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Social Studies at the Center

The official journal of National Council for the Social Studies Volume 76, Number 6 November/December 2012 www.socialstudies.org

November/December 2012

Contents

Volume 76, Number 6

Editorial staff Editor Michael Simpson Associate Editors Jennifer Bauduy Steven Lapham Art Director Rich Palmer Department Editors Democracy Education Diana Hess Elementary Education Mary E. Haas Instructional Technology Michael J. Berson Meghan McGlinn Manfra Looking at the Law Tiffany Willey Middleton Research and Practice Walter C. Parker Surfing the Net C. Frederick Risinger Teaching with Documents Lee Ann Potter
Social EducatioN (iSSN 0037-7724) is published monthly in September, october, bimonthly Nov/dec, Jan/Feb, March/april, May/June, by National council for the Social Studies, 8555 Sixteenth Street, Suite 500, Silver Spring, Maryland 20910; telephone (301) 588-1800. Periodicals postage paid at Silver Spring, Maryland and additional mailing ofces. Send Your Manuscripts and correspondence to socialed@ ncss.org. Print copies should be mailed to the Editors at the address listed above. Manuscripts for departments should be directed to the department editors. For submission guidelines, please visit: www.socialstudies.

272 Teaching with Documents 1863 Letter from the Department of State to the Government Printing Office Lee Ann Potter the featured documents relating to the Emancipation Proclamation illustrate how President lincolns government spread the news worldwide. 278 Looking at the Law Did that Dog Sniff Violate the Fourth Amendment? Catherine Hawke and Tiffany Middleton a recent Supreme court case looking at whether a drug dogs sniff gives police ofcers the right to get a search warrant, provides an excellent entry point into a lesson on the Fourth amendment. 283 Democracy Education Should Schools Teach Students to Vote? YES! Diana E. Hess teachers can impact young peoples involvement in elections by not only teaching about elections, but also about how to register to vote and how to go about voting. 290 New Directions in Assessment: Using Library of Congress Sources to Assess Historical Understanding Sam Wineburg, Mark Smith, and Joel Breakstone these newly designed assessments allow a quick evaluation of the quality of student thinking, and promote appropriate instructional action. 294 Research and Practice What Makes a Good History Essay? Assessing Historical Aspects of Argumentative Writing Chauncey Monte-Sano learning history and historical thinking can help students become better writers. 299 Surfing the Net What Social Studies Educators can do about the Marginalization of the Subject They Teach C. Frederick Risinger these recommended strategies and websites can help teachers protect and improve the role of social studies in the curriculum and mobilize public support for social studies and citizenship education.

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Social EducatioN does not accept responsibility for the views expressed by its contributors. it provides opportunities for the publication of materials reecting divergent ideas, judgments, and opinions. copyright 2012 National council for the Social Studies. the NcSS logotype is a trademark of National council for the Social Studies. Social EducatioN is indexed in Education index, Social Science citation index and indexed and annotated by ERic/chESS in current index to Journals in Education. copies of articles are now available from Bell and Howell information and learning, 300 North Zeeb Road, Box 1346, ann arbor, Mi 48106-1346; (800) 521-0600. For permission to reproduce articles for academic use, contact the copyright clearance center (ccc), academic Permissions Service (aPS), 222 Rosewood drive, danvers, Ma 01923; (978) 750-8400. inquiries about NcSS membership and subscriptions to Social EducatioN, as well as notication of changes of address by members and subscribers, can be e-mailed to membership@ncss.org or sent by regular mail to Membership department, NcSS, 8555 Sixteenth St., #500, Silver Spring, Md 20910. PoStMaStER: Send address changes to Social Education, 8555 Sixteenth Street, Suite 500, Silver Spring, Maryland 20910.

Cover: students at Community High school in West Chicago participate in a school mock election activity. see the article by Diana Hess on pp. 283289 (Photo by Candace Barry)

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National Council for the social studies


Founded 1921 NCSS OffiCerS John Moore, President Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green, KY Stephen Armstrong, President-Elect William H. Hall High School and King Phillip Middle School, West Hartford, CT Central Connecticut State University, New Britain, CT Michelle Herczog, Vice President Los Angeles County Office of Education, Downey, CA BOard Of direCtOrS Sue Blanchette, Past President Dallas, TX Karen Burgard Franklin College, Franklin, IN (2015) Andrew Demko Rainier Jr/Sr. High School, Rainier, OR (2015) Marian Desrosiers Salve Regina University, Newport, RI (2013) Terry Cherry Naaman Forest High School, Garland, TX (2014) Melissa Collum Clemson University, Clemson, SC (2013) Diane Hart Menlo Park, CA (2014) Peggy Jackson Moriarity High School, Moriarity, NM (2013) Mary McCullagh Christopher Columbus High School, Miami, FL (2015) India Meissel Lakeland High School, Suffolk, VA (2015) Kim ONeil Liverpool Elementary School, Liverpool, NY (2013) Elyse Poller Mansfield Middle School, Mansfield, CT (2014) Loraine Stewart Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA (2014) eX OffiCiO Maria Sanelli Chair, House of Delegates Steering Committee 2012 Kutztown University, Kutztown, PA Executive Director Susan Griffin Department Directors Timothy Daly administration Brenda Luper Finance David Bailor Meetings and Exhibitions Ana Chiquillo Post External Relations and council communication Cassandra Roberts Membership Processing Michael Simpson Publications
Membership in National council for the Social Studies is open to any person or institution interested in the social studies. comprehensive Membership dues are $79. Regular Membership dues are $66; Student/Retired Membership dues are $37 (instructor certication required for full-time student status). all memberships include the newsletter The Social Studies Professional. Members can choose as a benet either a full subscription to Social Education (six issues) or a full subscription to Social Studies and the Young Learner, which includes the September and May/June issues of Social Education. comprehensive members also receive all bulletins. the annual subscription rate for members, included in membership dues, is $35. Single copies are $7.95. Subscriptions to Social Education are $67 and institutional. additional subscriptions are not available to individuals (members or non-members). to join NcSS or subscribe as an institution, send check to NcSS, Po Box 79078, Baltimore, Maryland 21279-0078, call 1 800 296-7840, or visit
www.socialstudies.org/membership.

301 The World War II Era and Human Rights Education Stewart Waters and William B. Russell III this historical analysis and teaching activity offers teachers an approach for integrating human rights issues into the world history curriculum. 306 Case Study of Chinese Exclusion Act Enforcement Compiled by Joanne Dufour the featured lesson exploring early twentieth-century u.S. policies towards chinese immigrants can serve as a jumping off point into a discussion of contemporary u.S. immigration issues. 313 The Rho Kappa Spirit Mary T. McCullagh High school juniors and seniors describe some of their enriching experiences in social studies, citizenship, and civic engagement activities since joining the Rho Kappa social studies honor society. 315 A Grade 5 Common Core Exemplar: Teaching about the Bill of Rights Michelle Herczog this lesson brings the Bill of Rights to life for studentsadvancing their understanding of democratic principles while strengthening their reading, writing, and language skills. 324 Teaching Challenging Topics with Primary Sources Alan J. Singer Students can develop their abilities to analyze complex topics when they evaluate primary sources such as the excerpted documents in this article. 329 Annual Index
271 Editors Notebook 332 advertiser index

Return Address: NCSS 8555 Sixteenth Street, Suite 500, Silver Spring, Maryland 20910

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Social Education 76(6), p. 271 2012 National council for the Social Studies

Michael Simpson

editors Notebook
the social studies disciplines teach students both about historic milestones and issues of contemporary signicance. this edition of Social Education features several articles on such topics, as well as incisive analyses of the challenges of developing meaningful assessments and meeting the common core State Standards. this coming January, we will celebrate the 150th anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation. in this issues teaching with documents column, lee ann Potter examines the preparations made by the lincoln administration to distribute copies of the Proclamation to embassies and consulates overseas, where it rallied international sympathy to the union cause. the featured documents are the letter from the Secretary of State requesting the printing of the Proclamation, and an accounts ledger recording its printing cost. When Franky, a drug-snifng chocolate labrador owned by the Miami-dade Police department, identied the scent of marijuana in a local home in 2006, he started a chain of events that is now being reviewed by the Supreme court. in our looking at the law column, catherine Hawke and tiffany Middleton examine the Fourth amendment issues that have arisen from the seizure of marijuana and the arrest of Joelis Jardines in that episode. their suggestions for teaching about this and related cases will place the Fourth amendment at the center of lively classroom discussions. Historically, young voters have been less likely to go to the polls than older ones. diana Hess suggests that schools can play an important role in improving turnout among the young. among her recommendations is the inclusion of more voting-related topics in the curriculum (e.g., the history of suffrage movements, and more in-depth instruction about the electoral process and contemporary political issues). She also suggests that schools can play an important practical role in showing students who have reached voting age how to register, and how to go about casting their vote. Formative assessment is an important tool for increasing student achievement, as Sam Wineburg, Mark Smith and Joel Breakstone point out, because its goal is not to grade students but to pinpoint where they are having trouble and then to take appropriate instructional action (291). the authors describe a recent initiative in which they used the library of congress collection of primary sources to generate effective formative history assessments that can offer teachers a new means of improving the performance and capabilities of their students. chauncey Monte-Sano describes the challenges of evaluating history essays. one problem is that conventional rubrics often prioritize writing skills over historical understanding. in this issues Research and Practice column, she shares procedures that she has developed for evaluating essays that give appropriate weight to the quality of a students historical thinking and analysis, and illustrates her approach with specic examples of student writing. Stewart Waters and William B. Russell iii advocate a stronger focus in the world history curriculum on the impact of World War ii on the subsequent international commitment to the protection of human rights. citing the widespread violation of rights during that war, they emphasize the need to teach about the universal declaration of Human Rights, as well as other major human rights initiatives that have stemmed from the need to prevent a recurrence of the wartime atrocities. Joanne dufour reviews the effects of the chinese Exclusion act of 1882 and its subsequent amended versions. Her case study focuses on a young chinese immigrant to the united States, Yee Quong Yuen, who was ordered deported in 1910, but was subsequently allowed to stay after his appeal against the decision was upheld. the featured document is a record of the young mans interrogation by an immigration inspector. Fred Risinger reiterates the need for social studies teachers to defend our subject in the curriculum [and] mobilize public support for social studies and citizenship education (299) His internet column identies strategies and websites that can help our members to achieve those goals. an exciting new initiative by NcSS during the last year has been the establishment of a social studies honor society for students the Rho Kappa National Social Studies Honor Society, which was originally developed in Florida through the Florida council for the Social Studies. Mary t. Mccullagh, who teaches in a Miami school that has a Rho Kappa chapter, describes the excitement and benets that Rho Kappa can bring to students. the common core State Standards have now been adopted by 45 u.S. states and the district of columbia. there are many questions about the impact these standards will have on the social studies disciplines, which are entrusted with responsibilities for the development of student literacy. Michelle Herczog presents a strategy that helps to meet the common core standards through instruction based on important documents that gives students a profound understanding of the texts of the documents. She offers a detailed exemplar for presenting the Bill of Rights to a fth grade class. (Her suggested lesson can also be adapted to other grade levels.) alan Singer demonstrates the value of the use of primary sources for dealing with challenging topics in classes on history, government, and current events. He offers recommendations of specic texts that can enhance the discussion of same-sex relationships, the debate about the form of government that best ts human nature, and class examinations of the real meaning of literal interpretations of the u.S. constitution. as always, the editors of Social Education welcome the comments of readers on any of the contributions to this issue at socialed@
ncss.org.

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Social Education 76(6), pp. 299300 2012 National council for the Social Studies

Surfing the Net

What Social Studies educators can do about the Marginalization of the Subject they teach
C. Frederick Risinger
the juxtaposition of the 2012 national elections and the marginalization of social studies/citizenship education in the pre-K-12 school curriculum has been both coincidental, and, in a way, an opportunity for ussocial studies teachers, supervisors, and teacher educatorsto nd ways to restore creative classroom instruction about history, government, citizenship, and social studies to equality in the curriculum. two years ago, Social Education published my open letter to President Barack obama in which i expressed concern about the marginalization of social studies in the preK-12 curriculum and said that without effective instruction in social studies and civics, our nation would not only lose its national bearings, it will lose its soul. the letter accompanied my column on the movement to establish common Standards for all subject areas and how the emphasis on English/ language arts and Mathematics and high-stakes testing was pushing social studies out of the curriculum. i did not receive a reply from the president, but Secretary of Education arne duncan wrote an article referring to my column and stating his support for social studies. duncan also spoke at last years NcSS annual Meeting. He said some nice things about social studies and acknowledged that high stakes testing linked to the No child left Behind (NclB) program contributed to the marginalization of social studies. However, i have yet to hear about any initiatives from the department of Education to help improve the status of social studies in the curriculum. currently, there are two approaches to national standards for all subject areas: (1) those associated with the No child left Behind program of the u.S. department of Education; and (2) the ones being developed by the common core Standards initiative. Most social studies specialists believe the common core standards are more favorable to our eld and more compatible with NcSS goals and policies. in January 2010, NcSS and the civic Mission of
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Schools (cMS) convened a meeting of national organizations in civics, economics, geography, and history, to discuss working together on State created Standards for Social Studies. their work has progressed well and several states across the country have adopted them or are using them to create their own state standards. So, rather than my usual column providing links to internet sites that will help teachers design instructional approaches to a specic topic or idea in social studies, this column will help social studies teachers take steps to defend our subject in the curriculum, mobilize public support for social studies and citizenship education, and strengthen our role as social studies and citizenship educators. to accomplish these goals, we absolutely must work togetherwithin our school, our district, our stateand with social studies throughout the nation. Here is a set of recommended strategies and websites to assist you and your colleagues in helping to save social studies.

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a Vision of Powerful teaching and Learning in the Social Studies: Building Social Understanding and Civic efficacy

www.socialstudies.org/positions/ powerful Several of my recommended sites are within the NcSS website. We have to encourage our colleagues to join NcSS and its state afliates. No other organization can muster the resources and people to speak out for our eld. Strengthening NcSS is the best way to maintain and enhance our role in the school curriculum.
the NCSS toolkit: todays Social Studies Creating effective Citizens

nition and description of the ve themes. (You may have to close an advertisement rst, before you can see their approach to citizenship education, which is for grades K-6.)
National History education Clearinghouse

http://teachinghistory.org/teachingmaterials/state-standards While this site focuses primarily on history teaching and materials, it has one page that lists all state social studies standards by state and grade level. Just select the state and grade level and the

written by my friend, colleague, and great spokesman for civic education, John Patrick. it is still one of the best discussions of what citizenship education is and why and how it should be taught in the schools. it should be read, and re-read, by every social studies teacher. check it out, i think youll agree.
20 ideas for teaching Citizenship to Children

www.socialstudies.org/toolkit this is the most valuable web page in my list. the NcSS toolkit provides virtually all the information, recommended strategies, and other materials that you and your colleagues will use to drum up support for your efforts to maintain and improve public support for social studies.
education World

state standards currently in use.


CNN: Civic education in the News

www.educationworld.com/standards/ national/soc_sci/ Even though this set of common core Standards in social studies is also on the NcSS website, i wanted to highlight the way that Education World presents the introduction to the standards and identies which cooperative organization helped develop them. You can go to each of the partner sites and nd other links that will help you in your efforts.
education World

www.educationworld.com/a_curr/ curr008.shtml on this page, Education World explores Five themes for Good citizenship and suggests activities that can be used in the classroom to help students understand citizenship. i like their de-

http://articles.cnn.com/keyword/civiceducation this site changes regularly to keep up with daily happenings related to civic education. it can provide you and your group with examples of why social studies/civic education is important and why it should not be neglected in the curriculum. on the day i looked at it, it had articles and news stories about constitution day and how its observed in schools around the nation and a recommended classroom strategy where students weigh in on the issues of civil liberties and national security. Many of the stories include teaching suggestions.
teaching the responsibilities of Citizenship-eriC digest

www.kellybear.com/TeacherArticles/ TeacherTip27.html Kellybear is a website designed by leah davies who recommends strategies and materials for teachers. this url links to an excellent article that is a comprehensive discussion of great ideas for teaching citizenship, primarily in the elementary grades. Secondary teachers will be able to adapt the ideas for their own classes. i enjoyed reading them. there are dozens of other websites that i could have used. My primary purpose for this column is to help us (social studies educators) nd ways to work together to help protect and improve the role of social studies in the curriculum. ask to speak to your local school board to present information about the importance of social studies and how it is being marginalized by NclB testing. organize a letter writing campaign by members of your state NcSS afliate to state legislators asking them to support social studies/ citizenship education. Make a presentation to your school or districts parent/teacher organization. We have to work together to preserve the role of social studies in the schools. its not just for us; its for our nation.
C. Frederick Risinger retired as director of
professional development and coordinator of social studies education after 31 years at Indiana University, Bloomington. He currently is working on a new writing project and working on a website designed to help current teachers and teachers-in-training. He can be reached at risinger@indiana.edu.

www.education.com/reference/article/ Ref_Citizenship_2/ this ERic digest from long ago is


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Social Education 76(6), pp 313314 2012 National council for the Social Studies

the rho Kappa Spirit


Mary T. McCullagh
Many years ago, our school opened a chapter of Rho Kappa, the Social Studies Honor Society developed through the Florida council for the Social Studies (FcSS). as department chair and member of FcSS, i was thrilled to be able to offer our students opportunities in the Honor Society for the Social Studies. We invited junior and senior students to join, and they eagerly began to investigate projects and activities to promote social studies, citizenship and civic engagement, along with the aim of simply having fun. i would like to share some of our experiences with members of National council for the Social Studies now that NcSS has made Rho Kappa a national honor society open to schools in all states. Rho Kappa is the only national organization for high school juniors and seniors that recognizes excellence in the field of social studies.
photo by Mary T. McCullagh

oral histories from democratic activists; see www.civicvoices.org.] through this project, ive interviewed or seen and transcribed interviews of a wide variety of people from all kinds of different backgrounds, from whose testimonies i have learned a great amount of history. a firsthand account provides a richer and more meaningful experience than reading from a textbook. the project has expanded my worldview and deepened the global awareness of students at columbus High, which is an important lesson for many young people living in Miami. in addition, Rho Kappa has taught me not just about social studies and history, but about myself. Before becoming vice president, i never saw myself as a leader; now i see that i am much more capable than what i have given myself credit for.
danny P.

Rho Kappa students celebrate Veterans Day with Tuskegee Airmen Trainer lt Col. Eldridge Williams.

Soon after we started our chapter, it was clear that our guest speakers, field trips, and celebrations drew the interest of sophomore and freshmen students who wanted to participate in the events. We decided that we would create a History club to accompany the Rho Kappa Honor Society to encourage the involvement of students who were not yet eligible for the Honor Society status. We find that the participation of all grade levels allows us to cultivate the future leaders of Rho Kappa; in fact, the members of the current student executive board became involved as freshmen and sophomores. our chapter is very active in school and in community ser-

vice. our members are eager to work with classmates in a variety of projects and to host special events to honor our history. i asked three current student board members who have enjoyed their Rho Kappa participation to describe their experiences:
Christopher M.

as a member of Rho Kappa, ive participated in different projects and events celebrating american history and civic activism. ive enjoyed none more than participating in the civic Voices international democracy Memory Bank project. [in this program, students around the world have developed a collection of
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Rho Kappa, to me, means awareness: awareness of history, of adversity, and above all, of unity. over the years, our Rho Kappa chapter has promoted the study of influential people in history and the celebration of events that should never be forgotten. We have looked for heroes and heroines in our own communities, and have been inspired as we interview them as part of the civic Voices international democracy Memory Bank Project (www.civicvoices.org), and share their words with interested students and educators worldwide. We commemorate famous events in history: September 11, with eyewitness testimony; constitution day; Veterans day, with World War ii veterans; and Hispanic Heritage and african american History Months, to

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photo by Mary T. McCullagh

leo Casino, a Grammy nominated musician and film producer who led CCHs' musical African American History Month celebration, poses with a Rho Kappa alumnus.

Holocaust survivor Fred spiegel shares his testimony with Rho Kappa students.

name a few. We regularly welcome guest speakers who share with us their participation in the community, and they encourage us to rise to the challenges that face our world. We utilize the inhouse tV station to promote historical awareness with video and PowerPoint presentations; we also conduct information campaigns with flyers and banners. We participate in community service with other clubs, big and small, and share through actions the lessons we have learned from history. as a newly elected officer of Rho Kappa and the History club, the baton has now been passed to my fellow officers and me. i hope we can continue the organizations reputation and commitment to advancing knowledge and community involvement to the greatest degree.
Christian M.

have learned many new things and have participated in many amazing activities the society has undertaken. through the civic Voices international democracy Memory Bank Project (www.civicvoices. org), i have found a website containing amazing resources of civic engagement that inspire, more so than many other web resources. i also loved being able to hear the accounts of truly amazing people. For example, alison austin visited Rho Kappa members to share her commitment to working with children in Miami, and she shared how the u.S. civil rights movement influenced her life and her community involvement. i would not have participated in such inspiring activities had i not joined the Rho Kappa Honor Society.
Conclusion

dents as they interact with local community leaders. they gain incredible insights into what commitment to ones community looks like, and they learn how ordinary folks respond to challenges. they stand up, they speak out, and they lend a hand. the Rho Kappa events, activities, guest speakers, and field trips expand classrooms and course subjects and encourage students to take an active role in deepening their appreciation for social studies. Rho Kappa members dive in, contribute, explore, and construct their own understanding of the world and their roles in it! i encourage you to contact me at mmccullagh@columbushs.com if you have questions or suggestions. Best wishes on a successful Rho Kappa school year!
Mary T. McCullagh is chair of the social studies department at Christopher Columbus High School in Miami, Florida, and a member of the Board of Directors of National Council for the Social Studies.

through Rho Kappa Honor Society i

Some of my most memorable Rho Kappa experiences have been witnessing stu-

This article describes the typical activities of a Rho Kappa chapter. Rho Kappa National social studies Honor society is a program of National Council for the social studies (NCss). This honor society is the only national organization for high school juniors and seniors that recognizes excellence in the field of social studies. Rho Kappa was originally established by the Florida Council for social studies in 2000 for the state of Florida. NCss established Rho Kappa as a national program last year. Any accredited public or private high school can apply for a local chapter, through which individual students will be inducted into the Rho Kappa National social studies Honor society. For details, go to the Rho Kappa section of the NCss website (www.socialstudies.org) or access it directly at http://rhokappa.socialstudies.org/rhokappa/Home/

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photo by Mary T. McCullagh

2012 Annual Index


10 Top Websites for Teaching about Issues in the Election Season, andrea S. libresco and Jeannette Balantic, 189 1863 Letter from the Department of State to the Government Printing Office, lee ann Potter, 272 Around the World with Geospatial Technologies, andrew J. Milson and Joseph J. Kerski, 105 At the Core of Our Democracy: A Fragile Voting System, lee Hamilton, 193 Building Community through Shared Aesthetic Experience: A Multimedia Family History Project, Nancye E. Mccrary, 96 Campaign Documentaries: Behindthe-Scenes Perspectives Make Useful Teaching Tools, david Wolfford, 182 The Carter G. Woodson Book Awards, 135 Case Study of Chinese Exclusion Act Enforcement, Joanne dufour, 306 The Challenge of World History, cristbal t. Saldaa, 14 Child Soldiers: Rights Denied, Hope Restored, Kenneth t. carano and Robert W. Bailey, 253 Climate Change: Where Weve Been, Where Were Headed (Film Review of Plan B: Mobilizing to Save civilization), lori Kumler, 109 Close Up on Capital Punishment: Challenging Students Ideas of Justice, christopher W. Harrison, 249 Cold vs. Hot War: A Model for Building Conceptual Knowledge in History, Geoffrey Scheurman, 32 The Convict-Lease System, 1866 1928 It Makes a Long-Time Man Feel Bad, christine adrian, Mll 44, M2

Social Education, Volume 76 January/February 2012: 152 March/April 2012: 53110 May/June 2012: 113160 september 2012: 161220 october 2012: 221268 November/December 2012: 269-333

Middle Level Learning (MLL) supplement January/February 2012: Issue 43 May/June 2012: Issue 44 september 2012: Issue 45

index by title
Democratic Use of Blogs and Online Discussion Boards in Social Studies Education, andrew l. Hostetler, 100 Demystifying the Electoral College: 12 Frequently Asked Questions, tiffany Middleton, 169 Desperate Times, Desperate Measures: Executive Powers, Individual Rights and Guantnamo Bay Prison, Jason l. oBrien and Kyle t. Barbieri, 261 Did that Dog Sniff Violate the Fourth Amendment? catherine Hawke and tiffany Middleton, 278 Digital Reenactments: Using Green Screen Technology to Recreate the Past, caroline c. Shefeld and Stephen B. Swan, 92 Engaging Students in World History with a Bog Body Mystery, Michael M. Yell, 17 Fault Lines in American Culture: The Case for Civic Debate, H. Michael Hartoonian and Richard d. Van Scotter, 202 The Fed and the U. S. Constitution: Too Much Independence? Mary c. Suiter and Mark c. Schug, 72 The First Page of the Official Journal of the Constitutional ConventionJust the Tip of a Records Iceberg! lee ann Potter, 164 The First War Hawks: The Invasion of Canada in 1812, Steven Sellers lapham, Mll 45, M12 Flip-Flopping, Presidential Politics, and Abraham Lincoln, dave Neumann, 178 A Grade 5 Common Core Exemplar: Teaching about the Bill of Rights, Michelle Herczog, 315 Health Care and the High Court: An Overview, 123 Helping Students Analyze Revolutions, Stephen armstrong and Marian desrosiers, 38 History + English + Humanities = Critical, Creative, Global Thinkers, Jana Kirchner and tracy inman, 137 I like Chocolate Ice Cream: A Lesson in Thinking Civics, Robert a. Waterson, 195 Integrating Art and Music into Social Studies Instruction, c. Frederick Risinger, 157 Interviewing the Lost Generation from Prince Edward Countys Closed School Era, Helen Stiff-Williams and John P. Sturtz, 77 Iranian Women: Between Education and Repression, Rina Bousalis, 255 The Keys to the White House, allan J. lichtman, 233 The Keys to the White House: Prediction for 2012, allan lichtman, 57 Letter from Thomas Moran to Ferdinand Hayden and Paintings by Thomas Moran, lee ann Potter, Elizabeth K. Eder, and Michael Hussey, 117 Lights, Camera, Reenaction! Creating Video as We Study the Civil War, angela Stokes, Mll 43, M2 Links to Learning: Recommended Websites for your World History Class, laura Wangerin, 47 Mexican Americans in the Era of World War II: Studying the Sleepy Lagoon Case and Zoot Suit Riots, axel donizetti Ramirez, 151 New Directions in Assessment: Using Library of Congress Sources to Assess Historical Understanding, Sam Wineburg, Mark Smith, and Joel Breakstone, 290 No Place to Escape: Explaining the Cultural Revolution to American Students, Ji-li Jiang, 132 Our Civic Mission: Ask Congress to Support the Sandra Day OConnor Civic Learning Act, campaign for the civic Mission of Schools, 115 Pairing Nonfiction and Fiction: Social Studies and Language Arts Together, angela Falter thomas, Mll 43, M10 Perspectives: Are Voter Photo Identification Laws a Good Idea? tiffany Middleton, 66 The Phenomenon of Kony 2012: A Teaching Guide, Barbara B. Brown, John Metzler, and christine Root (with background guide by Patrick Vinck), 141 Photograph and Speech Related to the Cuban Missile Crisis, Stacey Bredhoff and lee ann Potter, 224 Planning the World History Course: A Reasoned Approach to Omission, thomas P. Weinland, 7 Preparing Global Citizens through the Study of Human Rights, toni Fuss Kirkwood-tucker, 244 Promoting Student Comprehension with Cooperative Learning, linda a. Fernsten, 147 Public Service Announcement about the 1940 Census, lee ann Potter and christopher Zarr, 62 The Reel History of the World: Teaching World History with Major Motion Pictures, William Benedict Russell iii, 22 The Rho Kappa Spirit, Mary t. Mccullagh, 313 Should Schools Teach Students to Vote? YES!, diana E. Hess, 283

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Stamps, Sarcophagi, and Songs: Teaching World History with Online Resources, Kelly Schrum, 29 The Struggle for Human Rights in Myanmar, Natalie Keefer, 258 Supreme Court Term in Review, catherine Hawke, 229 Teaching about Big Money in Elections: To Amend or Not to Amend the U.S. Constitution? James M. M. Hartwick and Brett l. M. levy, 236 Teaching about Global and U.S. Poverty Using the Internet, c. Frederick Risinger, 50 Teaching about the 2012 Elections Using the Internet, c. Frederick Risinger, 187 Teaching about the 2012 Elections Using the Internet-Part 2, c. Frederick Risinger, 242 Teaching about the Korean Comfort Women, Hyunduk Kim, 251

Teaching about the Nanking Massacre to Middle School Students, Justin Villet, Mll 45, M2 Teaching and Learning with Teachinghistory.org, Jennifer Rosenfeld and Kelly Schrum, 49 Teaching Challenging Topics with Primary Sources, alan J. Singer, 324 Teaching Critical Thinking by Asking Could Lincoln Be Elected Today? Kathleen Hall Jamieson, 174 Teaching Privacy in the 21st Century, odette Edbrooke and Meg leta ambrose, 217 Teaching the Social Studies through Your Local Community, anthony J. Filipovitch and talip ozturk, 85 Teaching World History: One Path through the Forest, Eve Fisher, 10 The Top Five Narratives for Teaching about Chinas Cultural Revolution, lindsey cafarella and chara Haeussler Bohan, 128

Touch, Type, and Transform: iPads in the Social Studies Classroom, ilene R. Berson, Michael J. Berson, and Meghan McGlinn Manfra, 88 The Universal Declaration of Human Rights, Hilary landorf, 247 Using the daily Show to Promote Media Literacy, H. James Garrett and Mardi Schmeichel, 211 Using Literature for Young People to Teach about Human Rights, caroline c. Shefeld and Brbara c. cruz, 263 The View from the Trenches, Sue Blanchette, 4 Web Resources for Teaching about Human Rights, Merry M. Merryeld, Germain Badang, christina Bragg, aleksandr Kvasov, Nathan taylor, anne Waliaula and Misato Yamaguchi, 266 What I Learned At NCSS 2011, c. Frederick Risinger, 82

What Makes a Good History Essay? Assessing Historical Aspects of Argumentative Writing, chauncey Monte-Sano, 294 What Social Studies Educators can do about the Marginalization of the Subject They Teach, c. Frederick Risinger, 299 The Why and Where of the Tappan Zee Bridge: A Lesson in Site Location, Physical Geography, and Politics, Jerry t. Mitchell, Jeremy cantrill, and Justin Kearse, 205 The World War II Era and Human Rights Education, Stewart Waters and William B. Russell iii, 301

index by author
adrian, christine, The Convict-Lease System, 18661928 It Makes a LongTime Man Feel Bad, Mll 44, M2 ambrose, Meg leta and odette Edbrooke, Teaching Privacy in the 21st Century, 217 armstrong, Stephen and Marian desrosiers, Helping Students Analyze Revolutions, 38 Badang, Germain, Merry M. Merryeld, christina Bragg, aleksandr Kvasov, Nathan taylor, anne Waliaula and Misato Yamaguchi, Web Resources for Teaching about Human Rights, 266 Bailey, Robert W. and Kenneth t. carano, Child Soldiers: Rights Denied, Hope Restored, 253 Balantic, Jeannette and andrea S. libresco, 10 Top Websites for Teaching about Issues in the Election Season, 189 Barbieri, Kyle t. and Jason l. oBrien, Desperate Times, Desperate Measures: Executive Powers, Individual Rights and Guantnamo Bay Prison, 261 Berson, ilene R., Michael J. Berson, and Meghan McGlinn Manfra, Touch, Type, and Transform: iPads in the Social Studies Classroom, 88 Berson, Michael J., ilene R. Berson, and Meghan McGlinn Manfra, Touch, Type, and Transform: iPads in the Social Studies Classroom, 88 Blanchette, Sue, The View from the Trenches, 4 Bohan, chara Haeussler, and lindsey cafarella, The Top Five Narratives for Teaching about Chinas Cultural Revolution, 128 Bousalis, Rina, Iranian Women: Between Education and Repression, 255 Bragg, christina, Merry M. Merryeld, Germain Badang, aleksandr Kvasov, Nathan taylor, anne Waliaula and Misato Yamaguchi, Web Resources for Teaching about Human Rights, 266 Breakstone, Joel, Sam Wineburg, and Mark Smith, New Directions in Assessment: Using Library of Congress Sources to Assess Historical Understanding, 290 Bredhoff, Stacey and lee ann Potter, Photograph and Speech Related to the Cuban Missile Crisis, 224 Brown, Barbara B., John Metzler, and christine Root (with background guide by Patrick Vinck), The Phenomenon of Kony 2012: A Teaching Guide, 141 cafarella, lindsey and chara Haeussler Bohan, The Top Five Narratives for Teaching about Chinas Cultural Revolution, 128 campaign for the civic Mission of Schools, Our Civic Mission: Ask Congress to Support the Sandra Day OConnor Civic Learning Act, 115 cantrill, Jeremy, Jerry t. Mitchell, and Justin Kearse, The Why and Where of the Tappan Zee Bridge: A Lesson in Site Location, Physical Geography, and Politics, 205 carano, Kenneth t. and Robert W. Bailey, Child Soldiers: Rights Denied, Hope Restored, 253 cruz, Brbara c. and caroline c. Shefeld, Using Literature for Young People to Teach about Human Rights 263 desrosiers, Marian and Stephen armstrong, Helping Students Analyze Revolutions, 38 dufour, Joanne, Case Study of Chinese Exclusion Act Enforcement, 306 Edbrooke, odette and Meg leta ambrose, Teaching Privacy in the 21st Century, 217 Eder, Elizabeth K., lee ann Potter, and Michael Hussey, Letter from Thomas Moran to Ferdinand Hayden and Paintings by Thomas Moran, 117 Fernsten, linda a., Promoting Student Comprehension with Cooperative Learning, 147 Filipovitch, anthony J. and talip ozturk, Teaching the Social Studies through Your Local Community, 85 Fisher, Eve, Teaching World History: One Path through the Forest, 10 Garrett, H. James and Mardi Schmeichel, Using the daily Show to Promote Media Literacy, 211 Hamilton, lee, at the Core of Our Democracy: A Fragile Voting System, 193

S o c i a l E d u c at i o n 330

Harrison, christopher W., Close Up on Capital Punishment: Challenging Students Ideas of Justice, 249 Hartoonian, H. Michael and Richard d. Van Scotter, Fault Lines in American Culture: The Case for Civic Debate, 202 Hartwick, James M.M. and Brett l.M. levy, Teaching about Big Money in Elections: To Amend or Not to Amend the U.S. Constitution? 236 Hawke, catherine, Supreme Court Term in Review, 229 Hawke, catherine and tiffany Middleton, Did that Dog Sniff Violate the Fourth Amendment? 278 Herczog, Michelle, A Grade 5 Common Core Exemplar: Teaching about the Bill of Rights, 315 Hess, diana E., Should Schools Teach Students to Vote? YES! 283 Hostetler, andrew l., Democratic Use of Blogs and Online Discussion Boards in Social Studies Education, 100 Hussey, Michael, lee ann Potter, and Elizabeth K. Eder, Letter from Thomas Moran to Ferdinand Hayden and Paintings by Thomas Moran, 117 inman, tracy, and Jana Kirchner, History + English + Humanities = Critical, Creative, Global Thinkers, 137 Jamieson, Kathleen Hall, Teaching Critical Thinking by Asking Could Lincoln Be Elected Today? 174 Jiang, Ji-li, No Place to Escape: Explaining the Cultural Revolution to American Students, 132 Keefer, Natalie, The Struggle for Human Rights in Myanmar, 258 Kerski, Joseph J. and andrew J. Milson, Around the World with Geospatial Technologies, 105 Kim, Hyunduk, Teaching about the Korean Comfort Women, 251 Kirchner, Jana and tracy inman, History + English + Humanities = Critical, Creative, Global Thinkers, 137 Kirkwood-tucker, toni Fuss, Preparing Global Citizens through the Study of Human Rights, 244

Kumler, lori, Climate Change: Where Weve Been, Where Were Headed (Film Review of Plan B: Mobilizing to Save civilization), 109 Kvasov, aleksandr, Merry M. Merryeld, Germain Badang, christina Bragg, Nathan taylor, anne Waliaula and Misato Yamaguchi, Web Resources for Teaching about Human Rights, 266 landorf, Hilary, The Universal Declaration of Human Rights, 247 lapham, Steven Sellers, The First War Hawks: The Invasion of Canada in 1812, Mll 45, M12 levy, Brett l.M. and James M.M. Hartwick, Teaching about Big Money in Elections: To Amend or Not to Amend the U.S. Constitution? 236 libresco, andrea S. and Jeannette Balantic, 10 Top Websites for Teaching about Issues in the Election Season, 189 lichtman, allan J., The Keys to the White House, 233 lichtman, allan, The Keys to the White House: Prediction for 2012, 57 Manfra, Meghan McGlinn, ilene R. Berson, and Michael J. Berson, Touch, Type, and Transform: iPads in the Social Studies Classroom, 88 Mccrary, Nancye E., Building Community through Shared Aesthetic Experience: A Multimedia Family History Project, 96 Mccullagh, Mary t., The Rho Kappa Spirit, 313 Merryeld, Merry M., Germain Badang, christina Bragg, aleksandr Kvasov, Nathan taylor, anne Waliaula and Misato Yamaguchi, Web Resources for Teaching about Human Rights, 266 Metzler, John, Barbara B. Brown, and christine Root (with background guide by Patrick Vinck), The Phenomenon of Kony 2012: A Teaching Guide, 141 Middleton, tiffany, Demystifying the Electoral College: 12 Frequently Asked Questions, 169 Middleton, tiffany, Perspectives: Are Voter Photo Identification Laws a Good Idea? 66 Middleton, tiffany and catherine

Hawke, Did that Dog Sniff Violate the Fourth Amendment? 278 Milson, andrew J. and Joseph J. Kerski, Around the World with Geospatial Technologies, 105 Mitchell, Jerry t., Jeremy cantrill, and Justin Kearse, The Why and Where of the Tappan Zee Bridge: A Lesson in Site Location, Physical Geography, and Politics, 205 Monte-Sano, chauncey, What Makes a Good History Essay? Assessing Historical Aspects of Argumentative Writing, 294 Neumann, dave, Flip-Flopping, Presidential Politics, and Abraham Lincoln, 178 oBrien, Jason l. and Kyle t. Barbieri, Desperate Times, Desperate Measures: Executive Powers, Individual Rights and Guantnamo Bay Prison, 261 ozturk, talip and anthony J. Filipovitch, Teaching the Social Studies through Your Local Community, 85 Potter, lee ann, 1863 Letter from the Department of State to the Government Printing Office, 272 Potter, lee ann, The First Page of the Official Journal of the Constitutional Convention--Just the Tip of a Records Iceberg! 164 Potter, lee ann and christopher Zarr, Public Service Announcement about the 1940 Census, 62 Potter, lee ann, Elizabeth K. Eder, and Michael Hussey, Letter from Thomas Moran to Ferdinand Hayden and Paintings by Thomas Moran, 117 Potter, lee ann and Stacey Bredhoff, Photograph and Speech Related to the Cuban Missile Crisis, 224 Ramirez, axel donizetti, Mexican Americans in the Era of World War II: Studying the Sleepy Lagoon Case and Zoot Suit Riots, 151 Risinger, c. Frederick, Integrating Art and Music into Social Studies Instruction, 157 Risinger, c. Frederick, Teaching about Global and U.S. Poverty Using the Internet, 50

Risinger, c. Frederick, Teaching about the 2012 Elections Using the Internet, 187 Risinger, c. Frederick, Teaching about the 2012 Elections Using the InternetPart 2, 242 Risinger, c. Frederick, What I Learned At NCSS 2011, 82 Risinger, c. Frederick, What Social Studies Educators can do about the Marginalization of the Subject They Teach, 299 Root, christine, Barbara B. Brown, and John Metzler (with background guide by Patrick Vinck), The Phenomenon of Kony 2012: A Teaching Guide, 141 Russell, William Benedict iii, The Reel History of the World: Teaching World History with Major Motion Pictures, 22 Russell, William B. iii and Stewart Waters, The World War II Era and Human Rights Education, 301 Saldaa, cristbal t., The Challenge of World History, 14 Scheurman, Geoffrey, Cold vs. Hot War: A Model for Building Conceptual Knowledge in History, 32 Schmeichel, Mardi and H. James Garrett, Using the daily Show to Promote Media Literacy, 211 Schrum, Kelly, Stamps, Sarcophagi, and Songs: Teaching World History with Online Resources, 29 Schrum, Kelly, Jennifer Rosenfeld, and Teaching and Learning with Teachinghistory.org, 49 Schug, Mark c. and Mary c. Suiter, The Fed and the U. S. Constitution: Too Much Independence? 72 Shefeld, caroline c. and Brbara c. cruz, Using Literature for Young People to Teach about Human Rights 263 Shefeld, caroline c. and Stephen B. Swan, Digital Reenactments: Using Green Screen Technology to Recreate the Past, 92 Singer, alan J., Teaching Challenging Topics with Primary Sources, 324

November/December 331

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Smith, Mark, Sam Wineburg, and Joel Breakstone, New Directions in Assessment: Using Library of Congress Sources to Assess Historical Understanding, 290 Stiff-Williams, Helen and John P. Sturtz, Interviewing the Lost Generation from Prince Edward Countys Closed School Era, 77 Stokes, angela, Lights, Camera, Reenaction! Creating Video as We Study the Civil War, Mll 43, M2 Sturtz, John P. and Helen Stiff-Williams, Interviewing the Lost Generation from Prince Edward Countys Closed School Era, 77 Suiter, Mary c. and Mark c. Schug, The Fed and the U. S. Constitution: Too Much Independence? 72 Swan, Stephen B. and caroline c. Shefeld, Digital Reenactments: Using Green Screen Technology to Recreate the Past, 92 taylor, Nathan, Merry M. Merryeld, Germain Badang, christina Bragg, aleksandr Kvasov, anne Waliaula and Misato Yamaguchi, Web Resources for Teaching about Human Rights, 266 thomas, angela Falter, Pairing Nonfiction and Fiction: Social Studies and Language Arts Together, Mll 43, M10 Van Scotter, Richard d. and H. Michael Hartoonian, Fault Lines in American Culture: The Case for Civic Debate, 202

Villet, Justin, Teaching about the Nanking Massacre to Middle School Students, Mll 45, M2 Waliaula, anne, Merry M. Merryeld, Germain Badang, christina Bragg, aleksandr Kvasov, Nathan taylor, and Misato Yamaguchi, Web Resources for Teaching about Human Rights, 266 Wangerin, laura, Links to Learning: Recommended Websites for your World History Class, 47 Waters, Stewart and William B. Russell iii, The World War II Era and Human Rights Education, 301 Waterson, Robert a., I like Chocolate Ice Cream: A Lesson in Thinking Civics, 195 Weinland, thomas P., Planning the World History Course: A Reasoned Approach to Omission, 7 Wineburg, Sam, Mark Smith, and Joel Breakstone, New Directions in Assessment: Using Library of Congress Sources to Assess Historical Understanding, 290 Wolfford, david, Campaign Documentaries: Behindthe-Scenes Perspectives Make Useful Teaching Tools, 182 Yamaguchi, Misato, Merry M. Merryeld, Germain Badang, christina Bragg, aleksandr Kvasov, Nathan taylor, and anne Waliaula, Web Resources for Teaching about Human Rights, 266 Yell, Michael M., Engaging Students in World History with a Bog Body Mystery, 17 Zarr, christopher and lee ann Potter, Public Service Announcement about the 1940 Census, 62

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Anti-Defamation League ............................................285 Ashland University...........................inside front cover Association for Asian Studies ...................................312 C-SPAN.................................................................. back cover The Choices Program....................................................277 Dar al Islam ........................................................................323 The History Project at UC Davis.................... 317, 321 James Madison Memorial Fellowship .................317 Foundation John F. Kennedy Library ................inside back cover Map of the Month ..........................................................323 National 4H Youth Conference Center ................321 PBS Video ............................................................................293 Smithsonian American Art Museum......... 289, 305 The University of Iowa College of Education ...298

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