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Supplement to The Delphos Herald

October 2012
Health, Medical & Fitness
2
Health and Medical Tab October 2012
2.0
1.6
1.2
0.8
0.4
0.0
10/8 10/12 10/17 10/22 10/27 11/1 11/6
New York
City
Washington, D.C.
Detroit
Indianapolis
Nashville
Atlanta
Miami
Orlando
New Orleans
Dallas
Houston
Kansas City Denver
Salt Lake City
San Francisco
Los Angeles
Seattle
Portland
Chicago
H L
100s 90s 80s 70s 60s 50s 40s 30s 20s 10s 0s -10s
Rain
Stationary Warm front Cold front
Snow
Minneapolis
Phoenix
REGIONAL FORECAST
Chicago
55/61
Louisville
49/69
Cincinnati
44/65
Richmond
44/61
Columbus
42/63
Cleveland
45/61
Toledo
46/60
Evansville
49/66
Bloomington
46/66
Indianapolis
48/65
Terre Haute
48/63
Fort Wayne
44/60
South Bend
48/60
Lafayette
49/60
Gary
51/60
St. Louis
53/64
Springeld
52/62
Champaign
50/60
Peoria
51/61
Davenport
42/60
Muncie
46/61
Lexington
45/65
TODAY'S INTERNATIONAL FORECAST
TUESDAY TODAY WEDNESDAY THURSDAY FRIDAY
National extremes
Low: -6 at Butte, Mont.
High: 89 at Laredo, Texas
Today
LO HI WEA
Tuesday
LO HI WEA
Today
LO HI WEA
Tuesday
LO HI WEA
NATIONAL FORECAST
Low 50
High 70
Low 48
High 65
Low 52
High 57
Low 34
High 48
Low 31
High 50
ALMANAC
Sunday through 7 p.m. 0
This month through Nov. 6 0.65 0.68
Total this year 40.31 34.99
Precipitation in inches Total Normal Temperature High Low
30-DAY TEMPERATURE HISTORY
30-DAY PRECIPITATION HISTORY IN INCHES
Indiana extremes
Low: 36 at Fort Wayne
High: 65 at Evansville
SUNDAYS
EXTREMES
TODAY'S TEMPERATURES
TODAY'S AIR QUALITY INDEX
TODAY'S POLLEN COUNT
TODAY'S UV INDEX
SUN AND MOON
Moderate Unhealthy
Low Medium High
Low Moderate High
Very unhealthy
Sunrise today 7:20 a.m.
Sunset today 5:37 p.m.
Sunrise Tuesday 7:21 a.m.
Sunset Tuesday 5:36 p.m.
Moon rises today 3:47 p.m.
Moon sets today 4:22 a.m.
Source: www.airnow.com
Source: www.pollen.com
0 10+ 6 2 4 8
0 10 6 2 4 8 12
Sunday 63 41
(2:21 p.m.) (7:37 a.m.)
Normal 57 39
Record 77 20
(in 1975) (in 1982)
80
70
60
50
40
6 9 3 6 6 3 9 12 noon
a.m. a.m. p.m.
Full Last New First
Nov. 10 Nov. 18 Nov. 25 Dec. 2
Very high
MORE ONLINE
For up-to-the-minute weather, go
to IndyStar.com/weather.
Albuquerque 29 53 Rn 29 50 Pc
Anchorage 20 28 Sn 12 22 Pc
Atlanta 43 68 Su 45 69 Su
Atlantic City 42 61 Su 43 62 Su
Baltimore 42 62 Su 46 65 Su
Billings 18 42 Su 23 47 Pc
Birmingham 49 70 Su 53 75 Su
Boise 24 44 Pc 26 47 Pc
Boston 41 61 Su 47 67 Pc
Bowling Green 49 70 Pc 49 70 Ts
Branson, MO 56 65 Ts 58 69 Ts
Buffalo 46 61 Pc 50 62 Pc
Burlington, VT 28 58 Su 38 60 Su
Charleston, SC 54 71 Su 54 71 Pc
Charleston, WV 38 66 Su 42 69 Su
Charlotte 38 67 Su 43 69 Su
Cheyenne 21 37 Cdy 22 37 Su
Chicago 55 61 Cdy 52 66 Rn
Cincinnati 44 65 Pc 46 70 Pc
Cleveland 45 61 Pc 50 65 Pc
Dallas 64 75 Ts 64 77 Ts
Daytona Beach 64 79 Rn 64 79 Rn
Denver 22 40 Cdy 23 36 Sn
Des Moines 35 58 Pc 41 44 Rn
Detroit 48 58 Rn 50 62 Cdy
El Paso 43 66 Pc 38 58 Su
Fairbanks 11 7 Sn -3 -2 Sn
Fargo, ND 30 44 Pc 26 45 Pc
Flagstaff 21 38 Sn 12 42 Su
Fort Myers 62 83 Pc 62 83 Pc
Grand Rapids 50 59 Pc 46 56 Rn
Green Bay 38 54 Su 37 44 Rn
Honolulu 72 84 Su 72 84 Su
Houston 67 81 Cdy 70 83 Ts
Jackson, MS 53 77 Pc 57 81 Pc
Jacksonville 59 73 Rn 60 72 Pc
Juneau 33 40 Rs 31 36 Rs
Kansas City 43 62 Ts 57 59 Ts
Knoxville 40 68 Su 44 72 Su
Las Vegas 44 60 Su 41 60 Pc
Little Rock 57 73 Cdy 61 75 Ts
Los Angeles 48 65 Su 48 68 Su
Louisville 49 69 Pc 54 75 Su
Memphis 55 73 Pc 58 77 Ts
Miami Beach 70 80 Pc 69 81 Pc
Milwaukee 46 55 Pc 46 53 Rn
Minneapolis 32 50 Su 33 43 Rn
Myrtle Beach,SC 50 70 Su 53 71 Pc
Naples 62 80 Pc 62 85 Pc
Nashville 48 70 Pc 50 75 Su
New Orleans 63 78 Pc 65 80 Pc
NewYork City 43 59 Su 46 67 Su
Norfolk, VA 47 65 Su 48 69 Pc
Oklahoma City 58 70 Ts 60 63 Rn
Omaha 31 57 Cdy 40 40 Rs
Orlando 63 81 Rn 63 82 Pc
Pensacola 58 72 Pc 59 76 Cdy
Philadelphia 40 61 Su 43 65 Su
Phoenix 50 63 Rn 45 67 Su
Pittsburgh 38 62 Su 42 65 Su
Portland, OR 41 51 Rn 44 54 Pc
Portland, ME 35 54 Su 42 58 Pc
Providence 39 63 Su 41 65 Su
Raleigh 39 66 Su 44 67 Pc
Rapid City 24 43 Pc 27 46 Cdy
St. Louis 53 64 Ts 55 72 Ts
Sacramento 39 60 Su 38 62 Pc
Saginaw 32 59 Pc 42 58 Cdy
Salt Lake City 30 37 Pc 28 38 Su
San Antonio 69 79 Cdy 67 81 Ts
San Diego 51 66 Pc 53 70 Su
San Francisco 47 60 Pc 46 62 Pc
San Juan, PR 76 86 Ts 76 84 Ts
Santa Fe 28 43 Rn 26 40 Pc
Savannah 53 71 Su 52 73 Pc
Seattle 42 50 Rn 44 51 Cdy
Sioux Falls, SD 25 52 Pc 31 42 Rs
Spokane 25 47 Cdy 29 48 Cdy
St. Thomas, VI 78 85 Ts 78 86 Ts
Tallahassee 52 75 Pc 50 77 Pc
Tampa 60 83 Pc 60 83 Pc
Tucson 46 59 Rn 36 60 Su
Tulsa 59 70 Ts 62 71 Ts
Washington 42 63 Su 44 65 Su
100
80
60
40
20
10/8 10/12 10/17 10/22 10/27 11/1 11/6
HIGH LOW
Amsterdam 48 53 Cdy
Athens 53 67 Su
Baghdad 50 73 Su
Bangkok 81 91 Ts
Beijing 43 54 Cdy
Beirut 57 73 Su
Berlin 42 56 Su
Bermuda 72 76 Cdy
Buenos Aires 63 82 Pc
Cairo 60 78 Su
Cancun 66 81 Pc
Copenhagen 43 50 Pc
Dublin 39 51 Pc
Edmonton 27 38 Pc
Geneva 48 58 Rn
Halifax 41 52 Su
Helsinki 42 47 Rn
Hong Kong 75 81 Ts
Istanbul 47 57 Su
Jerusalem 50 61 Su
Johannesburg 59 79 Su
Kabul 46 64 Pc
London 51 56 Cdy
Madrid 42 63 Rn
Manila 79 88 Ts
Mexico City 52 76 Pc
Montreal 43 57 Pc
Moscow 23 31 Pc
Nairobi 64 79 Ts
Nassau 72 85 Pc
New Delhi 64 86 Su
Oslo 36 41 Pc
Paris 48 52 Cdy
Rio de Janeiro 66 80 Su
Rome 54 68 Rn
Seoul 48 66 Pc
Singapore 77 87 Ts
Stockholm 39 46 Cdy
Sydney 65 81 Ts
Tokyo 56 68 Rn
Toronto 46 62 Pc
Vancouver 39 46 Rn
Vienna 45 54 Pc
Winnipeg 19 37 Sn
Zurich 44 53 Pc
Detroit
48/58
Good
Plan on lots of
clouds today with a
chance of a few
sprinkles or
showers. Despite
the clouds, it will
be mild with highs
in the mid 60s today and around
70 Tuesday.
- Chikage Windler Showers pos-
sible, espe-
cially north
and west
Mostly
cloudy and
warm. Rain
late tonight
Rain likely,
up to 1 inch
possible
Cool and
blustery
Veteran's
Day will be
breezy and
cool
B8 MONDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 2011 1 S T THE INDIANAPOLIS STAR INDYSTAR.COM A B C
weather
Stay up to date
at m.indystar.com
On your mobile device,
check out the latest news
24/7 at m.indystar.com
Get forecasts on
your mobile phone
Text Wand city (WIndianapolis) or
ZIP code (W46206) to 44636 (4INFO)
for latest forecast.
IS-5764572 IS-5764572
NEEDED
AREA RESIDENTS
to try new DIGITAL
Technology in Hearing Aids
HEARING
TESTS
OFFERED
3 Days Only!
Pl ease cal l i mmedi atel y.
Appoi ntments are Li mited !
REWARD!
If your eval uati on shows heari ng
i mprovement wi th new i nstruments,
you may choose to retai n them and recei ve
$500 OFF one i nstrument or
$1000 OFF A COMPLETE SET.
You wi l l al so recei ve a FREE Li feti me
I n-Offi ce Mai ntenance for the l i fe of the heari ng ai ds
and a year suppl y of Batteri es.
Benets of hearing instruments vary by type and degree of hearing loss, noise environment, accuracy of hearing evaluation and proper t. Beltone Hearing Care Centers are independently owned and operated. Participation may vary by location. 2011 Beltone
Hearing Centers
True

Technology
OpenEar Comfort
Virtually Invisible
Automatically Adjusts
Same Day Fit
Look!
Shes wearing
new open ear
technology!
Indy Northwest
2250 W 86th St.
(across from St. Vincent Hospital)
(317) 334-4444
Indy South
7007 S. Hwy. 31
(corner of Southport & Hwy 31)
(317) 885-4444
Greeneld
1789 N. State St.
Greeneld IN. 46140
(317) 462-9999
Noblesville
247 Sheridan Rd.
(Western Plaza)
(317) 770-9999
Indy West
1451 S. Green St. Brownsburg
(St. Rd. 267 S. of Brown Med Ctr)
(317) 858-8444
Indy Northeast
6115 Allisonville Rd.
(317) 359-4444
Many convenient locations throughout Indiana for additional locations near you call 1-800-371-HEAR
Bird Feed
Headquarters
FREE 5lb. Bag of Bird Feed
Text NURSERY to 44636
2.0
1.6
1.2
0.8
0.4
0.0
10/8 10/12 10/17 10/22 10/27 11/1 11/6
New York
City
Washington, D.C.
Detroit
Indianapolis
Nashville
Atlanta
Miami
Orlando
New Orleans
Dallas
Houston
Kansas City Denver
Salt Lake City
San Francisco
Los Angeles
Seattle
Portland
Chicago
H L
100s 90s 80s 70s 60s 50s 40s 30s 20s 10s 0s -10s
Rain
Stationary Warm front Cold front
Snow
Minneapolis
Phoenix
REGIONAL FORECAST
Chicago
55/61
Louisville
49/69
Cincinnati
44/65
Richmond
44/61
Columbus
42/63
Cleveland
45/61
Toledo
46/60
Evansville
49/66
Bloomington
46/66
Indianapolis
48/65
Terre Haute
48/63
Fort Wayne
44/60
South Bend
48/60
Lafayette
49/60
Gary
51/60
St. Louis
53/64
Springeld
52/62
Champaign
50/60
Peoria
51/61
Davenport
42/60
Muncie
46/61
Lexington
45/65
TODAY'S INTERNATIONAL FORECAST
TUESDAY TODAY WEDNESDAY THURSDAY FRIDAY
National extremes
Low: -6 at Butte, Mont.
High: 89 at Laredo, Texas
Today
LO HI WEA
Tuesday
LO HI WEA
Today
LO HI WEA
Tuesday
LO HI WEA
NATIONAL FORECAST
Low 50
High 70
Low 48
High 65
Low 52
High 57
Low 34
High 48
Low 31
High 50
ALMANAC
Sunday through 7 p.m. 0
This month through Nov. 6 0.65 0.68
Total this year 40.31 34.99
Precipitation in inches Total Normal Temperature High Low
30-DAY TEMPERATURE HISTORY
30-DAY PRECIPITATION HISTORY IN INCHES
Indiana extremes
Low: 36 at Fort Wayne
High: 65 at Evansville
SUNDAYS
EXTREMES
TODAY'S TEMPERATURES
TODAY'S AIR QUALITY INDEX
TODAY'S POLLEN COUNT
TODAY'S UV INDEX
SUN AND MOON
Moderate Unhealthy
Low Medium High
Low Moderate High
Very unhealthy
Sunrise today 7:20 a.m.
Sunset today 5:37 p.m.
Sunrise Tuesday 7:21 a.m.
Sunset Tuesday 5:36 p.m.
Moon rises today 3:47 p.m.
Moon sets today 4:22 a.m.
Source: www.airnow.com
Source: www.pollen.com
0 10+ 6 2 4 8
0 10 6 2 4 8 12
Sunday 63 41
(2:21 p.m.) (7:37 a.m.)
Normal 57 39
Record 77 20
(in 1975) (in 1982)
80
70
60
50
40
6 9 3 6 6 3 9 12 noon
a.m. a.m. p.m.
Full Last New First
Nov. 10 Nov. 18 Nov. 25 Dec. 2
Very high
MORE ONLINE
For up-to-the-minute weather, go
to IndyStar.com/weather.
Albuquerque 29 53 Rn 29 50 Pc
Anchorage 20 28 Sn 12 22 Pc
Atlanta 43 68 Su 45 69 Su
Atlantic City 42 61 Su 43 62 Su
Baltimore 42 62 Su 46 65 Su
Billings 18 42 Su 23 47 Pc
Birmingham 49 70 Su 53 75 Su
Boise 24 44 Pc 26 47 Pc
Boston 41 61 Su 47 67 Pc
Bowling Green 49 70 Pc 49 70 Ts
Branson, MO 56 65 Ts 58 69 Ts
Buffalo 46 61 Pc 50 62 Pc
Burlington, VT 28 58 Su 38 60 Su
Charleston, SC 54 71 Su 54 71 Pc
Charleston, WV 38 66 Su 42 69 Su
Charlotte 38 67 Su 43 69 Su
Cheyenne 21 37 Cdy 22 37 Su
Chicago 55 61 Cdy 52 66 Rn
Cincinnati 44 65 Pc 46 70 Pc
Cleveland 45 61 Pc 50 65 Pc
Dallas 64 75 Ts 64 77 Ts
Daytona Beach 64 79 Rn 64 79 Rn
Denver 22 40 Cdy 23 36 Sn
Des Moines 35 58 Pc 41 44 Rn
Detroit 48 58 Rn 50 62 Cdy
El Paso 43 66 Pc 38 58 Su
Fairbanks 11 7 Sn -3 -2 Sn
Fargo, ND 30 44 Pc 26 45 Pc
Flagstaff 21 38 Sn 12 42 Su
Fort Myers 62 83 Pc 62 83 Pc
Grand Rapids 50 59 Pc 46 56 Rn
Green Bay 38 54 Su 37 44 Rn
Honolulu 72 84 Su 72 84 Su
Houston 67 81 Cdy 70 83 Ts
Jackson, MS 53 77 Pc 57 81 Pc
Jacksonville 59 73 Rn 60 72 Pc
Juneau 33 40 Rs 31 36 Rs
Kansas City 43 62 Ts 57 59 Ts
Knoxville 40 68 Su 44 72 Su
Las Vegas 44 60 Su 41 60 Pc
Little Rock 57 73 Cdy 61 75 Ts
Los Angeles 48 65 Su 48 68 Su
Louisville 49 69 Pc 54 75 Su
Memphis 55 73 Pc 58 77 Ts
Miami Beach 70 80 Pc 69 81 Pc
Milwaukee 46 55 Pc 46 53 Rn
Minneapolis 32 50 Su 33 43 Rn
Myrtle Beach,SC 50 70 Su 53 71 Pc
Naples 62 80 Pc 62 85 Pc
Nashville 48 70 Pc 50 75 Su
New Orleans 63 78 Pc 65 80 Pc
NewYork City 43 59 Su 46 67 Su
Norfolk, VA 47 65 Su 48 69 Pc
Oklahoma City 58 70 Ts 60 63 Rn
Omaha 31 57 Cdy 40 40 Rs
Orlando 63 81 Rn 63 82 Pc
Pensacola 58 72 Pc 59 76 Cdy
Philadelphia 40 61 Su 43 65 Su
Phoenix 50 63 Rn 45 67 Su
Pittsburgh 38 62 Su 42 65 Su
Portland, OR 41 51 Rn 44 54 Pc
Portland, ME 35 54 Su 42 58 Pc
Providence 39 63 Su 41 65 Su
Raleigh 39 66 Su 44 67 Pc
Rapid City 24 43 Pc 27 46 Cdy
St. Louis 53 64 Ts 55 72 Ts
Sacramento 39 60 Su 38 62 Pc
Saginaw 32 59 Pc 42 58 Cdy
Salt Lake City 30 37 Pc 28 38 Su
San Antonio 69 79 Cdy 67 81 Ts
San Diego 51 66 Pc 53 70 Su
San Francisco 47 60 Pc 46 62 Pc
San Juan, PR 76 86 Ts 76 84 Ts
Santa Fe 28 43 Rn 26 40 Pc
Savannah 53 71 Su 52 73 Pc
Seattle 42 50 Rn 44 51 Cdy
Sioux Falls, SD 25 52 Pc 31 42 Rs
Spokane 25 47 Cdy 29 48 Cdy
St. Thomas, VI 78 85 Ts 78 86 Ts
Tallahassee 52 75 Pc 50 77 Pc
Tampa 60 83 Pc 60 83 Pc
Tucson 46 59 Rn 36 60 Su
Tulsa 59 70 Ts 62 71 Ts
Washington 42 63 Su 44 65 Su
100
80
60
40
20
10/8 10/12 10/17 10/22 10/27 11/1 11/6
HIGH LOW
Amsterdam 48 53 Cdy
Athens 53 67 Su
Baghdad 50 73 Su
Bangkok 81 91 Ts
Beijing 43 54 Cdy
Beirut 57 73 Su
Berlin 42 56 Su
Bermuda 72 76 Cdy
Buenos Aires 63 82 Pc
Cairo 60 78 Su
Cancun 66 81 Pc
Copenhagen 43 50 Pc
Dublin 39 51 Pc
Edmonton 27 38 Pc
Geneva 48 58 Rn
Halifax 41 52 Su
Helsinki 42 47 Rn
Hong Kong 75 81 Ts
Istanbul 47 57 Su
Jerusalem 50 61 Su
Johannesburg 59 79 Su
Kabul 46 64 Pc
London 51 56 Cdy
Madrid 42 63 Rn
Manila 79 88 Ts
Mexico City 52 76 Pc
Montreal 43 57 Pc
Moscow 23 31 Pc
Nairobi 64 79 Ts
Nassau 72 85 Pc
New Delhi 64 86 Su
Oslo 36 41 Pc
Paris 48 52 Cdy
Rio de Janeiro 66 80 Su
Rome 54 68 Rn
Seoul 48 66 Pc
Singapore 77 87 Ts
Stockholm 39 46 Cdy
Sydney 65 81 Ts
Tokyo 56 68 Rn
Toronto 46 62 Pc
Vancouver 39 46 Rn
Vienna 45 54 Pc
Winnipeg 19 37 Sn
Zurich 44 53 Pc
Detroit
48/58
Good
Plan on lots of
clouds today with a
chance of a few
sprinkles or
showers. Despite
the clouds, it will
be mild with highs
in the mid 60s today and around
70 Tuesday.
- Chikage Windler Showers pos-
sible, espe-
cially north
and west
Mostly
cloudy and
warm. Rain
late tonight
Rain likely,
up to 1 inch
possible
Cool and
blustery
Veteran's
Day will be
breezy and
cool
B8 MONDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 2011 1 S T THE INDIANAPOLIS STAR INDYSTAR.COM A B C
weather
Stay up to date
at m.indystar.com
On your mobile device,
check out the latest news
24/7 at m.indystar.com
Get forecasts on
your mobile phone
Text Wand city (WIndianapolis) or
ZIP code (W46206) to 44636 (4INFO)
for latest forecast.
IS-5764572 IS-5764572
NEEDED
AREA RESIDENTS
to try new DIGITAL
Technology in Hearing Aids
HEARING
TESTS
OFFERED
3 Days Only!
Pl ease cal l i mmedi atel y.
Appoi ntments are Li mited !
REWARD!
If your eval uati on shows heari ng
i mprovement wi th new i nstruments,
you may choose to retai n them and recei ve
$500 OFF one i nstrument or
$1000 OFF A COMPLETE SET.
You wi l l al so recei ve a FREE Li feti me
I n-Offi ce Mai ntenance for the l i fe of the heari ng ai ds
and a year suppl y of Batteri es.
Benets of hearing instruments vary by type and degree of hearing loss, noise environment, accuracy of hearing evaluation and proper t. Beltone Hearing Care Centers are independently owned and operated. Participation may vary by location. 2011 Beltone
Hearing Centers
True

Technology
OpenEar Comfort
Virtually Invisible
Automatically Adjusts
Same Day Fit
Look!
Shes wearing
new open ear
technology!
Indy Northwest
2250 W 86th St.
(across from St. Vincent Hospital)
(317) 334-4444
Indy South
7007 S. Hwy. 31
(corner of Southport & Hwy 31)
(317) 885-4444
Greeneld
1789 N. State St.
Greeneld IN. 46140
(317) 462-9999
Noblesville
247 Sheridan Rd.
(Western Plaza)
(317) 770-9999
Indy West
1451 S. Green St. Brownsburg
(St. Rd. 267 S. of Brown Med Ctr)
(317) 858-8444
Indy Northeast
6115 Allisonville Rd.
(317) 359-4444
Many convenient locations throughout Indiana for additional locations near you call 1-800-371-HEAR
Bird Feed
Headquarters
FREE 5lb. Bag of Bird Feed
Text NURSERY to 44636
1541 Allentown Road, Suite C
Lima
419-773-4021
Mon.-Thurs. 9-5
912 E. 2nd St., Suite 106
Defiance
419-773-4021
Tues. & Fri. only 9-5
REWARD!
If your evaluation shows hearing
improvement with new instruments, you may choose to
retain them and receive
$500 OFF one instrument or
$1000.00 OFF A COMPLETE SET.
You will also receive a FREE Lifetime In-Office
Maintenance for the life of the
hearing aids and a FREE $50 Visa Card*.
HEARING
TESTS
OFFERED
3 Days Only!
Please call immediately.
Appointments are limited!
NEEDED
AREA RESIDENTS
to try new DIGITAL
Technology in
Hearing Aids
*Hearing aids must be purchased for 30-day Trial.
Patient may return aids within 30 days of purchase for a full refund.
www.beltonehearingaid.com
1096 N. Ohio Street, Greenville 937-548-1138
Short-term Rehabilitation
& Long Term Nursing Care
Physical Therapy
Occupational Therapy
Speech Therapy
1425 E. 5th Street, Delphos 419-695-2871
VANCREST
Health Care & Rehabilitation Center
(ARA) - Everyone uses their memory at
some point during their work day. Whether
you are a teacher, stay-at-home mom, medi-
cal professional, skilled laborer, restaurant
server, or specialize in another craft, your
hippocampus - the part of the brain that sup-
ports short-term memory - is critical for re-
membering important appointments, names
and even where you parked your car.
A recent survey conducted by NMI Re-
search and DSM Nutritional Products found
that 84 percent of more than 1,000 respon-
dents ranked memory as being the most
important occupational skill. Other top rank-
ing skills include problem solving (85 per-
cent) and organizational skills (87 percent).
Nelson Dellis, 28, the two-time USA
Memory Champion, works as a memory
consultant by day. Dellis went on to win
the 2012 USA Memory Championship after
memorizing and recalling 303 random digits
in less than five minutes.
Many people ask me whats the secret to
memorizing random names, faces, numbers,
shopping lists, among many other things,
says Dellis. Im not super human; Im a
typical everyday guy who incorporates the
right mix of lifestyle factors to help support
my brain and memory health. These lifestyle
factors include giving my memory a work-
out, eating brain-healthy foods and exercis-
ing.
Dellis has a few secrets to his success,
which can be easily incorporated into your
daily routine to help support the health of
your hippocampus.
Tip 1: Exercise your hippocampus. En-
gage in brain-stimulating activities, includ-
ing reading, creating art, completing cross-
words, learning a new language or playing
a new instrument. Or, start training to be a
mental athlete in next years USA Memory
Championship.
Tip 2: Focus and make it interesting.
When trying to remember a persons name,
associate their name with an image. Be sure
to make the image interesting and visualize
the image on the persons shoulder or on the
top of their head. The more outrageous the
image, the better chance youll remember
their name.
Tip 3: Eat a brain-healthy diet. Foods
rich in DHA omega-3 help support overall
brain health and memory function. Try eat-
ing DHA-rich fish (salmon, trout, tuna) or,
if youre vegetarian or want a sustainable
source of DHA, try algal DHA-fortified
foods and beverages or an algal DHA sup-
plement. Look for the lifesDHA logo on the
packaging.
Tip 4: Give your body a workout. Engage
in physical activity for at least 30 minutes a
day to encourage new brain cells and con-
nections to form. Dellis exercises regularly
and is preparing to climb Mount Everest in
early 2013.
To learn more about the USA Memory
Championship, held annually in New York
City, visit www.usamemorychampionship.
com.
Put your memory to work
Secrets of success from
the USA memory champion
October 2012 Health and Medical Tab
3
ALAN J. CLINE, D.D.S.
603 East Third Street P.O. Box 249 Delphos, OH 45833-0249
Telephone: 419-692-7771 Fax: 419-692-8509
www.delphosfamilydentist.com
Is your Denture Loose?
A more rigid denture in 2 hours
with mini implants - cheaper, easier, less painful
than regular impants
General Dentist
Cosmetic & Family Dentistry
Sedation
Invisalign Invisible Braces
Traditional Braces
Implants
Extractions
Crowns
Bridges
Root Canals
Dentures & Partial Dentures
Announcing Under Armour
Performance Mouthwear
(ARA) - Today we tend to take for granted
the technological advances that many of us use
to see each day - light, thin, stylish prescrip-
tion eyeglasses that correct our vision so we
can live life to the fullest. But imagine what
your life would have been like a hundred years
ago if you couldnt see clearly. Your options
were to either simply live with the debilitating
condition or wear rudimentary spectacles that
allowed you to see clearly straight ahead, but
limited your peripheral vision.
Each day, millions of people wake up and
grab their prescription eyeglasses to start their
day off with near-perfect vision, says Jeff
Hopkins, senior manager at Carl Zeiss Vision,
a pioneer in eyeglass lens technology for 100
years. When you think back to what it was
like to have vision problems just a century
ago, its amazing how far weve come. Today,
prescription eyeglasses are technologically ad-
vanced, widely available and affordable.
A look at the last 100 years of optics history
shows how much prescription eyeglasses have
changed, and what trends are developing for
the future.
Before 1900: Jeepers, creepers - these
glasses arent helping my peepers
Prescription eyeglass wearers today have
clear vision across the entire surface of the
lens, but that was not always the case. Be-
fore 1912, prescription eyeglasses had a much
more restricted field of clear vision. For many
this meant vision was only clear when looking
directly ahead. As you moved your eye to one
side or the other, the view was increasingly
blurry. Seeing something in the periphery re-
quired more than a glance - you had to turn to
look at it.
1912: Goodbye tunnel vision, hello preci-
sion eyeglass lenses
On April 1, 1912, Carl Zeiss produced the
first precision eyeglass lens called Punktal,
which allowed many wearers to see across
the entire surface of the eyeglass lens right up
to the edge, making previous eyeglass lenses
obsolete. No more tunnel vision effects or
strained necks from having to move your head
back and forth all the time.
1920s to today: Talking bout my genera-
tions ... style of eyeglasses frames
Before Punktal, eyeglasses were usually
tiny, because a larger lens size only meant
more peripheral blur. Punktals wider fields of
view allowed the creation of larger, more di-
verse eyeglass frame styles. Long gone are the
days of the pince-nez glasses that were held
on ones face by pinching the nose, typically
found before the 1920s. Since then, many
styles have emerged to help define genera-
tional fashion. Browline frames, such as the
ones worn by Malcolm X, were popular in the
1950s. In the 1960s, stylish women comple-
mented their beehive hairdos with cat-eye
frames. Horn-rimmed frames were popular
in the 40s through the 60s, with popularity
booming again in 2012.
21st century: Lenses created and cus-
tomized just for me
Advancements continue in prescription
eyeglass lens technology, with the focus on
optimizing the vision experience for each in-
dividual person. This stems from the idea that
even if two people have the same prescription,
they might have different visual needs based
on the shape of their face, the style of their
eyeglass frames and even their daily activi-
ties. Customized lenses like ZEISS Progres-
sive Individual 2 are designed precisely for
each unique vision situation, and are based
on personal parameters, integrating their pre-
scription, their frames and the way they fit,
and their personal needs for near, intermediate
and distance vision into a unique personalized
design.
2012: Seeing is believing with online vi-
sion screening
Today there are more options than ever for
checking your eyesight, including screening
your vision from the convenience of your home
computer. For example, Zeiss offers a free on-
line vision screening tool that allows visitors
to test their visual acuity, contrast vision and
color vision, and can be used as a guide to help
you quickly and easily determine if its time to
get a professional eye exam at your local eye
care provider. The screening and results are
completed within five minutes or less.
The future is bright for vision technology.
Over the next 100 years, I have confidence
well be seeing better than ever, concludes
Hopkins.
Beyond tunnel vision
How prescription eyeglasses have changed the way we see the world
4
Health and Medical Tab October 2012
2793 Shawnee Rd., Lima
Toll Free: 1-877-4COLONS (1-877-426-5667)
(ARA) - Its not always easy to under-
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trients needed to meet daily requirements
such as those recommended by the National
Health Institutes (NIH) Institute of Medi-
cine and Office of Dietary Supplements.
Nutritional needs and goals vary based on
factors such as sex, activity level, lifestyle
and age, making it difficult for an individual
to determine what may be best for him/her.
With an infinite selection of supplements
available, it can also be overwhelming to
narrow down the right products to support
your overall health. The good news is that
there are simple ways to ensure youre get-
ting enough of the right vitamins for your
body - whatever your personal health and
fitness goals.
A customized solution such as GNCs
Vitapak (R) Program is a comprehensive
program designed with advanced formu-
las to help people reach their unique goals.
The scientifically backed Vitapak(R) pro-
grams feature clinically studied ingredi-
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one convenient pack with just a few pills.
With over 30 customized Vitapak(R) pro-
grams to choose from, there is a special-
ized Vitapak(R) program to fit your desired
goals.
These vitamins and minerals are essen-
tial to keep your body healthy and working
properly at all life stages, says Dr. Joseph
C. Maroon, an expert in nutrition and sports
medicine and chairman of GNCs Medical
Advisory Board. In addition to restoring
your bodys natural balance, the correct
combination of nutritional supplements
can also help fuel and replenish your body
before, during and after exercise.
Dr. Maroon suggests these additional
tips to help you achieve your individual
nutritional goals:
* Eat a well-balanced diet: Try to avoid
processed and refined foods and make
an effort to consume fruits and veg-
etables, rich in vitamins and minerals,
as well as lean proteins which contain
essential oils and iron.
* Since most people dont eat the daily
recommended 5 servings of fruits
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ing a customized vitamin/supplement
program: Options such as GNCs
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example, the Mega Men(R) Sport
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* Ask your health care provider: Dis-
cuss how to incorporate the right vita-
mins and supplements for you, based
on lifestyle, health and fitness goals.
For more information, visit http://www.
gnclivewell.com/vitapak/.
Does Your Child Deserve
a Specialist Who...
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Celeste Lopez, M.D.
154 W. Third Street, Delphos, Ohio
(419) 692-WELL
Has Been Specifcally Trained in the Treatment of children
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Recognizes That a Child is Not a Small Adult, But One Who Needs to be
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to Anyone Less Than a Specialist?
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Be Sure to Catch My Article in the Delphos Herald on the 1st Friday of Each Month.
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Herald
419-695-0015
www.delphosherald.com
YOUR NEWSPAPER ...
STILL THE BEST
MEDIUM IN TODAYS
INFORMATION AGE.
October 2012 Health and Medical Tab
5
Pumpkin, either canned or fresh, is a
healthful, filling food. Adding it to reci-
pes, or substituting other ingredients with
pumpkin, is a great way to boost the nutri-
tion of the foods you eat without adding a
lot of calories.
A half-cup of canned pumpkin has:
Just 40 calories
More than 3 grams of fiber
Very little fat
More than three times the vitamin
A you need in a day in the form of beta-
carotene. This is more than you would get
from most supplements.
And it is also a good source of vita-
min C, vitamin K, and iron.
Adding pumpkin to your diet will add
vitamins and taste, too.
Fresh pumpkin that has been cubed
and boiled has fewer calories than canned
pumpkin, about 25 per half cup. But it
also has less fiber, iron, and vitamin K.
Both forms are healthful choices, although
canned pumpkin is more convenient.
Tips and tools for getting pumpkin
into your diet
When opting for fresh pumpkin,
choose smaller sugar or pie pump-
kins instead of the larger jack-o-lanterns
for best results.
You can cook pumpkin, as you would
any squash, by baking, microwaving or
steaming it.
1. Rinse the outside well.
2. Cut it in half.
3. Scoop out the seeds.
4. Cook as desired until the flesh is
soft.
If you decide canned pumpkin is a bet-
ter choice for you, pick a salt-free version.
Canned pumpkin with salt contains almost
300 milligrams of sodium in a half-cup.
Dont make the mistake of buying
pumpkin pie filling, which has almost
three times the calories, instead of canned
pumpkin. Canned pumpkin is sometimes
called pureed pumpkin.
Ideas for using canned pumpkin are in-
credibly varied.
If you are an adventurous cook, try ex-
perimenting with your own recipes:
Add canned or mashed cooked pump-
kin to cookies, muffins, quick breads and
pancakes.
The next time you make a pot of chili,
include a can of pumpkin. It helps thicken
up the chili and gives it some stomach-
filling substance with very few calories.
The pumpkin flavor blends in with chili
spices.
Add diced pumpkin to soup. It is es-
pecially good with bean soup.
Make a creamy pumpkin soup with
canned or fresh pureed pumpkin, broth,
onion, and milk, and flavored with cinna-
mon, nutmeg and pepper.
Roast the pumpkin seeds for a healthy
snack alone or with a nut and seed mix.
Experiment with the amount. Pump-
kin is moist, but too much can make prod-
ucts like these heavier than youre accus-
tomed to.
Whatever the season, pumpkin can be
a healthy addition to your diet.
Information courtesy of www.cleve-
land.com/healthfit
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Charles R. Ryan, MD
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Vanessa L. Stallkamp, MD
Tammy Herrick, MD
Rose Pinto, PA-C
Courtney Hoover, PA-C
OB/GYN SPECIALISTS OF LIMA
830 West High Street, Lima
419-227-0610
or 800-686-4096
Carve a place for pumpkin in your diet
Maple-Pumpkin Custard with crystallized ginger
1 1/2 cups 1% milk
4 large eggs
3/4 cup maple syrup, (see Ingredient
note)
3/4 cup canned unseasoned pumpkin pu-
ree
1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon ground nutmeg
1/4 teaspoon salt
3 tablespoons whipped cream
1/4 cup chopped crystallized ginger
Preheat oven to 325F. Put a kettle of
water on to heat for the water bath. Line a
roasting pan with a folded kitchen towel.
Heat milk over low heat in a small
saucepan until barely steaming but not
boiling.
Whisk eggs and syrup in a large bowl
until smooth. Gently whisk in the warm
milk (a little bit at a time so the eggs dont
cook). Add pumpkin puree, cinnamon,
nutmeg and salt; whisk until blended.
Divide the mixture among six 6-ounce
(3/4-cup) custard cups. Skim foam from
the surface. Place custard cups in the pre-
pared roasting pan. Pour enough boiling
water into the pan to come halfway up the
sides of the custard cups. Place the pan in
the oven and bake, uncovered, until cus-
tards are just set but still quiver in the cen-
ter when shaken, 45 to 50 minutes. Trans-
fer custards to a wire rack and let cool for
45 minutes. Cover and refrigerate for at
least 1 hour, or until chilled.
To serve, top each custard with a dol-
lop of whipped cream and a sprinkling of
crystallized ginger.
TIPS & NOTES
Make Ahead Tip: Prepare through Step
4. Cover and refrigerate for up to 2 days.
Ingredient Note: If you can find it, use
Grade B dark amber syrup to get the best
maple flavor.
6
Health and Medical Tab October 2012
(ARA) - Every day, more and more
Americans are motivated to start exercise
programs. And while few will ever attain
the fitness of an all-star athlete, we can all
benefit from increased physical activity
and improved health. However, regardless
of your level of activity, you still need to
maintain good hydration.
Physical fitness is a state of good health
resulting from regular exercise and good
nutrition. When you exercise, your bodys
metabolism works at a much higher rate,
breaking down and regenerating tissues
and creating waste metabolites that need
to be flushed out of your system. Thats
why the universal recommendation is to
drink great amounts of water when youre
working out.
But you need more than just water for
proper hydration. You must also replace
the sodium and potassium along with the
water, says Dr. David McCarron, adjunct
professor at University of California Da-
vis. This is why athletes drink sports
drinks rather than just water. Replacing
water without sufficient sodium can quick-
ly produce hyponatremia, a potentially fa-
tal condition.
When the body loses electrolytes, typi-
cally from perspiration, over-rehydration
with only water can produce hypona-
tremia, which is a true medical emergency.
Hyponatremia symptoms are similar to
those of heat exhaustion and heat stroke
and can often be overlooked. Symptoms
range from mild to severe and can include
nausea, muscle cramps, disorientation,
confusion, seizures, coma and death.
In 2002, a healthy 28-year-old run-
ner collapsed and died during the Boston
Marathon as a result of hyponatremia. Ac-
cording to the British Medical Journal, 16
runners have died as a result of too little
sodium and overhydration and another
1,600 have become seriously ill. It is true
that water intoxication is more commonly
seen among extreme athletes, but older in-
dividuals are also at high risk for several
reasons.
As we age, our kidneys become less ef-
ficient at conserving salt when the body is
stressed and common medications such as
diuretics greatly increase that risk. Thats
why, during severe high temperatures,
news accounts most often refer to elderly
victims of the heat.
Ideally, anyone doing fitness exercising
should drink eight to 12 ounces of fluid
every 15 to 20 minutes during a session.
If exercising exceeds an hour, a beverage
that contains salt and an energy carbohy-
drate is far superior to plain water.
The recommended concentration of salt
in a fluid replacement beverage is 1/4 tea-
spoon per liter. Most sports drinks contain
salt, although the amount is not quite that
high. Anyone can make an alternative to
commercial fluid replacement beverages
easily by adding 1/4 to 1/2 teaspoon of salt
per liter or 32 ounces of water.
Both dehydration and sodium losses
negatively affect athletic performance.
However, it is difficult to differentiate be-
tween the two because they occur simulta-
neously and have similar negative conse-
quences. Dehydration, resulting from the
difference between the amount of fluid lost
and the amount taken in during exercise is
the most common cause of heat-related ill-
ness in athletes.
Remember, water alone may not be suf-
ficient and could actually increase your
risk of severe heat-related injuries. So the
next time youre exercising, drink a lot of
water to beat the workout heat, but also
up your intake of electrolytes, particularly
sodium and potassium. Learn more about
staying hydrated by visiting the Salt Gu-
rus YouTube channel.
When your body runs hot
you need sal t to stay hydrated
The Delphos Herald
419-695-0015 www.delphosherald.com
Cant
Seem
to put us
Down?
Neither can the subscribers
who read our newspaper
daily for local news,
information and so much
more!
Get a heads-up on whats
happening locally and
beyond; call 419-695-0015
to subscribe to the Delphos
Herald!
You must also replace the
sodium and potassium along
with the water. This is why
athletes drink sports drinks
rather than just water.
Replacing water without
sufficient sodium can quickly
produce hyponatremia, a
potentially fatal condition.
~ Dr. David McCarron,
adjunct professor at
University of California Davis
October 2012 Health and Medical Tab
7
Alliance for Womens Health, Inc.
WE WELCOME NEW PATIENTS!
Schedule your annual
check up today!
Board Certied Physicians:
Maurice K. Chung, RPH, MD;
Rhonda J. Medina, MD; Sleiman Smaili MD
Jackie Shriver, Certied Nurse Practitioner
310 S. Cable Rd., Lima
510 E. Spring St., St. Marys
419-228-1000
www.alliance4womenshealth.com
Celebrating 20 years of service to the medical community!
We welcome Diana Barbu, M.D.
to our practice
Celebrating 20 years of service to the medical community!
Alliance for Womens Health, Inc.
WE WELCOME NEW PATIENTS!
Schedule your annual
check up today!
Board Certied Physicians:
Maurice K. Chung, RPH, MD;
Rhonda J. Medina, MD; Sleiman Smaili MD
Jackie Shriver, Certied Nurse Practitioner
310 S. Cable Rd., Lima
510 E. Spring St., St. Marys
419-228-1000
www.alliance4womenshealth.com
Celebrating 20 years of service to the medical community!
We welcome Diana Barbu, M.D.
to our practice
310 S. Cable Rd., Lima
510 E. Spring St., St. Marys
Dr. Chung is also accepting patients at
1251 Lincoln Ave., Suite 2, Wapak
Healthy pumpkin bread
2 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
2 cups whole-wheat flour, preferably white
whole-wheat (see Tip)
1 tablespoon baking powder
2 teaspoons baking soda
2 teaspoons salt
2 large eggs
2 large egg whites
2 cups packed light brown sugar
3 cups canned unseasoned pumpkin puree
1/2 cup canola oil
Preheat oven to 350F. Coat two 9-by-5-inch
loaf pans with cooking spray.
Stir all-purpose flour, whole-wheat flour, bak-
ing powder, baking soda and salt in a large bowl.
Whisk eggs, egg whites, brown sugar, pumpkin
and oil in another large bowl. Add the pumpkin
mixture to the dry ingredients and mix until just
combined. Scrape the batter into the prepared
pans and smooth the tops.
Bake the loaves until the tops are golden
brown and a cake tester inserted in the center
comes out clean, 50 to 60 minutes. Cool in the
pans for 10 minutes. Turn the loaves out onto a
wire rack to cool completely.
TIPS & NOTES
Whole-wheat pastry flour is milled from soft
wheat. It contains less gluten than regular whole-
wheat flour and helps ensure a tender result in
delicate baked goods while providing the nutri-
tional benefits of whole grains. Find it at large
supermarkets and natural-foods stores. Store in
an airtight container in the freezer.
8
Health and Medical Tab October 2012
Living here has
its advantages.
Come see just how good life can be
at The Meadows stop by or call to
schedule a personal tour.
Working here and being close to the
residents is the most rewarding part of
my job emotionally and spiritually. There
is no reason for anyone to go anywhere
else - the care and facility are superior.
~Dr. Klir, Medical Director
The Meadows of Kalida
419-532-2961 PO Box 388, 755 Ottawa Street
Kalida, OH 45853 meadowsofkalida.com
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(StatePoint) Life has its ups and downs --
and adversity touches everyone at some point.
But some experts believe that a focus on the
positive can help you persevere through tough
times.
For Anita Moorjani for example, life took
a horrific turn when she was diagnosed with
late stage Hodgkins lymphoma. Admitted to
the hospital as a terminal patient, Moorjani
slipped into a deep coma, nearly dying before
she experienced a spontaneous remission and
recovery. Her case has since fascinated the
medical community.
While spontaneous remission of breast
cancer is not uncommon, according to a study
done by physician researchers at Dartmouth
Medical School in 2009, it is rarely seen in a
terminal cancer case.
Her recovery was certainly remarkable.
Based on what we have learned about cancer
cell behaviors, I am unable to attribute her dra-
matic recovery to chemotherapy. I speculate
that something non-physical switched off the
mutated genes, said Dr. Peter Ko, an oncolo-
gist with The University of Southern Califor-
nia, who has studied Moorjanis case.
Moorjani attributes her
victory in overcoming can-
cer to a belief in positive
things, learning to live fear-
lessly, and finally loving
herself.
In her New York Times
bestseller, Dying to Be
Me (Hay House), Moor-
jani candidly shares her
story, discussing the les-
sons she learned from her
near death experience, what
she would have done dif-
ferently and what she wants
people to know now.
Here are some tips
Moorjani feels can help
others face their own tri-
als:
Prior to her devastating
diagnosis, Moorjanis
life was driven by fear of
illness. Rather than letting similar fears and
stressors get the better of you, learn to enjoy
yourself and take care of whats inside.
Much of our suffering stems from feeling
less than. Love yourself unconditionally
and be yourself fearlessly. Remind those
close to you that you love them just the way
they are.
Dont obsess over problems or allow your
days to revolve around solving
them. Its actually far more pro-
ductive to distract yourself and
stay occupied with activities
that stimulate you in positive,
creative ways.
Thinking positive can be
tiring. Never suppress nega-
tive feelings when they creep
in. Instead of bottling up your
emotions, experience them
naturally. After all, a bad mood
wont last forever.
Everyday joys can go a long
way toward helping you cope
with stress and depression. Be
it a box of chocolates, a home
cooked meal or a great bottle
of wine, dont be shy about in-
dulging yourself in moderation
at meal time with foods that
make you happiest.
Whats most important for
your well-being is how you feel
about yourself during tough times, Moorjani
says.
You cant always eliminate adversity from
your life. Whether you are simply experienc-
ing the stresses of daily life, are grieving the
loss of a loved one, or struggling with the ram-
ifications of your own health crisis, knowing
how to cope is crucial to your health and can
make all the difference in the world.
POSITIVE THINKING
can improve your health
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October 2012 Health and Medical Tab
9
Shane Gerber, C.N.P.
OB/GYN & Family Practice
419-238-3047
Chris Ulrich, C.N.P.
Internal Medicine
419-238-7727
Jennifer Hohman, M.D.
Pediatrics
419-232-2323
Jocelyn Wray, M.D.
Physical Medicine
419-232-6333
Scott Jarvis, M.D.
Internal Medicine
419-238-7727
Thomas Conte, M.D.
Surgery
419-238-4909
Matthew Miller, M.D.
Family Practice
419-232-2077
Jefrey Easley, M.D.
Family Practice
419-232-2077
Douglas Moore, D.O.
OB/GYN
419-238-3047
Charles Hoehn, D.P.M.
Podiatry
419-238-7727
People You Know... People Who Care!

Van Wert Medical Services | 140 Fox Road | Van Wert, OH | VanWertHospital.org
Great Care, Right Here!
Van Wert County Hospital
1250 S. Washington Street | Van Wert, OH | 419-238-2390 | VanWertHospital.org
10
Health and Medical Tab October 2012
(ARA) - Just a few decades ago, the
phrase granny shoes implied a tragic
lack of coolness, and that the wearer had al-
lowed comfort to trump style in their slow
shuffle toward getting old. Those days are
definitely gone.
Todays baby boomers and seniors are
stepping out in everything from frisky flip-
flops and hot heels to righteous running
shoes and powerful hiking boots. Footwear
is no longer dictated by age, but rather by
the activity level and fashion sense of the
wearer.
Still, like everything else about our bod-
ies, our feet change with age. Because of
this, the steps we take to keep them healthy
have to adjust accordingly.
While staying active is a great way to
preserve overall
health and can
positively impact
foot health, aging
can naturally in-
crease the risk of
certain foot ail-
ments, says Jo-
seph Caporusso,
DPM, a podiatrist
and president of
the American
Podiatric Medi-
cal Association
(APMA). Its
important to know the symptoms of age-
related foot ailments and take steps to min-
imize their impact on your overall health.
APMA offers some information on com-
mon foot ailments to watch for as you age:
Arthritis
While many health issues can cause ar-
thritis, and it can affect people of any age,
those older than 50 are most prone to it.
The feet are more susceptible to this pain-
ful inflammation of
the cartilage and lin-
ing of the joints be-
cause each foot has
33 joints - all of which
help bear the weight
of the entire body ev-
ery day. Arthritic feet
can lead to a loss of
mobility if the condi-
tion is not diagnosed
and treated.
The causes of ar-
thritis can range from
heredity to injuries to
bacterial or viral infections that affect the
joints. Arthritis may take several forms, so
if youre experiencing foot pain, its best
to have it diagnosed by a podiatrist. Symp-
toms that indicate its time to see the doctor
include:
* Swelling in one or more joints
* Recurring pain or tenderness in any
joint
* Redness or heat in joints
Foot care tips
to keep boomers moving
ein Care Center
Healthy, Pain-Free Legs
for Men & Women
Praveen K. Malhotra, MD
Manu B. Aggarwal, MD
4192274472 or 8664724472
www.yourveincarecenter.com
Locations in Lima, Findlay & Celina
The Vein Care Centers services include:
Varicose Vein Treatment
Sclerotherapy & Laser Treatment
for Spider Veins
Microdermabrasion
Robin Feicht, RN
Sclerotherapist

Delphos, OH
Ph. 419-692-6618
vancrest.com
Larry Luersman, vocalist, Veronica Leursman on the
keyboard and Bob Hohlbein playing the harmonica, en-
tertain residents of Sarah Jane Living Center. Residents
enjoy games, activities, entertainment and refreshments
daily at Sarah Jane.
Expiration date: 10/31/12. DH
See FOOT CARE, page 14
October 2012 Health and Medical Tab
11
(ARA) - Health care today is expensive,
but there are ways that you can give your
wallet a break. One of the best ways to make
health care more affordable is to avoid the
need for medical care in the first place.
More than 75 percent of health care
costs are attributed to chronic illness, most
of which are controllable, if not prevent-
able. For those, here are five ways to save
on health care spending so you have more
money to enjoy life.
Know your numbers
It is important that you know your opti-
mal range for health markers such as blood
pressure, cholesterol and glucose. Knowing
your health scores allows you to take steps
to lessen your risk of chronic and costly
diseases such as heart disease, diabetes and
cancer. Not only are such diseases a burden
to national health spending, they also make
a major impact on personal spending.
For instance, people with type 2 diabe-
tes that can be controlled through diet and
exercise spend about $2,000 a year. When
it isnt controlled, those costs can esca-
late dramatically for insulin treatments, or
worse, hospitalization.
Life Time, The Healthy Way of Life
Company has initiated a new program
called myHealthScore to bridge the gap be-
tween fitness and health care. The program
provides testing, available to members and
nonmembers, to measure six critical health
markers: cholesterol ratio, blood pressure,
glucose, triglycerides, nicotine use and body
fat ratio. These metabolic markers provide a
baseline from which people can set goals,
or in some cases detect serious health issues
that might otherwise go undetected, even
with an annual doctor visit. A Life Time
health adviser works with participants to
move their score into an optimal range. Re-
sults from myHealthScore give someone an
inside-out view of their health, says Tom
Manella, vice president of Personal Train-
ing at Life Time.
Invest in prevention
Get health screenings as advised and pre-
vent illness with vaccines. What you spend
on an annual flu shot will more than make
up for costs you incur on over the counter
medications, doctors visits, and lost wages
if you get sick. Likewise, an annual mem-
bership to a fitness center can cost as little
as $50 a month, but being inactive and over-
weight costs significantly more: an addi-
tional $1,152 in medical expenses if youre
an obese man and $3,613 more if youre an
obese woman, according to a study pub-
lished in the Journal of Health Economics.
Put your money where your mouth is
Poor oral health is often a signal of big-
ger health problems. The same bacteria that
causes gum disease has been implicated in
other major health problems such as heart
disease, stroke, diabetes and premature
births, all of which can require expensive
and ongoing care. The American Dental
Association recommends brushing twice a
day with a toothbrush that is replaced every
three to four months and flossing every day,
an investment that will cost as little as $15
a year.
Stop spending on sugar
Your sweet tooth is very, very expensive.
Saving anywhere from $5 to $20 a week
that youd normally spend on sugary treats
translates into savings of $1,000 a year, not
to mention the calories saved, which can
save additional thousands spent on taking
off that extra weight later or obesity-related
medical expenses.
Flaunt your fitness in front of your
employer
Most health insurers provide incentives
for people to take the initiative to get and
stay healthy. For example at Allina Health
System, one of many companies using Life
Times myHealthCheck program, employ-
ees have the potential to earn up to $1,600
in what they call Be Fit Premium Credits.
Many health plans offer a discount for peo-
ple who make regular visits to a fitness cen-
ter, too. Ultimately the savings can trickle
down to deductible spending. The healthier
you are, the less you need to see a doctor,
which means out of pocket costs go down.
None of us enjoy spending money on
health care expenses. Do yourself - and your
wallet - a favor and begin to invest in better
health. Small steps today can pay big divi-
dends tomorrow.
Vertebral Arteries
Neck Bones
Headaches? Migraines?
Deep in your neck a pair of blood vessels (vertebral arteries)
pass through the openings in your neck bones. These vessels
supply 30% of your brains blood supply. Any twisting or mis-
alignment of your neck bones will kink those arteries and slow
the blood flow to your brain, (the start of a migraine). Dr. Reed,
D.C. can gently re-align your spine without popping or twisting
your neck.
Get the relief you are searching
for at 419-238-2601
or visit www.ReedSpinalCare.com
Turn
into
health
wealth
Five ways to take charge of your health
and increase your bottom line
to keep boomers moving
12
Health and Medical Tab October 2012
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(StatePoint) According to the National
Sleep Foundation, if you have trouble stay-
ing and falling asleep at night, or you wake
up feeling unrefreshed in the morning, you
may be suffering from insomnia.
Almost everyone has trouble sleeping
every so often, but for many Americans
having a hard time getting to sleep or wak-
ing in the middle of the night is a significant
problem.
To help, board certified sleep specialist
Dr. Russell Rosenberg, Chairman of the Na-
tional Sleep Foundation, offers answers to
some questions about insomnia:
What is insomnia?
Insomnia involves difficulty getting
to sleep, staying asleep, waking too early,
trouble getting back to sleep or lack of re-
freshing sleep, as defined by the American
Academy of Sleep Medicine.
Are the symptoms of insomnia the
same for everyone?
Insomnia may affect people differently.
Some complain of waking up in the middle
of the night and having trouble falling back
asleep, while others have trouble initially
getting to sleep.
What can I do to help me fall asleep
at night?
Establish a regular bed and wake time.
Create a sleep-conducive environment that
is dark, quiet and comfortable. Allow time
at night to wind down before climbing
into bed. Doing work, watching TV and us-
ing the computer, both close to bedtime or
in the bedroom, can hinder your ability to
fall asleep. Avoid violent shows and news
reports before bedtime as they can be agi-
tating.
If I wake up in the middle of the night,
what are some tips to help me fall back
to sleep?
If you wake up in the middle of the night
and stay in bed, dont stare at the clock.
Also, do not watch TV, use your computer
or cell phone, because use of these technol-
ogies can stimulate your brain and make it
harder to fall back to sleep. Avoid drinking
beverages containing caffeine or alcohol.
Most importantly, you should try to relax.
What can I do during the day to help
my insomnia?
Good day-
time habits may
help with both
types of insom-
nia. I tell my
patients to avoid
caffeine after
lunch, stresses
Rosenberg. Also,
get regular ex-
ercise but avoid
rigorous exercise
close to bed-
time and always
check with your
doctor before
starting any ex-
ercise regimen.
If those sug-
gestions dont help, what else should I
do?
You should speak with your healthcare
professional if you are having trouble sleep-
ing. He or she can determine whether or not
you suffer from insomnia and if treatment
is needed.
Where can I learn more about insom-
nia?
For more information regarding insom-
nia, visit the National Sleep Foundation
website at http://www.sleepfoundation.org/
article/sleep-related-problems/insomnia-
and-sleep.
How to get a good nights sleep
Ask the expert:
October 2012 Health and Medical Tab
13
(ARA) - For many people, being active
means fun in the sun that includes outdoor
activities like running, hiking, biking and
team sports. But an active lifestyle can take
a toll on the body and bring about aches and
pains from muscles and joints that arent
used to being utilized if you are always try-
ing new activities.
There are a number of ways to keep
your body healthy. However, one often
overlooked but beneficial component for a
healthy lifestyle is massage therapy, says
Amy Wiltgen, massage therapy instruc-
tor at Everest College - Merrionette Park.
Even the simplest relaxation massages will
decrease stress and improve circulation, re-
duce fatigue, and help keep your muscles,
bones and connective tissue in good work-
ing condition.
Wiltgen offers some tips for choosing
a massage therapist and maximizing the
experience:
Find a professional. The first step is to
find professional therapists who are li-
censed and insured, and have a certificate
of professional training in their specialty or
procedure. Perhaps most helpful is to get
a personal recommendation from a friend
or look for testimonials or reviews on web-
sites, says Wiltgen. Also look for aca-
demic credentials, such as a diploma from
an accredited program.
Ask questions and describe health is-
sues. When you call for an appointment,
have questions ready to get a good sense of
your compatibility with and the profession-
alism and personality of the therapist.
Communicate. Upon arriving at the ap-
pointment, make sure to let the therapist
know your health history and any prefer-
ences for depth of pressure, room tempera-
ture, choices in music and allergies to oils
or lotions. Dont be afraid to speak up to
ask the therapist to make any adjustments
during the massage.
Relax. Its important to relax. Let your
mind and body go to enjoy all the benefits
of the massage. Breathing normally helps
facilitate relaxation, says Wiltgen. People
often stop or limit their breathing when
they feel anxious or a sensitive area is mas-
saged.
Avoid pain. A common misconception
is that the massage has to hurt to feel good.
Whether its a professional giving a mas-
sage, or a friend or family member, com-
municate any discomfort immediately,
says Wiltgen.
Stay hydrated. Be sure to drink extra
water before and after the massage to help
flush toxins from the body and make sure
muscles are properly hydrated.
Having a massage on a regular basis
can be a powerful ally in your health care
regimen, and will help keep you at your op-
timal best, adds Wiltgen.
(ARA) - Many Americans put a great
deal of trust in our countrys health care
system and the health care professionals
who tend to their medical needs. But from
time to time, a medical procedure doesnt
go according to plan.
When a procedure goes wrong, here are
nine tips from FindLaw.com about your
rights as a patient:
1. Understand your health insurance.
Millions of Americans purchase health
insurance with little understanding of what
theyre actually buying. They assume that
when a medical crisis comes up, theyre
covered, but that isnt always the case. Take
responsibility for your health and read your
insurance policy to clearly understand what
is and isnt covered, and what your finan-
cial responsibilities will be in the event of a
major medical event.
2. Become familiar with your employ-
ers policies.
The Family and Medical Leave Act is a
federal law that has established minimum
unpaid leave standards and rights for em-
ployees who have health problems, sick
family members or who are giving birth to
or adopting children. Become familiar with
the law and any additional benefits offered
by your employer if you are or will be fac-
ing a medical situation that may make it dif-
ficult to work for a lengthy period of time.
3. Get a second opinion.
If you dont like the way youre being
treated or dont believe your physician is
providing the best possible care, consider
seeing another physician. If youre facing
a major medical issue and want to under-
stand all of the treatment options available
to you, or to confirm the treatment plan rec-
ommended by your primary physician, let
your doctor know that youre going to get
a second opinion. Good doctors generally
welcome further consultation with other
doctors. If you seek a second opinion, check
ahead of time that it is covered by your
health insurance.
4. Consider alternative courses of
treatment.
In times of a serious or critical illness,
ask your physician to explain all poten-
tial treatments to you, whether or not your
health insurance will pay for them.
5. Understand your right to refuse
medical treatment.
You have the right to refuse medical
treatment. You also have the right to leave a
hospital or health care facility against medi-
cal advice. If you do so, however, most hos-
pitals and health care facilities will require
you to read and sign a form indicating re-
fusal of treatment in order to protect them-
selves from any future malpractice claims.
6. Bring a trusted friend or family
member to your appointments.
Invite a trusted friend or family member
to join you when discussing your health
care with your physician. Medical infor-
mation and options for treatment can be
complex. Having another person listening
to your doctor can help you process all the
important information and sort out your op-
tions.
7. Protect yourself against health care
fraud.
Groups attempting to defraud the health
care system and/or programs like Medicare
and Medicaid may be putting your health at
risk through bogus treatments and prescrip-
tions. Stick with well-recognized health
care organizations and pharmacies, and
carefully watch your medical statements for
unusual activity.
8. Keep good records.
Keep your own records of your health
care treatment and make sure to inform
your primary physician of treatment you
have received from other doctors. Also keep
careful records of your childrens medical
histories, including information about vac-
cinations, allergies and medications.
9. Consider drafting a health care di-
rective.
You may want to hire an attorney to help
you complete a health care directive, which
designates a trusted person, such as a fam-
ily member, to make decisions about your
health care treatment in the event that you
cannot due to illness or injury, including
your wishes regarding organ donation.
For more information about your rights
as a patient, visit FindLaw.com.
How massage therapy can help you stay
healthy and active
Your health:
9 tips to protect your
rights as a patient
14
Health and Medical Tab October 2012
(ARA) - Local. Thats the buzzword
when it comes to healthy eats these days.
From the farm to the city, locally grown
goods are keeping menus fresh and food
lovers satisfied. This trend is on the rise in
hot-spot restaurants around the nation and
now its never been easier to make fresh,
culinary magic happen in your own home.
Heres the trick to getting it done: learn
the facts and become a produce profes-
sional.
The most obvious benefit of shopping
local is taking garden-fresh, flavor-packed
goods home for your family to nosh on.
Youll get the highest nutritional value
foods by buying in season, says chef Lynn
Krause, culinary academic director of The
International Culinary School at The Art
Institute of St. Louis. If thats not enough
to get your juices flowing, consider this:
Purchasing crops from various commu-
nity farmers boosts local economies and
enhances sustainability practices by keep-
ing food import/export needs down, ac-
cording to chef Linda Trakselis, culinary
instructor at The International Culinary
School at The Illinois Institute of Art - Chi-
cago. Buying produce cultivated within a
150-mile radius of your location may also
increase the likelihood of ingesting prod-
ucts with fewer pesticides and protective
coatings typically added during the ship-
ping process.
When it comes to buying regional
fruits and vegetables, chef Clare Menck,
academic director of Culinary Arts at The
International Culinary School at The Art
Institute of Wisconsin, recommends cruis-
ing farmers markets. Its best to arrive
early and do a lap for price checks, product
quality and available options. From there,
let your menu be guided by seasonal items
and begin picking your produce. Menck
also suggests you develop a relationship
with the farmers - ask for their pick of the
week, recipe tips and preparation sugges-
tions.
Purchasing medium sized, darker col-
ored fruits and veggies is your best bet
for flavor and nutrients, says Trakselis
of hand-picking products at the week-end
pop-up shops.
Farmers markets are also a great spot
to pounce on the freshest proteins. I al-
ways head for the specials; seek out the
fresh catch of the day, fresh cut steaks and
chicken specials to feature in meals, says
Krause. Local poultry and shellfish is often
inexpensive when compared to goods im-
ported from other regions.
Another convenient way to secure the
seasons freshest crops is to order produce
boxes from community supported agricul-
ture (CSA) programs. Boxes offer a variety
of the seasons crops straight from the farm
on a weekly, bi-monthly or monthly basis.
The problem may be that youre getting
something in the box youre unfamiliar
with, but thats not such a bad deal. You
learn how to incorporate new vegetables
into your meals and can ask for the farm-
ers cooking tips, says Trakselis.
Your bounty will vary by season as crops
are harvested for the market. Summertime
finds include berries, melons, peaches,
nectarines, tomatoes, summer squash, zuc-
chini, green beans, asparagus and dark,
leafy greens. As the season shifts to fall,
youll score root veggies, Swiss chard, kale
and the last crop of sweet corn and melons.
Winter brings citrus and hearty vegetables
like beets, turnips, winter squashes, Brus-
sels sprouts and leafy greens to your mar-
ket. Stock up on more bitter veggies during
this time as the hard winter frost releases
sugars in the produce and sweetens up your
goods. Finally, springtime means peas, let-
tuce and the first berry buds.
Proper storage will ensure the longev-
ity of your loot. Dont ever put your to-
matoes in the fridge - it breaks down the
fibrous membrane and youll notice a steep
decline in taste and texture, says Menck.
Natural sugars turn to starch in the fridge
and it also stops the ripening process. She
also recommends keeping onions, pota-
toes, garlic and even carrots in plastic con-
tainers in cool locations, like on a shelf in
the garage, especially in the wintertime.
Look no further than your local farm
for the freshest and most nutritious meals.
Knowing your way around the market will
benefit your weeks food haul, your health
and your wallet.
healthy eats from farm to family
Become a produce professional:
* Loss of mobility in a joint
* Stiffness in the early morning
* Skin changes such as rashes or growths
Arthritis can be treated, but early diag-
nosis is important. Treatment options may
include physical therapy, exercise or medi-
cation.
Diabetes
Foot-related complications are common
among the nearly 26 million Americans
who have diabetes. Proper diet, exercise,
medical care and careful home manage-
ment can help people with diabetes avoid
the most serious complications of the dis-
ease, including amputation.
In addition to regular checkups with
their podiatrist, people with diabetes can
reduce their risk of complications with
some basic foot care, including:
* Inspecting their feet daily.
* Choosing thick, soft socks without
seams that could rub or cause blisters.
* Exercising daily.
* Having new shoes properly measured
and fitted.
* Avoiding going barefoot.
* Seeing a podiatrist for treatment of cal-
luses, corns or warts, rather than trying
to treat these conditions themselves.
High blood pressure
Hypertension can be related to a buildup
of plaque in the blood vessels, a condition
which can lead to decreased circulation in
the legs and feet. Poor circulation can lead
to the development of open wounds on the
skin. Symptoms of poor circulation in the
feet and legs include cramping, sores that
take a long time to heal, changes in the
color or temperature of the feet, and loss of
hair on the feet and legs.
Heel pain
One of the most common foot com-
plaints, heel pain can be caused by walk-
ing gait abnormalities, an injury, wearing
poorly constructed footwear over the long
term, or being overweight.
Heel pain is often very treatable. A
podiatrist can examine the heel, and may
take X-rays to rule out bone problems as
the source of the pain. Treatment may in-
clude anti-inflammatory medication, exer-
cise and shoe recommendations, taping or
strapping, or use of shoe inserts or orthotic
devices.
To minimize risks of developing heel
pain, wear shoes that fit well and have
shock-absorbent soles, rigid shanks and
supportive heel counters. Wear the proper
type of shoe for the activity youll be do-
ing. Warm up before exercising, and pace
yourself while participating in athletic ac-
tivities.
Foot pain does not need to be an in-
evitable part of growing older, Caporusso
says. Wearing the right type of footwear
for your needs, and paying attention to foot
health can help keep boomers moving into
their senior years.
(Continued from page 10)
Foot care
October 2012 Health and Medical Tab
15

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Health and Medical Tab October 2012
Compassion
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Justice
Sacredness of Life
Service
St. Ritas Medical Center 730 W. Market St., Lima, OH 45801 419.227.3361 www.stritas.org
The Regions Leader In Healthcare.
in Healthcare.
The Regions Leader
The moment patients begin treatment at St. Ritas, they embark on a personal journey to recovery.
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No matter what brings you to our hospital, were committed to meeting your needs as well as those of
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For more information about our hospital, please visit www.stritas.org.
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