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SILK INDUSTRY

CONTENTS

Silk in India Silk what Silk why Silk where Types of Silk Life cycle of Silkworms Silk in an Animal Sericulture Top ten Cocoons Regional office central Silk board Mumbai List of library books

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SILK IN INDIA
Silk, known as "Paat" in Eastern India, Pattu in southern parts of India and Resham in Hindi/Urdu (from Persian), has a long history in India. Recent archaeological discoveries in Harappa and Chanhu-daro suggest that sericulture, employing wild silk threads from native silkworm species, existed in South Asia during the time of the Indus Valley Civilisation, roughly contemporaneous with the earliest known silk use in China. Silk is widely produced today. India is the second largest producer of Silk after China. A majority of the silk in India is produced in Karnataka State, particularly in Mysore and the North Bangalore regions of Muddenahalli, Kanivenarayanapura, and Doddaballapur. India is also the largest consumer of silk in the world. The tradition of wearing silk sarees in marriages by the brides is followed in southern parts of India. Silk is worn by people as a symbol of royalty while attending functions and during festivals. Historically silk was used by the upper classes, while cotton was used by the poorer classes. Today silk is mainly used in Bhoodhan Pochampally (also known as Silk City), Kanchipuram, Dharmavaram, Mysore, etc. in South India and Banaras in the North for manufacturing garments and sarees. "Murshidabad silk", famous from historical times, is mainly produced in Malda and Murshidabad district of West Bengal and woven with hand looms in Birbhum and Murshidabad district. Another place famous for production of silk is Bhagalpur. The silk from Kanchi is particularly well-known for its classic designs and enduring quality. The silk is traditionally hand-woven and hand-dyed and usually also has silver threads woven into the cloth. Most of this silk is used to make saris. The saris usually are very expensive and vibrant in color. Garments made from silk form an integral part of Indian weddings and other celebrations. In the northeastern state of Assam, three different types of silk are produced, collectively called Assam silk: Muga, Eri and Pat silk. Muga, the golden silk, and Eri are produced by silkworms that are native only to Assam. The heritage of silk rearing and weaving is very old and continues today especially with the production of Muga and Pat riha and mekhela chador, the three-piece silk saris woven with traditional motifs. Mysore Silk Sarees, which are known for their soft texture, last many years if carefully maintained. SILK - WHAT? Man is always inquisitive for silk products. SILK - The Queen of Textiles, spells luxury, elegance, class and comfort. Mankind has always loved this shimmering fibre of unparalleled grandeur from the moment Chinese Empress Shiling Ti discovered it in her tea cup. It withstood many a daunting challenges from other natural and artificial fibres and yet, remained the undisputed Queen of Textiles since centuries. Exquisite qualities

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like the natural sheen, inherent affinity for dyes and vibrant colours, high absorbance, light weight, resilience and excellent drape etc. have made silk, the irresistible and inevitable companion of the eve, all over the world. Chemically speaking, silk is made of proteins secreted in the fluid state by a caterpillar, popularly known as 'silkworm'. These silkworms feed on the selected food plants and spin cocoons as a 'protective shell' to perpetuate the life. Silkworm has four stages in its life cycle viz., egg, caterpillar, pupa and moth. Man interferes this life cycle at the cocoon stage to obtain the silk, a continuous filament of commercial importance, used in weaving of the dream fabric. SILK - WHY? Silk is a high value but low volume product accounting for only 0.2 % of world's total textile production. Silk production is regarded as an important tool for economic development of a country as it is a labour intensive and high income generating industry that churns out value added products of economic importance. The developing countries rely on it for employment generation, especially in rural sector and also as a means to earn the foreign exchange. SILK - WHERE? Geographically, Asia is the main producer of silk in the world and produces over 95 % of the total global output. Though there are over 40 countries on the world map of silk, bulk of it is produced in China and India, followed by Japan, Brazil and Korea. China is the leading supplier of silk to the world with an annual production of 153942 MT (2006).Out of Which the Mulberry raw silk product is 115092 MT. India is the second largest producer of silk with 18475 MT (200607) and also the largest consumer of silk in the world. It has a strong tradition and culture bound domestic market of silk. In India, mulberry silk is produced mainly in the states of Karnataka, Andhra Pradesh, Tamil Nadu, Jammu & Kashmir and West Bengal, while the non-mulberry silks are produced in Jharkhand, Chattisgarh, Orissa and north-eastern states.

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SILK TYPES

There are five major types of silk of commercial importance, obtained from different species of silkworms which in turn feed on a number of food plants. These are: Mulberry Tasar Muga Eri

Except mulberry, other varieties of silks are generally termed as non-mulberry silks. India has the unique distinction of producing all these commercial varieties of silk.

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Mulberry: The bulk of the commercial silk produced in the world comes from this variety and often silk generally refers to mulberry silk. Mulberry silk comes from the silkworm, Bombyx mori L. which solely feeds on the leaves of mulberry plant. These silkworms are completely domesticated and reared indoors. In India, the major mulberry silk producing states are Karnataka, Andhra Pradesh, West Bengal, Tamil Nadu and Jammu & Kashmir which together accounts for 92 % of country's total mulberry raw silk production.

Tasar:
Tasar (Tussah) is copperish colour, coarse silk mainly used for furnishings and interiors. It is less lustrous than mulberry silk, but has its own feel and appeal. Tasar silk is generated by the silkworm, Antheraea mylitta which mainly thrive on the food plants Asan and Arjun. The rearings are conducted in nature on the trees in the open. In India, tasar silk is mainly produced in the states of Jharkhand, Chattisgarh and Orissa, besides Maharashtra, West Bengal and Andhra Pradesh. Tasar culture is the main stay for many a tribal community in India.

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Oak Tasar It is a finer variety of tasar generated by the silkworm, Antheraea proyeli J. in India which feed on natural food plants of oak, found in abundance in the sub-Himalayan belt of India covering the states of Manipur, Himachal Pradesh, Uttar Pradesh, Assam, Meghalaya and Jammu & Kashmir. China is the major producer of oak tasar in the world and this comes from another silkworm which is known as Antheraea pernyi.

Eri:
Also known as Endi or Errandi, Eri is a multivoltine silk spun from open-ended cocoons, unlike other varieties of silk. Eri silk is the product of the domesticated silkworm, Philosamia ricini that feeds mainly on castor leaves. Ericulture is a household activity practiced mainly for protein rich pupae, a delicacy for the tribal. Resultantly, the eri cocoons are open-mouthed and are spun. The silk is used indigenously for preparation of chaddars (wraps) for own use by these tribals.
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In India, this culture is practiced mainly in the north-eastern states and Assam. It is also found in Bihar, West Bengal and Orissa.

Muga: This golden yellow colour silk is prerogative of India and the pride of Assam state. It is obtained from semi-domesticated multivoltine silkworm, Antheraea assamensis. These silkworms feed on the aromatic leaves of Som and Soalu plants and are reared on trees similar to that of tasar. Muga culture is specific to the state of Assam and an integral part of the tradition and culture of that state. The muga silk, an high value product is used in products like sarees, mekhalas, chaddars, etc.
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LYFE CYCLE OF SILKWARMS 47 DAYS

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PROCEDURE OF SILK MAKING

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SILK IS AN ANIMAL
Silk is an animal protein fiber produced by certain insects to build their cocoons and webs. Many different types of silk are produced by a huge variety of different types of insects other than moth caterpillars. Yet none of these have been exploited for commercial purposes, though there has been basic research into the structures of such silks. Silk is most commonly produced by larvae, and thus largely limited to insects with complete metamorphosis. In some instances, however, it is produced by adult insects such as web spinners. Silk production is especially common in the Hymenoptera (bees, wasps, and ants), and is sometimes used in nest construction. Other types of arthropod produce silk, most notably various arachnids such as spiders. The silk produced by other insects, mainly spiders, is used in a small number of other commercial applications, for example weapons, telescopes, and other optical instruments. The commercial process of silk making is highly complex and labour intensive. The following will provide basic information on how silk is made. [For general silk information, please visit About Silk Fabric, which covers various related subjects, such as Silk Care & Cleaning, Benefits of Silk, and Chinese Silk History.

Sericulture Hatching the Eggs The Feeding Period Spinning the Cocoon Reeling the Filament Types of Silk

Sericulture
Cultivation of the silkworm is known as sericulture. Although many insects produce silk, only the filament produced by Bombyx mori, the mulberry silk moth and a few others in the same genus, is used by the commercial silk industry. [The silkworm is, technically, not a worm but a moth pupa. For the sake of simplicity and consistency, however, we will use the term silkworm throughout this writing.

Hatching the Eggs


The first stage of silk production is the laying of silkworm eggs, in a controlled environment such as an aluminum box, which are then examined to ensure they are free from disease. The female deposits 300 to 400 eggs at a time.
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In an area the size of your monitor screen, 100 moths would deposit some 40,000 eggs, each Page 13 about the size of a pinhead. The female dies almost immediately after depositing the eggs and the male lives only a short time after. The adult possesses rudimentary mouthparts and does not eat during the short period of its mature existence.

Silk, one of the oldest fibers known to man, originated in China. The history of silk is both enchanting and illustrious. Following sections cover the various facets of silk history.

The Legend
According to well-established Chinese legend, Empress Hsi Ling Shi, wife of Emperor Huang Ti (also called the Yellow Emperor), was the first person to accidentally discover silk as weavable fiber. One day, when the empress was sipping tea under a mulberry tree, a cocoon fell into her cup and began to unravel. The empress became so enamored with the shimmering threads, she discovered their source, the Bombyx mori silkworm found in the white mulberry. The empress soon developed sericulture, the cultivation of silkworms, and invented the reel and loom. Thus began the history of silk. Whether or not the legend is accurate, it is certain that the earliest surviving references to silk history and production place it in China; and that for nearly 3 millennia, the Chinese had a global monopoly on silk production.

The Silk Road


Though first reserved for Chinese royalty, silk spread gradually through the Chinese culture both geographically and socially. From there, silken garments began to reach regions throughout Asia. Silk rapidly became a popular luxury fabric in the many areas accessible to Chinese merchants, because of its texture and luster. Demand for this exotic fabric eventually created the lucrative trade route now known as the Silk Road, taking silk westward and bringing gold, silver and wools to the East. It was named the Silk Road after its most valuable commodity silk was considered even more precious than gold! Clearly, a basic understanding of silk history would not be complete without understanding the crucial role played by the Silk Road in its global trade and introduction to the world outside of China. The Silk Road was some 4,000 miles long stretching from Eastern China to the Mediterranean Sea. A caravan tract, the Silk Road followed the Great Wall of China to the north-west, bypassing the Takla Makan desert, climbing the Pamir mountain range, crossing modern-day Afghanistan and going on to the Levant, with a major trading market in Damascus. From there, the merchandise was shipped across the Mediterranean Sea. Few people traveled the entire route; goods were handled mostly by a series of middlemen.

A Well-kept Secret
The Chinese realized the value of the beautiful material they were producing and kept its secret safe from the rest of the world for more than 30 centuries. Travelers were searched thoroughly at border crossings and anyone caught trying to smuggle eggs, cocoons or silkworms out of the
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country were summarily executed. Thus, under penalty of death, the mystery of sericulture remained a well-kept secret for almost three thousand years.

Sericulture Spreads into Asia and Europe


With the mulberry silk moth native to China, the Chinese had a monopoly on the world's silk production until about BCE 200 when Korea saw the emergence of its own silk industry thanks to a handful of Chinese immigrants who had settled there. By about CE 300, sericulture had spread into India, Japan, and Persia thus making silk a part of the history of these cultures. The Roman Empire knew of and traded in silk. Despite its popularity, however, the secret of silk-making was only to reach Europe around CE 550, via the Byzantine Empire. According to a legend well enshrined in silk history, monks working for the emperor Justinian smuggled silkworm eggs to Constantinople in hollow bamboo walking canes. The Byzantines were as secretive as the Chinese, and for many centuries the weaving and trading of silk fabric was a strict imperial monopoly. In the seventh century, the Arabs conquered Persia, capturing their magnificent silks in the process. Sericulture and silk weaving thus spread through Africa, Sicily, and Spain as the Arabs swept through these lands. Andalusia was Europe's main silk-producing center in the tenth century. By the 13th century, however, Italy had gained dominance and entered the hall of fame in silk history. Venetian merchants traded extensively in silk and encouraged silk growers to settle in Italy. By the 13th century, Italian silk was a significant source of trade. Even now, silk processed (finished, dyed, printed) in the province of Como enjoys an esteemed reputation. Italian silk was so popular in Europe that Francis I of France invited Italian silkmakers to France to create a French silk industry, especially in Lyon. By the 17th century France was challenging Italy's leadership, and the silk looms established in the Lyons area at that time are still famous today for the unique beauty of their weaving. In Medieval Europe, silk was used only by the nobility.

Sericulture Today
The nineteenth century and industrialization saw the downfall of the European silk industry. Cheaper Japanese silk, especially driven by the opening of the Suez Canal, was one of the many factors driving the trend. Additionally, advent of manmade fiber, such as nylon, started to dominate traditionally silk products such as stockings and parachutes. The two world wars, which interrupted the supply of raw material from Japan, also stifled the European silk industry. After the Second World War, Japan's silk production was restored, with improved production and quality of raw silk. Japan was to remain the world's biggest producer of raw silk, and practically the only major exporter of raw silk, until the 1970s. China gradually re-captured her position as the world's biggest producer and exporter of raw silk and silk yarn proving that the history of silk follows its own boomerang principles.
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Today, around 125,000 metric tons of silk is produced in the world. Almost two thirds of that production takes place in China. The other major producers are India, Japan, Korea, Thailand, Vietnam, Uzbekistan, and Brazil. United States is by far the largest importer of silk products today.
Acknowledgemen t: Facts about silk history in this writing have been borrowed from various sources such as Wikipedia and Encyclopaedia Brittanica . Please visit All About Silk for further information about silk.

TOP 10 COCOONS
Top Ten Cocoons (Reelable) Producers 2005 Country Production (Int $1000) Footnote Production (1000 kg) Footnote

People's Republic of 978,013 China India Uzbekistan Brazil Iran Thailand Vietnam 259,679 57,332 37,097 20,235 16,862 10,117

C C C C C C C C C C

290,003 77,000 17,000 11,000 6,000 5,000 3,000 1,500 1,000 600

F F F F F F F F F F

Democratic People's 5,059 Republic of Korea Romania Japan 3,372 2,023

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REGIONAL OFFICE CENTRAL SILK BOARD MUMBAI - 400 021.


1. --Particulars of the organization, functions and duties:

Consequent to the shifting of Central Silk Board Headquarter from Mumbai to Bangalore in the year 1981, Govt. of India had taken the decision to set up a Regional Office to look after the development of silk industry including export in the western region. The Regional Office is attached with a Certification Centre (C.C) providing services to the export community as also looks after the activities of Silk Mark Organisation of India (SMOI) forth promotion of Silk Mark in Western region. Thus the Regional Office is functioning in Mumbai for the past 25 years. This Regional Office is currently located at 16, Mittal Chambers, Nariman Point, Mumbai-400 021. Tel.No. 22020 326 - Direct 22020 330 General Fax No. 022 22020 329 E-mail csbro_mum@yahoo.com

The duties and responsibilities of this Regional Office includes a) To look after development of sericulture / silk industry in the States of Maharashtra, Gujarat and Goa. b) To provide Technical coordination to the Directorate of Sericulture of the respective States.

c) To liaison with various Central and State Govt. agencies. d) To provide export services to the Trade.
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e) To provide voluntary quality inspection of silk goods meant for export and domestic Trade. f) To provide testing facilities to the Custom drawn samples from export / import shipments. g) To provide quantitative and qualitative analytical reports of commercial / Trade samples tendered by exporters / importers. h) To issue GSP (Generalised System of Preferences) certificates, Certificates of Origin, Handloom / Handicrafts certificates for silk consignments exported from the country. i) Collection of inspection fee / service charge under the voluntary quality inspection scheme. j) Entrepreneur guidance to aspiring silk exporters. k) To promote Silk Mark Scheme under SMOI in the western zone l) To extent PR / Protocol services. m) To maintain and service the real estate under its control.

2. Powers and duties of its Officers and Staff Members. 2.1 Shri T.D. Koshy, Deputy Director (Insp.)
The Regional Office of CSB, Mumbai is presently headed by Deputy Director (Insp.) who is also the Officer-in-charge and Drawing & DisbursingOfficer. The senior most DD(I) also discharges his duties as the SeniorExecutive of the Silk Mark Organisation of India (SMOI).

A. Financial Powers.
1) Repairs and maintenance of buildings - Rs. 5,000.00 for single work order per annum. 2) Maintenance upkeep and repairs of - Rs. 5,000.00 equipments, computers, furnitures. 3) Purchase of stationary per year. - Rs. 5,000.00 4) Publicity materials per year - Rs. 5,000.00

5) Purchase of chemicals / disinfectants - Rs. 5,000.00 6) Purchase of library books / journals - Rs. 2,000.00 per year.
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7) Statutory payment like municipal rates, - Full powers for current taxes and insurance. payment except in case of enhancement/newrate.

8) Payment towards water and electricity - Rs. 5,000.00 per annum. 9) Payment towards Telephone and internet - Rs. 5,000.00 10) Payment towards postage - Rs. 5,000.00 11) Miscellaneous expenditure not listed above - Rs. 500.00 per case.

B. Administrative Powers:
a) To be the head of the office b) To supervise and maintain the general discipline and ensure smooth functioning of the office. c) To maintain Bank Account and act as the Drawing and Disbursing Officer for all payments including wages pertaining to this office. d) To attest entries in cash book. e) To certify the Service Books of employees under his fold. f) To authenticate leave account / leave travel concession, etc. g) To implement all policy decisions taken by the Board and conveyed through the Member Secretary, Central Silk Board in respect of his jurisdiction. h) To liaison and coordinate between various Govt. agencies, Director of Sericulture. i) To act as the Member-Convener of the State Level Sericulture Coordination Committee (SLSCC). j) To sanction tour programmes of officers and staff as admissible. k) To be the controlling officer for the traveling allowances for the officers and staff working under his fold. l) To provide medical facility to staff and officers as per their entitlements. m) Grant of increment to staff and officers below his rank. n) To grant special pay to cashier. o) To grant Overtime allowance to Driver. p) Initiate action as per disciplinary powers.

2-2 Shri R.B. Tandav, Deputy Director (Insp.)


1. Shri R.B. Tandav, DD(I) will be responsible for the overall supervision of the C.C. and the work related to export services. 2. He will also supervise the work related to promotion of Silk Mark.

2-3 Shri Abul Fazal, Assistant Director (Insp.)


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a) Receipt, issue and maintenance of Account in respect of Silk Mark Hologram and Tags. b) Motivation of prospective Members / AUs. c) Training of Authorised Users. d) Shri Fazal will be responsible for the orderly maintenance of SMOI store material specially Hologram in the Steel Cupboard provided and the key will be kept with him. e) To attend to all C.C. activities as per the daily work allotment. f) Maintenane of Guest Houses, collection of Guest House charges, issue of receipts and upkeep of the Guest House.

2-4 Shri Y. Srinivasa Rao, Assistant Director (Insp.)


a) Shri Rao AD(I) will be responsible for motivation and enrollment of prospective Members / AUs. b) Follow-up with Authorised Users and collecting feed back. c) Servicing of Authorised Users. d) Liaison with AUs / Members and arranging one to one meeting for building up greater rapport. e) Advance planning for Silk Mark Expo and mobilization of maximum participation of AUs. from all over India. f) Suggesting innovative ideas in respect of overall conduct of Expo and engaging wider sponsorship. g) To attend to all C.C. activities as per the daily work allotment. 2-5 Shri Alok Kumar, Assistant Director (Insp.) a) Membership, AU registration and renewals also maintenance of respective registers. b) General correspondence on Silk Mark. c) Handling of Silk Mark materials (except hologram) received from Central Office and its management. d) Creation of new publicity materials with innovative ideas. e) Computerization of core SMOI records. f) Maintenance of lists / information related to industry, Trade / Govt. Deptts. For ready access in short notice. g) Event management including Expo. h) Generate ideas / proposals for organizing events on special occasions and organizing awareness programme. i) To attend to all C.C. activities as per the daily work allotment.

2-6 Shri K. Mathivanan, Assistant Director (Insp.)


a) Shri Mathivanan, AD(I) will be responsible for motivation of AUs, survey and feed back from traders and consumers.
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b) Conduct discrete surveillance on AUs working and labeling of Silk Mark products. c) Creating innovative ideas in Silk Mark tagging / labeling. d) New ideas on Silk Mark publicity / promotion. e) To attend to all C.C. activities as per the daily work allotment.

2-7 Smt. M. Bhatnagar, Assistant Director (Eco.).


a) Attend to all work pertaining to collection, dissemination of Statistics in respect of sericulture, export, import, etc. b) Attend to all Publicity and Public Relation matters including that of Silk Mark scheme. c) Work relating to implementation of Official Language. d) Maintenance of Computer Section, AMC of Computer equipments. e) Maintenance of Library. f) Attend to Income Tax files. g) Smt. Bhatnagar will also function as the Convener of the Staff Quarters Coordination Committee . h) Maintenance and upkeep of the Regional Office premises. 2-8 Shri Anup Kumar Biswas, Assistant Superintendent. a) Shri Anup Kumar Biswas, Asstt. Supdt. will be the overall incharge of Administration, Accounts and Establishment Section. b) All files emanating from the above sections will be routed through him before submission to the Officer incharge.

c) Shri Biswas will look after the maintenance of FAS / PRS package and will oversee the timely dispatch of all Accounts statements, returns clarifications meant for Central Office. Smt. M. Bhuvaneshwari, him in this. d) Attend to all legal / Establishment matters including Court cases. e) Shri A.K. Biswas will be responsible for matters relating to both Internal and A.G. Audit as also follow-up matters arising out of the Audit Report. f) Assisting the officer incharge in the smooth functioning of the office.

LDCwill assist

2-9 Shri D.S. Tiwari, Assistant Superintendent (Tech.)


a) Attend to all matters relating to development of sericulture industry. b) Timely dispatch of Technical reports, progress reports, etc. c) Attend to all work relating to SLSCC and other meetings.
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d) Co-ordination / liaison work with departments of Mantralaya and other agencies including HOCL for supply of formaldehyde to other stations / States on request. e) Protocol work as and when required. f) Maintenance of GSLIS in respect of outstation units.

2-10 Smt. S.D. Bangera, Reporter.


a) Attend to dictation of Officer-incharge. b) Attend to all Establishment Section work. c) Attend to all Co-ordination work. d) Maintenance of Personal files of Officers and staff. e) Maintenance of Office Order, Office Circular and General correspondence received from Central Office and other offices in respect of Establishment, Co-ordination and General Administration. f) Maintenance of Attendance Registers, leave accounts, regulating shift duty of Chowkidars. g) Attend to diary work. h) Smt. Bangera will route her files through Shri A.K. Biswas, Asstt. Supdt. 2-11 Shri A.B. Balapure, Assistant a) Shri Balapure will attend to work of the Office Cashier. b) Attend to all AMC files excluding Computer & C.C. Section. c) Maintenance of CSB Staff quarters at Juhu (CPWD matters). d) Maintenance of CSB flats 16 & 62 at Mittal Chambers including timely payment of maintenance charges and other dues to the Society. e) Allotment of CSB Staff quarters. f) Maintenance of files in respect of ISEPC. g) Maintenance of office vehicle file. h) Maintenance of re-locating of Regional Office file. i) Maintenance of Internal Audit & A.G. Audit files. j) Maintenance of livery file. k) Circulars received from C.O. / Ministry in respect of tenders / purchase norms and procedures. l) Maintenance of Asset Register. m) All matters relating to appointment and maintenance of AMA and maintenance of files in respect of Nanavati Hospital under Tie-up agreement. n) Medical facilities and Medical claims. o) Shri Balapure will route his files through the Asstt.Supdt.

2-12 Smt. Bharati S. Kadam, UDC.


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a) Attend to Reception / receiving telephone calls and extending courtesy to visitors. b) Maintenance and upkeep of Telephone connections, equipments. c) Attend to all CC files and all work relating to CC & SMOI. d) Attend to registration of voluntary inspection application / TCOD, collection of inspection fee, Tariff Certificate fee, issue of money receipt, remittance of timely fee collection to the Cashier. e) Collection of Service Tax and its remittance. f) Maintenance of all other CC records, registers. g) AMC in respect of Lab equipments including Avery Weighing balance. h) Attend to maintenance of files correspondence and diary in respect of SMOI. i) Attend to purchase, issue and maintenance of Store materials and stationery materials and its records. j) Attend to dispatch work and stamp accounts. k) Routine typing (English and Hindi). l) Smt. B.S. Kadam will route files through Shri Biswas, Asstt. Supdt. In respect of Stores and Stationery as also dispatch and stamp account before submitting to the officer-incharge. All other files will be routed through Shri R.B. Tandav, DD(I).

2-13 Smt. Bhuvaneshwari A. Kolar, LDC.


a) Smt. Bhuvaneshwari A. Kolar, LDC will assist in the maintenance of FAS / PRS system. She will attend to the day-today feeding of the data and will ensure timely submission of reports, statements meant for Central Office as per the prescribed schedule. b) Attend to LTC claims. c) Attend to T.A. bills including T.A. claims of inspection officials in respect of day today visit to E.P. d) Attend to routine typing work. e) Smt. Bhuvaneshwari will route her files through Shri A.K. Biswas, Asstt. Supdt.

2-14 Shri A.M. Pathan, Staff Car Driver.


a) To function as Staff Car Driver. b) Upkeep of office vehicle. c) Maintenance of log book and mileage / fuel details. d) Collection of oil / fuel bill for submission of payment. e) To ensure fitness of vehicle. f) To report malfunctioning / repair work of vehicle. g) Payment of Road Tax, insurance and other b ills pertaining to vehicle.

3. Procedure followed in the decision making process, including


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channels of supervision and accountability.


The Regional Office Act on the programmes and policies formulated andcommunicated by the Chief Executive Officer and Member Secretary of theCSB, Bangalore. Therefore the decision making norms for the RegionalOffice, Mumbai is spelt out as follows:

a) All Policy decisions are decided by the CSB Headquarters. b) Decisions of routine matters and issues which are delegated to the Regional Office are taken by the Head of the Regional Office according to his financial & administrative powers. While, the overall general supervision rest with the Officer-Incharge, the various sections are supervised and managed by the respective section heads.

4. Norms set by the Regional Office for the discharge of its functions.
The Regional Office and its departments / sections work under the clear guidelines set under the work allotment issued from time to time by the Officer-incharge. Schedule and deadlines are fixed for all the routine reports/ returns meant for Central Office and various offices.

5. Rules, Regulations, Instructions, manuals and records held by it or under its control or used by its employees for discharging its functions.
a) Voluntary quality inspection manual b) QAP Manual under Silk Mark. c) Swamys Hand Book d) Swamys Master Manual for DDOs and Head of Office. e) General Financial Rules. f) Swamys Compilation of Medical Attendance Rules. g) Swamys Compilation of F.R.S.R Leave Rules.

6. A Statement of Categories of documents that are held by it or under its control.


a) Lease Agreements of Regional Office premises (old premises at Meghdoot). b) Authorised User agreement under Silk Mark Scheme.
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7. The particulars of any arrangement that exists in consultation with or representation by the members of the public in relation to the formulationof its policy or implementation thereof.
None.

8. A statement of the Boards, Councils, Committees and other bodiesconsisting of 2 or more persons constituted as its part or for thepurpose of its advice, and as to whether meetings of these Boards,Councils, Committees and other bodies are open to the public, orthe minutes of such meetings are accessible to the public.

State Level Sericulture Co-ordination Committee (SLSCC)


Is constituted with members from sericulturists, reelers and NGOs apart fromGovt. officials to formulate the policies and programmes of sericulturedevelopment in the State of Maharashtra. This Committee meets thrice in ayear and the minutes of the meeting has been circulated to the Members. Theminutes can also be accessible to the general public on demand.

11. Budget allocation to each of its agency indicating the particularsof all plans, proposed expenditure and reports on disbursementmade. ______________________________________________________
The Regional Office, CSB , Mumbai is fully supported by grants-in-aidreceived from Central Office from time to time. This grants consists of establishment and maintenance cost of the Regional Office including salaryto its employees. There is no system in place at present wherein budgets are allotted to agencies for any developmental plans directly by the Regional Office. 12. The manner of execution of subsidy programmes, including the amounts allocated and the details of beneficiaries of such programmes.

______________________________________________________ Not applicable.


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13. Particulars of receipts of concessions, permits or authorization granted by it. ______________________________________________________ NIL 14. Details in respect of information, available to or held by it, reduced in an electronic form.

The following details are held by this office which are available in electronic form:
a) Directory of silk exporters of Mumbai region. b) Directory of Silk Mark Authorised Users. c) Directory of boutiques dealing with silk in Mumbai. d) Directory of silk retailers / wholesalers of natural silk goods exported through Certification Centre, Mumbai. e) Statistical Biennial in respect of silk industry.

15. The particulars of facilities available to Citizens for obtaining information including the working hours of library or reading room if maintained for public use. ________________________________________________________
a) The facility of Testing Lab available to Trade / public. b) The list of library books annexed (Annexure-I). b) The library is opened to any interested person / general public who like to access information data on silk industry. The timing for the general public is from 11.00 a.m. to 4.00 p.m.

16. Name, designation and other particulars of Public Information Officer.


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______________________________________________________
Shri T.D. Koshy, Deputy Director (Insp.) is appointed as Assistant Public Information Officer of the Regional Office, CSB, Mumbai.

17. Such other information as may be prescribed and thereafter update the publications every year. ____________________________________________________
All information given under 1 to 16 above encompass all vital information in respect of the Regional Office, CSB, Mumbai. However, thefollowing publications will be updated and incorporated from time to time:a) Salary of employees. b) Directory of exporters. c) Directory of Authorised Users. d) Export Statistics.

LIST OF LIBRARY BOOKS


S.NO,Name of the Book Author 1 FAO Manual of Sericulture FAO Agri.Servi. Bulle.&FAO of UN 2 International Journal of Wild Silkmoth & Silk Intl society for Wild Silkmoths & CSB 3 Seri Business Manual CSB, Bangalore 4 Silk Weaving (translated from Chinese) Compiled by Zhejiang Silk Engg.Institute, China 5 Silkworm Breeding (translated from Japanese) Eikichi Hiratsuka 6 Fiber Science & Technology (translated from Japanase) Akira Nakamura 7 Structure of Silk Yarn (translated from Japanese) Nobumasa Hojo 8 Protection of Mulberry Plants (translated from Chinese) Chief editor-Huang Erlian 9 Development Physiology of Silkworms(trans.Japanese) S.Morohoshi 10 Silk Dyeing & finishing Handbook(trans.Chinese) Complied by Shanghai Muni.Silk Ind.Corpn.,China 11 ISO 9000 Brian Rothery 12 Ultimate Visual Dictionary Dorling Kindersley(DK) 13 Compendium of Textile Statistics - 1998 Office of the Textile Commissioner 14 Mulberry Silk Reeling Technology D.Mahadevappa, V.G.Halliyal, D.G.Shankar, Ravindra Bhandiwad 15 Silk Production & Export Management T.D.Koshy 16 Textile Fibres Dr.V.A. Shenai 17 Principles of Textile Testing J.E. Booth
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18 Global Silk Industry R.K.Datta & Mahesh Nanavati 19 Muga Silk Industry Director Of Seri. Govt.of Assam 20 Basics of Textiles& Visual Inspection System Textile Committee 21 Glimpses of World Cotton The East India Cotton Association Ltd., Mumbai 22 Demand & Supply prospects for High Quality Raw Silk Gopal Naik, K.R. Babu 23 Econometric Modelling of the Indian Silk Industry Gopal Naik, Santhoshkumar Singh, Nalini Govind 24 Manual on Silkworm Eggs Production Dr.M.N.Narasimana 25 Directory of Exporters & Manufacturers of Silk Goods in India CSB, Bangalore 26 Asimov's Chronology of Science & Discovry ISAAC ASIMOV 27 A Guide for Cultivation & Protection of Important Crops Dr.M. Puttarudriah 28 Marketing Management S.A. Sherlekar 29 Handbook of Pesticides Small Industry Research Institute, Delhi

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