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EU 27 environmental legislation for lighting

A quick guide including selling arguments January 2009

Introduction
In this booklet you will find an overview of the main EU27 environmental legislation currently effecting our Lamp, Gear and Luminaire business. You will find a brief description of the legislation itself, what it means for lighting, status, and sales arguments that can be used for each directive. Philips is committed to sustainability and fully complies with or exceeds all current legislation whilst also anticipating forthcoming legislation. All legislation described provides a large opportunity to promote and sell added value lamps, gear and luminaires. The environment as an opportunity is here to stay. This booklet will be updated periodically. January 2009

Uplamping Pays, Green Lamping Saves

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Index of legislation
1. The first five minutes 2. Selling arguments 3. Hazardous Substances (RoHS) 4. Waste (WEEE) 5. Energy using Products Directive (EuP) 6. Energy Performance of Building Directive (EPBD) 7. Ballast Directive 8. Energy Services Directive (ESD) 9. Energy Efficiency Label (EEL) 10. Lighting Quality Norms indoor (EN 12464-1) 11. Lighting Quality Norms outdoor (EN 13201) 12. Eco-label 6 10 14 18 20 26 30 32 36 38 40 42

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1. The first five minutes


It is clear that the next few years are important for environmental legislation* related to lighting. Some legislation already in force will be updated (e.g. WEEE, RoHS, EPBD, Energy Efficiency Label), some will be evaluated to decide if they should be continued or not (Eco-label) and newly published Directives (e.g. EuP and ESD) will be implemented in the EU27 market, thus phasing out energy inefficient products and forcing the EU27 market to switch to energy efficient lighting products.

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Philips and the European Lighting Industry (ELC, CELMA) support all these legislations, because it will increase the application of value added lighting solutions. Special focus should be paid to energy efficiency, hazardous substances and lifetime reliability. Environmental legislation related to lighting already surfaced more than a decade ago but during the last years the amount of legislation related to lighting has been increased mainly in the area of energy efficiency. About 2/3 of all lighting currently installed in the world is based on old technology, for which energy efficient alternatives are available now. Environmental legislation offers unique opportunities to discuss renovation of lighting with your customers. When lighting renovation rates are increased, particular for the building sector and public lighting, both substantial energy savings as well as green sales growth will result. The Accelerated Renovation Approach** aims to achieve this by making our customers an offer they cant refuse; lighting solutions that save energy and offer better quality of light at the same time. A large part of our communication for the coming years will be focused on encouraging businesses to make the switch now to energy saving lighting: it helps the business (by saving money and having good quality light) while contributing to a better environment at the same time.

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As Philips we bring a powerful and consistent message to the market, across different channels and market segments. Thats why we have developed a recognizable vehicle that will come back in our communication linked to Green / energy saving. The vehicle is a green sofa. The idea behind this sofa is that if you take a seat, you make a statement to switch to energy saving lighting. People become ambassadors that call to action: together we can make that change! Understanding the environmental legislation and making the right decisions will have an impact on your business. It is better to take action now than to wait when the legislation will be enforced because all the laws lead to better lighting. Complying to environmental legislation means seeking for business opportunities. Offering your customer the cheapest product means satisfying his initial needs, but tends to be a solution, which in the longer term results into the most expensive solution. Therefore we recommend buying Philips Green products, and go for the Triple Win: 1. Users/tax payers save costs and obtain better light quality 2. The environment benefits from lower energy/CO2 emissions 3. Business / country competitiveness is strengthened.

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* More details on the EU27 legislation can be found in the Philips Lighting Academy (PLA) module on environmental legislation. ** More details on the Accelerated Renovation Approach are available on the Green Switch Intranet site: www.lighting.philips.com/greenswitch or ask your local Philips Lighting contact person (for installers/external partners).

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2. Suggestions on how to use environmental arguments in sales discussions


In the last years environment (climate change) and energy efficiency (scarcity, compatibility) are high on the political agenda. This resulted in a number of existing and forthcoming legislations on energy efficiency in general but also on lighting in specific. This legislation can be used as an additional argument to convince customers to switch to energy efficient and sustainable lighting solutions next to TCO and lighting requirements. Of course the first sales argument will be that customers should always be in line with the lighting norms for indoor (EN-12464-1) and outdoor (EN-13201) which are also included in this booklet.

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The process First check if your customer is aware of environmental legislation and if they have an ISO14001 certificate or a sustainability program If yes, ask what they do to be in compliance with legislation, their ISO-14001 improvement plan or sustainability objectives, and what the consequences are for their lighting systems. If no, explain them that compliance to legislation helps them to improve the lighting and what they can do to become compliant (you can use this booklet but also the PLA module on EU27 environmental legislation). Offer them a scan to evaluate the compliance and show them a number of products that are the best solution and outperform existing legislation and competition. These are the so-called Green Products. Next to being in line with legislation, these products are the most economical solution and provide optimal quality light which make them the best sustainable solution with respect to planet (environment), people (quality light) and profit (TCO)

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Offer Environmental scan (to check conformity existing products with legislation) Declaration of conformity to environmental legislation Carbon footprints (especially interesting for governmental customers and commercial organizations with a sustainability program) ISO14001 improvement and sustainability programs can include next to compliance with legislation Carbon neutrality Green procurement Environmental labeling (building codes, eco label) Social responsibility (well being for employees)

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Be aware that compliance to legislation is seen as the absolute minimum. This means compliance to minimum requirement standards as expressed in for example the EuP and the RoHS. All Philips products are in line with these requirements but our Green Products are best in class and outperform competition. However there are also legislations such as the EPBD that challenge building owners to become best in class.

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3. RoHS Directive - 2002/95/EC


Restriction of the use of certain Hazardous Substances in electrical and electronic equipment Status - Implemented 1 July 2006 Revision 2009 new RoHS expected 2010

Aim of legislation This legislation complements the WEEE Directive by cutting the amounts of potentially hazardous materials contained in electronic and electrical products. Reduces risks to recycling staff. Lowers liability and prevents end users from coming into contact with hazardous substances. Minimizes the need for special waste treatment and recycling equipment. Minimizes pollution due to less use of substances. Helps to cut overall WEEE costs.

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Key RoHS points: The use in lighting products of the following substances has been restricted:
Lead (Pb) Mercury (Hg) Hexavalent Chromium (Cr VI) Cadmium (Cd) Polybrominated Biphenyls (PBB) Polybrominated Diphenyl Ethers (PBDE)

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What does it mean for Lamps, Gear and Luminaires? The RoHS directive covers lamps, gear and luminaires and together with the WEEE directive will have a significant impact on reducing the quantities of hazardous substances coming into the environment. Be aware that in the RoHS legislation, in contrast to the WEEE legislation, filament lamps are also included. There are some lighting exemptions in the legislation for both mercury and lead based on current industry levels of these substances (see table below). This is due to the fact that some mercury is needed to allow gas discharge lamps to operate efficiently and a lack in some cases of industrial technical alternatives in lead for certain product categories. One key consequence of the RoHS legislation should be the restriction of poor quality products. Philips, with its commitment to apply Ecodesign in its innovations, will exceed these new standards. Lighting exemptions in the RoHS directive:
Substance Mercury Application CFL Straight fluorescent lamps (general purposes) Halophosphate (standard lamps) Triphosphate normal life (80 colours) Triphosphate long life (Xtra/Xtreme) Fluorescent lamps for special purposes (Compact) HID lamps Glass in starters and fluorescent tubes High melting temperature solders (Pb>85%) Electronic ceramic parts (e.g. in drivers) Exemption Max Value < 5 mg < 10 mg < 5 mg < 8 mg Exempted Exempted Exempted Exempted Exempted

Lead

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Related sales arguments All Philips Lighting products are compliant. Conformity declarations are available on request. Our MASTER fluorescent lamps contain industry leading low levels of mercury. You will recognize these by the following logos* on the packaging. These products fit perfectly for companies with an environmental and sustainability policy, as well as for companies that are ISO14001 certified. The absolute content of hazardous substances is not always the most important value. For example the mercury content over lifetime can be a more important driver to select longer lifetime reliable products such as MASTER TL-D Xtra and Xtreme. *

Note: Mercury is still needed to create energy efficient lighting using discharge technology (such as fluorescent lamps). There are several reasons why Philips has very low values of mercury such as a reliable manufacturing processes resulting in the low mercury consumption during life.

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4. WEEE Directive - 2002/96/EC


Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment Status - Implemented WEEE should have officially been implemented on 13-08-2005, and now it is implemented in all EU 27 countries + 2 (Norway and Switzerland). Aim of legislation The purpose of the directive is to prevent waste or to reduce it by re-using or re-cycling. The basic premise of the directive is that the producer is responsible for the financing of environmentally sound disposal of his products at the end-of-life stage. The environmental background is the rapid increase of WEEE waste, the hazardous component content and the insufficient recycling effort at the moment. Key points WEEE Manufacturers and importers of electronic and electrical equipment are responsible for compensating the collection, recovery and treatment of WEEE costs. Consumers can return their products free of charge to the collection points. Only licensed operators will be able to handle and recover WEEE.

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What does it mean for lighting? The WEEE covers all Gas discharge lamps. Control Gear is seen as an integral part of the luminaire. The products that are covered under the WEEE can be recognized by a crossed-out wheeled dustbin label*. In all EU27+2 countries, ELC lamp manufacturers work together to set up collective recycling and service organizations. For lamps, Philips puts a visible flat fee on the invoice to finance the disposal structure. For gear and luminaires each country has a specific solution. These service organizations take over the producer responsibility. Philips is a member and in some countries chairman of this service organization. Related sales arguments The WEEE fee is a significant part of the lamp purchase price especially for low quality lamps with a short lifetime such as a halophosphate fluorescent lamp. There is no fee differentiation between different type of lamps under the scope of the directive. The longer the lifetime the lower the impact of the WEEE fee but also the amount of waste. Philips has a full range of long-life time reliable products such as the MASTER TL-D Xtra/Xtreme and MASTER PL-L Xtra LEDs have the longest lifetime of all existing lighting products and they are also not covered by WEEE. Thus are LEDs the best choice with respect to the lowest waste impact regarding costs and material. *

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5. EuP Directive - 2005/32/EC


Framework directive for the setting of Ecodesign requirements for Energy using Products Status - Published The EUP Directive was published on 22 July 2005. Member states have transposed (i.e. adopted) it into national law. In 2008, two specific underlying Implementing Measures (IM) on lighting have been voted positively by the Regulatory Committee (RC): the IM on Tertiary Sector Lighting and the IM on Domestic Lighting (phase 1). For both IMs entry into force is expected in Q1 2009. During 2009 the IM on Domestic Lighting (phase 2) will be designed and voting in the RC is expected in Q4 2009. Aim of legislation The EUP Directive is aiming at reducing the environmental impact of energy using products without obstacles to intra-EU trade. The Implementing Measures set the energy efficiency criteria of new products and are immediately valid in all Member states as from their publication in the European Gazette, and no transposition is needed.

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What will it mean for lighting? The focus in the IMs is to set minimum energy efficiency requirements, thus automatically phasing out products that cannot fulfill these requirements. Next to the energy efficiency requirements also more detailed product information has to become available. See below table with the consequences for the IM Tertiary Sector Lighting. Stage 1: 1 year after entry into force (2010)
Lamps Phase out T8 halophosphate fluorescent lamps Ballasts Minimum Energy Efficiency Index (EEI) class B2 ballasts for fluorescent lamps included in table 17. Luminaires 18 months (second half 2010): mandatory product information for fluorescent and High Intensity Discharge lamps (>2000 lumen) available on websites and technical documents

Phase out of fluorescent lamps (T8 & T5) with colour rendering index < 80 Mandatory information for fluorescent and High Intensity Discharge (HID) lamps available on websites and technical documents Phase out CFL-ni 2-pin lamps (these lamps can only be operated on magnetic ballasts)

Minimum EEI class A3 ballasts for fluorescent lamps not included in table 17 (new lamps) Mandatory EEI marking on all fluorescent ballasts Standby power maximum 1W for fluorescent lamp ballasts Standby power maximum 1W for luminaires for fluorescent lamps

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Stage 2: 3 years after entry into force (2012)


Lamps Phase out T10 and T12 halophosphate fluorescent lamps Ballasts Introduction of minimum efficiency requirements for High Intensity Discharge (HID) ballasts. No change to fluorescent lamp ballasts requirements. Efficiency marking on all HID ballasts Luminaires Luminaires for fluorescent lamps without integrated ballast and for high intensity discharge lamps shall be compatible with ballasts complying with the 3rd stage requirements,except luminaires with ingress protection grade at least IP4X (complete enclosed luminaires) Mandatory product information for all luminaires available on websites and technical documents Standby power maximum 0.5W for fluorescent lamp ballasts Standby power maximum 0.5 W for luminaires for fluorescent lamps

Phase out High Pressure Sodium (HPS) lamps below limit level (excluding HPS plug-in to operate on HPM ballasts) Phase out Metal Halide lamps (E27, E40 and PGZ12) below limit level 6 years after entry into force (2015): phase out other HID lamps below limit level, a.o. High Pressure Mercury (HPM) lamps and phase out plug-in High Pressure Sodium (HPS) lamps to operate on HPM ballasts

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Stage 3: 8 years after entry into force (2017)


Lamps Phase out some additional Metal Halide lamps 405W (E27, E40 and PGZ12) through higher minimum efficacy requirements + improved life & lumen maintenance Ballasts Phase out B1, B2, A3 ballasts for fluorescent lamp ballasts Luminaires All luminaires to be compatible only with 3rd stage requirements ballasts

Values for HID ballasts: Nominal lamp wattage (P) Minimum ballast efficiency (ballast) % 78 85 87 90 92

W P<30 30<P <= 75 75 < P <= 105 105 < P <= 405 P> 405

See page 24 for table with consequences for the IM Domestic Lighting (phase 1).

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Summary Domestic Lighting, phase 1, Consequences stages 1- 6 Directional light sources (reflector lamps) and special purpose lamps are exempted ABC Allowed in the EU27 market DEFG not allowed in the EU27 market
Minimum Efficiency * >=80W >950lm >=65W >725lm >=45W >450lm >=7W >60lm Minimum Efficiency * >=80W >950lm >=65W >725lm >=45W >450lm >=7W >60lm from Clear Frosted Clear Frosted Clear Frosted Clear Frosted from Clear Stage 1 09/2009 ABC/DEFG A/BCDEFG ABCDE/FG A/BCDEFG ABCDE/FG A/BCDEFG ABCDE/FG A/BCDEFG Stage 4 09/2012 Stage 5 09/2013 Stage 6 09/2016 AB C A AB C A AB C A AB C A Revision 2014 ABC/DEFG ABC/DEFG Stage 2 09/2010 Stage 3 09/2011

Clear Frosted Clear Frosted Clear Frosted ABC/DEFG

* Valid for all incandescent lamps and halogens with E27, E14, B22 and B15 cap and <12.000 lm. Values are defined in Lumen and no longer in Watt. ** Clear lamps with G9/R7s socket are allowed to be energy class C.
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Increased quality requirements

Frosted

Related sales arguments The EuP will phase out a number of energy inefficient products within the near future. It makes no sense to sell new lighting systems including this such as HPL based luminaires that will need to be renovated on very short notice and thus imposing additional costs. Therefore it is recommended to focus on selling lighting systems consisting of products in line with the future EuP requirements. Products that will be phase out are: halophosphate TL lamps, low efficient metal halides lamps, low efficient High Pressure Sodium lamps, CFL-ni 2-pin lamps, EM gear for fluorescense, High Pressure Mercury lamps, incandescent lamps, low efficient halogen lamps (see also tables above). Products that will are in line with the EUP Directive are electronic gear and controls, as well as lamps like CosmoPolis as alternative for HPL, MASTER TL-D Eco and MASTER TL5 as alternative for halophosphate TL lamps, and CFL-I, MASTER classic and MASTER LED as alternative for incandescent lamps and low efficient halogen lamps. These products also make business sense thanks to their energy cost savings (TCO), optimal lighting quality, lifetime reliability and minimized use of hazardous substances.

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6. EPBD Directive - 2002/91/EC


Directive on the energy performance of buildings Status: Implemented 2006 Revision 2009 / 2010 New 2010 The Energy Performance of Buildings Directive was published on 4 January 2003. Currently the majority of Member States adopted the Directive with national law. For what Lighting is concerned, on November 2007 a CEN standard has been published (EN 15193) calculating the so-called LENI (Lighting Energy Numeric Indicator) in kWh/m2/year. Unfortunately the majority of national laws indicate for the whole building the total maximum energy consumption, where detailed parameters per energy efficiency measure (coating, cooling, lighting, etc) would be preferable. Aim of legislation To create a common framework to promote the improvement of the energy performance of buildings. The directive is part of the EU framework to combat climate change at the demand side by reducing energy consumption and increase energy efficiency. Buildings are targeted because they account for one third of the total EU energy consumption. It is an additional instrument to directive 93/76/EC. Member states are responsible for setting minimum targets. They will also ensure certification and inspection.

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Key Building directive points: The directive concerns residential and tertiary sector (offices, public buildings, etc.). The minimum useful floor area has to be more than 1000 m2. Renovated buildings have to comply as well if the renovation content is higher than 25% of the total value of the building. It does not concern historical buildings and industrial sites. It does not lay down criteria on equipment such as household appliances, nor on qualifications of installations. It offers a common methodology for calculating the integrated energy performance of buildings and systems for energy certifications that are less than five years old. The methodology should include all aspects of energy consumption such as heating, cooling, lighting position and orientation of the building, heat recovery, etc. Minimum total building criteria will be set by national legislation. This means that individual solutions have to be summated and be averaged over the total. The energy use of energy efficient installations can compensate for less energy efficient installations in the same building. Since for lighting the application performance requirements (EN 12464) are not made mandatory by the Building Directive, it is still possible to install under performing systems. Some countries have specific national regulations enforcing light technical performance standards for specific applications. The envisaged update of the Building Directive may further strengthen the requirements and broaden its scope.

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What does it mean for lighting? Lighting has to compete with other energy consuming products in buildings and their potential for reducing energy use. It is important to explain the benefits of energy efficient lighting both in energy reduction and as cost savings. This means that HF gear, controls, and systems such as TL5 all become more attractive. Related sales arguments The EPBD is not implemented and enforced in most of the member states so not many end users are aware how to comply and how to balance the opportunities for lighting with respect to the other elements in this legislation. Explain them the benefits of energy efficient lighting and how it can contribute to achieve a high classification level in a cost effective way. The first step to comply to the EPBD is to perform an energy scan to define the energy classification and a lighting scan including a LENI calculation. To decrease the LENI and to contribute to the highest EPBD class advice Green Products such as MASTER TL5 lamps, Controls and Electronic ballasts. Certification and energy efficient lighting will increase the value of the building. High quality lighting will be stimulated by addressing compliance to Light technical performance standard EN 12464.

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7. Ballast Directive 2000/55/EC


Energy Efficiency requirements for ballasts for fluorescent lighting Status Implemented will become part of EuP and repealed as separate directive Phase 1: ban on EEI D-class ballasts per 21-5-2002 Phase 2: ban on EEI C-class ballasts per 11-2005 Phase 3: all the contents will be included in EUP Implementing Measures Tertiary Sector Lighting as per stage 2 (February 2010) and repealed (i.e. deleted) as separate Directive Aim of legislation Promote energy savings through moving away from less energy efficient ballasts by limiting the ballast losses. Key points: Ballasts are classified through an Energy Efficiency Index (EEI) A1, A2, A3, B1, B2, C and D, where A1 is the most energy efficient due to dimming facility and D the least energy efficient. Compliance to the Ballast Directive is, like the Low Voltage Directive and the EMC Directive, shown by the application of the CE marking. This means that luminaires imported from outside Europe must comply with the directive as well.

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The Ballast Directive is only for fluorescent lamps (TL, CFL-NI). Ballasts with high losses are phased out in two steps (D-class by 21-5-2003and C-class by 11-2005). What does it mean for lighting? As 50% of sales are C-class ballasts, this directive is a huge opportunity to switch to electronic ballast (A-class) and related control systems. It should also help restrict low quality cheap imports from outside the EU. Electromagnetic ballasts (B-class) are also allowed, but this category is more expensive and larger than C and D-class. Sales arguments Only B and A-type ballast are allowed. Advise to change the luminaire as it is not economical viable to change the ballast due to high labour costs. Additional benefits are better optimal performance and the possibility to integrate day light linking and presence detection to save even more energy. In case of upgrading, selecting an A1-class electronic ballasts is the best choice due to better energy efficiency and maximized energy savings through dimming and the use of controls (up to 30% saving by switching from EM to Electronic and up to 75% by using controls). Additional benefits of electronic ballasts are longer lamp life, no flicker and no end-of-life effects.

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8. ESD Directive - 2006/32/EC


Directive on the promotion of end use efficiency and energy services Status - Published 2006 Implemented 2008 It has been implemented as national legislation in 2008. Aim of legislation Energy consumption in the EU is 20% higher than can be justified economically. The ESD requires Member States to make 3 National Energy Efficiency Action Plans (NEEAP) (in 2007, 2011, 2014) to save 9% of energy in 9 years. In additional there is a Political Agreement (March 2007) to go even beyond this legislation and save 20% energy by 2020. The ESD also requires Energy Suppliers to implement energy efficiency measures. This legislation emphasizes the need to apply all other existing environmental legislation, as well as the new EUP directive. Where the EUP Directive focuses on the demand side (new products), the ESD applies to distribution and retail sale of energy such as electricity and other types of energy carriers, the public procurement and the role of governments, auditing of installations and funding mechanisms for renovations.

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Key points Energy Service & Efficiency directive: Eliminate barriers that prevent efficient end use of energy by target setting, set up of incentives, financial and legal frameworks. Develop a market for energy services and providing energy-saving programs and other measures to improve end-use energy efficiency. A general savings target of 1% per year (for a 9-year period) supplied or sold to end-users (based on previous five year average). A mandatory target of 1.5% in the public sector through procurement, energy programs and other measures. Targets should be met by Financial instruments, like third party contracts and energy performance contracts Purchase of equipment with good energy efficiency and low-energy products Energy distributors that sell electricity should Supply and promote energy services Refrain activity that could hamper energy efficiency Supply information to improve energy efficiency Member states must also take care that financial instruments are put into place including certification, monitoring and auditing systems.

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What will it mean for lighting? Due to lobby efforts, lighting (renovation) projects are mentioned in nearly all National Energy Efficiency Action Plans. It is also of interest to electricity suppliers, because it is one of the cheapest and fastest ways to realize energy savings related to the obligations above mentioned. Related sales arguments The UK Energy Efficiency Commitment is one of the systems that fit in the ESD, where large amounts of CFL lamps are sold to electricity suppliers (so-called PES business). The ESD and the UK best practice will be a unique opportunity to roll out this approach all over Europe to promote energy efficient lighting as a vehicle for the public sector to achieve their targets. It is a unique opportunity to sell energy efficient lighting solutions to utilities not only in the domestic domain but also at professional end users. Partnerships with Energy Service Companies (ESCOs) can be a good way to help energy companies to comply to the ESD with the help of lighting. You can also offer to use the energy scan that the energy companies can use to make their customers aware of their saving potential.

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9. Energy Efficiency Label - 98/11/EC


Status - Implemented Revision 2009 Update of the council Directive 92/75/EC with regard to energy efficiency labeling of household lamps. Aim of legislation Stimulate the market to buy more energy efficient products by making categories in energy efficiency classes and make them available in a label on the packaging. Key points: Ratings for lighting are defined as energy efficiency class A (most energy efficient) to G (least energy efficient). Classes are calculated using lumen output and lamp power input (see annex IV of the directive). The label must be put on the packaging and communicated in mail order catalogues and other printed material. This should contain the following information: Energy efficiency class Luminous flux of the lamp Input power Average rated lamp life See for label dimensions Annex 1 of the directive

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What does it mean for lighting? Product scope: Filament and integral compact fluorescent lamps and all fluorescent lamps. The scope will be enlarged with all products in EUP Excluded are: Lamps with luminous flux > 6500 lumens Lamps with input power < 4W Reflector lamps Lamps operated on batteries Light outside visible range (400 to 800 nm) Lamps integrated in luminaire not for illumination Related sales arguments Compliance to the EEL is applying the right marking not the choice in the EEL class. Use category A and B, as the most energy efficient range of products, not only good for the environment but. in line with the forthcoming EuP phase out of incandescent lamps and also the lowest running costs.

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10. Light Technical Performance Standard EN 12464-1: for indoor applications.


Status published in 2003 to accommodate to the Workplace Directive on the protection of labour This standard is not called up by European legislation. No obligatory application is necessary. Some countries refer to this standard in their regulations for some specific applications. Aim of the standard Provide a minimum level of lighting so that people can perform the task as expected without excessive negative visual and health effects. Key points: The standard specifies minimum requirements for indoor workplaces (sport accommodations excepted). Ra>80 is required in full time work areas. T>4000 K in areas of medical attention and T>6000 where colour inspection is needed (dentist, laboratories, pharmacies) >200 lux at task area where people are present and >20 lux where people only occasionally present. Recommended values are between 300 - 500 lux.

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What does it mean for lighting? The standard affects colour rendering, colour temperature, light levels glare and flicker. It meets the needs for visual comfort, safety and performance. Related sales arguments Compliance to the norm means that lighting is meeting the minimum values for good lighting with respect to colour rendering, amount of light on the task, glare and uniformity. All the green products comply to the norm, there are solutions for 1-to-1 replacement and we can offer lighting plans. Energy efficient solutions For each customer segment an energy efficient lighting solution exists already today (see also PLA module Lighting Solutions)

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11. Light Technical Performance Standard EN 13201: for outdoor applications.


Status published in 2004 This standard is not called up by European legislation. No obligatory application is necessary. Some countries on a voluntary base adopted it putting its standards as mandatory to be followed for some specific applications. Aim of the standard Provide guidelines for lighting designers of road lighting installations by describing visibility requirements for the safe use of roads. This standard also aims to reduce or prevent obtrusive light in places where it isnt needed (glare; light pollution, etc). Key points: To achieve the minimum required lighting for save traffic, both socially and functional. The norm comes with lighting situations and converts these into performance requirements. For road lighting the luminance (cd/m2), the overall and lengthwise uniformity, the threshold increment (indication of the loss of visual performance due to perceived glare from the lighting element) and the surround ratio are relevant. Especially in cities the vertical illuminance at buildings should not be too high to prevent complaints from inhabitants. Limits are set.

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What does it mean for lighting? The Lighting Industry wants to obtain an obligatory status after updating the standard to integrate energy efficiency criteria for road lighting installations. Related sales arguments Compliance to the norm means that lighting is meeting the minimum values for good lighting with respect the amount of light related to the road classification, glare and uniformity. All the green products comply to the norm, there are solutions for 1-to-1 replacement and we can offer lighting plans. Energy efficient solutions For each customer segment an energy efficient lighting solution exists already today (see also PLA module Lighting Solutions)

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12. Eco-label 002/747/EC (revision of 1999/568/EC)


Revised ecological criteria for the award of the Community Eco-label to light bulbs

LR IMG
Status - Implemented in 1999 and revised in 2002 Voluntary Scheme of products meeting ecological criteria. Philips is not using this label.

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2009 Koninklijke Philips Electronics N.V. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part is prohibited without the prior written consent of the copyright owner. The information presented in this document does not form part of any quotation or contract, is believed to be accurate and reliable and may be changed without notice. No liability will be accepted by the publisher for any consequence of its use. Publication thereof does not convey nor imply any license under patent- or other industrial or intellectual property rights. Date of release: January 2009 / UK XXX XXX XXXXX Printed in the Netherlands