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Delta II GPS IIR-9 Media Kit

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Mars Exploration Rover-B Media Kit


This site requires a JavaScript-enabled browser and uses Flash for both animation and navigation. To get the full benefit of the Boeing Web Site, you will need to download and install the latest version of the Flash player, then return to view the MER-B site. You can still view a non-Flash web page by clicking on the links below. Delta Launch Videos MER-B Mission Information Photos Extra Links

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Delta Mission Information

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Backgrounders
Boeing Delta II Space Launch Complex 17 MER-B Fact Sheet

Mission Details
Boeing Delta II Launches Opportunity Sending Second NASA Rover to Mars Boeing and NASA Scrub Delta II Launch of MER-B "Opportunity" Second Mars Rover Ready for Launch Aboard Boeing Delta II MER-B Media Kit cover Science Objective MER Will Follow the Water Science Instruments MER Roams the Red Planet Spacecraft Cruise Configuration Mission Description Flight Mode Description: Boost Phase Boost Profile Boost Sequence of Events Flight Mode Description Second and Third Stage Flight Mode Description Second and Third Stage (cont.) Second and Third Stage Flight Profile Second and Third Stage Sequence of Events MER-B Orbit Trace ( 93-deg Azimuth) MER-B Orbit Trace (99-deg Azimuth) Launch Decal

Delta Launch Vehicle


Delta II 7925-9.5 Launch Vehicle Delta II 7925H-9.5 and MER-B

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Delta launch video web page

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Delta II Rocks!

Delta II Rolls!!

NASA Video of Mars Exploration Rovers

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Delta II Photo Gallery

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Preparing for Launch


Technicians make final preparations to NASAs Mars Exploration Rover-B vehicle, named Opportunity, before its integration into the aeroshell that will protect it during its trip to Mars. Opportunity, scheduled for launch on June 28 from Space Launch Complex 17B, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla., will land on Mars on Jan. 25, 2004. Workers at Space Launch Complex Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, position two of the nine solid rocket systems into place before being ma Delta II 7925H-9.5, or Delta II Heav vehicle. The Alliant Techsystems 64 diameter stretched boosters will be NASAs Mars Exploration Rover-B scheduled for launch on June 28.

The Delta II 7925H-9.5, or Delta II Heavy launch vehicle configuration, is shown shrouded by the mobile service tower at Space Launch Complex 17B, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla. The rocket will launch NASAs Mars Exploration Rover-B vehicle, named Opportunity, on June 28. The mission marks the inaugural launch of the Delta II Heavy.

The second stage of the Delta II 79 or Delta II Heavy launch vehicle, is being raised by a crane at Space La Complex 17B, Cape Canaveral Air Station, Fla. The rocket is schedule launch NASAs Mars Exploration Ro vehicle, named Opportunity, on Jun AJ10-118K second stage is develop Aerojet, and has contributed to the the Delta II.

NASAs Mars Exploration Rover-B vehicle, named Opportunity, scheduled for launch on June 28 from Space Launch Complex 17B, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla., is shown being raised by a crane to be placed on top of the Delta II 7925H-9.5, or Delta II Heavy launch vehicle. Opportunity is the second of two rover missions to Mars being launched by Delta II rockets in 2003 for NASA.

Opportunity, also known as Mars E Rover-B, is shown being integrated fairing of the Delta II 7925H-9.5, or Heavy launch vehicle, at Space Lau Complex 17B, Cape Canaveral Air Station, Fla. The launch, scheduled 28, is the first launch of the Delta II and will deploy Opportunity approxi minutes after liftoff.

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Mars Exploration Rover-B Photo Gallery

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Mars Exploration RoverB Opportunity

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NASA Photo Technicians make final preparations to NASAs Mars Exploration Rover-B vehicle, named Opportunity, before its

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Mars Exploration Rover-B Photo Gallery

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integration into the aeroshell that will protect it during its trip to Mars. Opportunity, scheduled for launch on June 28 from Space Launch Complex 17B, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla., will land on Mars on Jan. 25, 2004.

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Mars Exploration Rover-B Photo Gallery

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Alliant Techsystems Stretched Booster

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NASA Photo

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Mars Exploration Rover-B Photo Gallery

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Workers at Space Launch Complex 17B, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla., position two of the nine solid rocket booster systems into place before being mated to the Delta II 7925H-9.5, or Delta II Heavy launch vehicle. The Alliant Techsystems 64-inch-diameter stretched boosters will be used for NASAs Mars Exploration Rover-B mission, scheduled for launch on June 28.

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Mars Exploration Rover-B Photo Gallery

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Delta II in Mobile Service Tower

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NASA Photo

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Mars Exploration Rover-B Photo Gallery

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The Delta II 7925H-9.5, or Delta II Heavy launch vehicle configuration, is shown shrouded by the mobile service tower at Space Launch Complex 17B, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla. The rocket will launch NASAs Mars Exploration Rover-B vehicle, named Opportunity, on June 28. The mission marks the inaugural launch of the Delta II Heavy.

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Mars Exploration Rover-B Photo Gallery

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Aerojet AJ10-118K Second Stage

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NASA Photo

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Mars Exploration Rover-B Photo Gallery

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The second stage of the Delta II 7925H-9.5, or Delta II Heavy launch vehicle, is shown being raised by a crane at Space Launch Complex 17B, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla. The rocket is scheduled to launch NASAs Mars Exploration Rover-B vehicle, named Opportunity, on June 28. The AJ10-118K second stage is developed by Aerojet, and has contributed to the success of the Delta II.

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Mars Exploration Rover-B Photo Gallery

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Mars Exploration RoverB Spacecraft Raised

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NASA Photo

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Mars Exploration Rover-B Photo Gallery

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NASAs Mars Exploration Rover-B vehicle, named Opportunity, scheduled for launch on June 28 from Space Launch Complex 17B, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla., is shown being raised by a crane to be placed on top of the Delta II 7925H-9.5, or Delta II Heavy launch vehicle. Opportunity is the second of two rover missions to Mars being launched by Delta II rockets in 2003 for NASA.

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Mars Exploration Rover-B Photo Gallery

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Mars Exploration RoverB Spacecraft in Fairing

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NASA Photo Opportunity, also known as Mars Exploration Rover-B, is shown being integrated into the fairing of the Delta II 7925H-

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Mars Exploration Rover-B Photo Gallery

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9.5, or Delta II Heavy launch vehicle, at Space Launch Complex 17B, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla. The launch, scheduled for June 28, is the first launch of the Delta II Heavy and will deploy Opportunity approximately 80 minutes after liftoff.

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Mars Exploration Rover B


Delta Launch Vehicle Programs

MER Science Objective


The big science question for the Mars Exploration Rover (MER) missions is how past water activity on Mars has influenced the planets environment over time and whether or not the past environment was suitable for life. While there is no liquid water on the surface of Mars today, the record of past water activity on Mars can be found in the rocks, minerals, and geologic landforms, particularly in those that can only form in the presence of water.

MER Will Follow the Water


The MER rovers will offer unique contributions in pursuit of the overall Mars science strategy to Follow the Water. Understanding the history of water on Mars is important to meeting the four science goals of NASAs long-term Mars Exploration Program: Determine whether life ever arose on Mars Characterize the climate of Mars Characterize the geology of Mars Prepare for human exploration

MER Science Instruments


Panoramic camera to image the surface and sky of Mars Miniature Thermal Emission Spectrometer to determine the mineralogy of rocks and soils Mssbauer Spectrometer to study iron-bearing minerals Alpha Particle X-ray Spectrometer to determine elemental chemistry of rocks and soils Microscopic imager that will provide information on the small-scale features of Martian rocks and soils Rock abrasion tool to grind away the surface of rocks, allowing the other instruments to examine their interior Magnet array to reveal clues about dust particle mineralogy and the planets geologic history

MER Roams the Red Planet

http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/mer/

MER Spacecraft Cruise Configuration


Medium Gain Antenna (MGA) Cruise Stage (shown transparent) Low Gain Antenna (LGA) Solar Panels (transparent) Sun Sensor (5 places) Sun Sensor (5 places) Thruster Cluster (2 places)

HRS Radiators (1 of 12) Thruster Cluster (2 places)

RAD Motor (3 places)

Prop Tank (2 places) Lander (stowed) Sun Sensor (5 places) Sun Sensor Electronics Module Star Scanner Cruise Electronics Module (CEM)

Aeroshell (backshell/heatshield; backshell shown transparent)

Delta II 7925H Launch Vehicle


9.5-ft Fairing
Fairing Spacecraft Third-stage Motor

Second Stage

Attach Fitting Spin Table Third-stage Motor Separation Clamp Band

First Stage

Guidance Electronics Second-stage Miniskirt and Support Truss Helium Spheres Nitrogen Sphere Interstage Wiring Tunnel Fuel Tank Centerbody Section First-stage Oxidizer Tank Conical Section Fairing Access Door
Fairing

Thrust Augmentation Solids

MER B Mission Description


Launch period: 25 June to 15 July 2003 Launch times for 25 June First opportunity (93-deg launch azimuth): 00:38:16 EDT 04:38:16 UTC Second opportunity (99-deg launch azimuth): 01:19:19 EDT 05:19:19 UTC Spacecraft mass: 1,077 kg (2,374 lb) Injection conditions for 25 June Altitude: 1,013.9 nmi Velocity: 33,932 fps Mars landing date: 25 January 2004 Landing site: Meridiani Planum, Mars

MER B Flight Mode Description Boost Phase


Launch from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Complex 17B 93- or 99-deg flight azimuth Direct-flight azimuth mode employed (combined pitch/yaw): Eliminates large roll maneuver which orients vehicle Quad II downrange 6 GEM solid motors ignite at liftoff and 3 ignite in the air, after the first 6 have burned out. Boost trajectory designed to meet controllability, structural, and environmental constraints while maximizing performance. Main Engine Cutoff (MECO) occurs at depletion of first-stage propellants, approximately 263 seconds after liftoff. Payload fairing jettison meets free-molecular heating rate requirement of <0.25 Btu/ft2-sec. At SECO-1, vehicle in 90-nmi circular parking orbit.

MER B Boost Profile


Fairing Jettison t = 4 min, 42 sec Alt = 66.3 nmi VI = 21,573 fps Second-Stage Ignition t = 4 min, 31.5 sec Alt = 65.1 nmi VI = 21,525 fps MECO t = 4 min, 23.5 sec Alt = 61.6 nmi VI = 21,512 fps SECO-1 t = 8 min, 47.8 sec Alt = 92.1 nmi VI = 25,604 fps i = 28.5 deg Notes: (1) VI = Inertial Velocity (2) Data are for the 93-deg flight azimuth. Data for 99-deg flight azimuth are similar.

SRM Jettison (3) t = 2 min, 39.5 sec Alt = 36.5 nmi VI = 10,895 fps

SRM Jettison (3/3) t = 1 min, 20.5 sec and 1 min, 21.5 sec Alt = 13.7/13.9 nmi VI = 3,933/3,991 fps

SRM Impact
Liftoff

SRM Impact

MER B Boost Sequence of Events


Event 93-deg Azimuth Time (min/sec) 99-deg Azimuth Time (min/sec)

Liftoff Mach 1 Maximum dynamic pressure Six solid motors burnout Air Lit solid motors ignition (3) Jettison three solid motors Jettison three solid motors Air Lit solid motor burnout Jettison three Air Lit solid motors Main engine cutoff (MECO) Stage I-II separation Stage II ignition Jettison fairing First cutoff Stage II (SECO-1)

0:00 0:29.6 0:38.8 1:16.4 1:19.0 1:20.5 1:21.5 2:35.7 2:39.5 4:23.5 4:31.5 4:37.0 4:42.0 8:47.8

0:00 0:29.6 0:38.8 1:16.4 1:19.0 1:20.5 1:21.5 2:35.7 2:39.5 4:23.5 4:31.5 4:37.0 4:42.0 8:48.4

MER B Flight Mode Description Second and Third Stage


Following SECO-1, vehicle is reoriented to restart burn attitude (meets launch vehicle sun angle requirements). Second stage restarted over Pacific Ocean Mobile telemetry required for coverage of restart and third-stage burns for some days. Third-stage spin-up delayed 50 sec following SECO-2 to permit guidance pointing. Third stage and spacecraft separated 3 sec after spin-up. Third-stage motor ignition 40 sec after spin-up.

MER B Flight Mode Description Second and Third Stage


(Continued)

Third-stage motor burn lasting 87.1 sec injects spacecraft into desired orbit. Yo-Yo de-spin weights deployed 5 sec prior to spacecraft separation. Spacecraft separated 6 min, 15 sec after third-stage ignition over Hawaii/Vandenberg (depending upon launch opportunity). Second stage will perform depletion burn to reduce stages orbital lifetime.

MER B Second- and Third-Stage Flight Profile


SECO-2 72 min, 20.2 sec 87.8 x 2779.9-nmi orbit at 28.5-deg inclination Stage III Ignition 73 min, 50.2 sec Spacecraft Separation 80 min, 5.2 sec

Stage II Restart 70 min, 8.6 sec 86.0 x 97.8-nmi orbit at 28.5-deg inclination

Stage II-III Separation Stage III Burnout (TECO) 73 min, 13.2 sec 75 min, 17.3 sec Targeting Interface Point 83 min, 50.2 sec Hp = 99.6 nmi C3 = 10.3457 km2/sec2 DLA = 2.8813 deg RLA = 340.1184 deg Earth

Note: Values shown are for the 93-deg flight azimuth 25 June 2003 launch date.

MERB Second- and Third-Stage Sequence of Events


Event 93-deg Azimuth 99-deg Azimuth Time (min/sec) Time (min/sec)

Begin maneuver to restart attitude End maneuver to restart attitude Begin thermal roll program End thermal program Stage II restart ignition Second cutoffStage II (SECO-2) Fire spin rockets Stage II-III separation Stage III ignition Stage III NCS enable Stage III burnout (TECO) Deploy Yo-Yo weights NCS disable Spacecraft separation Targeting interface point

11:40.0 15:30.0 16:00.0 68:08.0 70:08.6 72:20.2 73:10.2 73:13.2 73:50.2 73:50.2 75:17.3 80:00.2 80:05.2 83:50.2

11:40.0 15:30.0 16:00.0 64:26.0 67:56.8 70:08.8 70:58.3 71:01.3 71:38.3 71:38.3 73:05.4 77:48.3 77:53.3 81:38.3

MER B Orbit Trace


(25 June 2003 93-deg Azimuth)
DTO Data, Telemetry Station Elevation = 2 deg
Station Identification TEL-4 = Eastern Range Telemetry Station at CCAFS/KSC ANT = Eastern Range Telemetry Station at Antigua KWAJ = U.S. Army Telemetry Station at Kwajalein Atoll P-3 = NP-3D U.S. Navy Telemetry Aircraft ATOL = USAF Deployable Telemetry Station at Johnston Atoll HTS = AFSCN Tracking Station at Hawaii VTS = AFSCN Tracking Station at Vandenberg
VTS 8 TEL4 1 ANT

75N

60N 45N Latitude (deg) 30N 15N 0 15S 30S 45S 60S
1= 2= 3= 4= 5= 6= 7= 8= Legend (time) MECO (4 min, 23.5 sec) SECO-1 (8 min, 47.8 sec) Restart Ign (70 min, 8.6 sec) SECO-2 (72 min, 20.2 sec) Stage-3 Ign (73 min, 50.2 sec) TECO (75 min, 17.3 sec) S/C Sep (80 min, 5.2 sec) Targeting Interface Point (83 min, 50.2 sec)
7

ATOL KWAJ 4

HTS 6 5

3 P-3

75S 160W

100W

40W

20E Longitude (deg)

80E

140E

160W

MER B Orbit Trace


(25 June 2003 99-deg Azimuth)
DTO Data, Telemetry Station Elevation = 2 deg
Station Identification TEL-4 = Eastern Range Telemetry Station at CCAFS/KSC ANT = Eastern Range Telemetry Station at Antigua KWAJ = U.S. Army Telemetry Station at Kwajalein Atoll P-3 = NP-3D U.S. Navy Telemetry Aircraft ATOL = USAF Deployable Telemetry Station at Johnston Atoll HTS = AFSCN Tracking Station at Hawaii VTS = AFSCN Tracking Station at Vandenberg
VTS

75N

60N 45N Latitude (deg) 30N 15N 0 15S 30S 45S 60S
1= 2= 3= 4= 5= 6= 7= 8= Legend (time) MECO (4 min, 23.5 sec) SECO-1 (8 min, 48.4 sec) Restart Ign (67 min, 56.8 sec) SECO-2 (70 min, 08.8 sec) Stage-3 Ign (71 min, 38.3 sec) TECO (73 min, 05.4 sec) S/C Sep (77 min, 53.3 sec) Targeting Interface Point (81 min, 38.3 sec)
7 8

TEL4 1

2 ANT KWAJ 3

ATOL 6 4 P-3 5 HTS

75S 160W

100W

40W

20E Longitude (deg)

80E

140E

160W

Fact Sheet
Integrated Defense Systems P. O. Box 516 St. Louis, MO 63166 www.boeing.com

Boeing Delta II MER-B Mission


Mission: Date: Time: Mars Exploration Rover-B (MER-B) Opportunity June 28, 2003 First Opportunity (93-degree launch azimuth) 11:56:16 p.m. EDT (instantaneous launch window) Second Opportunity (99-degree launch azimuth) 12:37:59 a.m. EDT on June 29 (instantaneous launch window) Launch Site: Space Launch Complex 17B Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla. Boeing Delta II 7925H-9.5 (Delta II Heavy) NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory and Kennedy Space Center MER-B, named Opportunity, is the second of two Mars rovers being launched for NASA by Boeing Delta II launch vehicles in June 2003. The first rover, MER-A, named Spirit, was launched on June 10. Both rovers will land on Mars in 2004; MER-A on Jan. 4; MER-B on Jan. 25. The primary goal of the MER missions is to help scientists determine if life could have existed on Mars based on past water activity on Mars. The rovers will use precision instruments to collect samples of the Martian terrain rocks, minerals and geologic landforms to look for clues of past water activity in the composition of the matter. The missions will help NASA continue its pursuit in understanding the history of water activity on Mars to answer the following questions: Did life ever exist on Mars? What is the climate of Mars? What is the geology of Mars? Can Mars be safely explored by humans?
Contact: Boeing Communications: (714) 896-1301 Boeing Launch Hotline: (714) 896-4770 Boeing Delta Web site: www.boeing.com/delta

Launch Vehicle: Customer: Overview:

Delta links

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Boeing Launch Services Boeing Delta Launch Vehicles NASA MER Website MER Launch Preparation Images NASA Image Website

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