what seemed like a very long
time Logan fred, catching me unawares and
making me jump. The yearling hunched at the
impact, wobbled and fell to the ground. I spun
the camera onto Logan who had a grin that
extended from ear to ear and Colin shaking his
hand vigorously.
By this time the light was beginning to fade
fast and we needed to get a move on fast to
get this animal up the hill before dark. We
wandered down to the animal and thats when
everything pretty much got hilarious. An
important part of any hunt are the photos.
These are taken as a record of the hunt, to be
placed in the album so they can be brought
out at any time during celebrations or on a
special occasion. Logan had a wee problem
with photography. It was getting dark by this
time and the camera fash was necessary.
Every time we fashed Logan would blink. He
blinked and blinked and blinked some more.
Consequently in all the photos he had his
eyes closed. Logan was a tad embarrassed
about this to the extent of frustration. He
told us that he experienced similar frustration
when they were taking photos for his drivers
licence. They said he was not allowed to drive
with his eyes closed so he needed them to be
open in the photo. Even worse came time for
high school prom photos. Well I say no more.
We managed to get a couple of photos after
twenty or so attempts of Logan with his eyes
as half open slits which would have to do.
Due to this delay a subsequent demonstration
on dressing out and autopsy was carried out
under torch light. Logan carried his deer up
the steep hill running on adrenalin I think. We
got it back to camp and decided to take more
photos next day in the daylight when eyes
would be in non blink mode. It was a great
hunt and a pleasure to be with Logan when he
shot his frst animal.
GIsBOrne hunTs 2010
B y M i k e S p r a y
The HUNTS course trainees
MSC ARTICLE
Logan processing his deer
Lyn carries out her deer
Lyn and Ashley making venison mince
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29 NZ Hunting & Wildlife 172 - Autumn 2011 NZ Hunting & Wildlife 172 - Autumn 2011 28
STORY
TwO TrOphIes
In One TrIp
B y R o n P o s k i t t , N o r t h C a n t e r b u r y B r a n c h
Now retirement age has hit, youll notice
us older fellows do a lot of reminiscing, yet
we still potter around the hills with the odd
success. But, theres nothing like those hard
trips where great amounts of energy were
used with inferior gear compared to today. One
such hunt I went on was with an icon of the
North Canterbury NZDA who I met many years
ago on search and rescue exploits around
Canterbury; the one and only Zeff Veronese
who became a very good but competitive
friend. On this occasion he had a contact at
Mt Creighton on the shores of Lake Wakatipu
and so was born a hunt for the Fallow stags in
their rut.
We drove down on 16th April 1991 with a
trailer attached carrying my two trail bikes,
an AG175 and a Honda 125, the laugh being
that Zeff had never ridden a motor cycle. On
arrival a practice run was frst on the menu,
oh for a video camera. As he puttered around
the moderately fat paddock there were legs
and arms going everywhere, his eyeballs were
stuck out like dogs balls and Italian expletives
vented the air between a fall or two until he
got the hang of it. He was one determined
character, so we loaded up and left the next
morning.
The going was on a 4 x 4 track with real
steep pinches, eventually going round to a
beautiful small lake that had a picturesque hut
overlooking it. Zeff was glad to be out of the
saddle, quoting with a wry smile on his dial, I
must be bloody mad coming on one of these
things.
A night of Alfredo with other Italian delicacies
was had, (hes not a bad cook) followed by an
early rise in the morning. Zeff knew the area
and so he, being a lot younger, then put the
pace on, so covering a lot of high open tussock
tops. Nothing for a long time was seen or
heard until we approached a ridge overlooking
a small valley with intermittent bush. Some
time was spent glassing and then the grunt of
a buck was heard. Zeff spotted him some 300
yards away over on the opposite face, down
a lot lower but standing side on and coughing
out that distinct Fallow grunt. A lot of antler
was apparent; Zeff carefully lay down, and
using his day pack for at rest, he nestled the
beast (a prototype 7mm x 300 Weatherby),
to a comfortable position and squeezed off. A
miss, then my backup shot missed too as the
animal jumped up a few steps to stand side
on again. Zeff felt he went under him, so after
making the necessary adjustments, the next
shot pole axed him on the spot.
Two fellows got down there as quickly as
possible to ascertain his potential, which
turned to great pleasure on seeing a rack of
well over the 200 DS mark. Photos, then head
skinning, followed by a snack, soon saw us on
the long journey back, intermittently looking
into the little guts and depressions as we
went, but not a sign was seen. It was decided
the game was nearer to the station so we
would move back to the shearers quarters for
my chance.
On the way back a really steep incline
presented itself whereupon Zeff said, Im not
bloody riding up that!
I went up frst and walked back to take his bike
up while he went up by hob nail express. To
be fair it was steep and I had trouble keeping
the front wheel down; it even gave me a scare
when I went near the drop off edge a few
times.
Being back at base brought an air of relaxation
to my mate, bar an easy ride tomorrow, biking
was fnished and I would doubt if to this day
Zeff has ever been on a bike again.
Good weather stayed with us as we climbed
up a side valley the next morning, disturbing
goats as we went, deer sign was prevalent in
the bush. Seated by some scrub the binoculars
scanned the opposite face as the morning sun
hit it after a moderate frost. The scene still
STORY
etched in my memory, the game on view was everywhere. Goats
of every hue and colour were scattered about in small mobs, the
young ones playing chasing and king of the castle on the little
knobs. Fallow deer were also present, some twenty in total in
four bunches. There were the usual grey/black ones with a few
of the menai colouring, much like a Red fawn at birth only with
white underneath. Then a beautiful pure white doe was seen. As
Zeff said, they are not to be shot and I can understand why. They
are a great sight to see, two light timbered bucks were in sight,
and as no big boys were in the area we left this tranquil scene.
It was decided to enter the native birch bush to hunt, and as we
came up on a fatter open area with a creek bubbling through it,
a bucks grunt was heard, the guttural throat rasps increasing in
volume and intensity as we closed the distance. Zeff passed me
the beast saying quietly, That will make sure he goes down.
I thought my BAR .308 was enough, but who can argue with this
thirty-inch cannon. I went forward on my own and as I ghosted
up behind a tree I peered round to see his majesty using his vocal
chords to the full extent. Some dozen or so does were in the
background looking very uneasy. Silently the beast was brought
up to bear on his lungs some forty-yards away; he fell at the shot,
as I winced at the mighty kick, then Zeff was with me watching
the master of the area kick his last.
Another very tidy head DS 214, and if my memory serves me
correctly Zeffs was about DS 217. Two happy boys toasted each
other that night to our success and a memorable trip.
Rons Fallow was taken in native birch.
Another very tidy head. (DS 214)
Zeff heard the distinct Fallow grunt before
spotting him some 300 yards away (DS 217)
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Our motor cycle ride ended at this
picturesque hut overlooking the beautiful
Lake Luna (near Queenstown)
NZ Hunting & Wildlife 172 - Autumn 2011 NZ Hunting & Wildlife 172 - Autumn 2011 30 31
BUSH TELEGRAPH ARTICLE
Tahr InTeresT GrOup
A meeting was held 17 February where DOC
gave a run down on their control operations.
A heated discussion followed on whether or
not bulls were to be targeted by DOC. The
department claimed that only mature bulls
would not be targeted and this was challenged
by several stake holders who were adamant
that the agreement was that no bulls (mature
or otherwise) should be targeted outside of the
national parks.
The question was then asked at what stage a
bull became a mature bull. After some robust
debate it was decided that there needed to be
some clarifcation on whether it is all bulls or
mature bulls only which are to be left.
A claim was then made that there were 80 to
90 bulls left in Mount Cook National Park after
DOCs control operation. DOC then asked,
who would clean them up? One of the group
said that according to DOCs own records
and permits, those 80 to 90 bulls would have
already been taken by live capture, heli-
hunting or recreational hunting. It was also
noted that there was signifcant migration into
and out of the park by mature bulls.
Tahr Interest Group control management of
females and juveniles, 7 12 February 2011
Area Total
sightings
Total kills
Landsborough 348 143
Karangarua 208 73
Mahitahi 33 17
Total West Coast 589 233
Total East Coast 307 60
Two Thumb Range
Totals overall 896 299
Orua Blue DuCk
prOTeCTIOn prOjeCT
Manawatu Branch
A recent report in the Manawatu Branchs
newsletter, Ruahine Rumble, indicates that
the project is still going strong and that animal
numbers being trapped are falling. Some
concern was raised around the number of traps
(27) which were either set strangely or had
got hung up after fring. These traps had the
setting loop sitting on the trigger arm which
someone possibly did intentionally. As many of
the traps as possible were reset. It is great to
see that a regular number of volunteers are still
actively involved with the project.
BUSH TELEGRAPH
prOseCuTIOn FOr
IlleGal hunTInG In
CanTerBury
Department of Conservation media release, 10
February 2011
Thanks to the efforts of some recreational
hunters, the Department of Conservation (DOC)
has successfully prosecuted a commercial
helicopter operator for illegally heli-hunting in a
recreational hunting area (RHA).
Last week in the Rangiora District Court,
Simon Lawn, Phillip Coll and Ahaura
Helicopters Ltd were convicted on all
charges for undertaking wild animal recovery
operations (WARO) in Lake Sumner Forest
Park, North Canterbury.
The two individuals and the company received
a total of $3,150 in fnes and $2,646 in costs
for culling and recovering deer in the Lake
Sumner recreational hunting area.
DOC Waimakariri staff received independent
reports from two groups of hunters who
noted a helicopter being used to shoot and
recover deer in the Mackenzie and McMillan
catchments in the early morning of the 7
March 2010.
We hope the successful prosecution sends
a strong message to WARO operators that
both DOC and recreational hunters are
committed to protecting RHAs from illegal
WARO activities, said DOC Waimakariri Area
Manager Kingsley Timpson.
We are very grateful for the detailed
information provided by both parties as to
the exact time, location, movements and
notable features about the helicopter. This
has enabled us to lay charges against the two
individuals and the company under the 1977
Wild Animal Control Act.
This is the frst successful prosecution of this
nature for the Department and is due to the
high quality of the information supplied by the
hunters.
RHAs are set up so recreational hunters
can access and stay in remote areas for the
enjoyment and skill of hunting on foot, without
suddenly being disturbed by, or competing
with, commercial helicopters also after the
same animal.
Lake Sumner recreational hunting area is
one of eight RHAs in the country set aside in
the early 80s solely for recreational hunting.
Commercial helicopter operators are not
permitted to operate in these areas under their
current WARO permit conditions.
According to Kingsley Timpson, it has been
hard in the past to enforce these conditions
due to the remoteness of RHAs and diffculty
in positively identifying alleged offenders.
We cannot be in all places at all times and are
very reliant on the public to be our eyes and
ears when it comes to noting and reporting
illegal activities on public conservation land.
GaMe BIrD hunTInG seasOn
Is alMOsT upOn us.
Experienced hunters will already be keenly
counting down the days and preparing for the
frst Saturday in May opening day which
is May 7 this year.
But if youve never had a go, its not too late
to give it a shot.
Fish & Game Wellington has all the
information for beginners wanting to get
started in this classic Kiwi pastime, and we
can even point new participants towards
potential hunting sites.
Game bird hunting is a traditional and popular
pursuit which helps build a range of positive
personal attributes, especially connecting
people more closely to the outdoors. Whats
more, kids love the excitement of being out in
the feld with their elders and its one of the
few activities to actively engage them longer
than computer games.
Hunters in New Zealand also make a huge
contribution to the environment by helping
protect, maintain and enhance threatened
wildlife habitat and ecosystems that game
birds rely on. This has a signifcant benefcial
fow-on effect to all species that live in these
unique environments.
Fish & Game carefully manages bird
populations to ensure the harvest over the
season is entirely sustainable. And of course,
hunters have the opportunity to treat their
family and friends to healthy, totally free-
range, favoursome food theyve gathered
from the wild.
For more information contact Wellington Fish
& Game on Telephone 06 359 0409.
Place 3 ducks in a large pot and cover with
water. Add 1 whole onion per duck and
cook slowly for 2 3 hours.
When cooked remove the ducks from the
liquid and allow liquid to cool. Once cooled,
remove the fat that will have settled on the
top of the liquid.
Remove the duck meat from the bones and
shred.
Pour the liquid through a strainer and save.
Keep the onions and leave to drain on a
paper towel.
Now melt 150 gms of butter in a pot and
add tsp dry mustard, tsp ground
ginger, tsp mixed herbs, 1 tsp curry
powder, 1 tsp salt, tsp pepper, and 1
tsp brown sugar.
Then blend in 1 cup of four and the
cooked onions. Cook for 2 3 minutes.
Remove from heat and stir in 1 - 2 litres
of the saved cooking liquid. Return to heat
and stir until it boils. Then add 2 tsp soy
sauce, 2 tsp sherry and the duck meat.
Then bring back to the boil. Great served
with mashed winter vegetables or rice.
wals DuCks
(This is a family recipe that
is tried and true).
Anne Cocks, Kaikohe
MInIsTerIal release
Kate Wilkinson - 17 March 2011
Canada geese protection status changed
The protection status of Canada geese as a
game bird will be changed to allow farmers,
park owners and aviation managers to cull these
birds themselves, Minister of Conservation Kate
Wilkinson announced today.
Canada geese will be removed from Schedule 1 of
the Wildlife Act 1953 and listed on Schedule 5. This
means that Fish & Game will no longer manage the
geese as a hunting resource. A permit will not be
required to shoot them.
As the population of Canada geese continues to
increase so does their risk to aviation safety and
the damage they infict to pasture and crops, Ms
Wilkinson says.
The current status where the geese populations are
managed as a game bird is not working.
Farmers have been getting increasingly frustrated
with these birds fouling pasture and damaging
crops.
They also pose an aviation hazard due to their large
size and this change will allow for the birds to be
more effectively controlled where they pose a risk
to aircraft safety.
Ms Wilkinson says there are tens of thousands of
Canada geese across the country and recreational
hunting opportunities will remain.
I expect Fish & Game to continue to work with
landowners to assist with managing populations
around the country.
The geese are well established and on top of that
farmers will have an incentive to provide hunting
access to reduce their goose control costs.
Background
The Canada goose is an introduced game bird
managed by Fish & Game councils for the beneft of
recreational game licence holders.
Species listed on Schedule 1 of the Wildlife Act are
declared to be game. This means the populations
are managed by local Fish & Game councils for
recreational hunting purposes.
Species on Schedule 5 are not protected.
Farmers, urban park managers and those
responsible for aviation safety advise that current
Canada geese management is not adequately
meeting their needs.
In 1995 the South Island Canada Goose
Management Plan was agreed that set the
maximum population number at 20,350. The
population has remained well above that level and in
2008 was estimated to be 35,000.
Fish & Game councils are independent. Under
the current regime, farmers, park managers, the
aviation sector, and the government have no direct
input to goose management.
Individual landowners can suffer thousands or tens
of thousands of dollars of damage to pasture and
crops from geese in a single year.
Four to fve geese will consume the equivalent
amount of grass that a sheep does and this impact
is further compounded by associated fouling.
FrIenDs OF The COBB
By Alec Milne, Golden Bay, amateur ornithologist
Friends of Cobb are a small group of
enthusiastic conservationists who are actively
trapping stoats in the Cobb Valley, for the
beneft of the areas iconic birdlife (The Golden
Bay Branch of NZDA are also running stoats
trap lines which is great.) We have always
envisaged an area of intensive pest control
near the road end. To this end we have applied
for and been granted, funding for an area of
intensive rat and possum control running from
the bush near the NZDA lodge up to Chaffeys
Stream (ie the forest face on the true right).
The abundance of mice means trapping is not
an option and feracol (vitamin D) is the most
benign toxin suitable. (DOC used feracol in
this area two years ago for possum control.)
There is no secondary poisoning effect with
feracol and it is not persistent. The standard
warning with feracol use states venison should
not be recovered from areas where feracol
has been used and it is only to be used in bait
stations. Therefore, unless deer learn to lift the
lid and lick out the paste it is hard to envisage
any problems. (If this did occur, lids would
be modifed to ensure deer were excluded.) If
members have concerns or are aware of any
issues regarding feracol use in hunting areas,
please respond to foc@clear.net.nz and the
issue will be raised with the DOC (Takaka).
GaMe BIrD hunTInG
- GIve IT a shOT!
B y H a mi s h C a r n a c h a n , c o mmu n i c a t i o n s o f f i c e r , N Z F i s h & G a me
33 NZ Hunting & Wildlife 172 - Autumn 2011 NZ Hunting & Wildlife 172 - Autumn 2011 32
Last March I had the great pleasure of receiving
a renewal of an old invitation from Cliff Marshall
to accompany him on a trip to his fabulous Jap
Valley.
As for obvious reasons this is a relatively secret
spot in the Kaimanawa bush, I will not go into the
exact locality details. Suffce to mention that on
the appointed day, April 11, Charlie Bins and I met
Cliff Marshall and Roy Larritt at Taupo lakeside
and proceeded together to Cliffs Jap Valley
camp.
Although a damp morning the afternoon turned
fne, and making good time we had the camp
nicely fxed up before dark.
The following morning dawned wet, but we arose
at 5 am and left for a day in the bush together.
We did not go to Jap Valley, however, but during
the days wanderings in high, beech bush we saw
about ten Red deer and two Sika hinds. Lured to
his doom by Roys big roaring horn, Charlie shot a
small 8-pointer Red stag for camp meat.
The Reds, a poor lot of small-bodied animals
were roaring quite well this day, but the Sika
were silent. Cliff and I made an attempt to
photograph a Red stag while Roy, a past-master
in the art of calling, kept him working up with
his horn. So successful was Roy, that Cliff and
I had hardly gone 70 yards stagwards, with
our cameras still in their cases, when we were
met by the stag coming fast through the bush
towards us. We froze while he passed us closely.
He ran right up to Roy and Charlie and received
such a fright that he took off with such speed
that he fouled a tree and turned a somersault.
When we arrived back at camp that night it
looked as though the weather was lifting, so we
hoped for a fne day on the morrow.
Although there was rain and thunder during the
night, daylight saw clear skies and a promise of
a good day. As Roy had to leave for home the
following day Cliff and he left at daybreak for
Jap Valley, while Charlie and I left for a ramble
together. After going for some distance we sat
on a log. Suddenly there was noise of something
behind us and we turned just in time to see a
dark Sika stag making off. He did not have a
good head.
As we progressed along a Red hind barked, and
later we saw a Red hind standing under a leaning
tree where we left her unmolested. Further along
we saw another hind and then a Red stag. Then
I stalked and photographed a Red stag as he lay
in his form chewing his cud. I had to follow him
for quite some time, often only about 20 feet off,
before he laid down in a suitable spot where the
light was suffcient to get a correct exposure
even for the fast Tri-X flm, so dark was the foor
of the forest.
The exposure of l/25th at f4.5 was later found to
be good, but the distance to the stag was too far.
It was interesting to see his reactions when he
heard the camera.
We later saw two more Red deer, and I heard a
pheasant curking in the distance, alarmed no
doubt by a passing deer. The Red stags were
roaring well in the morning, some roared all day;
but we heard no Sika.
We arrived back at camp a little earlier than
Roy and Cliff who brought back four Sika heads
and a skin. They had, it appeared, a great day
in Jap Valley. Roy had to take off his boots and
stalk in his socks in order to get his 6-pointer.
In sandals Cliff had skilfully stalked and shot
two 8-pointers. One was of the small variety,
the shoulder height being thirty-three inches;
and the other the large type, the shoulder height
being thirty-eight inches. With this head he won
the Waikato Branch Jap competition and the
Humphrey Trophy.
The skin from this stag was a Red type with light
spots a typical Manchurian Sika. The other
head Cliff carried to camp was one of those
motor-bike mutations.
Next morning dawned foggy and wet, and we
bade cheerio to Roy as he struggled out to his
car under a ninety-two pound load of skin, horn,
meat and equipment. It was decided to give Jap
Valley a rest, so Cliff went out on his own while
Charlie and I took off in another direction.
When about a mile from the camp we heard
the frst Sika whistle of the season. After a long
spell we heard it again, but then a Red hind and
fawn dashed off with prolonged barking which
spoilt our chances. A little further on we came
across some little pigs. I tried to take a photo of
them but one ran into me and the whole sounder
bolted, jumping a nearby hind and fawn in their
noisy fight. Far behind us a Sika bugled twice,
but although we back-peddled he wouldnt play.
We returned back to camp after seeing about
nine more Red deer and hearing another Sika
stag whistle away to our rear. Cliff arrived shortly
after. He had shot a Red deer or two and had
explored some more country.
We arose early the next morning, and despite
the rain Cliff decided to take us off to Jap Valley.
After quite a hike we eventually topped a saddle,
and Cliff waved his hand towards a valley that
spread before us. Jap Valley, he said, as he
cupped his hands about his mouth and gave his
famous whistle-roar.
Immediately from about 150 yards ahead of us
came the answering call Meee-ooo-rrr.
It was decided that I should take this beast, so
I cautiously made towards the spot and waited.
Soon I saw a Sika hind, followed closely by the
stag, working through the pepperwood. The hind
passed through a gap between big beech trees
about forty yards away, and knowing that the
stag would be following close I aimed the rife
in that direction. The stag appeared, showing
4-points on my side, and bringing the sights on
his chest I quickly pulled the trigger.
As the bullet struck home he gave a jump and
bolted, and I immediately raced after him to
fnd him dead about 50 yards beyond. In the
process I twisted my left foot severelythe
frst time I have hurt myself in nearly 20 years of
deerstalking. Unfortunately, too, the stags right
antler had only 2-points.
As we went further into the valley we saw many
Sika stags and hinds, the stags answering Cliffs
calls from every quarter. We went carefully from
one to another until Cliff indicated a fne stag,
apparently an 8-pointer, and motioned for Charlie
to take the shot. It was one of those diffcult
shots, and I was not surprised when Charlie
missed.
After a bit we saw this buck again, and I got in a
hurried shot at about 70 yards as he turned to go.
He disappeared from view as I fred, but my two
companions said I had scored a hit. I followed as
hard as I could with my sprained ankle, and just
managed to catch sight of him and put in a shot
at 40 yards as he was going over a mound. Down
he went with a hit in the hindquarters, but just
managed to pull out of sight with the aid of his
front legs. We trailed him for some distance but
all to no avail.
Hardly had we got going again when Cliff spotted
a great stag with three on each top looking our
way. I have no doubt at all that he could have
raised his rife and shot what was probably a
world-class Sika head but instead, with the
sportsmanship so typical of this man, he turned
and motioned to Charlie to take the shot.
Unfortunately, before Charlie could get into
position to see the stag it had vanished with the
ghost-like ability so characteristic of the Sika.
There can be no doubt about it, these Sika stags
in prime make a Red stag seem a fool.
Soon we ran out of the herd, so we stopped and
had lunch beside a stream before returning. One
roared only, something like a Red (no whistle)
so I wished to see him. He proved to be a typical
black faced little fellow, so we left him standing
and no doubt wondering what he saw.
The time was now getting on, so we made our
way back to the saddle near which Cliff shot an
8-pointer which proved to be too young for a
good trophy. Just how many deer we saw that
day I havent a clue, but it was as Cliff had told
me, there were no Reds in Jap Valley. In the
course of our long bush ramblings we disturbed
both species, but it was easy to tell the two
apart. When it was Reds, we saw their yellow
patches disappearing; when it was Sika their
bobbing fannies were snow-white, for they lift
the hairs of the white part into a dish-sized circle
when disturbed. At no time did we fnd Reds and
Sika together, for they each formed into their own
little groups.
The next day, April 16th, dawned fne, and Cliff
left early for Jap Valley to take photographs.
As my foot was swollen and painful, I stayed in
camp and cleaned up the skulls of Cliffs two
Sika heads. Later I left for a ramble on my own,
fnding my way to a little clearing where I found
six cast antlerstwo from Sika. No doubt many
more could be found there.
On returning back to camp I found that Cliff had
arrived before me with two more Sika heads.
One was another motor-bike variety, this time
complete with hand-grips! The other head
was much better and won for Cliff a second
place in the Waikato Branch NZDA competition.
Unfortunately the head missed the right trey
tine, and the left trey
was almost incorporated
in the tops - a common
characteristic of the Sika.
Although we were
supposed to return the
following day, we decided
to leave camp at daybreak
for another trip to Jap
Valley. There we found the
herd had moved further
away and were more
cautious. However, after a
while Cliff got them bugling. While he was taking
a photo of a young buck from 50 yards back I
saw a 7-pointer spying on him while he focussed
his camera. Then a good bugler close-by had
Charlie stalking in his socks, his boots in the bag.
However, the buck came up very close to him
on the lee side in thick pepperwood, winded him
and bolted, but not before Charlie had spotted his
3-point top!
We continued on, by-passing a small dark
coloured young buck which stood and looked at
us as we passed (so foolish at that age), until we
came close to two bugling bucks. As I started
to stalk them a doe got in my way, but Cliff kept
her interested while I worked back and around
to work into the wind to get closer to the further
stag. As he had the innertop missing I left him
and was coming, back, to see the other when I
met him and the doe making off. I thought the
head not up to standard so let him go too.
On returning back to Cliff he told me he thought
he saw three on top and advised me to have a
further look. I duly, took off, and when within a
short distance of the two animals the doe got
in my way, forcing me to take refuge behind
a konini tree. Here she unknowingly kept me
stranded while Cliff and Charlie, seeing my
predicament, skirted around and gave Charlie an
opportunity of dropping the stag from across the
creek.
It was an 8-point head, but unfortunately it
had a brow tine missing. However, seeing that
it was Charlies frst Sika head we persuaded
him to take it home. He eventually won second
place with it at the Auckland Branch of the
Deerstalkers Association competition.
Proceeding further down the valley we heard
another good bugle.
Cliff kept him interested while I circled in; only
to have a very tricky wind give me away when I
was very close. Later we saw several does, also
I caught sight of a dark young 6-pointer; but only
a glimpse of a dark red body and a black and
white stern.
We reached camp that night just as the sun
was setting in all its golden glory, fooding the
beautiful wild valley with a molten mist. So, too,
was the sun setting on our stalk, for this was our
last day in Jap Valley.
To think it over now brings back nostalgic
memories - of the smell of the forest; the tinkle
of the bush streams; the roar of the waterfall;
the chorus of bird song; and the telegraph-pole
sized beech trees displacing old manuka - an
ever expanding forest. And lastly, of companions
staunch and true!
jap valley
B y N o r m a n D o u g l a s , ( f o u n d e r o f t h e D o u g l a s S c o r e s y s t e m )
O r i g i n a l l y p u b l i s h e d i n N Z D A s a n n u a l p u b l i c a t i o n T h e R o a r , V o l 3 , M a r c h 1 9 5 7
BLAST FROM THE PAST
The story of a hunt in a secret valley where the Jap still holds its own.
The other members of the hunting party
with their trophies
Norman Douglas with his Sika stag
35 NZ Hunting & Wildlife 172 - Autumn 2011 NZ Hunting & Wildlife 172 - Autumn 2011 34
GrannIe OlIves
reCIpes
Eels (a recipe I inherited from my mother).
They taste much like whitebait.
My father would catch the eel then skin, gut and chop it into
pieces before giving it to my mother to cook.
She would put the pieces of eel into a pot, cover it with water
and put the pot on the back of the stove to cook slowly. When
the eels were cooked, the pot was put on the kitchen sink bench
to cool overnight. Next morning using two forks she would
remove the cooked fesh from the bones.
Mother would then roll the eel fesh into a ready made egg
batter, add a dash of salt and fry as you would any other fritter.
The Kapiti Coast Meats butcher, (Stuart, who is also a hunter)
says he always puts the eel bones into a pot and covers them
with water to make a soup. He throws in anything else, ie
carrots, veges etc. This would be very healthy too.
Stuart is going to get me two eels in due course and I will
experiment with the eel soup and let you know the recipe that
comes to the fore.
Deer kIDneys
Have the frying pan sizzling hot with oil, butter or fat.
Finely slice the kidneys and place into pan with a dash of salt
and black pepper.
Cook one side for a few seconds, then turn over, moving the
kidney slices around the pan so as not to stick.
Serve and eat at once.
This recipe will also work for deer heart and
liver.
Back at home I stuff hearts with
traditional stuffng and slowly bake in
the oven keeping the lid on the roasting
dish until cooked.
Good cooking
Grannie Olive
Photo taken by Max Pudney of
Grannie Olive, as she would
like to be known.
THE STALkERS TABLE
N E L S O N B R A N C H
2 0 1 0 S W A Z I
S H O O T
The Nelson Branch ran its Swazi shoot at the end
of last year and put almost thirty young shooters,
(male and female) through their paces. The shoot
entailed 20 rounds at 100 metres using deer targets with
fring from prone, sitting and standing positions. A shoot off was required
to confrm that female shooters can more than hold their own.
SWAZI JUNIOR SHOOTS
Orders & payment should be posted to:
NZDA, PO Box 6514, Marion Square,
Wellington, 6141
Under the terms of the Privacy Act 1993, I acknowledge
that you are retaining my name for the purpose of mailing
further information on NZDA and related matters.
FUNDRAISER
NZDA has produced 100 Limited Edition
B&W Unframed Prints
(to Fit a 16 X 20 frame with matting board)

Money raised from the sale of prints will be managed by the National
Association to provide funds for research projects. NZDA has commissioned
further prints in this big game series, which will also be available as limited
editions. Te original pencil drawings were created by Wellington artist,
Alan Patterson.
Please send me ___ prints @ $75.00 each including post & packaging
I have enclosed my cheque for $ _____________________
Name: _________________________________________
Address: ________________________________________
Email: _________________________________
Phone: _____________________________
Chamois Bull Tahr
Roaring Red Wapiti
Editors note:
While many game food harvesters may eat the heart, liver and
kidneys, the NZ Food Safety Authoritys advice on eating offal is:
The heart is usually safe to eat. Never eat the liver or kidneys and
dont feed them to your pets. These organs flter poisons from the
body and concentrate them. These poisons may make you very sick or
could kill your dog if you use them for dog tucker.
R O T O R U A B R A N C H S W A Z I
S H O O T A U G U S T 1 8 T H 2 0 1 0
On a cold wet totally miserable afternoon, six young men and their dads
turned up for our annual Swazi shoot. Placings: Grant Piper 1st; Mitchel
Peterson 2nd; Cameron Slade 3rd; Josh Lee 4th. Grant and Mitchel received
Swazi prizes. The two younger ones had their day also; Cameron Russell
shot the highest score for the day and his mate Patrick put up a credible
performance also.
37 NZ Hunting & Wildlife 172 - Autumn 2011 NZ Hunting & Wildlife 172 - Autumn 2011 36
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John with his light box and camera recording
the glass slides
Some time ago, when David Hodder was on the
national executive he brought the John (Jack)
Forbes photographic glass slide collection to
Wellington. This came about after a Mr E W
Atkinson of Rangiora prevailed upon his Uncle,
Mr Frank Eade who received the slides after the
death of John Forbes, to let him have the slides
so that they could be delivered into a safe haven.
The collection of 320 slides date from C 1912,
come in ffteen different sizes and are an
irreplaceable and valuable historic record of
the history of deerstalking in New Zealand. The
slides depict mountain scenes, campsites and
magnifcent trophy heads; but one slide that
caught my eye was that of a live stag with its
antlers caught in a fax bush. Some of the slides
are in a stereo format. Despite their age they
are in very good condition, but being only one
millimetre thick glass, are very fragile and will
not stand too much handling.
John Forbes of Christchurch was one of our
greatest deerstalkers, (as told in Graeme
Robsons book, Following the Sons of
Invermark (2008)). It is understood that Forbes
was a representative for Healings, the cycle
wholesalers and each year he took extended
leave to hunt for his trophies in the wild country
of Otago and Westland amongst the wild herd of
British indigenous Red deer gifted to the Otago
Province by the Earl of Dalhousie in 1870 from
his estate in Invermark.
During 2010 I volunteered to become a
cataloguer for the NZDA Heritage Trust and one
of my frst tasks was to fnd a away to digitize
the Forbes collection. Unfortunately the trust
does not have a magic lantern to be able to
show the slides, so digitizing is our only
option. Every now and again a magic lantern
does become available on the internet auctions
but sell for a few thousand dollars.
Trying to fnd ways to record the slides was not
an easy task, however after a lot of trial and
error I found a suitable solution. By making a
light box and placing a slide onto it I am able
to photograph the slide with a digital camera
and download the photo to a computer. Once the
work has been completed the photos will then
be burnt onto a CD or DVD.
I consider it a privilege to be able to work with
our heritage and to help to make our history
more available to our future deerstalkers.
The boxes that the slides arrived in
An example of an original slide The result of a slide after digitizing. Photo taken
by John Forbes of a 19-point Red shot by Archie
Kitto, C 1920, (possibly the Hunter Valley)
jOhn FOrBes
phOTOGraphIC
Glass slIDe
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39 NZ Hunting & Wildlife 172 - Autumn 2011 NZ Hunting & Wildlife 172 - Autumn 2011 38
PLACES TO HUNT
FeaTures:
A total area of approximately 347,000 hectares
of conservation estate is currently available for
open hunting in Otago, and many other areas
are available for restricted hunting. In addition,
more conservation areas will become available
as new conservation lands are gazetted
through the ongoing Pastoral Lease Tenure
Review process. Wild animal populations
in Otago are generally at low to moderate
levels. This is largely the result of extensive
commercial helicopter hunting for deer,
chamois and tahr, particularly in the western
mountains. In addition, the department has
undertaken sustained goat control in all areas
since 1990 and maintains a tahr buffer zone
between the Haast Highway and the Fiordland
National Park. Regardless of overall levels,
however, good localised hunting opportunities
exist among many diverse landscapes.
hunTInG In MOunT aspIrInG
naTIOnal park - wakaTIpu
area:
All of the following areas are part of Mt
Aspiring National Park, and are administered
from the Wakatipu Area Offce: phone 03 442,
7933 fax 03 442 7932; Cavells Building, 1
Arthurs Point Road, Queenstown 9371 or P O
Box 811, Queenstown 9348.
Beans Burn and Rock Burn:
Takes in the Beans Burn and Rock Burn
catchments, and is bordered by the Dart River
and the Humboldt Mountains north to Poseidon
(2208m), Niobe (2204m) and Tantalus Peak
(1951m). Comprises beech forested valleys
and terraces with subalpine and alpine
vegetation on the tops. Although there is no
hut in the Beans Burn there is a rock bivvy
near First Flat. Access to the Beans Burn is
usually via the Routeburn-Kinloch Road to
Weka Flat, then by track to Lake Sylvan and
continuing north through open beech terraces
along the Dart to the Rock Burn. There is a
four bunk hut with mattresses and heating
at the mouth of the Rock Burn, Topo50 map
sheet CB10, E1228149, N5042941 (also
known as McIntyres). A bridge crosses an
impressive canyon above the hut. From here,
sidle the hill and follow the Dart River to the
Beans Burn. Alternatively, Dart River Safaris
operate a jet boat service up the Dart in
the summer. This would eliminate any river
crossings and they can drop you at the mouth
of the Beans Burn.
No hunting is allowed in the area bordered
by the Dart River, the Route Burn and Lake
Sylvan due to it being a high use area by
trampers.
The Rock Burn can be popular with trampers
as an alternative from the Routeburn, with
routes leading from the Rock Burn to the
North Routeburn, the Olivine River, and the
Beans Burn. Animal numbers, vegetation
and terrain are similar to those in the Beans
Burn. Like many of the valleys in Mt Aspiring
National Park there are large boulders and
rock overhangs that can be used as shelters.
Access to the Rock Burn is via the Routeburn-
Kinloch Road to either the beginning of the
Lake Sylvan track or to the Routeburn day
shelter and over Sugarloaf Pass.
Routeburn North Branch:
No hunting is allowed in the main Routeburn
Valley as it is a high use tramping area. The
rife bolt must be removed while in the main
Routeburn Valley.
The North Branch is dotted with huge bluffs,
particularly on the true left. Access is via the
Routeburn-Kinloch Road to the Routeburn
shelter. From there, take the Routeburn track
to the Routeburn Flat hut (sleeps 20) where
the North Branch joins the Routeburn.
Rees Valley:
This includes land within MANP, from Lennox
Falls to Black Peak, along the tops of the
Forbes Mountains to Mt Cunningham, then
down the park boundary beside the Rees
River. It includes the Hunter Creek catchment.
Much of the area is subalpine and alpine
vegetation and terrain. Beech forest is
confned to the lower slopes of Hunter Creek
and Cattle Slip faces, alongside the Rees
River. Access is via the Rees Valley Road to
the Muddy Creek car park. The Rees Track
provides access up the valley. Huts in the
area include Earnslaw Hut, Topo50 map sheet
CA10, E1238883, N5048944 (basic hut
sleeps 4/heating) near Lennox Creek, with a
rock bivvy further upstream.
Upper Dart:
This area takes in the Upper Dart catchment
and valley north of Daleys Flat Hut, up to Mt
Ansted and Cascade Saddle, and across to
the tops of the Barrier Range. Beech forest
is confned to the terraces and lower slopes
in the mid-section of the valley, with the
catchment head predominantly sub-alpine
and alpine vegetation. The Dart Track follows
the Dart River and crosses into the Rees from
above Dart Hut. Another route provides access
via Cascade Saddle into the West Matukituki.
The area is popular with trampers taking in
the Dart-Rees circuit. Dart Hut, Topo50 map
sheet CA10, E1246716, N5060574 (sleeps 32,
heating and mattresses), is at the foot of Mt
Cunningham and Daleys Flat Hut, Topo50 map
sheet CA10, E1232582, N5056824 (sleeps 20,
heating and mattresses supplied) is midway up
the Dart valley. Access is by air, jet boat or on
foot up the Dart Valley.
Arawhata:
This is a very large area taking in part of
the Arawhata catchment that lies within
Mt Aspiring National Park. It includes the
Joe River, the Five Fingers Range, and the
Olivine Range. As well as the major peaks and
alpine zone, terrain includes some very large
grassy fats. Most of the area lies within the
Wilderness Zone, and as such there are no
huts, tracks or bridges and no aircraft landings
are permitted. As it is on the western side of
the main divide it has typical Fiordland/West
Coast weather and vegetation. Hunters are
asked to report any tahr sightings in this area
as it is part of the southern exclusion zone, a
buffer zone protecting Fiordland National Park
from tahr ingress.
Barrier:
This is mountainous terrain in the western
reaches of Mt Aspiring National Park, bordered
by the Barrier Range and the Olivine Range
in the east and includes the Forgotten River
and the headwaters of the Barrier and Pyke
Rivers. All of the area falls within the Parks
Wilderness Zone. Access can be gained
from the eastern side by walking overland
for a number of days, or via Te Anau and the
Hollyford and Pyke Rivers. There are no huts,
tracks or bridges, providing a truly remote
experience. This area is also on the western
side of the main divide, so experiences
Fiordland/West Coast climate and vegetation
conditions.
hunTInG In The wakaTIpu
reGIOn
The Wakatipu area comprises a large area of Otagos western mountains. It includes a range of
ecosystems, such as the beech forests of Mt Aspiring National Park and the Caples and Greenstone
Valleys, the shrublands of the Remarkables and Hector Mountains and the extensive tussock lands of the
Richardson Mountains and Shotover district. Hunting areas are spread throughout the Wakatipu region.
Hunting & Fishing New Zealand vouchers
Published stories* in this magazine will now receive Hunting & Fishing New
Zealand vouchers to be redeemed at any of their 30 stores throughout the
country from Kaitaia to Invercargill
You can use your voucher to buy the knife youve always wanted, to update your outdoor
wardrobe, or to bring the price down on a heavy duty purchase.
Note: vouchers cannot be used on purchases of frearms, ammo & licences.
Vouchers - the perfect excuse to visit your outdoor store - again!!
NOTE - we are moving into the 21st century - if possible, please send your stories on disk or email them to
the editor. Slides and prints are still preferred over emailed images, to ensure quality reproduction
* Vouchers will not be awarded in sections that ofer other prizes eg Beginners Luck
Write a story and WIN
hunTInG OuTsIDe MOunT
aspIrInG naTIOnal park -
wakaTIpu area
Upper Shotover Conservation Area
(9356ha):
Takes in the northern Richardson Mountains
and includes the headwaters of the Upper
Shotover from Mt Bowyang, north along the
tops to Mt Ferguson at 2484m, Centaur Peaks
at 2525m and Lochnagar at 2542m. On the
northern boundary it joins Mt Aspiring National
Park near Mt Tindall. The area lies above
1000m and comprises subalpine and alpine
vegetation with extensive bluffs. It includes
the headwaters of the Glencairn, Sixty-mile
and Lochnagar Creeks. Access is mainly by
air from the Matukituki Valley, or by foot via
the Rees Valley or Branches Station; the latter
requires landowner permission. The river
valleys are pastoral lease land and no hunting
is allowed.
Black Peak Conservation Area (2650 ha):
Covers the northern headwaters of the
Shotover River, the Shiel Burn tops and the
Polnoon Burn tops. Very mountainous terrain
with high peaks, alpine benches and extensive,
steep bluffs. Vegetation is alpine and
subalpine. Access is generally by air from the
north via the Matukituki Valley. Foot access
is available via the Leaping Burn (permission
required from the owners of Matukituki
Station). Foot access to the Shiel Burn and
Polnoon Burn tops can be gained through
Branches Station in the Shotover Valley
(landowner permission required).
Ballarat Creek Conservation Area (600ha):
Adjoins Mt Aurum Recreation Reserve and
covers a series of ridges running into Ballarat
Creek and the Flood Burn. Ballarat Hut is on
a terrace approximately a third of the way up
Ballarat Creek, but is an historic hut and not
for overnight use. Access is via The Branches
Road to the confuence of the Flood Burn and
the Shotover River.
Lower Dart (4600ha):
Covers the broad expanse of the Lower Dart
Valley from Bride Peaks and Mt Head down to
Mt Earnslaw (2820m) and the mouth of the
Beansburn. Terrain and vegetation covers
the full montage of snow tussock, red, silver,
and mountain beech forest, and sub-alpine
and alpine tops. There is a moratorium on
shooting whitetail deer between Chinamans
Bluff and the Earnslaw Burn, and Mt Alfred.
There is a 20 bunk hut with heating and
mattresses at Daleys Flat, Topo50 map sheet
CA10, E1232582, N5056824 in the Dart Valley
(hut tickets required). Access to this area is via
the Glenorchy-Paradise Road.
The Slip Stream area is adjacent to the lower Dart
on the true right and includes Slip Stream and the
Cosmos Peaks areas. No access is allowed into
this sacred area without a special permit.
41 NZ Hunting & Wildlife 172 - Autumn 2011 NZ Hunting & Wildlife 172 - Autumn 2011 40
Title: Atlas of Rare Birds
Author: Dominic Couzens
Publisher: New Holland, UK
ISBN: 9781847735355
RRP: $69.99
Format: Hardcover, colour pictures, maps
and information
Reviewed by: Hilda Frampton
A bird lover would fnd this book a rich
encounter with rarity. Sad to say, humans
are the main offenders of this cause.
Even if they have been guilty of liberating
pests of prey, loss of habitat, diminishing
food sources, climate change and black
market racketeers all contribute to the
ecological disaster that is encroaching
into the wildlife kingdom.
However, the real enthusiast will fnd
the comments and photography an eye
pleasing pastime. This is a valuable
resource of intriguing and sometimes
comical behaviours, of the beautiful
plumage and the striking companionship
with the photographer. There are maps
giving the exact distribution of the birds
and in a wider comparison to the rest of
the world.
The author has seriously consulted
history right through to the threat of
extinction. Successful trapping and
relocation regimes have in many cases
prolonged the life and helped some bird
species back from the brink, although this
can come at a high price, a feather in the
cap for the dedicated ornithologists.
This book is a must if you enjoy reading
about the rare birds of the earth and
appreciate great photography.
B
O
O
k
Title: SPOT X - Gamebird Hunting New Zealand
Author: Mark Airey
Publisher: Spot X Publications Ltd
ISBN: 9781877374617
RRP: $44.99
Format: Soft cover, 295mm x 210mm, colour
photos and topomaps
Reviewed by: Alby Frampton
Gamebird hunting spots dont come any easier
unless like me and many other enthusiasts you
have that private and personal friendship with a
farmer or landowner. Browsing through these pages
I recognised some well-known locations, but never
envisaged the number that is accessible throughout
the country. It makes one want to tackle a few more
local spots, but having said that, why gallop off to
new pastures when youve already got a good one?
For a new chum to gamebird hunting, especially
outside of ducks I found the information informative
and valuable. The research done to put this book
together was a great idea and as its only the 1st
edition so makes you wonder what extras the 2nd
edition will cover.
This book provides notes from North Cape to Bluff
and the variety of gamebirds are all given mention;
where to go and how to get there then X marks the
spot.
There is important coverage of frearm safety and
the approach to landowners. Not only is this book
an investment that should be on the bookshelves of
local hunters but also on the shelves of all hunters
caravans and shooting rigs. Even more so for those
who spend a lot of time cruising the islands hunting
during the seasons and for those hunters who are
retired and still hunting and cruising.
Hunters are not always willing to share good posies
and this book has done it for you. Go get them.
B
O
O
k
Title: Best Short Nature Walks in New Zealand
Author: Peter Janssen
Publisher: New Holland
ISBN: 978186966288-2
Format: 243 x 167mm, 224 pages, soft cover,
coloured and black and white photos plus location
maps.
Reviewed by: Trevor Dyke
The arrival of Best Short Nature Walks in New
Zealand could not have been better timed. Having only
moved to Wellington a few months ago I turned to the
section that covers the Wellington and Wairarapa region.
I soon discovered that there are thirteen walks scattered
throughout the region, some of which my wife and I
have already visited with our grandchildren. We have
already earmarked future walks to do.
There are over 200 walks listed in the book covering
the whole of New Zealand. Each walk has the point of
interest described; graded as easy, medium or hard;
how to get to parking area with a description of the road
and route; and the time to allow for the walk, based on
a leisurely pace. Some useful tips about equipment,
shoes, jackets, security, using mobile phones, sandfies,
giardia and watching wildlife is also covered.
A general description accompanies each walk and any
features along with nature notes so that you can identify
some of the countrys fora and fauna. Also some route
directions are provided where needed.
Best Short Nature Walks in New Zealand is written in
an easy style. Descriptions are brief with information on
each walk only taking two or three minutes to read. The
size of the book is small enough to keep in the car or
place in your day pack to refer to on your walk. I for one
will be purchasing a copy to keep in the car.
This book compliments Peter Janssens other books,
Excellent Short Walks in the North Island and
Excellent Short Walks in the South Island and
more recently, Touring the Natural Wonders of New
Zealand.
B
O
O
k
REVIEWS POETRY
I heard you from my camp one eve
As darkness settled down
I knew that I must hunt you
And gaze upon your crown
You roared at dawn next morning
To challenge for your hinds
And soon the call repeated
By others of your kind
I said that I will stalk you
Through all these forest lands
Where hills and glens can hide you
From Haast up to the Franz
I chased you over river fats
Or waited in the snow
You always had the next move planned
And knew just where to go
Through glasses I have watched you
When a distant shot was heard
You ran your does to safety
Proud guardian of the herd
Sometimes I give up with despair
You seem to outwit man
And then I see you in a gorge
On shale or shingle fan
Ive seen you in near summer
In early sunny dawn
Just browsing midst the tussocks
Or watching playful fawn
You seem to know just where to graze
Or where the grass is green
A patch of sweet snow lichen
By the shady mountain stream
And when the Gods are angry
The lightning rips and jags
You stand high on the ramparts
Defance from the crags
For days on end Ive missed you
When other stags have run
I hope you are no victim
Of an airborne hunters gun
But now my time is getting short
Ill have to hitch my pack
I hope the Gods protect you
For next year Ill be back
So if you think youve beaten me
This seems to be your right
Youll know that you were close to me
I had you in my sights
I pray that if somewhere, sometime
I hear your mating call
I hope the monarch that you are
You never have to fall
sTaG rOyal
By the late Bill Ross, an old West Coaster
43 NZ Hunting & Wildlife 172 - Autumn 2011 NZ Hunting & Wildlife 172 - Autumn 2011 42
POINTS OF ENVY
wInnInG heaDs FrOM
The 2010 COMpeTITIOns
Three heads will
feature i n each of
the next i ssues of
NZ Hunti ng and Wil dli fe.
ClIFF Marshall MeMOrIal TrOphy sIka Deer
Wi n n e r : D i o n P a t t e r s o n , Wa i k a t o B r a n c h . D S : 1 6 0
We tramped for several hours into the Waimarino, then dropped our overnight gear to continue hunting. Around midday I gave a roar and was answered by
the Sika stag which then proceeded to crash in.
MCCOnaChIe shIelD ChaMOIs
Wi n n e r : V e r n P e a r s o n , T a u p o B r a n c h . D S : 2 7
I spotted a chamois through breaks in the fog and tried a shot at 360 metres and to my surprise got it. When I got to it I discovered that the chamois was
bigger than I thought making me very happy.
The seDDOn shIelD russIa Deer
Wi n n e r : D a v i d C o o mb e , T h a n e s v a l l e y B r a n c h . D S 1 6 7
TrevOr Chappell TrOphy wIlD sheep
Wi n n e r : J i mmy S h a n d , N o r t h O t a g o B r a n c h . D S 7 8
While hunting down Dogs Den Bush I spotted the ram on a bluff about 250 metres up from the river. I managed to get within 150 metres to take him.
NZ Hunting & Wildlife 172 - Autumn 2011 NZ Hunting & Wildlife 172 - Autumn 2011 44 45
January 2011
Sunday Monday TueSday WedneSday ThurSday Friday SaTurday
30


nra northland
Champs, Whangarei.
nZda north island.
Benchrest, Kaitoke.
31
nZda north island
Benchrest, Kaitoke.
1
new years day
nZCT new year Shoot,
rotorua.
Mountains to the Sea art
exhibition, nelson starts.
2
nZCT new year Shoot,
rotorua.
Kids Fishing day, hauhora.
nra Southern hawkes Bay
Championships, Cheltenham.
3 4
new years holiday
5 6 7 8
WSra Service
Challenge, Trentham.
nra 300m nationals,
Trentham/Seddon.
9
Kaikohe a&P Show.
Charles upham Memorial
Shoot, Masterton.
nra 300m nationals,
Trentham/Seddon.
10
Charles upham Memorial
Shoot, Trentham.
WSra Service Challenge,
Trentham.
11
nra teams north/South
islands, Trentham
12
last day payment haast
block system, 4pm.
nra Champs, Trentham.
13
nra Champs, Trentham
14
nra Champs, Trentham
15
unclaimed haast blocks
available from 9am,
03 750 0809.
nra Champs, Trentham.
16
Taranaki a&P Show.
Paeroa a&P Show.
Wairoa a&P Show.
17
Castlepoint Fishing
Competition.
Taranaki a&P Show.
Wairoa a&P Show.
18
Southland anniversary
19
nra oceania Games,
Trentham
20
nra oceania Games,
Trentham
21 22
23

dargaville hunting, Shooting
& Fishing Show, Kaipara.
Tauranga a&P Show.
horowhenua a&P Show.
24

Tauranga a&P Show.
horowhenua a&P Show.
25


Wellington anniversary
26 27



28 29

nZda north island.
Benchrest, Kaitoke
the way it used to be...
The combatants photographed by Fred Gillespie
2011 Calendar
Please send me ________ the way it used to be... heritage A4 sepia tone
calendar(s) @ $7.50 each including post & packaging
I have enclosed my cheque for $ ________________
Name: ______________________________________________________
Address: _____________________________________________________
Email: _______________________________________________________
Phone: ___________________________________
ORDERS & PAYMENT SHOULD BE POSTED TO:
NZDA, PO Box 6514, Marion Square, Wellington, 6141
UNDER THE TERMS OF THE PRIVACY ACT 1993, I ACKNOWLEDGE THAT
YOU ARE RETAINING MY NAME FOR THE PURPOSE OF MAILING FURTHER
INFORMATION ON NZDA AND RELATED MATTERS.
the way it used to be...
NZDA 2011 Calendar
. . . historical photographs from the
glory days of hunting, featuring old
huts, dated camp scenes, bringing
home the trophies by horse pack, big
Red stags, Wapiti bulls and memories
of the 1975 Save our tahr campaign.
Features NZDA, sporting clay and
NZSR championship shooting dates,
militaria auctions, pig hunts, A&P
shows, hunting ballot dates, national
competition close off dates, and most
important WORLD RUGBY CUP MATCH
SCHEDULES.
January 2011
Sunday Monday TueSday WedneSday ThurSday Friday SaTurday
30


nra northland
Champs, Whangarei.
nZda north island.
Benchrest, Kaitoke.
31
nZda north island
Benchrest, Kaitoke.
1
new years day
nZCT new year Shoot,
rotorua.
Mountains to the Sea art
exhibition, nelson starts.
2
nZCT new year Shoot,
rotorua.
Kids Fishing day, hauhora.
nra Southern hawkes Bay
Championships, Cheltenham.
3 4
new years holiday
5 6 7 8
WSra Service
Challenge, Trentham.
nra 300m nationals,
Trentham/Seddon.
9
Kaikohe a&P Show.
Charles upham Memorial
Shoot, Masterton.
nra 300m nationals,
Trentham/Seddon.
10
Charles upham Memorial
Shoot, Trentham.
WSra Service Challenge,
Trentham.
11
nra teams north/South
islands, Trentham
12
last day payment haast
block system, 4pm.
nra Champs, Trentham.
13
nra Champs, Trentham
14
nra Champs, Trentham
15
unclaimed haast blocks
available from 9am,
03 750 0809.
nra Champs, Trentham.
16
Taranaki a&P Show.
Paeroa a&P Show.
Wairoa a&P Show.
17
Castlepoint Fishing
Competition.
Taranaki a&P Show.
Wairoa a&P Show.
18
Southland anniversary
19
nra oceania Games,
Trentham
20
nra oceania Games,
Trentham
21 22
23

dargaville hunting, Shooting
& Fishing Show, Kaipara.
Tauranga a&P Show.
horowhenua a&P Show.
24

Tauranga a&P Show.
horowhenua a&P Show.
25


Wellington anniversary
26 27



28 29

nZda north island.
Benchrest, Kaitoke
nOrTh IslanD BenChresT
ChaMpIOnshIps - january 2011
B y P e t e r H a x e l l , A u c k l a n d B r a n c h
ON TARGET
North Island Benchrest Championships - January 2011
Competitor Match 1 2 3 4 5 Agg Place Agg Place
105 Peter Haxell LV100 0.287 0.130 0.192 0.175 0.204 0.1976 1 LVGRAND 0.2357 1
LV200 0.470 0.465 0.508 0.845 0.449 0.2737 1
HV100 0.229 0.362 0.366 0.145 0.245 0.2694 1 HVGRAND 0.2998 1
HV200 0.680 0.656 0.520 0.549 0.896 0.3301 1 2GUN 0.2677 1

102 Malcolm Perry LV100 0.347 0.309 0.223 0.238 0.274 0.2782 4 LVGRAND 0.3232 2
LV200 0.455 0.997 0.701 0.541 0.987 0.3681 2
HV100 0.240 0.548 0.266 0.379 0.357 0.3580 4 HVGRAND 0.3644 2
HV200 0.800 0.751 0.648 0.922 0.587 0.3708 2 2GUN 0.3438 2

104 Mike Peacock LV100 0.307 0.277 0.258 0.290 0.190 0.2644 3 LVGRAND 0.3257 3
LV200 0.803 0.795 0.434 0.841 0.996 0.3869 4
HV100 0.422 0.369 0.236 0.383 0.377 0.3574 3 HVGRAND 0.3806 3
HV200 0.861 0.675 0.412 1.373 0.716 0.4037 4 2GUN 0.3531 3
The 2011 North Island Benchrest
Championships were hosted by the Hutt
Valley Branch on their Kaitoke range over the
weekend 28/29/30 January.
Conditions on the Friday were quite nice
but after that it was all down hill. Saturday
morning was decidedly awful and Malcolm
Perry reported trees down on the access road.
Fortunately, the farmers amongst us had the
appropriate tools to clear the road and the boys
combined efforts cleared it so we could get
to the range. We were greeted with horizontal
rain and howling gales. Needless to say, not the
best for shooting small groups. In fact, trying
to get a couple of bullets to touch proved an
interesting endeavour.

We were joined by four new shooters, two
from the outskirts of Wellington who shot both
the 200 yardages. Another drove down from
Palmerston North to have a look at what we do
and came equipped with a very nice .222 bench
rife that was originally owned by Lynn Harris.
He shot some of Lynns loads which came with
the rife at some 100m targets and did pretty
well for a beginner. Hopefully the seed has been
sown. Many thanks to those who made the
effort to attend.

Sincere thanks to Maurice Subritzky for
organising the shoot and his wife Margaret for
the nice roast dinner on Sunday night. Thanks
also to the target crew who did a wonderful job
on the 200m yardages with not one mistake.

Many thanks also to Malcolm for staying on-site
to look after our gear and play security guard.
I speak for everyone in saying that it was very
much appreciated.
2011 CALENDARS
NOW $7.50ea
47 NZ Hunting & Wildlife 172 - Autumn 2011 NZ Hunting & Wildlife 172 - Autumn 2011 46
AJ Productions ................................................................................. 23
Animal Skin Tanning Services Ltd ................................... 48
Barnaul .................................................................................................. 29
Great Lake Tannery & Expiditer ......................................... 12
Gunworks Canterbury ............................................................... 39
Hunting & Fishing NZ ....................................................... 27, 40
Kilwell Sports Ltd ............................ 19, Inside Back Cover
Lecia, Lacklands Ltd ................................................................. 27
Lowa ........................................................................................................ 31
Mana Charters ............................................................................... 12
Nicholas Taylor, Barrister ....................................................... 48
NZ Ammunition Company ...................................................... 39
NZ Deerstalkers Association ..................................... 13, 36
New Zealand Police .............................................................. 8, 14
Steve Barclay Taxidermy ............................................................. 9
Swazi Apparel .................................................. 37, Back Cover
Target Products (1978) Ltd .......................................... 37, 43
Wapiti Bull limited edition print offer .......................... 36
Zeiss ................................................................. Inside Front Cover
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NZ Hunting & Wildlife 172 - Autumn 2011 48