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The Milwaukee Metropolitan Sewerage District with Sixteenth Street Community Health Center

KInnIcKInnIc rIver corrIdor neIghborhood Plan

K I n n I c K I n n I c r I v e r co r r I d o r n e I g h b o r h o o d P l a n

December 2009

ac K n o w l e d g e m e n t s
This neighborhood plan is the culmination of the efforts of many individuals and groups who devoted their time and energy to the future of the Kinnickinnic River and its surrounding neighborhood. We wish to extend our sincere appreciation to everyone who made this plan possible through their input, enthusiasm, and commitment. Very special thanks to the following individuals for their leadership and cooperation throughout the planning process. Technical Review Committee Nancy Aten, Landscapes of Place Marsha Burzynski, Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources Tom Burzynski, Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources Mary Beth Driscoll, Groundwork Milwaukee Steve Fendt, Southside Organizing Committee Dave Fowler, Milwaukee Metropolitan Sewerage District Nancy Frank, University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee Ben Gramling, Sixteenth Street Community Health Center Mike Hahn, Southeastern Wisconsin Regional Planning Commission Kevin Haley, Milwaukee County Department of Parks, Culture, and Recreation Rebecca Klaper, University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee Other Stakeholders Tory Kress, City of Milwaukee Department of City Development
Jill Lackey, Urban Anthropology

Mike Maierle, City of Milwaukee Department of City Development Cheryl Nenn, Milwaukee Riverkeeper Ron Printz, Southeastern Wisconsin Regional Planning Commission Gled Radford, City of Milwaukee Housing Authority Tim Thur, City of Milwaukee Department of Public Works Angie Tornes, National Park Service Rosemary Whenes, Sierra Club Neil White, Lincoln Village Business Association Mike Van Alstine, Milwaukee Christian Center

Milwaukee County Supervisor Marina Dimitrijevic Milwaukee County Supervisor Peggy West City of Milwaukee Alderman Bob Donovan City of Milwaukee Alderman Jim Witkowiak City of Milwaukee Alderman Terry Witkowski City of Milwaukee Alderman Tony Zielinski Paul Biedrzycki, City of Milwaukee Health Department Michael Bucholtz, Zablocki Neighborhood Association Carijean Buhk, Urban Ecology Center Fernando Campos, United Community Center

Hilde Dewulf, Lincoln Neighborhood Redevelopment Corp. Jesus Gloria, Milwaukee Police Department Esperanza Gutierrez, Community Member Father Jim Jankowski, Basilica of St. Josaphat Thomas Kelnhofer, Hayes Bilingual Elementary School Paco Martorell, Milwaukee Riverkeeper Roberto Montemayor, Community Member Barbara Nelson, Community Member Sherri Ohly, CORE El Centro Jim Otepka, Carmen High School

Jose Perez, City of Milwaukee DCD Judy Ramazzini, Lincoln Village Main Street Virgilio Rodrguez, United Community Center Imelda Roman, UMOS John Rozga, Community Member Debbie Steidl, Community Member Luz Tellez, Casa Romero Chuck Ward, Milwaukee County Department of Parks John Wishon, Milwaukee County Department of Parks

Special Thanks To Kosciuszko Community Center staff and Milwaukee Christian Center Youth Build for their assistance and participation with the public meetings. This project was made possible by a grant from the Wisconsin Coastal Management Program. The planning consultant team for this neighborhood plan included JJR, PDI/Graef, Beth Foy and Associates, and Gladys Gonzalez of Palante! Creative, LLC.
Plan prepared by: JJR, LLC 625 Williamson Street Madison, Wisconsin (608) 251-1177 www.jjr-us.com Note: All photographs and graphics are by the JJR Team unless otherwise noted. PDI/Graef 241 North Broadway Avenue Suite 300 Milwaukee, Wisconsin (414) 275-2545 www.pdisite.com II K I n n I c K I n n I c r I v e r co r r I d o r n e I g h b o r h o o d P l a n

ta b l e o F co n t e n t s
executIve summary............................................................................ 1.0 IntroductIon................................................................................. Iv

3.3 Transportation and Circulation............................................................. A. Bridges.................................................................................................. B. Traffic Calming.................................................................................... C. Pedestrian and Bicycle Circulation......................................................... 3.4 Parks and Open Spaces........................................................................... A. Modrzejewski Playground Improvements............................................... B. Pulaski Park Improvements.................................................................. C. Kinnickinnic Recreation Area and Parkway......................................... D. Other Parks and Open Spaces.............................................................. 3.5 Community Involvement, Education, and Stewardship.................... A. Community Involvement........................................................................ B. Educational and Stewardship Opportunities.........................................
4.0 ImPlementatIon............................................................................

61 61 62 64 66 66 68 71 72 73 73 73 75 74 79 81 82 92 92 92 95 97 98

1 2 5 8 13 14 16 16 16 20 20 22 25 26 27

1.1 Project Overview..................................................................................... 1.2 Project Process......................................................................................... 1.3 Relationship to Other Plans...................................................................
2.0 neIghborhood FrameworK....................................................

2.1 Context...................................................................................................... A. Historical/Cultural Context................................................................ B. The KK Watershed............................................................................... C. Flood Management............................................................................... 2.2 Opportunities Analysis........................................................................... A. River Corridor...................................................................................... B. Housing and Development Pattern........................................................ C. Commercial Development...................................................................... D. Transportation and Circulation............................................................. E. Parks and Open Spaces........................................................................

4.1 Neighborhood Plan Implementation Framework.............................. 4.2 Partnership Opportunities..................................................................... A. Potential Partnerships........................................................................... 4.3 Funding Sources...................................................................................... A.1 Public/Stakeholder Input....................................................................... A. Summary of Stakeholder Interviews..................................................... B. Summary of Comments from March 4th, 2009 Public Open House (Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, Threats)......................... C. Comments Received at June 3rd, 2009 Public Open House................... D. Urban Anthropology Survey of Lincoln Village Residents................... A.2 Neighborhood Plan Goals and Objectives..........................................

3.0 neIghborhood PlannIng and desIgn recommendatIons....................................................................... 33

3.1 A New Kinnickinnic River................................................................. A. Recommended Alignment and Potential Property Acquisition................ B. New Greenway Amenities.................................................................... C. Habitat Creation Opportunities............................................................ D. Public Access and Safety....................................................................... 3.2 Neighborhood Development................................................................ A. Identifying Redevelopment Opportunities................................................ B. Enhancing Existing Residential Neighborhoods.................................... C. Enhancing Business Districts and Corridors.........................................

36 36 37 46 47 49 49 54 59

aPPendIx................................................................................................... 91

A.3 Relationship to the Near South Side Area Plan................................. 102 A.4 References and Resources...................................................................... 103

III

executIve summary
The Kinnickinnic (KK) River is sometimes called the Lost River of Milwaukee. Winding through southside neighborhoods, the river could be mistaken for a concrete-lined drainage ditch. But it wasnt always this way. The KK was once a tree-lined stream with natural springs, fishing holes, and abundant wildlife before being channelized in the early 1960s. The KKs problems today go beyond just an identity crisis. The river no longer has the capacity to convey the floodwaters from large storms safely through its narrow corridor. With houses on both banks for a 0.7-mile stretch between S. 16th Street and S. 6th Street, the river occasionally overtops its banks and spills into basements and streets. Public safety is jeopardized not only by the fast-moving floodwaters and steep concrete slopes, but by the health issues associated with sewage backups in homes and mold and mildew as a result of frequent flooding. The need for a neighborhood plan for the residential corridor surrounding the KK was identified when it became apparent that rehabilitating the river to increase flood capacity and meet public safety objectives would require a wider footprint. The concrete lined-channel is no longer performing as designed and is nearing the end of its effective life. The nearby residents are being negatively impacted by the frequent flooding and backups, and the river is doing nothing to promote or enhance the neighborhood. The Milwaukee Metropolitan Sewerage District (MMSD) has studied many different alternatives to manage flooding in the neighborhood, and has concluded that the most viable alternative that meets their flood management and public safety objectives is widening the existing channel between S. 27th Street and Interstate 94/43. A wider river channel means that the dense residential corridor between S. 16th and S. 6th Streets would be signficantly impacted, and homes on both sides of the river would need to be acquired and removed. For this project to move forward, MMSD, with the help of the Sixteenth Street Community Health Center and other partners, recognized that the community needed to have input as to how the new river would look and what impacts it would have on the fabric of the surrounding neighborhood. This neighborhood plan is the culmination of a 10-month-long process of community and stakeholder input, analysis, collaboration and idea gathering
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on ways to integrate the new KK River corridor into the community in a positive, meaningful way. This plan also provides recommendations for enhancing the existing neighorhood beyond the banks of the river: rehabilitating the existing housing stock, identifying opportunities for redevelopment, improving business corridors and supporting the local economy, greening the neighborhood through sustainable initiatives, and creating better parks and open spaces for residents to enjoy. The new KK River corridor is envisioned as a greenway, with improved pedestrian and bicycle connections, community gathering places, water quality and stormwater management features, instream and riparian habitat for fish, birds, insects and other wildlife, and new economic opportunities for local businesses and entrepreneurs. An important component of this neighborhood plan also relates to community involvement, stewardship, and education. It identifies ways to create experiences, places, and programs that will teach the next generation of Milwaukeeans the importance of urban natural areas and the use of sustainable practices. It suggests ways to involve the community in implementation, because without the support of neighbors and business owners, the recommendations in this plan cannot come to fruition. This neighborhood plan is intended to be used as a guide by policy makers, governmental agencies, volunteers, residents, business owners, and developers. Implementing these guidelines will ensure the preservation of the neighborhood character and provide a framework for improvements as the river undergoes a major transformation. Formal adoption of this plan by the City of Milwaukee will provide a clear roadmap as to how public investments should be made as well as give some certainty to private sector investors about the future conditions of this neighborhood and help attract outside funds. This plan represents only the beginning of a planning and design process that will unfold over the next several years. As the detailed design of the corridor proceeds, the public will have additional opportunities to provide continued input. The catalytic project of rehabilitating the KK will create many new opportunities, but its the way in which those opportunities are met that will make the difference for the future of the neighborhood.

1.0 introduc tion

1.1 Projec t overvIew


W. Lincoln

F W.

ore

st

e om

W. Cleveland

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94

The Kinnickinnic (KK) River has been in decline for several decades. As a river, it no longer serves the functions of a healthy ecosystem. As a drainage way, it no longer has the capacity to safely convey floodwaters through its narrow corridor. As an urban waterway, its crumbling concrete lining detracts from the surrounding neighborhood rather than enhances it. The river is seen by the neighborhood as impaired and unattractive. Those who remember the days before it was channelized and lined with concrete recall hunting for crawfish and splashing in the spring-fed waterfalls and lagoons. Today, the graffiti-ridden, trash-lined concrete channel conjures up little more than a forgotten drainage way, and the neighborhood has turned away. The floodwaters, which rise up quickly and spill into the streets, threaten the safety and property of those who live beside it. The current KK River just doesnt work. However, there are still those who believe that the KK River can be again what it once was, a jewel of the community and of the greater south side. They envision a park-like neighborhood amenity with bike trails, gardens, and open spaces. They envision fish and other wildlife returning to the river and its corridor, and children playing and learning from this urban oasis. The Milwaukee Metropolitan Sewerage District (MMSD) is in the process of evaluating engineering approaches for rehabilitating the river for improved flood management and public safety. The Sixteenth Street Community Health Center (SSCHC), a health provider on the south side that recognizes the critical link between the health of the river and the health of the community, is another group that has led the effort to revitalize the river and the adjacent neighborhood. A series of focus groups, engineering studies, action plans, and educational outreach programs involving many different stakeholders have culminated in the need for a comprehensive neighborhood plan for the corridor surrounding the KK River. This neighborhood plan is a result of a unique partnership between these two entities, MMSD and SSCHC, along with Groundwork Milwaukee and other organizations to develop a community-supported plan that would set a vision for a revitalized and reconnected KK River. The neighborhood plan area includes a 2.5-mile stretch of the KK River Corridor, running from S. 27th Street on the west (upstream) end to Interstate Highway 94/43 on the east (downstream) end, and the neighborhood between Lincoln Avenue on the north and Oklahoma Avenue on the south. The neighborhood land use is characterized

S.20th

S. 27th

W. Oklahoma

Figure 1-1. Kinnickinic River Neighborhood Plan Study Area

The Kinnickinnic River as it exists today (photo courtesy of MMSD)

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S. 13th

S. 6th

primarily by high density residential areas, bounded on the north by the Lincoln Avenue commercial corridor, and on the west by the Forest Home Cemetery. The area contains several Milwaukee Public Schools (MPS) as well as several private schools. Pulaski Park and the adjacent Kinnickinnic Recreation Area make up a large portion of the public park space (owned by Milwaukee County), and Robert Modrzejewski Playground (formerly known as Cleveland Park) is owned and operated as a MPS playground. The neighborhood also has pockets of active industrial land use and underutilized commercial and industrial properties. The dense residential area between S. 6th and S. 16th Streets in particular will be significantly impacted by MMSDs flood management project, and as many as 83 properties may need to be acquired and demolished as a result of widening the channel to increase flood capacity. The scope of this neighborhood plan includes evaluation of the river channel engineering alternatives for their ability to support improved public open space and recreational access, innovative stormwater practices, ecological restoration, water quality improvements, neighborhood housing improvements, and commercial/economic development opportunities. The resulting neighborhood plan includes a recommended alternative that balances and advances these important community objectives. Upon completion of the neighborhood plan, the final recommendations will be given to MMSD to incorporate into the flood management project as it transitions from the planning phase into the design phase. The process of property acquisitions and relocation of residents may take several years. Over that period, the design of the river and adjacent lands will be refined and finalized, and construction for flood management improvements will begin once all necessary properties have been acquired. This neighborhood plan as well as other elements of the KK River rehabilitation and flood management project has been overseen by a Technical Review Committee (TRC) which includes representatives from government agencies, educational organizations, and nonprofit organizations with expertise in water-related environmental issues (see the Acknowledgements section for a list of the members of the TRC). In addition, at the beginning of the neighborhood planning process in Spring 2008, the TRC was expanded to include community stakeholders.

The following is a list of design issues that were identified by the TRC as critical topics to be addressed by the neighborhood plan, and were presented to the planning team at the beginning of the project (in no particular order of importance):

Channel Rehabilitation Flood Management River Edge Public Safety and Public Access Aquatic and Terrestrial Ecosystem Restoration and Water Quality Improvement Housing Commercial and Economic Development Infrastructure and Public Land Community Involvement, Education, and Stewardship

The goals and objectives developed for this neighborhood plan based on the above list of issues are provided in Appendix A.2.

Businesses on S. 13th Street

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Figure 1-2. Neighborhood Plan Process Diagram

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1.2 Projec t Process


The Kinnickinnic River Corridor Neighborhood Plan emerged from an interactive and collaborative process stretching over ten months, but the efforts that led to the project go back several years. The neighborhood plan process involved three general phases: (1) analysis of site opportunities and constraints, (2) creation of draft conceptual alternatives, and (3) review and refinement of the draft plan into the final neighborhood plan and document. At each point during the process, comments were gathered through public workshops, meetings with the TRC, and additional conversations with stakeholders and agencies. This input enabled the planning team to craft a plan that addressed the needs of the community while integrating the technical requirements of MMSDs ongoing flood management study. Figure 1-2 illustrates the overall planning process. Phase 1: Analysis of Site Opportunities and Constraints The first phase of the public involvement process included an education and awareness campaign which was facilitated by SSCHC staff. An informational bilingual public outreach piece developed by the planning team was distributed to residents and business owners in the neighborhood and door-to-door canvassing was conducted in January and February 2009 to spread the word about the upcoming process and the issues surrounding the neighborhood plan and flood management project. SSCHC also conducted one-on-one stakeholder interviews throughout the first several months of 2009 in English and Spanish with community leaders, business owners, religious leaders, block watch captains, County Supervisors, City Alderpersons, leaders of non-profit organizations, City and County staff, and others. A summary of the stakeholder interviews is included in the Appendix. The first public open house was held on March 4th, 2009 at the Kosciuszko Community Center as an opportunity for residents and stakeholders to provide information about the neighborhood. There were five input stations covering the following topics:

Where We Play parks and open spaces Where We Live housing and residential Where We Do Business commercial districts, economic development Taking A Stake In Our Community crime, perception, community involvement and stewardship

Participants were asked questions regarding what they liked about the neighborhood and how things could be improved. Boards with images of the existing conditions were presented in bilingual (English/Spanish) formats along with lists of key discussion issues related to each topic. All input stations were staffed by one member of the JJR Team as well as a bilingual facilitator from SSCHC. Comments and feedback received at the public open houses are included in the Appendix. This feedback was compiled by the planning team into a list of Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, and Threats (SWOT) for the five categories listed above. Site Analysis diagrams were created based on the SWOT information and a review of existing conditions (see Section 2.2). The planning team then developed goals and objectives for the neighborhood plan based on the list of critical design issues identified by the TRC, public and stakeholder input, and direction from MMSD, SSCHC, and the TRC. For each topic a goal is identified along with supporting objectives. A complete listing of the goals and objectives for each design issue is located in Section A.2 of the appendix. Phase 2: Draft Plan Alternatives The planning team held an internal charrette to develop neighborhood design alternatives based on the site opportunities and constraints identified in the first phase. The group evaluated different river alignments and cross-sections and their respective impacts to neighborhood housing, the street grid and circulation, and other infrastructure. The group also identified potential opportunities for redevelopment, important commercial connections and corridors, and improvements to parks and other public infrastructure. Working with Hey & Associates, MMSDs consultant for the flood management study, the JJR Team began to identify the magnitude of the displacement of residences which may be required for river rehabilitation and flood management implementation.

Reinvesting In Our River issues related to river rehabilitation and


flood management

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The draft plan alternatives were presented to the TRC on April 6th, 2009 and to City staff on April 21st, 2009. A meeting was held on May 19th, 2009 at the Kosciuszko Community Center to provide information specifically to home-owners, business-owners, and tenants between S. 6th and S. 16th Streets. This meeting, run by MMSD staff, focused primarily on real estate and acquisition issues, and served to inform individuals of the process, mechanics, and potential time frame for acquisitions, should the project go forward. The presentation and questions were translated to Spanish in real-time via headsets, and all materials were provided in both English and Spanish. A second full public meeting was held on June 3rd, also at the Kosciuszko Community Center, to present the draft plan alternatives and concepts. The first part of the meeting included a presentation by the JJR Team which was translated in real-time for Spanish speakers and which included a summary of what was heard at the first public meeting as well as an introduction to the draft alternatives. The second part of the meeting was an input session similar to the first meeting. The four input stations were staffed by JJR Team members and bilingual facilitators, and allowed participants to provide feedback on the alternative concepts for the following topics:

Residents participating in March 4th public meeting (photo courtesy of SSCHC)

A New Kinnickinnic River Parks and Public Spaces Redevelopment Opportunities Transportation and Circulation

In addition, two information stations were staffed by MMSD to answer questions about flood management and real estate issues (for those who were not able to attend the May 19th real estate meeting). All presentation materials were provided in English and Spanish. The input stations utilized character images from other places, renderings, and sketches to convey concepts and to elicit feedback. Input from this meeting is included in the Appendix.
Childrens activity table at March 4th public meeting. Activities at all public meetings were designed by Groundwork Milwaukee to teach children about watersheds and river ecosystems (photo courtesy of SSCHC)

Information presented at the second meeting as well as the public feedback received and some additional plan refinements were presented to the TRC on June 24th, 2009.

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Phase 3: Final Neighborhood Plan Document Feedback from the Phase 2 meetings was discussed at a second internal planning team charrette, and the draft plan alternatives and concepts were further refined and developed. Draft text and graphics associated with the final neighborhood plan recommendations were reviewed and discussed at a final meeting with the TRC on July 23rd, 2009. The input was used to refine the draft plan and create a preliminary report document, which was reviewed by MMSD, SSCHC and the TRC. Although the report represents the final plan created by this planning process, the recommendations will continue to be refined and assessed throughout the implementation process, especially as it relates to the river corridor and MMSDs flood management project. The companion illustrative summary document was also prepared in both English and Spanish for a wider target audience. A final public open house was held on August 13th, 2009 to present the neighborhood plan recommendations to the community. Community Outreach SSCHC and Groundwork Milwaukee led efforts throughout the planning process to inform the local community and other project stakeholders about opportunities to attend and participate in the neighborhood plans public meetings. These efforts included the distribution of thousands of direct mail invitations, door-to-door literature drops to residences in close proximity to the river corridor, notices within newsletters of community-based organizations and postings at businesses along key commercial corridors. Substantial numbers of local residents attended these meetings, in part due to these important outreach efforts. Local elected officials were also kept apprised of the ongoing development of the neighborhood plan through briefings that were conducted throughout the planning process. Concurrent with the neighborhood planning process, Urban Anthropology, a nonprofit organization in Lincoln Village, conducted door-to-door surveys of Lincoln Village residents. The survey included two questions regarding rehabilitation of the KK River and the potential property acquisitions. The questions and results of the survey are included in the Appendix and are further discussed in Section 2.2.

Residents talking with MMSD staff at June 3rd public meeting (photo courtesy of SSCHC)

Participants at A New Kinnickinnic River station at June 3rd public meeting (photo courtesy of SSCHC)

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1 . 3 r e l at I o n s h I P to ot h e r P l a n s
The KK River has been the subject of recent studies, projects, focus groups, and planning efforts. This section describes the most relevant studies and projects which address this neighborhood in whole or in part, or the KK River and its tributaries. MMSD/Hey & Associates KK River Channel Rehabilitation and Flood Management Strategy The project which is most intimately intertwined with this neighborhood plan is MMSDs river rehabilitation and flood management strategy, being prepared by their consultant Hey & Associates, Inc. Hey & Associates is currently under contract with MMSD to study channel modification alternatives between S. 6th and S. 27th Streets. The primary focus of the engineering evaluation by Hey has been flood conveyance and public safety. Hey has evaluated cross-sections which would minimize the risk of flooding of nearby properties and to contain the one percent probability flood (also known as the 100-year flood) within the channel section.
Flooding at the S. 9th Pl bridge in 2008 (photo courtesy of MMSD)

The current one percent possibility floodplain as defined by SEWRPC (See Section 2.1) inundates streets and approximately 280 properties in the neighborhood both north and south of the channel. A brief discussion of the full-range of engineering alternatives considered by MMSD and Hey is provided in Section 2.2. The interaction between the Hey study and the JJR neighborhood plan was an iterative process; Hey provided information regarding the flood modeling to the JJR Team, while the JJR Team primarily focused on issues such as maintaining the street grid, minimizing housing acquisitions, and other community needs and objectives based on input from the public meetings. Through this process, and through comments from TRC and City staff, a recommended river alignment was identified. Upon completion of the neighborhood plan, MMSD and Hey will perform additional evaluation of the recommended alternative for flood conveyance capacity, relationship to existing infrastructure such as utilities and bridges and other engineering considerations outside of the scope of this neighborhood plan.

Looking west from the (former) S. 11th St bridge in 1961 (photo courtesy of MMSD)

Hey is also under contract with MMSD to develop a preliminary plat for properties needed for the recommended alignment.

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W. Lincoln Avenue Planning Area Boundary DCD Area Plan Boundary S. 16th Street S. 6th Street

Near South Area Plan


S. 27th Street S. 20th Street
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W. Cleveland Avenue

Railroad Corri

dor

Kinnickinnic River

Southwest Area Plan


W. Oklahoma Avenue

Southeast Area Plan

Figure 1-3. DCD Area Plan Boundaries and Neighborhood Planning Area

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This neighborhood planning process has also served as the public involvement process for the MMSD flood management project. At the June 3rd and August 13th public meetings, all of the flood management alternatives which had been evaluated to date (including ones that were deemed to not be viable) were described for the public at the Flood Management station staffed by MMSD. In addition, information was presented to the public regarding MMSDs property acquisition process at the May 19th, June 3rd, and August 13th public meetings.

City Area Plans The City of Milwaukee Department of City Development (DCD) is currently in the process of conducting a city-wide Comprehensive Plan which includes a Citywide Policy Plan and multiple Area Plans. There are three DCD Area Plans that overlap this neighborhood planning area: the Near South Side Area Plan, the Southeast Area Plan, and the Southwest Area Plan. The boundaries of these Area Plans in relation to the project area are shown in Figure 1-3.

chaPter 1: IntroductIon

The Area Plan with the most overlap with the neighborhood planning area is the Near South Side Area Plan (NSSAP). A detailed analysis outlining the relationship between this neighborhood plan and the NSSAP is located in Section A.4 of the appendix. The NSSAP, adopted by the Milwaukee Common Council on May 27, 2009, covers an area roughly bounded by the Menomonee Valley on the north, the Kinnickinnic River on the east, and 43rd Street to the west. The southern edge of the study area is the Union Pacific rail line, running east/west just south of Cleveland. As a result, approximately the northern half of the Kinnickinnic River Corridor (KKRC) Neighborhood Plan study area was included in the Near South Side Plan, referred to as the Lincoln Village District in the plan. It is the intent of this neighborhood plan to acknowledge the recommendations of the NSSAP as a basis for principles, recommendations, and action steps that constitute the KKRC plan. The neighborhood plan can be seen as the next step in the planning process, taking a more focused look at the neighborhood with a goal of maximizing benefits for the neighborhood as a result of the proposed flood control measures considered for the river corridor itself. A summary of NSSAP recommendations that bear particular relationship to the issues encountered in the KKRC planning process are provided in the Appendix of this plan. This summary also discusses how the KKRC plan addresses the NSSAP recommendations or policies. MMSD 6th Street to Highway 94/43 River Rehabilitation Project and 6th Street Bridge Replacement MMSD and their consultant, Short Elliott Hendrickson, Inc (SEH), are currently in the process of final design for the lowest reach of the project area, from S. 6th St to the Interstate bridge, as part of MMSDs first phase of river rehabilitation. The replacement of the 6th Street bridge is also currently under final design. MMSD moved quickly to implement a project that would result in immediate flood risk reduction. The steep slopes in this area are primarily wooded and in some places severely eroded, so the project is recommending slope stabilization measures as well as channel bed rehabilitation and removal of concrete.
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The City of Milwaukee was able to secure Federal funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (commonly referred to as stimulus funds) for the 6th Street bridge project, and the funds come with stipulations regarding the timing for implementation. Therefore, this piece of the project was accelerated in order to qualify for stimulus money. However, the two project teams have interacted and coordinated throughout the process to ensure that the community input is considered for this first phase of river rehabilitation. PCB Dredging Project In 2007, the KK River was listed as one of the top ten most endangered rivers in the country by American Rivers, an environmental group in Washington, D.C. (April 17, 2007). The reasons quoted were the accumulation of toxic sediment at the mouth of the river and the negative impacts to Lake Michigan. In June 2009, little more than half-way through this neighborhood planning process, the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (WDNR) commenced a dredging project to remove approximately 170,000 cubic yards of PCB-contaminated sediment at the mouth of the KK River. The dredging efforts were focused between West Becher Street and South Kinnickinnic Avenue, downstream of the neighborhood planning project area. According to the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel (July 7, 2009), the project was expected to cost $22 million, with $14.3 million coming from the Federal 2002 Great Lakes Legacy Act and the remaining $7.3 million from State matching funds. Upon completion of the dredging project, the navigation channel will be restored to a depth of 20 feet. Kinnickinnic River Corridor Action Plan and other SSCHC Initiatives Recognizing the critical link between environmental health and community health, the SSCHC has helped forge a unique coalition of community partners working to restore the KK River, and in doing so reinvigorate and revitalize the surrounding community. In 2004, SSCHC, along with partners such as UW-Milwaukees Great Lakes Water Institute and the National Park Service, developed a river restoration action plan called the Kinnickinnic River Corridor Action Plan.

The Action Plan identifies four priority issues critical to the long-term rehabilitation of the KK River corridor: 1. Quality of life objectives need to be addressed in order to achieve sustainable environmental improvements. 2. A diverse stakeholder group needs to be educated and engaged through a broad variety of activities. 3. A vision for change needs to be developed that illustrates the potential for improvement along the river corridor. 4. The ecological and environmental integrity of the river needs to be revitalized in a community-supported and sustainable manner. Over the past several years, SSCHC has also organized and participated in river cleanups that have removed more than 200 tons of debris from the river, and worked closely with government agencies on a variety of river improvement and public access initiatives. The common thread throughout all of these projects is the recognition that the future of the river corridor and its urban inhabitants are dynamically interconnected, and that sound planning and design for one cannot take place without sound planning and design for the other. Ecologically, economically and culturally, the future of the KK River and its surrounding neighborhoods are wholly dependent on one another. Water Quality Initiative and the Southeastern Wisconsin Watersheds Trust In 2002, MMSD, the WDNR, and the Southeastern Wisconsin Regional Planning Commission (SEWRPC) partnered to form the Water Quality Initiative, a combined planning effort to assess water resources in the Milwaukee area using a watershed approach. Rather than focusing solely on point discharges or segments of a stream or river, the WQI effort took a broader approach and looked at all of the factors contributing to the health of the watershed. This planning effort informed MMSD in prioritizing efforts and setting forth their 2020 Facilities Plan and SEWRPC in their update to the Regional Water Quality Management Plan. The KK River watershed was one of six major watersheds included in the study.
Result of a KK River cleanup in 2006 (photo courtesy of SSCHC)

Railroad bridge over KK River

chaPter 1: IntroductIon 11

The Southeastern Wisconsin Watersheds Trust (SWWT) is a collaborative effort to achieve healthy and sustainable water resources throughout the Greater Milwaukee Watersheds, and is an outgrowth of the Water Quality Initiative. SWWT is developing a Watershed Restoration Plan for the Kinnickinnic River Watershed that will include specific recommendations to achieve measurable improvements in water quality and water resources throughout the Watershed. Wilson Park Creek Flood Management and Rehabilitation MMSD is beginning a planning project to look at Wilson Park Creek, the primary tributary to the KK River. Currently, the project is looking to reduce flood risk from the one-percent flood event (also known as the 100-year flood event) for 120 residential and commercial structures that have been identified in the updated floodplain determined by SEWRPC in 2008. Prior to this update, there were no structures that were recognized as being at flood risk for the one-percent flood event along the Wilson Park Creek. To date, the project team has developed two different flood management alternatives that consist of flood management concepts at several locations along Wilson Park Creek. These alternatives are anticipated to be finalized and evaluated with the Technical Review Committee and presented to the public in the Fall of 2009, with a report summarizing the findings scheduled for the end of 2009. Kinnickinnic River Trail The City of Milwaukee, along with SSCHC, Groundwork Milwaukee, and the National Parks Service Rivers and Trails Program is currently in the process of planning the Kinnickinnic River Trail, which will connect the Third Ward to the Bay View and Lincoln Village neighborhoods. The multi-use trail will follow the KK River and is proposed to have trailheads near the intersection of S. 6th Street and Rosedale Avenue, the intersection of S. First Street and Lincoln Avenue, and the intersection of Kinnickinnic Avenue and Maple Street. The trail is currently proposed to meet up with the Oak Leaf Trail on S. 6th Street near the MMSD facility, but this neighborhood plan recommends that it also connect to the future KK greenway bike corridor as part of the flood management and river rehabilitation project.

Confluence of KK River mainstem and Wilson Park Creek at St. Lukes Hospital near W. Kinnickinnic River Parkway

An image from the Kinnickinnic River Trail Corridor visioning charrette (image courtesy of Groundwork Milwaukee)

12 K I n n I c K I n n I c r I v e r co r r I d o r n e I g h b o r h o o d P l a n

2.0 NEIGHBORHOOD FRAMEWORK

2 . 1 CO N T E X T
area is composed of portions of three city neighborhoods: Lincoln Village, Polonia, and Forest Hill Homes. The neighborhood includes significant landmarks including the Basilica of St. Josaphat on the east side of the project area and Forest Home Cemetery to the west. The area is served by a grid of streets that create a residential rectangular block pattern with blocks oriented with the long dimension running north/ south. Two major east/west arterials, Lincoln and Oklahoma Avenues carry heavier vehicular traffic levels and provide access to the neighborhood as well as convey city through traffic. These streets also contain commercial businesses which serve the neighborhood. Sixth Street bounds the eastern edge of the planning area and is a major arterial which links the area to the downtown and to other city neighborhoods. The bridge that spans the Kinnickinnic River at 6th Street is being replaced as part of a project separate from this planning study (see Section 1.4). Other significant north/ south streets include S. 13th and S. 16th Streets. Thirteenth Street is a neighborhood arterial, providing access through the middle of the study area and serving as the location for various commercial establishments. A railroad corridor passes through the neighborhood, bridged at S. 6th St, S. 9th Pl, S. 13th St, and S. 16th St. The corridor effectively divides the neighborhood, due to the limited number of crossings. The neighborhood offers a variety of transportation options. Public transit serves the neighborhood along several main corridors. Major bus lines travel along Lincoln, Oklahoma, Windlake, 6th, and 16th Streets. Most residential areas are thus within a reasonable walking distance of public transit. Bicycles are accommodated along the Oak Leaf Trail, which travels down Manitoba Street. Access to Interstate 94/43 occurs at Morgan and Becher. Several large parks provide open space and recreational activities for neighborhood residents, including Kosciuszko Park, Pulaski Park, Baran Park, and the Kinnickinnic Recreation Area. Smaller facilities, including Modrzejewski Playground and several school playgrounds provide more localized opportunities for activities. The river corridor itself is currently not an amenity for the neighborhood, although residents noted that the portion of the river that runs adjacent to Harrison Street between 9th and 12th attracts dog walkers and some pedestrians.

Aerial oblique photo of KK corridor looking east showing Modrzejewski Playground and Harrison and Cleveland Avenues (photo courtesy of MMSD)

The project study area is a dense urban neighborhood strategically located near downtown Milwaukee. The neighborhood is also readily accessible from Interstate 94/43. These conditions benefit the neighborhood in that density and access provide a solid customer base for neighborhood retail, offer a range of housing choices, and provides a basis for pedestrian usage throughout the neighborhood. The Kinnickinnic River Corridor Neighborhood Plan area is bounded by Lincoln Ave to the North, Interstate 94/43 to the east, Oklahoma Ave to the south and S. 27th St to the west. The

14 K I N N I C K I N N I C R I V E R CO R R I D O R N E I G H B O R H O O D P L A N

Major Streets Existing On-Street Bike Trail Proposed Kinnickinnic River Trail Bike/ Pedestrian Connector

Railroad Bridge Pedestrian Bridge Vehicular Bridge Planning Area boundary


P P
F P

Schools Places of Interest Police Station Fire Station

Commercial Parks & Open Space Institutional & City Services Cemetery
0 225 450 900

Figure 2-1. KK Corridor Neighborhood Planning Area

CHAPTER 2: NEIGHBORHOOD FRAMEWORK 15

A. Historical/Cultural Context The neighborhood has a rich history with many ethnicities represented in the population and as evidenced in the mix of shops, restaurants, and cultural institutions present throughout the neighborhood. The area was originally settled by the Poles and other Eastern Europeans during the late 1800's and descendents of these settlers still populate the neighborhood today. In the past few decades arrivals from Latin America have joined the population, along with Middle Easterners, Asians, North American Indians, and African Americans. The mix of cultures gives the neighborhood a unique and vital pulse. Cultural facilities, such as St. Josaphat Basilica and Kosciuszko Park are city landmarks and represent the history and values of the population. Businesses along Lincoln Avenue range from Mexican bakeries to Polish shops including many ethnic restaurants. The Old South Side Farmers Market at Kosciuszko Park is another wellknown neighborhood attraction. As of the last census (2000), approximately 40 percent of the neighborhood population is of Hispanic origin (as reported by a UW-Milwaukee study on the corridor). B. The KK Watershed The KK watershed is the most urbanized watershed in the Milwaukee area, and includes parts of Milwaukee, Cudahy, Greenfield, St. Francis, West Allis and West Milwaukee. The watershed is the areas most densely populated, with approximately 152,000 people living within its boundaries and 93 percent of the watershed devoted to urban use. The KK is an 8-mile stretch of river reaching from the headwaters near S. 60th St and Cleveland Ave and emptying into Milwaukees Inner Harbor and Lake Michigan. The approximately 25-square-mile watershed contains 25 miles of perennial streams and seven ponds. The main tributary to the KK mainstem is Wilson Park Creek, which joins the KK at St. Lukes Hospital. The KK watershed map is shown in Figure 2-3. C. Flood Management Flooding has plagued the KK corridor for decades. The primary purpose behind channelizing and lining the river with concrete in the early 1960s was for flood conveyance. At the time, conveyance goals were met; however almost 40 years later the channel no longer has the capacity to safely convey the one percent probability floodwaters from its highly developed watershed. Inundation of the dense residential neighborhood between S. 6th and S. 16th Streets by flood waters overtopping the KK banks in recent years has resulted in many homes near the river being damaged. Several

Example of a business on Lincoln Avenue

The KK River, looking west from the (former) S. 7th St bridge in 1960, one year prior to the concrete channel installation (photo courtesy of MMSD)

16 K I N N I C K I N N I C R I V E R CO R R I D O R N E I G H B O R H O O D P L A N

drownings have occurred as well. The river is flashy in nature, with rapid increases in flood discharges and depths, which leaves little opportunity for warning occupants of flood-prone areas and poses safety risks. As the concrete channel approaches the end of its effective design life, the need for a solution that would safely convey floodwaters through the neighborhood while reestablishing aquatic and terrestrial habitat opportunities has become increasingly apparent. MMSD began working with their consultant, Hey & Associates, in 2007 to evaluate engineering alternatives for replacement of the concrete lining. During that same time period, SEWRPC began to update the regions flood models to reflect more current monitoring data. This resulted in an increase in flows through the KK corridor and an expanded floodplain (see Figure 2-4). Hey used the new SEWRPC flows to model the KK corridor in their engineering evaluations. The full-range of engineering alternatives that were considered for flood management in this stretch of the KK included the following:
Greenfield West Allis W. Lincoln

Lake Michigan

S. 27th

F W.

ore

o tH

me

Planning Project Area


43

Lake Pkw

W. Oklahoma S. 6th
94

Milwaukee

St. Francis

Lo om is

894

43

Layton

94

General Mitchell Airport

Cudahy

Greendale

Do Nothing: The Do Nothing approach has been considered as

Figure 2-3. Kinnickinnic River Watershed Map

an option, but given the nature of the crumbling concrete channel and the flooding and safety issues facing the neighborhood, this is not a desirable outcome. MMSD would still be required to make incremental repairs to the existing concrete channel under this scenario, and the long term structural viability of the channel would not be ensured. At some point the scope and scale of the repairs may approach channel replacement, and WDNR has indicated they would not be likely to permit replacement of the channel with new concrete lining. Another negative outcome of the do-nothing scenario is that the new SEWRPC floodplain would eventually be incorporated into regulatory floodmaps with the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), and homeowners in the regulated floodplain would be required to purchase flood insurance to obtain loans or maintain existing mortgages and have other restrictions imposed upon them. This requirement could force some to not be able to obtain loans or be able to afford to own or renovate their home.

Upstream Storage: To reduce flows and minimize flooding in the

critical residential zone between 6th and 16th Streets, the team looked at potential areas for temporary storage of floodwaters upstream. They concluded that there were insufficient storage opportunities to significantly reduce peak flows through the target area and eliminate the need to widen the channel downstream. pipe that would reduce the amount of water passing through the critical zone. This was determined to be cost prohibitive as the size of the infrastructure that would be required to convey such high flows would make it very expensive.

Diversion: The team evaluated the potential for a high-flow diversion

Rectangular Channel: The team evaluated using a 60-foot wide

concrete channel with 9-foot high vertical concrete side walls that would fit within the existing river corridor but provide additional flood capacity due to rectangular shape and the elevated floodwalls.

CHAPTER 2: NEIGHBORHOOD FRAMEWORK 17

W. Lincoln Avenue Floodway 100-year Floodplain S. 27th Street S. 20th Street S. 16th Street

43 94

W. Cleveland Avenue

Railroad Corri

dor

S. 13th Street

S. 9th Place

Kinnickinnic River

W. Oklahoma Avenue

Figure 2-4. Existing one-percent probability (100-year) floodplain, as mapped by SEWRPC (2009).

S. 6th Street

300 600

1200

The channel as proposed would have had extremely high velocities and no habitat or water quality improvements and would have posed more of a threat to the safety of nearby residents. Because of the negative environmental impacts and safety concerns associated with this option, representatives from the WDNR indicated this alternative would not be permittable. Because of the above concerns, and since the alternative did not meet project objectives other than flood conveyance, this option was eliminated for consideration.

Widening (but not deepening) the channel: In order to avoid a large

combined sewer pipe that crosses under the river channel at 8th Street, the team considered keeping the river bottom elevation as it is now while widening the channel to a width of approximately 250 feet (from its existing 60 feet). The additional impacts to properties in the corridor created by such a wide channel was enough to eliminate this alternative in favor of one that widens and deepens the channel, which would require the relocation of the combined sewer.

18 K I N N I C K I N N I C R I V E R CO R R I D O R N E I G H B O R H O O D P L A N

Widening and Deepening the Channel: The Hey team came up with two

alternative engineering cross-sections for the channel between S. 6th and S. 16th Streets which would both widen and deepen the existing channel and use natural materials; one with vegetated sloped banks (trapezoidal) and one with terraced overbanks consisting of short walls. Either alternative would have a cobble stone low-flow channel. Both alternatives are still in consideration and served as the basis of design for all of the neighborhood planning recommendations to follow. These sections are shown in Figure 2-5, along with the eliminated concrete channel alternative.

The final outcome of the flood management strategy will likely include a combination of bridge replacements and modifications, property acquisitions, and widening and deepening the channel.

Rectangular Concrete Channel (eliminated alternative)

Trapezoidal Stone & Vegetated Channel

Terraced Stone & Vegetated Channel

Figure 2-5. Engineering cross-sections considered by the Hey/MMSD Team for flood conveyance between S. 6th and S. 16th Streets.

CHAPTER 2: NEIGHBORHOOD FRAMEWORK 19

2 . 2 O P P O R T U N I T I E S A N A LYS I S
The following section describes the neighborhood opportunities identified by the planning team based on the feedback from the first phase of meetings, review of existing conditions, and the subsequent development of draft plan alternatives and concepts. A. River Corridor To accommodate flood flows, the new corridor will need to be more than double its existing 60-foot width. This will likely impact properties and infrastructure on both sides of the existing channel. However, there is some flexibility in the alignment of the new channel, so several alternative alignments between S. 6th and S. 16th Streets were considered. Figure 2-6 shows the three corridor alignment alternatives that were considered as part of the neighborhood planning process. Due to the narrowness of the existing corridor, there would be properties impacted in any of the three alignment alternatives. The recommended alignment would ideally impact the fewest number of properties and displace the fewest number of residents. Another major consideration was the impact to Harrison Avenue. In two of the three alternatives, the approximate existing river alignment was maintained, which would have displaced several blocks of Harrison Avenue, roughly between S. 13th and S. 8th Streets. These alternatives would have allowed an existing large City combined sewer to remain intact on the south bank of the channel. However, the street grid would be disrupted, and in Alternative 2, Harrison would be disconnected, forcing more traffic onto nearby east-west streets such as Arthur and Cleveland Avenues. Alternative 3 reconnected Harrison but in a new alignment, and would have required the most number of properties to be acquired and demolished. The City DPW indicated that the utility infrastructure under Harrison Ave would be more difficult and costly to relocate than the sewer on the south bank. Also, the need to maintain Harrison Ave as a thorough-fare due to the high volumes of traffic would have made Alternative 2 the least desirable option. Alternative 2 was also undesirable to the City and local residents because of the creation of several more dead-end streets. Alternative 3 was less favored than Alternative 1 because of the disruption to the street grid and the increased number of properties that would be impacted.

KK River near S. 14th Street (looking east)

Various alternative cross-sections evaluated for S. 6th to S. 16th Street corridor during the neighborhood planning process

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Alternative 1 - Harrison Ave alignment is maintained, river corridor is pushed to the south between S. 12th and S. 9th Streets

Alternative 2 - River corridor follows existing alignment; Harrison Ave is interrupted by width of new river corridor; dead-ends created at S. 11th and S. 12 Streets

Alternative 3 - River corridor follows existing alignment; Harrison Ave is relocated to follow new river corridor
Parks and Open Space

Vehicular Bridge Pedestrian Bridge Greenway

Figure 2-6. River corridor and Harrison Ave alignment alternatives considered during the neighborhood planning process
0 75 150 300

CHAPTER 2: NEIGHBORHOOD FRAMEWORK 21

Alternative 1, which maintained Harrison Avenues existing alignment by moving the river corridor to the south, ultimately received the most favorable responses from the public and the planning team. This alternative also proposed that Harrison Ave become a parkway drive running parallel to the new river greenway. Upstream of S. 16th St, the river winds its way through Pulaski Park and the KK Recreation Area. This area, while valuable to the neighborhood, was less of a concern from the standpoint of property acquisitions, so this area was not studied in the same amount of detail as the area between S. 6th and S. 16th Streets. The Urban Anthropology survey (see Sec. 1.2), conducted throughout spring and summer of 2009, asked residents of Lincoln Village what types of things they would like to see in the new river corridor greenway. The top vote-getters were community gardens, picnic areas, and bicycle paths. Fishing areas also received many votes. These amenities are consistent with the recommendations of this neighborhood plan, as discussed in Chapter 3. The questions and full results of the survey are provided in the Appendix. B. Housing and Development Pattern As in many Milwaukee neighborhoods the housing and development patterns represent a classic urban configuration consisting of a gridiron street and block system punctuated by commercial arterials containing neighborhood commercial businesses. Neighborhood schools, churches, and other cultural institutions are located throughout the area. Residential areas are comprised of mostly one and two family homes, with most built during the early decades of the 20th Century. Styles vary but are typical of those seen in many Milwaukee neighborhoods. Of particular note are the many Polish Flats in the area. Most homes feature front porches and entrances directly to the street. Current or former mixed-use structures occupy many corner sites in the neighborhood, featuring a commercial space on the ground floor and a residential flat on the upper floor. On most blocks garages are to the rear of the lot, with access to an alley. There is a relatively consistent scale between structures, with building size and use changing near the commercial corridors along Lincoln, Oklahoma and 13th. Continuity of the street grid and the consistency of building scale give the neighborhood a cohesive feel, with the exception of the breaks to the urban fabric that occur as the result of the interruption of the railroad corridor and the river channel. Housing stock is of mixed condition, as well-kept properties intermingle with structures in need of repair or update. Encouraging the rehabilitation and upkeep of properties is a
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Residential street in the neighborhood

Lincoln Village sign on S. 13th Street and Bay View marker on Chase Avenue bridge

Parks and Open Space Schools

Commercial Properties Susceptible to Change

Neighborhood Gateway Urban Street Cross Section


0 225 450 900

Figure 2-7. Redevelopment framework including properties susceptible to change, important commercial and residential connections.

CHAPTER 2: NEIGHBORHOOD FRAMEWORK 23

continuing neighborhood issue. While no undeveloped land exists in the neighborhood, several industrial properties and underutilized sites could provide redevelopment opportunities for the construction on new urban housing. This plan envisions the KK River becoming a major amenity for the area. The river corridor runs through the middle of the neighborhood and it has the potential to benefit many residential properties in terms of the added availability of recreational and open space amenities. The improved river environment also has the potential for increasing property values. Residential areas can also benefit from a green streets approach that can improve visual quality and pedestrian comfort on neighborhood streets, as outlined in Chapter 3 of this report. Throughout the river rehabilitation and neighborhood planning processes, the TRC members have stressed the importance of ensuring that existing neighborhood residents benefit from the changes anticipated by the river rehabilitation project. This concern was the principal motivation for conducting the neighborhood planning process.
A residential street off of Cleveland Avenue

In order to maximize the benefits for the neighborhood a conceptual redevelopment and planning framework strategy is proposed for the neighborhood as indicated in Figure 2-7. The diagram indicates properties susceptible to change and priority areas for redevelopment activity, which may be new or rehabilitated construction. One of the redevelopment areas is located along S. 13th St, between the river and Oklahoma Ave, which is envisioned as a potential neighborhood commercial street containing shops and services that serve the general neighborhood. Along this street potential neighborhood gateways (the dashed circles on the map) or activity nodes are indicated at the intersections of 13th and Lincoln and at 13th and Oklahoma marking the beginning and ending of what could become the neighborhoods main street. A sense of gateway could be created by actual physical streetscape features that mark an entrance point or could consist of special building architecture elements. A gateway can also be created by a special activity oriented to pedestrians such as a sidewalk caf or a pedestrian plaza or gathering area in these locations. Another node is suggested at the point where 13th Street crosses the KK River. This is the point where the trail and public space system associated with the river corridor meets up with the street and could be a location where special artwork, trail or nature signage, or small scale commercial retail activities (riverside caf, bike shop, etc) could develop over time.

Under-utilized commercial/warehouse building on Cleveland Avenue

The other redevelopment sites indicated in Figure 2-7 (yellow areas within the red dashed line) are places where current uses may be expected to change over time due

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to underutilization or obsolescence. There are existing residential areas adjacent to the redevelopment zones that are also included. These adjacent areas are envisioned as places where targeted efforts could be made to provide programs and funds to help property owners fix up existing homes. The importance of coupling both new property redevelopment and the rehabilitation of existing property is noted later in this document. C. Commercial Development The neighborhood is served by several primary commercial corridors that bound or traverse the study area along Lincoln, Oklahoma and 13th. These corridors contain a mix of business types, some providing goods and services to the local trade area and others that, given their location along a busy traffic corridor, cater to a larger customer base. On-street parking is provided along the corridors while some businesses have small surface parking lots adjacent to the establishment. Lincoln Avenue is the primary commercial center for the neighborhood. Stretching between 5th and 20th Streets, the Lincoln Village Business District is home to a collection of ethnic restaurants, specialty shops, and other unique businesses. The Lincoln Village Business Association is an active organization which oversees the operation and development of the district. The district is a Main Street Milwaukee and a Wisconsin Main Street community. Oklahoma Avenue has some commercial development, primarily at block corners. Many of these are gas stations or auto related businesses. Businesses are interspersed with residences so there is not the same sense of a cohesive business district as found on Lincoln Avenue. Participants at public meetings mentioned that the levels and rate of traffic flow on Oklahoma tended to deter pedestrian access and comfort. Thirteenth Street offers a collection of businesses concentrated primarily south of the river. Most businesses provide goods or services to the local neighborhood, including several taverns and restaurants. Concerns were raised during the public meetings regarding the number of bars and nature of some of the businesses, especially those featuring adult entertainment. The business corridor is conveniently located within the neighborhood as it is within walking distance of many residential areas. The portion of S. 13th St north of the river and south of Lincoln contains a few scattered businesses interspersed with mostly residential development. While there currently is no organized business association for the area, there has been some discussion in the community about such an effort.
Businesses on Lincoln Avenue

Existing business corridor on S. 13th Street

CHAPTER 2: NEIGHBORHOOD FRAMEWORK 25

The neighborhood contains some industrial development located mostly between the rail corridor and Cleveland Avenue. Many of these uses appear to be in transition or decline and some of the properties could be considered potential sites for redevelopment. D. Transportation and Circulation The neighborhood is served by a circulation grid that provides fairly easy access throughout the area, with a few notable exceptions. The street grid and alleys are interrupted at the river. Existing river crossings include four vehicular bridges and three pedestrian bridges between S. 6th St and S. 16th St. Alleys are also truncated at the river. While these dead-end conditions can allow for a quiet cul-de-sac character they also can become places where vandalism or crime can be a problem as there is a lack of access and surveillance by the general public and police. Three pedestrian bridges provide additional access at key points. Maintaining adequate north/south access across the river will be important as options for corridor modifications are considered. Quality visual design of new replacement bridges will be important, as these elements will become highly visible components of civic architecture in the area. There is also the potential to incorporate artwork or cultural/historical elements into the architecture of any newly designed bridges. Bicycle circulation occurs in the neighborhood along city streets and sidewalks and along Manitoba Street, where the Oak Leaf Trail currently extends through the neighborhood. As the river corridor is re-imagined, there is the potential to incorporate additional bike trails within or along the green space. As the neighborhood becomes more bicyclefriendly consideration should be given for providing additional amenities such as bike racks, drinking fountains, and wayfinding signage to help improve usability and enjoyment of the bicycle system. Due to the density and compactness of the neighborhood, pedestrian access is generally good. During public input sessions, residents indicated that many people do walk to local shops and public facilities. As noted earlier, north/south circulation is limited by the river corridor and also by the railroad line, which also has limited crossings. Crossing busy streets was mentioned as a problem, and traffic calming measures at key intersections should be considered for neighborhood improvements. The neighborhood is served by public transit routes occurring along several major streets. As a lack of street parking was mentioned by residents during the planning process as a neighborhood concern, maintaining or increasing public transit access
26 K I N N I C K I N N I C R I V E R CO R R I D O R N E I G H B O R H O O D P L A N

Existing pedestrian bridge at a dead-end

Existing S. 9th Place vehicular bridge

and use by residents can be an important factor in reducing the need for auto use in the neighborhood. Consideration should be given for providing adequate bus shelters and other pedestrian amenities at key stops as a way to make the whole public transit experience more comfortable. Residents mentioned several concerns regarding traffic and circulation in the neighborhood during the planning process. Excessive speeds reached by some drivers on east/west streets (Arthur, Harrison, Cleveland) was seen as a problem. Availability of street parking was also viewed as a problem. E. Parks and Open Space The existing parks in the neighborhood most impacted by the new river rehabilitation include Robert J. Modrzejewski Playground (formerly Cleveland Park) and Pulaski Park and the adjacent Kinnickinnic Recreation Area. Other large area parks outside the planning area include Kosciuszko Park on Lincoln Avenue and Baran Park near Chase Avenue. An inventory analysis map was prepared to identify areas of the neighborhood which are lacking public open space within a short walk or which are separated from a park by a barrier such as a major street or railroad corridor. Figure 2-9 shows the inventory map. Two principal areas were identified as lacking in park space: the southeast corner of the neighborhood near S. 6th St and Oklahoma Ave and the northeast corner near Lincoln Ave and S. 6th St. These parts of the neighborhood are greater than a 5-minute walk to Pulaski Park or Modrzejewski Playground, and are separated from other area parks by Lincoln Avenue to the north and S. 6th Street and S. Chase Ave on the east. Also, the lack of pedestrian crossings over the sunken railroad corridor make the south side of the neighborhood especially isolated from recreational opportunities. The dense neighborhood does not currently have a fabric of smaller neighborhood parks where children can play close to home. This leads many children to play in the streets. The playgrounds associated with some of the nearby schools, such as Hayes Bilingual School, do not provide much green space. There is a general lack of green space outside of Pulaski Park and the private cemeteries in the neighborhood (which with their large trees and expansive green provide a visual break but are not accessible for active or passive recreation). The existing bike trail that goes through the neighborhood is the Oak Leaf trail, operated by Milwaukee County Parks. The trail follows the KK Parkway between S.
Play structure at Hayes Bilingual School Children playing at the edge of the river bank

CHAPTER 2: NEIGHBORHOOD FRAMEWORK 27

Existing On-Street Bike Trail Bike/ Pedestrian Connector

Commercial Parks & Open Space Institutional & City Services Cemetery
P

Schools Places of Interest

225 450

900

Figure 2-9. Neighborhood park inventory analysis map

28 K I N N I C K I N N I C R I V E R CO R R I D O R N E I G H B O R H O O D P L A N

27th and S. 20th Streets, is briefly off the street through the KK Recreation Area, and then follows streets to the east. Many residents expressed an interest in providing offstreet bike paths due to the safety issues associated with kids biking in the busy narrow streets. The City is currently planning to extend a new bike trail system, the KK River Trail, along the KK River from S. 6th St to the east along the south bank. Several residents expressed concern that there are no good places in the neighborhood to walk or run dogs. The parks do not allow dogs and there are no alternatives nearby for people to take their dogs for outdoor recreation. Another desire expressed by residents was for space to introduce urban agriculture or community gardens.
MODRzEjEWSKI PLAYGROUND

Modrzejewski Playground is owned and operated by MPS as a playground, and Hayes Bilingual School often uses it as an outdoor classroom. The existing park is surrounded by a large chain-link fence and for safety reasons is not connected to the concretelined river channel which abuts its north edge. The north half of the park is primarily asphalt, and many residents felt that this area is unattractive and underutilized. The shelter at Modrzejewski Playground is in the center of the park and is not easily seen from the street, so it can be a hangout for gangs and illegal/dangerous activities. The building has restrooms and some storage used by the park programs but no other amenities or accessible areas. The playground has a small splash pool and umbrella, a relatively new play structure, and nearby swings. According to the MPS facility staff, the splash pool gets a lot of use and is popular with neighborhood families. There are also basketball courts, which some neighbors have complained can be a gathering space for teenagers and after-dark activities as well as fights. The baseball diamond and field on the south end of Modrzejewski Playground is primarily used by MPS programs for activities like kickball. During the conceptual alternatives phase, the project team looked at several options for reconfiguring and reconnecting Modrzejewski Playground to the river as well as the neighborhood around it. The new greenway will provide a new opportunity for connection to the park space and open it up for educational and recreational opportunities that it previously lacked.

Modrzejewski Playground asphalt area and shelter

Modrzejewski Playground swings

CHAPTER 2: NEIGHBORHOOD FRAMEWORK 29

S. 11th Street

S. 10th Street

S. 11th Street

S. 10th Street

S. 11th Street

W. Cleveland Ave

W. Cleveland Ave

W. Cleveland Ave

Three initial Modrzejewski Playground concepts with varying emphasis on recreation fields, natural spaces, and urban gathering spaces

The property is lined with mature street trees which is an amenity that should be maintained. However, the area that is currently paved with asphalt does not provide valuable open space benefits. The concepts looked at incorporating mixed-use ball fields which could accommodate both baseball and soccer as well as unprogrammed open space for playing frisbee or similar activities. The team also considered public gathering spaces such as an outdoor classroom/informal amphitheater along the river bank, picnic areas, and plaza spaces for a farmers market or local art fair.
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Other potential amenities for the playground considered include natural areas with winding paths, enhanced/increased parking, an expanded spray park and playground, and a new relocated shelter. A few residents, upon hearing of potential plans for an amphitheater, were concerned about noise levels in the park and the potential to attract too many people for concerts. This fear may have had something to do with the connotation of an amphitheater being a noisy place with amplified music rather than a gentle stepped slope where children could gather with their teachers on field trips and learn about the river or where a local ethnic dance group could perform.

S. 10th Street

PULASKI PARK

Pulaski Park offers a wide expanse of open space in an otherwise dense neighborhood, with plenty of mature tree cover, rolling terrain, and a visual connection with the river. It also houses an indoor pool (Pulaski Pool), a softball field and mixed-used recreational fields, tennis and basketball courts, a playground, and winding walkways and paths. The major street running along the east side of Pulaski Park, S. 16th St, is a wide busy street with no continuous pedestrian path or sidewalk along the park side. The terrain in the park creates somewhat of a barrier between the park and S. 16th St in places. The large flat multi-use ball/soccer field north of the river is bare of grass and consequently dusty, as the lawn is over-utilized and under-maintained. The tennis courts had no nets or broken nets on them at the time of this report in summer of 2009, and children were using them for playing baseball and other non-tennis-related activities. The only pedestrian bridge that crosses the river in Pulaski Park is flanked on one side by a steep hill and stairs, and on one occasion we observed a family riding bikes down the stairs to the bridge to cross over. Adjacent to the river is a good-sized playground and basketball courts. These amenities will likely need to be flood-proofed due to the potential need for additional flood storage. Opportunities for improvement in Pulaski Park primarily relate to maintenance of facilities such as the tennis courts and recreation field, and better pedestrian and bicycle connections to and through the park. The flood management and river rehabilitation project MMSD is proposing will provide opportunity for better pedestrian and bicycle connections and access. It it also predicted to result in the need for a new pedestrian bridge.

Pulaski Park pedestrian bridge with stairs leading to the softball field and service building

Pulaski Park mixed-use recreation field north of the river and tennis courts (on hill)

CHAPTER 2: NEIGHBORHOOD FRAMEWORK 31

KINNICKINNIC RECREATION AREA AND PARKWAY

Also owned and operated by Milwaukee County, the nearby KK Recreation Area and KK Parkway provide additional green space and recreational facilities for the neighborhood and the greater area. Some of the same problems seen in Pulaski Park are evident in these areas due to lack of available funds for maintenance and improvements. The four tennis courts that reside near the KK Parkway sit empty and overgrown with no nets. The archery range also appears to be suffering from lack of maintenance. The vegetation along the rivers edge is so dense that someone walking in the KK Recreation Area would not know there is a river adjacent to the park. This wall of vegetation currently serves as a barrier between the park and the concrete-lined channel, and it poses an impediment to visual connection with the river. Many long-time residents of the neighborhood expressed fond memories for the days before the river was channelized when there was a lagoon in the area behind Pulaski High School which included a waterfall and swimming hole. These residents felt strongly that the new rehabilitated river should include some semblance of that former lagoon. The Oak Leaf Trail is located on the KK Parkway between S. 20th and S. 27th Streets. There is an opportunity to provide an off-street parallel trail for bicyclists and pedestrians in the land adjacent to the street that would allow for separation between vehicle traffic and bicycle/pedestrian traffic. There is currently a narrow asphalt trail along a portion of the Parkway which could be replaced with a wider mixed-use trail more suitable for commuters. The need for more off-street bike paths in the neighborhood was a comment expressed by a number of residents at the meetings. The new river corridor through this parkway area will provide added benefits to the already green passive-recreation open area, and will create new opportunities for recreation associated with the river as well as river views which currently are obstructed by vegetation.

A family enjoying a picnic in the KK Recreation Area (the KK River is located behind the dense vegetation)

Existing asphalt trail along the KK Parkway

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3.0 NEIGHBORHOOD plaNNING & D E s I G N R E C O M M E N D aT I O N s

This chapter outlines planning and design recommendations for the KK River Corridor Neighborhood, including concepts, patterns, and strategies. The recommendations are broken down into the following categories: 1. A New Kinnickinnic River 2. Neighborhood Development 3. Transportation and Circulation 4. Parks and Open Spaces 5. Community Involvement, Education, and Stewardship Figure 3-1 illustrates the overall Neighborhood Master Plan. The plan highlights key recommendations and improvements which could be implemented over a period of many years. The KK River flood management and rehabilitation project will be the primary catalyst for change in the neighborhood; the new greenway will wind its way through the neighborhood providing new connections, new opportunities, and new life to the community.
An example of what the new KK River could look like (under low flow conditions)

The plan recommends enhanced streetscapes through the 13th Street and Lincoln Avenue commercial corridors to encourage new economic development opportunities and boost existing local businesses. It also encourages the creation of green streets to create pedestrian-friendly and environmentally-sustainable corridors along several residential streets. The plan envisions a revitalized Modrzejewski Playground (formerly Cleveland Park) with a stronger connection to the river as well as community gathering spaces and educational and interpretive opportunities. The new river greenway will also shape the County land west of S. 16th St, through Pulaski Park and the KK Recreation Area. The greenway will provide new bicycle and pedestrian amenities and reconnect these valuable community parklands to the river. The changes brought on by the river rehabilitation project are envisioned to spur new development as well as reinvestment in existing residential areas. The plan provides guidelines for how new development should be designed to fit within the context of the existing neighborhood, and how valuable public funds should be focused to provide the most benefit for residents and investors alike.

Existing homes on Harrison Avenue which would face the new parkway and river corridor greenway

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14 14 6 10 2 5 11 5 1 4 5 5 4 6

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0
8 1 2 3 4 5 6 7

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Modrzejewski/Cleveland Park Improvement New Kinnickinnic River Greenway Potential Pocket Park/ Community Gardens Potential Redevelopment Site River Gateway Green Street Improvements Business Corridor Improvements

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Neighborhood Gateway (Commercial) New Pedestrian Bridge Over Railroad Harrison Parkway Pulaski Park Improvements Stormwater Management/ Natural Recreation Area Kinnickinnic River Parkway/Kinnickinnic Recreation Area Home Renovation/Improvement Efforts

Existing Parks and Open Space Existing Schools Existing Commercial Potential Redevelopment Opportunities Planning Area boundary

Figure 3-1. KK River Corridor Neighborhood Master Plan CHAPTER 3: NEIGHBORHOOD PLANNING & DEsIGN RECOmmENDATIONs 35

3.1 A NEw KINNICKINNIC RIVER


A. Recommended River Corridor Alignment and Potential Property Acquisitions consideration to areas which are currently at the greatest risk of flooding due to their elevations or which have been affected by flooding in the past. At the east end of the corridor, closest to S. 6th St, this primarily includes properties on the south bank of the river. The new river corridor limits represent the smallest area necessary to meet flood conveyance and public safety objectives. A property will only be acquired if it will be directly impacted by the new river corridor or if it is necessary to gain access to the site for construction purposes. No additional homes are slated for acquisition for green space, redevelopment, new structures, roads or alleys. Utility relocation which is required due to the new river alignment will be kept to the greatest extent possible within the area needed for flood management.

Figure 3-2 shows the recommended alignment of the new KK River corridor and greenway. This alignment meets conveyance goals for flood management while minimizing property acquisitions, relocation of utilities and other public infrastructure, as well as impacts to the existing street grid. This recommended alignment was the basis for MMSDs initial property acquisition plat, developed by MMSDs consultant Hey & Associates in summer 2009. The initial plat and subsequent revisions will be used to direct MMSD funds for property acquisitions over a several-year period. Owners of properties placed on the plat will be notified once the plat has been approved and adopted by the MMSD Commission. The properties listed on the plat may change through the process of preliminary engineering and development of construction documents, and some could be added or removed. The recommended alignment of the river corridor was developed with
W. Harrison Avenue S. 13th Street

Existing River Channel 100 Year Flood Plain Existing Vehicular Bridge S. 6th Street

S. 16th Street

S. 9th Place

Existing Pedestrian Bridge Recommended KK River Corridor Outline

150 300

600

Kinnickinnic River

W. Cleveland Avenue

Railroad Corri

dor

Figure 3-2. Approximate limits of new river corridor alignment superimposed over existing orthophoto, S. 6th to S. 16th Streets

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mmsDs ACquIsITION PROCEss

increase in rent to live in a comparable apartment for up to four years. 6. In most cases, MMSD will remove residences and other structures on the acquired properties once the residents have successfully relocated. However, under certain special circumstances, MMSD would allow the owner to occupy the home for a period after the acquisition until such time as it is needed for construction activities. 7. The construction project will begin once all the identified properties have been purchased, residents relocated, and the existing structures have been removed. This process may take a number of years from the time acquisitions begin to when the last home is demolished. Relocated residents who would like to remain in the neighborhood will be assisted and encouraged to the greatest extent possible to find existing comparable homes for sale within the neighborhood. B. New Greenway Amenities The new KK River corridor greenway will present many opportunities for added community benefits. Many residents at the public open houses felt strongly that there should be no privatization of the river or private developments such as high-end condominiums along the new river corridor. This plan encourages all future investments in the new KK River greenway to be designed to serve the community as a whole rather than individual property owners or investors. The neighborhood plan recommends the creation of a new greenway with a series of unique zones of character, represented by different edge treatment and adjacent land uses. The types and locations of the river character zones were chosen to respond to neighborhood features and community objectives, however any combination of the recommendations could be implemented throughout the new greenway. These zones represent examples of different river edge treatments that provide community benefits beyond basic flood management and public safety objectives.

Because property acquisitions and the loss of homes is such a central issue in this neighborhood plan and forms the basis for all other recommendations in this section, the authors felt it was important to provide a short explanation of MMSDs acquisition process for the information of the reader. MMSD has an established process through which property acquisitions are executed. The following steps outline their process, however this report in no way represents all of the details, policies, and procedures MMSD has in place and in no way obligates MMSD. This list is for informational purposes only, and affected property owners will be provided complete and accurate information directly from MMSD. 1. MMSD identifies a property on an official Property Acquisition Plat, which signifies that the property is necessary to be acquired for the project. 2. MMSD contacts the property owner and begins the formal process of acquisition. 3. MMSD hires an appraiser to conduct an appraisal of the home and establish a fair market value. The property owner can hire an independent appraiser if they choose and MMSD will compensate the owner for the second appraisal. 4. MMSD identifies several comparable replacement properties which, compared to the owners current property, are substantially equal and similar with respect to size, type, age, and condition, and are located either in the same neighborhood or a neighborhood with similar characteristics and accessibility. 5. MMSD puts together an offer to purchase the property based on the fair market value of the home. MMSD covers real estate and attorneys fees associated with reviewing legal real estate documents. MMSD prepares a relocation plan for the owners which includes compensation for moving expenses to relocate within 50 miles (for owner occupiers or renters only). The relocation compensation may also include a differential payment making up the difference, if any, between the acquisition price of the home and the purchase price of the replacement home (up to $25,000). Renters could also receive, if necessary, a lump sum payment to offset an

CHAPTER 3: NEIGHBORHOOD PLANNING & DEsIGN RECOmmENDATIONs 37

Collect
E1 E4 E2 E3

Gather
E1 E2 E5

Grow
E1

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E5

Figure 3-3. Recommended KK River corridor alignment between S. 6th and S. 16th Streets, showing river character zones RIVER CORRIDOR ZONEs
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360

Three river character zones are defined below and are described on the following pages: 1. Grow - S. 6th Street to S. 9th Place 2. Gather - S. 9th Place to S. 13th Street 3. Collect - S. 13th Street to S. 16th Street Downstream of S. 6th St, the river changes character, and the concrete channel ends. While this area is accessed by fisherman, hikers and others, Figure 3-3 focuses on the new KK River corridor between S. 6th and S. 16th Streets. Some of the major features are called out. The next few pages describe each zone in more detail and gives examples, descriptions, cross-sections, and sketches to illustrate the concepts. The new greenway would have a continuous paved bicycle path along the river that would also serve as a maintenance access path for MMSD. ADA-accessible ramps from street grade down to the path would be provided at or near all vehicular and pedestrian bridges. The bicycle path would continue below most bridges, which eliminates street crossings and provides more continuity for through-commuters and local bikers. Additional recommendations for bicycle and pedestrian connections are discussed in Section 3.3. Bridges over the river are discussed in Section 3.3 as well.
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E3 E2

Overlooks: Create spaces that offer expansive views of the river corridor River Access: Promote use of the river corridor by providing safe and accessible connections, bridges and spaces Water Quality: Enhance water quality through stormwater management Habitat: Provide fish and wildlife habitat using pools and riffles Program Activities: Establish riverfront activities that engage users and create a lively environment such as community gardens

E4

E5

Grow - S. 6th Street to S. 9th Place The term Grow describes an emphasis on urban agriculture in this zone. This zone is envisioned to be lined with community garden plots and have a natural and residential aesthetic. Some of the features of this zone include: Sloped banks (trapezoidal channel) with some native vegetation and some mowed areas River paseos (green alleys) connect disconnected streets on north and south sides of river (See Section 3.3 for more information on river paseos) Community garden plots at the top of bank line the rivers edge in old residential lots which, due to the new river corridor, are oddly shaped and too small for a residence Opportunities for river access include informal stone paths for river access and fishing opportunities
Community garden plots were constructed by community members on a formerly vacant lot in this Detroit neighborhood

Example of a river bed with sloped vegetated banks

Community gardens, like this one in Chicago, are popular in dense urban areas as a way to allow residents to produce their own fresh food affordably

CHAPTER 3: NEIGHBORHOOD PLANNING & DEsIGN RECOmmENDATIONs 39

1 2

Trailhead Plaza & Gateway Feature Informal Stone Path near Pools for Fishing Enhanced Pedestrian Crossing Community Garden Plots Pedestrian Bridge River Paseo Overlook Potential Future River-Oriented Redevelopment Opportunity Bike/Maintenance Path River Channel Narrowed Bridge with Enhanced Views
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Figure 3-6. Grow (S. 6th St to S. 9th Pl) plan view and typical cross-section

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Gather - S. 9th Place to S. 13th Street The term Gather is used to emphasize a community gathering place. The proximity of this zone with the S. 13th St commercial corridor also lends a more urban setting, with the following features: Harrison Avenue Parkway hugs the north bank of the river and includes enhanced streetscaping, a sidewalk, landscaping, trees, and pedestrian amenities such as benches, lighting, and trash/recycling receptacles Opportunities to draw commercial activity to the river at S. 13th St bridge crossing, especially for recreational businesses and services such as bike rentals or cafes Terraced banks with small stone or concrete walls connected by mowed grass areas Overlook/small plaza structure with railing juts out with use of a vertical wall at the end of 10th Street Modrzejewski Playground connects to river with terraced slope and small outdoor classroom/informal amphitheater Slightly wider or more prominent pedestrian bridge at S. 11th St connects residential green corridor from north to south
Natural stone materials create terraces along the waters edge

Terraced slope using low concrete walls

A walkway, or promenade, would line the top of bank along Harrison Parkway with trees, benches, lighting and other amenities

CHAPTER 3: NEIGHBORHOOD PLANNING & DEsIGN RECOmmENDATIONs 41

Figure 3-7. Artist rendering looking west from the S. 9th Pl bridge towards the S. 11th St pedestrian bridge, Modrzejewski Playground on the south (left) and the S. 10th St overlook on the north (right) along the new Harrison Parkway

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3 4 2

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Pedestrian Bridge River Paseo Overlook Potential Future River-Oriented Redevelopment Opportunity

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Bike/Maintenance Path River Channel Modrzejewski Playground


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Narrowed Bridge with Enhanced Views

Figure 3-8. Gather (S. 9th Pl to S. 13th St) plan view

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Figure 3-9. Gather typical cross-section through Modrzejewski Playground amphitheater and Harrison Parkway

CHAPTER 3: NEIGHBORHOOD PLANNING & DEsIGN RECOmmENDATIONs 43

Collect: S. 13th Street to S. 16th Street The term Collect is used for this zone to describe an emphasis on stormwater management and water quality treatment practices. To the extent possible, local street runoff (such as from Harrison Ave, alleys) should be disconnected from the combined sewer and allowed to flow at the surface to treatment zones along both banks of the river. Interpretive signage or kiosks should be provided to draw attention and educate residents about water quality issues.
Direct stormwater runoff from streets and parking lots into planting beds designed to filter solids, metals, and other pollutants and infiltrate water to reduce runoff volumes and peak flows

Demonstration rain gardens/biofiltration zones along Harrison Ave parkway and river paseos River paseos connect disconnected streets on south side of river (see Section 3.3 for more information on river paseos) Sloped banks (trapezoidal channel) with some native vegetation and some mowed areas Park-like setting transitions more urban zone to entrance to Pulaski Park Opportunities for river access include informal stone paths for river access and fishing opportunities Small overlook structures along Harrison Avenue parkway Bike/maintenance corridor on the south bank with access points to street-level at S. 13th St, S. 15th St (pedestrian bridge) and S. 16th St bridges; bike path crosses under S. 13th and S. 15th but not S. 16th. Trailhead feature at S. 13th St with informational kiosk or welcome sign and map. Enhanced (tabletop) crossing at S. 16th St where bicycle path crosses to Pulaski Park (See Section 3.3 for more information about pedestrian crossings and traffic calming).

A rain garden street (photo courtesy of City of Madison, www.cityofmadison.com/engineering/stormwater/raingardens/)

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4 12

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Trailhead Plaza & Gateway Feature Informal Stone Path near Pools for Fishing Enhanced Pedestrian Crossing Harrison Ave Parkway

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Figure 3-10. Collect (S. 13th St to S. 16th St) plan view and typical cross-section

CHAPTER 3: NEIGHBORHOOD PLANNING & DEsIGN RECOmmENDATIONs 45

C. Habitat Creation Opportunities Removing the concrete lining and drop structures will mark a significant step towards restoring the natural ecosystem of the KK River. However, creation of quality, functional habitat opportunities for fish and other aquatic species in the rehabilitated river will require more than just concrete removal. Natural streams and rivers in Southern Wisconsin that occur in glacial outwash or glacial till typically consist of coarse sand, fine sands, woody debris and banks held in place by plant roots. Instream fish habitat in a natural river or stream typically is created by logs, roots or other features which increase habitat complexity and create localized changes in channel morphology. A balance of riffles and pools provide diversity of velocities and depths of water to support different types of species, from invertebrates to fish to mammals. Many fish species need a combination of fast-moving shallow water and calmer deeper pools to complete their life cycle activities. However, in an engineered stream bed, such as that of the new KK River, there are limited opportunities to provide complexity due to the need for stability and predictability. The diagram to the left depicts the shape of a natural river with ample space to meander. A natural meander can not be accommodated in the narrow corridor and urban environment of the KK River. Therefore, the design will need to mimic the natural environment as much as possible while still providing the objectives of flood management and public safety, and still stay within the confines of a fixed urban corridor. The new KK River design should incorporate as many strategies as possible to allow for targeted fish species to find adequate food sources and spawning environments. Targeted fish species for the KK have been identified by the WDNR as steelhead trout and northern pike. Some strategies are listed below. 1. Any instream structures need to be designed and constructed to withstand impacts by large flooding events and inundation of sediment and other debris. Instream structures such as pools may not be successful due to high amounts of sedimentation from uncontrolled runoff upstream.
Illustration of a pool and riffle sequence in a stream (from Mount, California Rivers and Streams, U.C. Press, 1995)

Fish habitat restoration area, Gilkey Creek, Flint, Michigan

2. A healthy riparian corridor (the narrow area alongside the river which contains specific types of vegetation to support the river ecosystem) should be established and maintained. The rivers ability to occasionally flood and spread out within its riparian corridor is vital to the health of its ecosystem as it provides essential

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nutrients, debris, and even habitat. The vegetated buffer area also provides filtration and treatment of stormwater runoff. 3. Where feasible, provide instream deflectors, boulder clusters, log or boulder weirs, or similar structures to create opportunities for pools, areas of refuge, and temporary protection for fish and other species as they travel through the corridor. Utilize natural materials in the creation of instream structures whenever feasible. 4. Establish or maintain to the greatest extent possible areas of riparian canopy trees or other types of vegetation which overhang the river and provide shade and habitat for birds, insects, and other species vital to the overall health of the river. 5. Establish a monitoring system with an environmental non-profit organization like Milwaukee Riverkeeper to track the number and diversity of target species as well as other healthy stream indicators such as dissolved oxygen levels, turbidity, nitrogen and phosphorus levels, and suspended solids. Keep records of these indicators over multiple seasons to track the progress of the rivers rehabilitation process. Monitor the integrity of fish habitat structures after large storm events or on an annual basis to determine if they are still functioning as designed. D. Public Access and Safety The new KK greenway will restore the connection between the community and the river and provide new opportunities for interaction and education. This increased access and activity, while positive overall for the residents and visitors of the neighborhood, must be balanced with a practical awareness of the risks associated with an urban waterway cutting through a residential area. The nature of the river is flashy, and while removing the concrete lining and restoring a more natural corridor will dampen some of the impact of sudden floods and rising waters, this fact will not be entirely eliminated. While the KK River will continue to pose a potential risk to unattended children, the new wider corridor will allow for improved access for would-be rescuers, gentler slopes for egress, and slower water velocities, especially along the perimeter of the corridor. Natural surfaces such as vegetation and rocks slow down floodwaters, allowing someone more opportunity to escape, or cling to an object until they can be rescued. The following is a list of strategies which will help provide balance between the community benefit of increased access with the potential safety risks.
Informal stone paths and boulder steps provide river access and interaction

Boulder weir and pool, with narrowed stream to increase velocity over the weir (courtesy of Vernon County Land and Water Conservation Department)

CHAPTER 3: NEIGHBORHOOD PLANNING & DEsIGN RECOmmENDATIONs 47

1. Easy Access. This plan recommends the creation of boulder paths and stairs throughout the corridor, not only as a means of providing informal access to the rivers edge, but also for quick escape routes and easy access for rescuers. Providing these at regular intervals ensures that, even when it is storming and grassed slopes may be slippery, the boulder steps are an egress route out when waters begin to rise. Access and egress will also be improved by the addition of accessible paved ramps at all of the bridges (every other street between S. 6th and S. 16th Streets). 2. Increased Awareness and Education. School children will have the ability to interact more with the river and learn about its natural cycles and behavior, and to look for warning signs. There should also be programs to educate parents about the risks associated with leaving small children unattended near the river, even during dry conditions. 3. Eyes on the River. With the increase in activity in the river corridor comes additional opportunities for people to spot and prevent potential accidents. Currently, the neighborhood for the most part has its back to the river. With the new bicycle corridor, active pedestrian connections on the river banks, and the Harrison Parkway adjacent to a significant portion of the residential corridor, the river will have many more eyes on it, and it will be much easier to identify and aid potential victims of floodwaters or crime. 4. Lighting. While light poles cannot be accommodated in the river floodway for maintenance reasons, the banks of the corridor should be well-lit with pedestrianscale lighting. Lighting should be provided below bridges where the bicycle corridor crosses under them. 5. Emergency Call Boxes. Easily-identifiable emergency call boxes should be provided at regular intervals such as at trailheads and access ramps to the corridor, and near bridges.

Increased public access to the river comes with some risks, but the benefits to the community outweigh the threats, and a more active corridor means more eyes on the river

Provide pedestrian-scale lighting for safety along walks and other public areas on the river bank and in parks

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3 . 2 N E I G H B O R H O O D D E V E LO P m E N T
Figure 3-11 shows the Neighborhood Development Master Plan, which indicates a development strategy for the neighborhood and some potential sites where redevelopment might occur in the future. Redevelopment could include several types of activity including new construction on existing sites that are underutilized or have obsolete uses or could include the rehabilitation and improvement of existing structures. The strategy aims to build upon the current assets of the neighborhood, address shortcomings, and examine opportunities for integrating new and rehabilitated development. The development strategy addresses three primary issues: R1. Identifying redevelopment opportunities R2. Enhancing existing residential neighborhoods R3. Enhancing business districts and corridors A. Identifying Redevelopment Opportunities As in many other Milwaukee neighborhoods, redevelopment offers the primary opportunity to incorporate new businesses, housing and open space into the neighborhood. An effective redevelopment strategy should include the following general concepts: Where possible, encourage clusters of redevelopment activities and improvements. Clusters are more effective than spreading efforts out over a large area because they are more visible and create a feeling of momentum and that redevelopment efforts are working. Redevelopment on vacant or underutilized properties must be accompanied by rehabilitation of existing residential properties. This strategy preserves neighborhood character while preventing displacement of existing residents. Utilize public improvements, where possible, to increase value and spur redevelopment activity. Public improvements could be as modest as planting trees in the street terrace or more ambitious, including investments such as boulevard construction or park development. All public improvements should be visually appealing and create desirability in the area.
Example of neighborhood-scale mixed-use development.

Example of new one- and two-family residential development.

CHAPTER 3: NEIGHBORHOOD PLANNING & DEsIGN RECOmmENDATIONs 49

Three Components of Neighborhood Development: R1 Identifying Redevelopment Opportunities R2 Enhancing Existing Residential Neighborhoods R3 Enhancing Business Districts and Corridors R2

Fig 3-13

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Fig 3-12

225 450

900

Existing Parks and Open Space Existing Schools Existing Commercial

Potential Redevelopment Opportunities Proposed Greenway Redevelopment Concept

Commercial Enhancement Opportunities

Neighborhood Gateway

Figure 3-11. Neighborhood Development Master Plan

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Public expenditures on infrastructure should be prioritized and targeted to maximize private sector investment in redevelopment. Strategies to mitigate gentrification.

Illustrated Patterns/ Recommendations 3 9 Neighborhood Greens Parking to Rear

Overall this neighborhood does not contain much vacant land for new development opportunities. Therefore the major opportunities for new development will be on properties susceptible to change. Figures 3-12 and 3-13 outline examples and recommendations regarding potential new development on several sites that could be considered in transition or likely to change ownership or use over time. The concepts include public streets, single family homes, duplexes, townhomes, multifamily buildings, small neighborhood businesses, and small neighborhood parks or green spaces. If a site is indicated on this plan it does not mean that a property owner will be forced to participate in redevelopment efforts. The plan is meant to show places where redevelopment activity would most benefit the neighborhood in order to help set priorities and help target efforts.
PATTERNs/RECOmmENDATIONs

12 Celebrate the Corner

1. Urban Grid: Extend/continue the urban street grid wherever possible into redevelopment parcels. 2. Complementary Development: Utilize and design housing types that are compatible with the overall scale and character of the neighborhood. 3. Neighborhood Greens: Provide small neighborhood green spaces within redevelopment sites where possible. Green spaces must be open to the general public. 4. Eyes on the Street: Locate building entrances on principal public streets. Within buildings locate habitable spaces along the street faade. 5. Layers of History: Consider renovating older structures into new uses to preserve pieces of the neighborhoods past. 6. Walkable Streets: Include sidewalks, pedestrian lanes, and pedestrian gathering places in new developments. Consider providing benches, shade trees, and other amenities that enhance pedestrian use and comfort.
9

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Figure 3-12. Redevelopment concept at the intersection of W. Oklahoma Ave and S. 20th St

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7. Engage the River: Where new development is adjacent or in proximity to the river, design the site to allow public physical and visual access to the river. 8. Corner Shops: Where possible, provide small ground floor retail spaces in new developments, especially at block corners. 9. Parking to Rear: When designing commercial buildings, place the parking to the rear or side of the building rather than in front of the building. 10. Green Streets: Provide vegetation along all streets. Consider rain gardens, stormwater filter strips, and bioswales in new developments in order to reduce quantity and increase quality of stormwater runoff. 11. Transportation Alternatives: Within new development, provide facilities for bicycle parking and storage. Consider the location of transit routes when designing redevelopment projects. Higher densities can be considered along major transit lines. 12. Celebrate the Corner: Where new commercial development occurs at a block corner, especially at a major intersection, provide an architectural element (tower, porch, rotunda, etc.) that marks the corner. 13. Plazas and Cafes: In new commercial developments provide small gathering places along the street edges of buildings for sidewalk cafes, outdoor eating, and retail display. Figures 3-12 and 3-13 indicate examples of development that can serve as models for appropriate redevelopment in the KK River neighborhood. Most new redevelopment is expected to take the form of structures similar to those in the neighborhood or typical of those found in other similar residential neighborhoods in Milwaukee. These would include single-family homes, duplexes, one- to three- story retail buildings, and possibly owner-occupied single-family row homes. It is important to note that the city tax base will initially be reduced due to the loss of homes caused by the widening of the river corridor. Redevelopment and increases in property values that may result as a consequence of the river project will help replace this lost value. There are several sites identified in this plan which could accommodate new development or the renovation of existing structures. It is anticipated that the changes and improvements to the river corridor as outlined in this plan will enhance opportunities for redevelopment. The timeline for redevelopment is hard to predict

Example of mixed-use development with residential or office space above first floor retail

Example of mixed-use development with residential space above first-floor retail

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8 4 10

11

100

200

Illustrated Patterns/ Recommendations 2 4 7 Complementary Development Eyes on the Street Engage the River 8 Corner Shops

10 Green Streets 11 Transportation Alternatives

Figure 3-13. Redevelopment concept along the existing rail corridor and along the KK River between S. 16th Street and the Interstate

CHAPTER 3: NEIGHBORHOOD PLANNING & DEsIGN RECOmmENDATIONs 53

due to the nature of the development marketplace but it is expected that once the river modifications and elements of this neighborhood plan are implemented, interest in neighborhood investment will increase. Some earlier investment may be expected as some property owners see the potential in the neighborhood in advance of the river restoration project. B. Enhancing Existing Residential Neighborhoods The condition and perception of housing has a significant impact on the identity and value of a neighborhood. The condition of housing relates not only to the actual residential structures but also to the streets, yards, and other public places within the neighborhood. The following recommendations seek to foster a holistic approach to neighborhood preservation or development that includes involving both the public and private sectors. One of the recommendations of this plan concerns fostering green residential streets within the neighborhood. This concept is based upon the idea of linking the residential areas to the newly-renovated river corridor through green infrastructure in order to highlight sustainable development practices and opportunities for homeowners to apply basic principles to their properties. While these green streets are envisioned to be implemented eventually throughout the neighborhood, this plan proposes an initial effort along S. 11th St: this street was selected because it provides linkage between the river, a renovated Modrzejewski Playground, Hayes Bilingual Elementary School, and Zablocki Elementary School. Figure 3-14 provides an example of a portion of one of these streets.
PATTERNs/RECOmmENDATIONs

1. Green Streets: Provide Green Residential Streets, beginning with a demonstration project for S. 11th St. Components of Green streets could include the following: Enhance street lighting, especially at corners. Provide traffic calming in the form of small traffic circles at intersections to help slow down speeding. Circles could be place at 11th Street and cross streets where speed has been a problem such as Arthur and Cleveland Avenues. Install landscape bump-outs at intersections to reduce paving and stormwater run-off while helping to ease pedestrian crossing.

Figure 3-14. Green residential street concept in plan (above) and section (below)

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Encourage the use of rain gardens, rain barrels, and other sustainable practices by property owners along the street. Consider the installation of biofiltration swales or planters along the streets. Maintain existing residential street trees and infill where appropriate to provide continuous mature tree canopies. Pilot a rain garden street program similar to the City of Madisons program. The City worked with residents to construct rain gardens in street terraces that would intercept runoff from streets, sidewalks, and roofs and treat it prior to discharging to the street storm sewer.

2. Farm Street: Consider the provision of community gardens along certain streets. One possibility would be to utilize the proposed green space along the southern side of Harrison, to the north of the newly-routed river corridor for a series of gardens in addition to other landscape features along this stretch. 3. Mixed-Use Corner Building: Encourage neighborhood-compatible mixed-uses in the many corner residential buildings that have a ground floor retail or office space that is either currently or formerly in use. These commercial uses within residential blocks are permitted as long as they are economically viable and physically well maintained, and as long as their use does not become automobile-oriented or otherwise detrimental to the neighborhood. 4. Green Playgrounds: Convert some of the asphalt-paved grounds of the schools within the neighborhoods to small gardens or green spaces such as rain gardens. 5. Home Ownership: Retain and increase owner occupancy for all residential types thorough City owner assistance programs and low interest loans. 6. Neighborhood Association: Work with neighborhood associations such as Urban Anthropology in Lincoln Village or encourage formation of a neighborhood group just for the neighborhood planning area. This group could be fundamental in helping bridge cultural differences, reach understandings, and act as a community voice in dealings with the City and other institutions. 7. Local Conservation Corps: Provide programs in which groups of teens or young adults would be given summer jobs to help clean and maintain not only the

Painted rain barrels can brighten a street and educate people about stormwater issues and water conservation

Many residential streets in the neighborhood already have mature street trees. Tree canopies capture stormwater and help keep the neighborhood cool.

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river corridor but also local parks and green spaces. 8. Teach Children Environmental Stewardship: Initiate programs in local schools to teach about the river ecology and sustainable practices including recycling. Residents have indicated that in many neighborhood families, the children primarily bring new knowledge into the household from which the older generation learns. 9. Neighborhood Paseo: Delineate a pedestrian walking loop to create a neighborhood stroll along certain sidewalks, park pathways, and the river corridor. This walk could become a kind of neighborhood trail, linking cultural, historical and environmental features. Historical and cultural signage could be incorporated along this path to create interest and provide educational opportunities. 10. Community Art: Provide a network of art projects, especially along the river corridor. Consider both permanent and temporary works. 11. Community Policing: Encourage more positive daily interaction with residents and police by encouraging neighborhood patrols done on foot, bicycle, or horseback. 12. Target Investment Neighborhood: Utilize a Target Investment Neighborhood Strategy (TIN) strategy to reverse signs of neglect and improve properties. These programs can include grants for home rehabilitation, assistance for home loans, aggressive enforcement of building code violations, nuisance properties, etc.
AssIsTANCE TO HELP RETAIN ExIsTING REsIDENTs

While redevelopment opportunities can create housing choices that can serve both existing residents and newcomers, it is important that resources be available to help retain existing homeowners and to provide them with tools to help encourage property maintenance and renovation. Listed below are some programs which are available to assist homeowners. Local community organizations and staff from the City of Milwaukee should work with local residents to investigate the feasibility of utilizing these resources. There are numerous federal, state and county housing programs to assist individuals, developers and local communities in funding or providing housing and to rehabilitate existing housing stock. Nonprofit organizations are also a valuable resource for housing programs. Many of these programs are funded at the federal level and administered by the state of Wisconsin. Below is a list of programs that provide a wide range of

Figure 3-15. Business corridor improvements concept in plan view (above) and section (below)

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housing opportunities for existing and future neighborhood residents that should be considered by the City and others. Please note that housing programs are continually changing and this is not a comprehensive list of federal, state and county programs and participation in other programs should be considered equally. Federal Programs The Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) is a federal agency with the primary responsibility for housing programs and community development. HUD operates the HOME program, which is the largest Federal block grant to State and local governments designed exclusively to create housing for low-income households. Additionally HUD runs the Section 8 Rental Voucher Programs, which increase housing choices for very low-income households by allowing families to choose privately owned rental housing. Below is a list of HUD funded housing programs. Again, many of these programs are administered at the state and county level. Community Development Block Grant Program (CDBG) Section 8 Rental Voucher Program Section 202 Supportive Housing for the Elderly Program Section 811 Supportive Housing for Persons with Disabilities Rehabilitation Mortgage Insurance Section 203(k) Home Investment Partnership Program (HOME) Housing Opportunities for People with AIDS (HOPWA) Community Housing Development Organization (CHDO) Homebuyer and Rehabilitation Program (RHD) Tenant Based Rental Assistance Program (TBRA) Emergency Shelter Grant Program (ESG) Continuum Care Supportive Housing Funds

State Programs The Wisconsin Department of Commerces Division of Housing and Community Development (DHCD), and the Bureau of Supportive Housings Wisconsin Housing and Economic Development Authority (WHEDA) are two state agencies that administer and fund many Wisconsin housing programs. The Wisconsin Department of Agriculture (USDA) Rural Development and the Wisconsin Department of Administration also operate a number of housing programs. Below is a list of state administered and funded housing programs. Housing Cost Reduction Initiative (HCRI) Housing Preservation Program (HPP) Local Housing Organization Grants (LoHOG) Interest Bearing Real Estate Trust Accounts Program (IBRETA) Manufactured Housing Rehabilitation and Recycling (MHRR) State Shelter Subsidy Grant Program (SSSG) Wisconsin Fresh Start Program (WFS) Critical Assistance Program (CA) Emergency Shelter/Transitional Housing/Homeless Prevention Program (ESG/THP/HPP) Project for Assist in the Transition from Homelessness (PATH) SSI Outreach, Access and Recovery (SOAR) Wisconsin ServicePoint (WISP/HMIS) CDBG Revolving Loan Fund CDBG Emergency Assistance Program (EAP) CDBG Neighborhood Stabilization Program (NSP) HOME Rental Rehabilitation Program (RRP)

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Low-income Housing Tax Credit Program (LIHTC) Home Ownership Mortgage (HOME) Loan Program Fixed-Interest Only Loan Program HOME Plus Loan Program Property Tax Deferral Program Workforce Housing Initiative Farm Labor Housing Loans and Grants Multi-Family Housing Direct Loans Multi-Family Housing Guarantee Loans Rural Housing Site Loans Single-Family Housing Direct Loans Single-Family Housing Guarantee Loans Low Income Energy Assistance Program (LIEAP)

County Programs Milwaukee County also administers housing programs, which are federally funded including: Milwaukee County Home Repair Program HOME Programs Community Development Block Grants

Workforce Housing Workforce housing is a way to provide housing for people who would like to live closer to their workplace. WHEDA states that workforce housing can help reduce stress to employees who have to commute a lengthy distance to work and help employers increase staff retention and decrease costs associated with recruiting and training. The Wisconsin Partnership for Housing Development (WPHD) indicates that workforce housing provides for less fuel consumption and pollution, which helps the environment and lowers spending. Workforce housing also moves people between homes and jobs, which helps balance state and local budgets and holds down taxes for businesses and working families. Through the Workforce Housing Initiative, WHEDA provides assistance with designing the program and developing additional private and public resources. WHEDA can also contract with local nonprofits for technical assistance, Home buyer education and credit counseling services. Several Milwaukee area businesses have workforce programs, such as Aurora Health Care, Harley Davidson, and Northwestern Mutual Life Insurance Company. It is recommended that the City support local businesses workforce housing programs in such manner as may be determined from time to time by the Common Council.

An existing residential street in the neighborhood

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C. Enhancing Business Districts and Corridors The following recommendations are intended to help foster revitalized neighborhood shopping streets and commercial corridors within the neighborhood using a Main Street approach to redevelopment: preservation, economic restructuring, marketing and promotion. Design of new structures (or rehab of existing structures) should reinforce and build upon the traditional development patterns and existing assets of this neighborhood.
PATTERNs/RECOmmENDATIONs

1. Active Streets: On pedestrian-oriented commercial corridors, commercial uses are preferred. After that, the primary goal is to create a retail-oriented mix of uses that will activate the street, morning to evening. Uses that detract from the retail focus of the commercial corridor are discouraged. Encourage street level, pedestrian-oriented retail uses on commercial corridors, with other compatible uses on the upper stories above retail. Allow compatible uses (for ex. office, service, entertainment) at street level provided there is no negative impact on retail activity. 2. Quality Public Space: The physical quality of the public streets is a crucial ingredient in creating an attractive and successful business environment. Provide streetscape enhancements for the commercial corridors along S. 13th St and Lincoln Ave. Figure 3-15 indicates a plan and section view of a typical condition of the proposed streetscape for the S. 13th St commercial district. Similar streetscape enhancements are also recommended for the Lincoln Avenue business district. Components should include the following: Improved street lighting Special paving at key intersections and pedestrian crossings Street trees and landscaping Intersection improvements to make it easier for pedestrians to cross the street Areas for businesses to have sidewalk cafes or outdoor display of goods Parking along the street edge Benches and other street furniture along the street where appropriate

Example of business corridor streetscaping

Example of business corridor streetscaping

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3. Celebrate the River: Provide a focal point where S. 13th St crosses the river corridor. Consider gateway elements, access points, and potential small scale commercial uses (such as a bike shop) along S. 13th St where it passes over the river. 4. Encourage Transit Use: Intensify commercial and mixed-use at major transit stops. Develop two-story retail and mixed-use if possible. Add uses that spill over into the public right-of-way (coffeehouses with sidewalk cafes, for example). Integrate sheltered transit waiting areas into corner design of buildings. Provide bike racks near businesses. 5. Neighborhood-compatible Use: Only permit commercial uses compatible in scale and intensity with residential neighborhoods if they provide a service to adjacent residents and the traffic, noise, hours of operation, lighting and building mass are not objectionable to residents. Examine and modify, if necessary, current land use and zoning designations in order to create more neighborhood-friendly pedestrianoriented development along business corridors. 6. Parking: Parking that serves one or more uses on the commercial corridor is preferred, i.e. shared parking. Parking should be placed to the rear or side of commercial corridor buildings, not in front of the building creating a separation between the pedestrian and the storefront faade or front faade (whichever the case may be). Employ a Park Once concept, where customers may park once and walk to multiple stores or destinations within a commercial or mixed use district. 7. Business Organization: Consider forming a Business Improvement District (BID) for the commercial district along S. 13th St. 8. Street Definition: Buildings should be built-out to the public right-ofway so that, collectively, the buildings on a block work together to define the public realm - the pedestrian area, parks and green space, public amenities and the street itself. 9. Retain History: Preserve historic faades (including display windows) during adaptive reuse, rebuilding, or redevelopment of commercial buildings. Make new building materials compatible with historic buildings in the area, e.g., brick veneer might be compatible with finished concrete, architectural-finished metal panels, glass or glass block, cut stone,

decorative masonry block or other durable materials. Include similar architectural details, such as upper & lower cornices, decorative window hoods and sills, recessed street entries, storefront windows, and signage. 10. Business Signage: Building signage should play a significant role in faade composition, not merely identify the building or street address. Encourage signage that is integral to the design of the principal faade and the main entry. In historic areas, encourage design that follows the pattern of historic signs in the area, for example, a sculpture or painted mural that advertises building products sold at that location. Billboards (off-premise signs) that cover large portions of the building faade or roof are strongly discouraged. 11. District Continuity and Stability: Discourage creation of new gaps in commercial blocks, i.e., surface parking, vacant lots; and promote more substantial investment in vacant or underutilized properties. Residential demolition for building commercial surface parking lots is discouraged. Avoid concentration of uses that give an area, block or street a bad read or negative image, i.e. the appearance of being unsafe or unstable. 12. Limit Auto-Oriented Use: Avoid concentration of high traffic, automobile-oriented commercial uses such as gas stations, convenience stores and drive-thru establishments (general standard of no more than one per block) within pedestrian-oriented commercial districts. 13. Upper Floor Residential: Provide some residential use on the upper floors of commercial buildings in order to provide more 24-hour activity and more eyes on the street.

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3 . 3 T R A N s P O R TAT I O N A N D C I R C u L AT I O N
Figure 3-16 shows the Transportation and Circulation Recommendations for the neighborhood planning area. A. Bridges The expanded width of the KK River corridor will require replacement of multiple vehicular and pedestrian bridges. Current plans indicate the need for replacement of the 6th St Bridge (already under design), the 9th Pl Bridge, the 13th St Bridge, and all existing pedestrian bridges. The 16th St and Cleveland Ave bridges will be retrofitted for additional flow capacity but will not be replaced. All replacement bridges will be designed for improved flood conveyance, but should also incorporate the following recommendations: 1. Existing Crossings. Maintain existing bridge locations over the river for both vehicular and pedestrian crossings. 2. Bridge Gateways. Make bridges appear unique to the neighborhood by having local artist installations at the approaches/gateways. Provide signage at the bridges to identify the KK River so drivers know they are crossing over a named river and not a drainage way. 3. Open Railings. Provide open railings designed to allow visual access to river from vehicles. 4. Accessibility. Provide ADA-accessible ramps to greenway bike corridor at all vehicular and pedestrian bridges. 5. Clearance. Maintain adequate clearance below bridges for bike/maintenance corridor to safely fit below (no less than 10 feet of clearance). 6. Lighting. Provide lighting under bridges at the abutments for safety (lighting needs to be able to withstand occasional inundation by floodwaters). Where appropriate provide light poles on the bridges (on major bridges and commercial corridors such as S. 13th St). 7. Soften Abutments. Soften bridge abutments with native materials such as vegetation and stone terraces.
North Avenue bridge with open railing for visibility

Example of a steel single-span pedestrian/bicycle bridge

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Market Street Improvements Green Street Improvements Pedestrian Bridge Planned Kinnickinnic River Bike Trail

Kinnickinnic River Bike Trail Expansion Oak Leaf Trail Bus Route Traffic Calming Improvements

Raised Intersection

Potential Ramp Location Vehicular Bridge River Paseo

225 450

900

Figure 3-16. Transportation and Circulation Recommendations 62 K I N N I C K I N N I C R I V E R CO R R I D O R N E I G H B O R H O O D P L A N

8. Narrow Bridges. Remove parking lanes on new vehicular bridges and narrow bridges to slow down traffic, enhance views of the river corridor, and provide a sense of arrival at the river. 9. Bike Lanes and Sidewalks. Maintain bike lanes in both directions (where appropriate) as well as sidewalks. 10. New Connection. Add a pedestrian bridge over the sunken railroad corridor at S. 11th Street to connect southern half of neighborhood to the river greenway and park spaces. B. Traffic Calming As previously discussed, this plan recommends implementation of traffic calming measures along some of the most heavily traveled streets in the neighborhood to encourage safer pedestrian crossings and generally slow down speeders through the residential areas. The following is a list of traffic calming measures which are recommended in this plan, as shown on Figure 3-16: 1. Crosswalk Bump-outs. Bump-outs decrease the distance pedestrians must cross while narrowing the road and slowing down traffic. They can also enhance visibility for pedestrians by opening up intersections where they might normally be parked cars near the crosswalks. 2. Raised Crosswalks. Raised crosswalks provide a visual and physical cue to drivers that pedestrians are present, and also prompts them to slow down as if they were crossing over a speed bump. Raising the height of the crosswalk to sidewalk level also allows for better pedestrian visibility. 3. Tabletop Intersections. A tabletop, or raised, intersection is a flat-topped area that covers the entire intersection. Similar to raised crosswalks, it increases pedestrian safety and visibility while forcing traffic to slow down at the approach to the intersection. 4. Median Strips. Median strips narrow the driving width of the street and forces traffic to slow down. Median strips also provide refuge for pedestrians and bicycles while crossing large streets. These would work particularly well on wide neighborhood streets such as S. 13th St, S. 20th St, and S. 27th St. 5. Intersection Circles. Small intersection circles, or traffic circles, can slow down traffic at residential intersections by reducing the sight distance and forcing drivers to slow down and adjust their path of travel.
Bump-outs at crosswalks for safer pedestrian crossing

Four-lane enhanced pedestrian crossing with median

Small traffic circle at a busy residential intersection

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C. Pedestrian and Bicycle Circulation


BICyCLE CORRIDOR

The KK River corridor presents a new opportunity for safe, off-street alternative commuting by bicycle. However, it is important to note that the bike path, while elevated above a ten-year storm recurrence interval, would be located within the floodplain of the river and would be inundated during major storm events (greater than a ten-year storm, or ten percent probability storm). Therefore there would be occasions when the river corridor trail would be unusable. During these times, the Oak Leaf Trail would still be available for bike commuters (which follows neighborhood streets), and pedestrian-oriented walks along the top of both banks of the river would be available as well.
Raised crosswalk with textured surface

Below is a list of design considerations for the new bicycle path: 1. The new bike trail in the greenway should connect with the KK River Trail at the proposed trailhead at S. 6th St and Rosedale. 2. Below is a draft logo for the KK River Trail, which is currently under design. The signage used throughout the new greenway should be consistent with the signage used for the KK River Trail east of S. 6th St. 3. The new path should be no less than 10-ft wide and should be striped in the middle for two-directional traffic.

Mixed-use asphalt trail with center line

KK River Trail draft logo (courtesy of Groundwork Milwaukee)

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4. Adequate clearance should be provided below all bridges (10 ft minimum). 5. At-grade street crossings should be well-signed and well-lit and, where necessary, should have raised crossings or other traffic calming measures such as bumpouts. Yield or stop signs should be provided for bicyclists at all street crossings. For heavy traffic streets, consider the use of a user-activated traffic lights to allow bicyclists and pedestrians to cross safely during busy times of day.
RIVER PAsEOs

The concept for river paseos comes from the Spanish word for a walk or drive. They could also be described as green alley connections. The idea is to connect streets and alleys which dead-end at the river by a continuous pedestrian-oriented pathway. 1. Eliminate dead-ends along the river by connecting streets and alleys through River paseos. 2. River paseos should be pedestrian-oriented with the ability for a vehicle to slowly drive the length of a half block, but should not create a continuous corridor that would encourage a vehicle to speed or drive from one end to another. 3. Provide opportunities for infiltration/biofiltration of street runoff and educational opportunities and demonstration projects along the river paseos. 4. Incorporate solar-powered pedestrian lighting and amenities such as benches and trash and recycling receptacles. 5. Build on the Alley Gate Pilot Program from the Near South Side Area Plan (a program to empower residents to reclaim their neighborhood space and achieve the goals they have for safety and beautification while creating shared social space.) 6. Use sustainable paving materials such as grass pavers or pervious pavement.
Rain Barrel

A bike trail with parallel jogging path

Solar Powered Lighting

Permeable Pavement

Bioswale

Figure 3-17. River paseo cross-section

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3 . 4 PA R K s A N D O P E N s PAC E s
8 7 6

A. Modrzejewski Playground Improvements Figure 3-18 shows the recommended concept for improvements at Modrzejewski Playground. The following is a list of recommendations:
2

Remove existing asphalt and restore green space, with a mix of open lawn for soccer, Frisbee, or kites and taller native vegetation with paths. Keep existing pedestrian bridge connection at 11th Street, but move bridge to be centered on the street. Provide opportunity for a local art installation at the bridge entry. Relocate shelter to be closer to the street and parking. Provide a more open-air shelter/pavilion for better visibility and to accommodate larger school groups or outings. Consider a green building with water-conservation demonstration projects like dual-flush toilets and rain barrels/cisterns. Create an attractive gathering space/plaza along Cleveland Ave for community events such as a farmers market or cultural celebration. Provide identification signage at each corner along Cleveland as well as at the river near the pedestrian bridge.
1
Active Open Space Passive Open Space/ Education Area Playground Shelter/Gathering Space Parking Amphitheater/Outdoor Classroom

4 5

11

9 3

7 8 9 10 11

Bicycle Path S. 11 St. Pedestrian Bridge Enhanced Pool/ Spray Park Plaza and Entry Feature Basketball Courts

2 3 4

10
0 50 100 200

Figure 3-18. Modrzejewski Playground concept recommendations

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Connect the park with the river with a gentle stepped terrace that could be used as an informal amphitheater for small concerts or performances. This area could also double as an outdoor classroom for school groups on field trips to the river. Integrate unique community art that reflects the diverse heritages of the neighborhood. Provide interactive displays and interpretive signage for demonstration projects and other educational opportunities related to the natural environment and sustainability such as rain gardens and biofiltration areas. Maintain existing street trees that line the park (where possible), and fill in street trees on residential sides as needed. Provide improved lighting for evening activities. Involve the neighborhood in park programming (i.e. planting and maintaining rain gardens, installing features such as interactive sculptures and play spaces, neighborhood block parties, etc.) Have a community organization adopt the park.

Ideas for an informal stone amphitheater/outdoor classroom along the river at Modrzejewski Playground

Create interactive features such as a spray park

Incorporate art and cultural elements

Community gathering space/plaza

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B. Pulaski Park Improvements Relocate the existing pedestrian bridge to provide better access on the south bank where the topography is steeper. Currently there is a set of stairs leading down to the pedestrian bridge. These stairs should be removed and a new accessible path should be provided to the bridge. Relocate the existing playground and basketball courts as a result of the widened river corridor. The suggested new location is to the east on the area currently used as a mixed-use field. Due to height and space restrictions below the S. 16th St bridge (which is not slated for replacement at this time), the proposed bike path will likely cross at grade at S. 16th St to Pulaski Park. An improved raised crossing with median should be provided at this location. At this point the path will split in two directions: the main commuter route will follow S. 16th St along the west side of the street. A separated at-grade or slightly elevated bike lane should be provided along the edge of the street. It is suggested that the existing parking lane be eliminated in this area to accommodate the bicycle path. The bike lane should be separated from vehicular traffic via a curb or median strip.

10 7

1 2

Recreation Fields/Active Open Space Passive Open Space Relocated Playground Relocated Basketball Court Pedestrian Path Pedestrian Bridge

7 8 9 10 11

Greenway Kinnickinnic River Natural Area Bike Path/ Maintenance Path Separated Bike Path

11

3 4 5 6

40

80

160

Figure 3-19. Pulaski Park recommended concept

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A secondary path for river access could be provided along the top of the river bank to the Cleveland Ave bridge, where it would connect with the sidewalk. The Cleveland Ave bridge is not slated for replacement at this time, so there is not enough space to accommodate the bike trail below the bridge. The bike path would stay off the road through the KK Recreation Area until 27th Street, and will be located in the river channel wherever possible. Provide pedestrian paths or sidewalks along the top of bank on south side of river, and minimize brushy vegetation or other obstructions to visibility within the corridor. Provide opportunities for access to the river for fishing and other interactions. Provide informal stone crossings at regular intervals. General character of Pulaski Park should be very natural with trees, paths, and passive recreation opportunities. Maintain the existing pool and at least one of the ball fields, but consider making the open field areas more versatile and less programmed to allow for a soccer pickup game or other more informal activities than league baseball. Consider improved pedestrian-scale lighting, especially near playground and river walkway. Improve lighting at basketball courts and south ball field.

A multi-use path separated from the street via a median strip

Natural areas with paths

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9 8 4

5 7

11 9 7 1 7 6 7 9 7 10

6 1 2

12

1
0 100 200 400

1 2 3 4

Existing Recreation Fields/ Active Open Space Passive Open Space Existing Playground Existing Tennis Courts

5 6 7 8

Existing Archery Range Parking Area Flood Storage/ Engineered Wetlands Kinnickinnic River

9 10 11 12

Natural Area Bike Path/ Maintenance Path Kinnickinnic Parkway Pulaski High School

Figure 3-20. KK Recreation Area and KK Parkway recommended concept 70 K I N N I C K I N N I C R I V E R CO R R I D O R N E I G H B O R H O O D P L A N

C. Kinnickinnic Recreation Area and Parkway The parkland west of S. 16th St and east of S. 27th St, which includes Milwaukee Countys Kinnickinnic Recreation Area and the green area along the Kinnickinnic Parkway, is a large expanse of existing greenway which provides many different opportunities for recreation. Below is a list of recommendations for this area (which are illustrated on Figure 3-20): Provide temporary flood storage in the green spaces between S. 16th and S. 27th Streets. These areas were identified by MMSDs consultant Hey & Associates as potential viable locations to provide minor flood storage to reduce downstream flows. Create engineered wetlands along the KK River for habitat restoration and water quality treatment. Wetland types could include a combination of forested wetlands, emergent wetlands, and wet meadow for diversity of habitat. Utilize combinations of native and naturalistic plantings to attract wildlife and provide visual interest. Direct local street runoff, where feasible, into the river and through the engineered wetlands. Pre-treatment in sediment forebays or inline treatment devices such as Stormceptor units are recommended to prevent excessive sedimentation.

Provide stormwater treatment and habitat restoration demonstration areas and include interpretive signage to educate the public. Construct the bike/maintenance trail in the river corridor but provide alternative route at the top of bank for periods of flooding. Provide a parallel off-street path along the KK Parkway for the Oak Leaf Trail, which currently is on the street. Provide access to the river corridor via informal stone paths at regular intervals, especially near good fishing areas. Clear thick vegetation and plant trees and native grasses along the rivers edge. Perform seasonal controlled burns or mechanical control to prevent the spread of invasive plant species. Consider removing the existing tennis courts and replacing with an open-air pavilion for picnics or educational field trips.

Interpretive sign explaining local wildlife

The use of multiple types of wetlands creates diverse habitats while also filtering and absorbing stormwater runoff

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D. Other Parks, Gardens, and Open Spaces 1. Pocket Parks and Playgrounds: Look for opportunities to provide pocket parks and playgrounds in the neighborhood on underutilized or vacant lots, focusing especially on the areas of the neighborhood identified in the analysis map shown on Figure 2-9 which are the least served by the existing parks. These may include lots that come up for sale, are tax delinquent or unsuitable for new development. 2. Public Art: Celebrate the diverse cultures in the neighborhood by incorporating public art and display opportunities representing different heritages. 3. Urban Agriculture: Incorporate community gardens/urban agriculture into new developments and along the new river greenway. 4. New Greens: Provide open space and lawns for children to play in all new developments.

Pocket parks can create important community gathering spaces or just passive open space

Playground with attractive fencing and gateway feature

Gateways can be a great place to provide art that reflects features of the region or local heritages.

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3 . 5 CO m m u N I T y I N V O LV E m E N T, E D u C AT I O N , A N D s T E wA R D s H I P
A. Community Involvement At the public open houses, residents suggested opportunities to improve the perception of the neighborhood and get more people invested in the community. Below is a list of common themes we heard from residents: 1. Inspire people to take pride in the neighborhood. Some people dont respect the river as it is today and allow trash and graffiti to accumulate. 2. Encourage people to clean-up trash in the river and streets, perhaps even provide incentives. Teach people about recycling. Encourage or assist homeowners and absentee landlords to maintain their properties. 3. Get students and youth to participate. Teach them to respect the environment and their surroundings. 4. Start an education campaign about water usage and conservation. 5. Hold after-school programs to keep kids from getting involved in gangs, drugs, or other dangerous activities. 6. Increase policing, especially on foot or bike patrol. 7. Have local residents design and install local art exhibits in parks. With the help of local organizations and nonprofits such as those listed in Section 4.2, the residents of the KK corridor can rebuild their neighborhood. Many already know what needs to be done but need to see change happening before they act. B. Educational and Stewardship Opportunities Below is a list of ideas for educational opportunities in the river corridor (this list is only a small sampling of ideas, as education should be all about creativity). 1. Have neighborhood schools form partnerships with the Urban Ecology Centers Neighborhood Environmental Education Program to get children out in their local parks and greenways on a regular basis to learn about nature. 2. Hold local Urban Farmers events to teach people how to grow their own food and to establish vibrant and active community gardens in the neighborhood.
Residents planting a rain garden in the street terrace (photo courtesy of the City of Madison) Children labelling storm inlets with No Dumping, Drains to River signs (photo courtesy of SSCHC)

CHAPTER 3: NEIGHBORHOOD PLANNING & DEsIGN RECOmmENDATIONs 73

3. Sponsor rain barrel drives and have kids decorate the barrels while learning about the benefits they provide for stormwater management and water conservation. 4. Continue to hold regular Earth Day clean-ups, but also consider having school groups, Boy Scout or Girl Scout troops, church groups, or other organizations adopt stretches of the river and perform more regular clean-ups. 5. Install interpretive signs along the new greenway showing the species that live there and explaining how river ecosystems function. 6. Construct rain gardens, biofiltration areas, and other creative stormwater techniques in such a way that they become a conscious visible part of the urban fabric. 7. Make Modrzejewski Playground a center for environmental education, including an outdoor classroom along the river, pathways with interpretive signage, a green shelter, and rain gardens. 8. Consider providing summer jobs programs in which groups of local teens or young adults would help clean and maintain the river and other neighborhood green spaces. 9. Get more great ideas on how kids can learn about the environment at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agencys Kids Center: http://www.epa.gov/kids/.

Neighborhood children painting a rain barrel (photo courtesy of SSCHC)

A green kiosk with a vegetated roof informs people about ongoing local sustainable projects 74 K I N N I C K I N N I C R I V E R CO R R I D O R N E I G H B O R H O O D P L A N

4 . 0 I M P L E M E N TAT I O N

4 . 1 N E I G H B O R H O O D P L A N I m P L E m E N tAt I O N f R A m E w O R K
A mix of public and private agencies and organizations, business and property owners, and neighborhood residents will implement the recommendations of this plan over a period of many years. In order to move forward successfully with the phased implementation of the neighborhood plans recommendations, it will be critical for the City of Milwaukee to adopt the Kinnickinnic River Corridor Neighborhood Plan into its City-wide planning framework. Formal adoption by the City of Milwaukee of the neighborhood plan will accomplish several important objectives:

1. Provide a clear roadmap to public sector agencies that offers guidance on how

public investments should be made within the neighborhood plan boundaries 2. Provide the greatest level of certainty to private sector investors regarding likely future conditions within the neighborhood plan boundaries 3. Strengthen the standing of the plans recommendations and thereby improve the ability to attract outside financial resources that will be necessary to move quickly into implementation
A volunteer signs in at a registration table for a KK River clean-up event (photo courtesy of SSCHC)

Achieving the above objectives will be necessary to maximize the long term economic, environmental and social value to the local community, which is the principal goal that lies at the heart of the neighborhood plan itself. The following section provides a framework for executing the specific goals, objectives, and recommendations outlined in this neighborhood plan. Potential implementation partner(s) are listed for each activity. These could include parties which would be primarily responsible for implementation or could help provide guidance or assistance. An implementation timeframe is also assigned to each recommendation. Policies/ actions listed as short term could be started right away and before the river restoration projects begins. Items listed as medium term are projected to be implemented around the time the river restoration starts construction. Long term items are expected to be addressed after the river project is completed. Recommendations listed as ongoing are those which can occur at anytime as residents, property owners, business owners, and agencies consider action. Potential funding opportunities have also been identified as applicable. Additional organizations that have potential to help implement the recommendations of this plan are described in Section 4.2, and a more comprehensive list of funding opportunities and sources are provided in Section 4.3.

Neighborhood children working together (photo courtesy of SSCHC)

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Recommendation/Concept Neighborhood Redevelopment 1 Urban Grid 2 3 Complementary Development Neighborhood Greens

Description

Implementation Partner(s) Timeframe

Potential Funding Opportunities or Other Implementation Strategies

Extend/continue the urban street grid wherever possible into redevelopment parcels. Utilize and design housing types that are compatible with the overall scale and character of the neighborhood. Provide small neighborhood green spaces within redevelopment sites where possible. Green spaces must be open to the general public. Locate building entrances on principal public streets. Within buildings locate habitable spaces along the street faade.

Developer/property owner Developer/property owner, DCD Developer/property owner, DCD Developer/property owner, DCD

Ongoing Ongoing Ongoing

Will occur property by property as redevelopment occurs. Verify by City/DCD review; potential to create and utilize design standards, special districts, and overlay zones to preserve/enhance character. Verify by City/DCD review; potential to create and utilize design standards, special districts, and overlay zones to preserve/enhance character, consider spaces be maintained by homeowners association. Verify by City/DCD review; potential to create and utilize design standards, special districts, and overlay zones to preserve/enhance character. Consider DCD faade grant program, potential for "Milwaukee Main Street" eligibility. Consider TIF formation which could fund improvements.

4 5 6

Eyes on the Street Layers of History Walkable Streets

Ongoing Ongoing Ongoing

Consider renovating older structures into new uses to preserve Developer/property owner remnants of the neighborhoods past. Include sidewalks, pedestrian lanes, and pedestrian gathering Developer/property owner places in new developments. Consider providing benches, shade trees, and other amenities that enhance pedestrian use and comfort. Where new development is adjacent or in proximity to the river, Developer/property owner design the site to allow public physical and visual access to the river. Where possible, provide small ground floor retail spaces in new Developer/property owner or rehabilitated developments, especially at block corners. When designing commercial buildings, place the parking to the Developer/property owner rear or side of the building rather than in front of the building.

Engage the River

Ongoing

Verify by City/DCD review; potential to create and utilize design standards, special districts, and overlay zones to preserve/enhance character. Consider the City's Retail Investment Fund (RIF) program for neighborhood business districts. Verify by City/DCD review; potential to create and utilize design standards, special districts, and overlay zones to preserve/enhance character.

8 9

Corner shops Parking to Rear

Ongoing Ongoing

Enhancing Existing Residential Neighborhoods 1 "Green" Streets Provide "Green" Residential Streets, beginning with a demonstration project for 12th Street. 2 "Farm Street" Consider the provision of community gardens along certain streets.

City of Milwaukee, MMSD, neighborhood associations

Medium term TIN (Targeted Investment Neighborhood) Capital Improvement Program; Promote MMSD"s "every drop counts" program along "Green" Streets Potential funding source: USDA Community Food Projects Competitive Grants Program, other federal sources.

Mixed-Use Corner Building

Neighborhood associations, Short to residents, City of Milwaukee medium term (Office of Green Initiatives), Groundwork Milwaukee, Milwuakee Urban Gardens Encourage neighborhood-compatible mixed-uses in the many Developer/property owner Ongoing corner residential buildings that have a ground floor retail or office space that is either currently or formerly in use. Convert some of the asphalt-paved grounds of the schools within the neighborhoods to small gardens or green spaces such as rain gardens. Local schools and Short term institutions, City of Milwaukee DPW Department of Environmental Services, Groundwork Milwaukee

Consider the City's Retail Investment Fund (RIF) program for neighborhood business districts.

"Green" Playgrounds

CHAPtER 4: ImPLEmENtAtION 77

Recommendation/Concept 5 Home Ownership

Description

Implementation Partner(s) Timeframe

Potential Funding Opportunities or Other Implementation Strategies Consider Targeted Investment Neighborhood (TIN) initiative & Neighborhood Improvement Development Corporation (NIDC) programs.

Retain and increase owner occupancy for all residential types City of Milwaukee, Ongoing thorough City owner assistance programs and low interest neighborhood associations, loans. residents Encourage the formation of a neighborhood association(s) for Neighborhood residents and Short term the area. This group could be fundamental in helping bridge stakeholders cultural differences, reach understandings, and act as a community voice in dealings with the City and other institutions. Community associations and Short, institutions, (30th Street, medium, long Groundwork, MMSD) term

Neighborhood Association

Local Conservation Corp: Provide programs in which groups of teens or young adults would be given summer jobs to help clean and maintain not only the river corridor but also local parks and green spaces. Teach the Children Environmental Stewardship

Initiate programs in local schools to teach about the river Local schools, MMSD, ecology and sustainable practices including recycling. Groundwork, Milwaukee Residents have indicated that in many neighborhood families, Riverkeeper the children primarily bring new knowledge into the household from which the older generation learns. Delineate a pedestrian walking loop to create a neighborhood Neighborhood organizations, Medium term stroll along certain sidewalks, park pathways, and the river residents, City of Milwaukee corridor. Provide a network of art projects, especially along the river corridor. Consider both permanent and temporary works. Encourage more positive daily interaction with residents and police by encouraging neighborhood patrols done on foot, bicycle, or horseback. Neighborhood organizations, Medium to long term residents, MMSD, arts community Neighborhood residents, Short term organizations, Milwaukee Police Dept. Ongoing Potential funding source: Wisconsin Arts Board

Neighborhood Paseo

10 11

Community Art Community Policing

12

Target Investment Neighborhood

Utilize a Target Investment Neighborhood Strategy (TIN) City of Milwaukee strategy to reverse signs of neglect and improve properties. These programs can include grants for home rehabilitation, assistance for home loans, aggressive enforcement of building code violations, nuisance properties, etc.

Consider Targeted Investment Neighborhood (TIN) initiative & Neighborhood Improvement Development Corporation (NIDC) programs.

Enhancing Business Districts and Corridors 1 Active Streets Encourage street level, pedestrian-oriented retail uses on Developer/property owner, commercial corridors, with other compatible uses on the upper DCD stories above retail. 2 Quality Public Space Provide streetscape enhancements for the commercial corridors along 13th and Lincoln. City of Milwaukee DPW & DCD, neighborhood business organizations

Ongoing

Verify by City/DCD review; potential to create and utilize design standards, special districts, and overlay zones to promote active uses along commercial street edges.

Short to Capital Improvement Program, consider forming Business Improvement District, Medium term consider forming TIF; Urban Forestry grants

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Recommendation/Concept 3 Celebrate the River

Description Provide a focal point where 13th Street crosses the river corridor. Consider gateway elements, access points, and potential small scale commercial uses (such as a bike shop) along 13th where it passes over the river. Intensify commercial and mixed-use at major transit stops

Implementation Partner(s) Timeframe MMSD & river channel design team (infrastructure elements), property owners/developers (commercial uses) Property owner/developer, Medium to long term

Potential Funding Opportunities or Other Implementation Strategies

4 5

Encourage Transit Use Neighborhood-compatible Use

Ongoing Ongoing

Verify by City/DCD review; potential to create and utilize design standards, special districts, and overlay zones to channel growth at transit nodes. Consider city/DCD review of current zoning; potential to create and utilize design standards, special districts, and overlay zones to ensure neighborhoodcompatible uses. Verify by City/DCD review; potential to create and utilize design standards, special districts, and overlay zones to affect parking placement.

Examine and modify, if necessary, current land use and zoning Neighborhood association, designations in order to create more neighborhood-friendly business/property owners, pedestrian-oriented development along business corridors. City of Milwaukee DCD Parking that serves one or more uses on the commercial Property owner/developer corridor is preferred, i.e. shared parking. Parking should be placed to the rear or side of commercial corridor buildings, not in front of the building. Consider forming a Business Improvement District (BID) for the Neighborhood businesses commercial district along 13th Street. Buildings should be built-out to the public right-of-way so that, Property owner/developer collectively, the buildings on a block work together to define the public realm. Preserve historic faades (including display windows) during Property owner/developer adaptive reuse, rebuilding, or redevelopment of commercial buildings. Make new building materials compatible with historic buildings in the area Building signage should play a significant role in faade Property owner/developer composition, not merely identify the building or street address. Encourage signage that is integral to the design of the principal faade and the main entry. Discourage creation of new gaps in commercial blocks, i.e., surface parking, vacant lots; and promote more substantial investment in vacant or underutilized properties. Residential demolition for building commercial surface parking lots is discouraged. Property owner/developer

Parking

Ongoing

7 8

Business Organization Street Definition

Short term Ongoing Verify by City/DCD review; potential to create and utilize design standards, special districts, and overlay zones to ensure building placement. Verify by City/DCD review; potential to create and utilize design standards, special districts, and overlay zones to promote compatible development.

Retain History

Ongoing

10

Business Signage

Ongoing

Verify by City/DCD review; potential to create and utilize sign design standards, special districts, and overlay zones to regulate signage.

11

District Continuity and Stability

Ongoing

Verify by City/DCD review; potential to create and utilize design standards, special districts, and overlay zones.

12

Limit Auto-Oriented Use

Avoid concentration of high traffic, automobile-oriented Property owner/developer commercial uses such as gas stations, convenience stores and drive-thru establishments (general standard of no more than one per block) within pedestrian-oriented commercial districts. Provide some residential use on the upper floors of commercial Property owner/developer buildings in order to provide more 24-hour activity and more "eyes on the street."

Ongoing

Verify by City/DCD review; potential to create and utilize design standards, special districts, and overlay zones to influence use.

13

Upper Floor Residential

Ongoing

Verify by City/DCD review; potential to create and utilize design standards, special districts, and overlay zones to help encourage mixed-use.

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Recommendation/Concept A New Kinnickinnic River Community Gardens

Description

Implementation Partner(s) Timeframe

Potential Funding Opportunities or Other Implementation Strategies

Create community garden plots along river banks

Instream Habitat Restoration Provide opportunites for aquatic habitat restoration within the river corridor Water Quality BMPs Provide water quality best management practices in the river corridor to treat stormwater runoff from local streets and alleys

MMSD with City of Milwaukee, Groundwork Milwaukee and other local nonprofits and residents MMSD, WDNR MMSD with City of Milwaukee, Milwaukee County, WDNR

Medium term Potential funding sources: USDA Community Food Projects Competitive Grants Program; work with Growing Power to develop community-based garden programs Medium term Potential funding sources: NFWF grants, Sustain Our Great Lakes, DNR River Protection Management, NOAA Open Rivers, American Sportfishing grants Medium term Potential funding sources: WDNR Nonpoint TRM and UNPS & SW grants, Sustain Our Great Lakes

Bike Corridor

River Access Overlook plaza

Provide a new bicycle corridor along the new river greenway MMSD, Milwaukee County, Medium term Potential funding sources: Bikes Belong grants, WisDOT Congestion Mitigation, between S. 6th St and S. 27th St including accessible ramps to City of Milwaukee Dept. of Recreational Trails and/or Local Transportation Enhancements grants (especially grade at bridge crossings and major intersections Puplic Works, Wisconsin Bike on County land) Federation Provide informal stone paths for access throughout the river MMSD Medium term corridor, especially near fishing spots Create structures which provide overlook opportunities at key locations along the river corridor between S. 6th and 16th Streets, such as where north-south streets end at Harrison Parkway MMSD, City of Milwaukee Medium term

Harrison Parkway

Harrison Avenue Parkway includes enhanced streetscaping, a City of Milwaukee sidewalk, landscaping, trees, and pedestrian amenities such as benches, lighting, and trash/recycling receptacles Opportunity to draw commercial activity to the river at S. 13th St Developer/property owner bridge crossing, especially for recreational businesses and services such as bike rentals or cafes

Medium term Potential funding source: WisDOT Surface Transportation Program, TIN (Target Improvement Neighborhood) Capital Improvement Program Long term Potential funding source: DCD Retail Investment Fund

Recreational Businesses

Parks and Open Spaces Modrzejewski Playground Improvements

Create community gathering spaces, increase green space, MPS, City of Milwaukee, provide environmental education opportunities, improve access nonprofits, residents to the river, enhance/expand playground and spray park, incorporate community art Improve circulation, provide habitat restoration areas in the river Milwaukee County corridor, relocate playground and basketball courts, repurpose existing mixed-use recreation field, create more natural areas and trails for passive recreation

Medium term Potential funding souces: EPA Environmental Education, Wisconsin Arts Board, Milwaukee Arts Board, Coastal Management grants, Ben & Jerry's Foundation grants, Stewardship grants Medium term Potential funding souces: Stewardship grants, Urban Forestry grants, C.D. Besadny Conservation grants, DNR Land and Water Conservation Fund, DNR River Protection grants Medium term Potential funding sources: FishAmerica Foundation grants, Ben & Jerry's Foundation grants, Bikes Belong grants, C.D. Besadny Conservation grants, WisDOT alternative transportation grants, NFWF habitat restoration grants, Stewardship grants, Kodak American Greenways grants, DNR River Protection grants, etc.

Pulaski Park Improvements

Kinnickinnic Recreation Area Reconnect river with parkway and recreation area, provide off- Milwaukee County, MMSD and Parkway Improvements street bicycle path along parkway, create habitat restoration areas, engineered wetlands for habitat and water quality improvements, fishing opportunities, flood storage, and educational interpretive signage

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Recommendation/Concept Transportation and Circulation Bridge Replacements

Description

Implementation Partner(s) Timeframe

Potential Funding Opportunities or Other Implementation Strategies

Existing bridges will be replaced or, in some cases, modified, to City of Milwaukee and MMSD Medium term accommodate the new river corridor width. New bridges should be designed to incorporate the recommendations provided in Section 3.3, including open railings, adequate clearance, lighting, etc. Make bridges appear unique to the neighborhood by having local artist installations at the approaches/gateways. City of Milwaukee, local artists Medium term Potential funding sources: Wisconsin Arts Board, Milwaukee Arts Board Long term Potential funding source: WisDOT Surface Transportation Program, TIN (Target Improvement Neighborhood) Capital Improvement Program Potential funding source: WisDOT Surface Transportation Program, TIN (Target Improvement Neighborhood) Capital Improvement Program

Bridge Gateways New Bridge Connection

Add a pedestrian bridge over the sunken railroad corridor at S. City of Milwaukee 11th Street to connect southern half of neighborhood to the river greenway and park spaces. Provide traffic calming measures on major streets to enhance City of Milwaukee pedestrian safety as described in Section 3.3 and shown on the Transportation recommendations map

Traffic Calming

Ongoing

4 . 2 PA R t N E R S H I P O P P O R t U N I t I E S
The KK River rehabilitation and flood management project will primarily be implemented by MMSD. The City of Milwaukee will be involved in the construction of new bridges, relocation of public utilities, and some public amenities such as streetscape enhancements. Milwaukee County will primarily be responsible for recommendations on parklands in the project area. However, there are many opportunities for others in the community to get involved in the implementation of the neighborhood plan. Planting Community organizations and volunteers from the neighborhood can be very instrumental in installation of plant material in parks, community gardens, rain gardens, etc. Monitoring - Nonprofit environmental organizations such as Milwaukee Riverkeeper can train volunteers to conduct regular sampling to monitor the health of the river and other project progress. Maintaining Regular maintenance of the new, naturalized river corridor will include the regular removal of litter and debris, control of invasive species and other nuisance weeds, and graffiti prevention. By adopting the river and taking on the responsibility of keeping it attractive and litter-free, the community will have an important opportunity to invest in the health and livelihood of the neighborhood. There is already great precedence in this neighborhood for getting the community involved in KK River clean-up projects, so expanding the program to more regular intervals or after large storm events (when waters recede) should be relatively straight-forward. A. Potential Partnerships In addition to MMSD and SSCHC, there are many community organizations in Milwaukee which could bring technical resources, organization skills, and volunteer hours to the KK project. The following is a list of some key potential partnerships:

Groundwork Milwaukee: A partner for this planning effort,

Groundwork Milwaukee has been extremely involved in community participation and outreach efforts. Groundworks mission is to bring about sustained regeneration, improvement and management of the physical environment by developing community-based partnerships that empower people, businesses and organizations to promote environmental, economic and social well-being. Their

CHAPtER 4: ImPLEmENtAtION 81

projects range from helping local businesses to community planning efforts to community gardens, rain gardens, and trails. The group has been leading the effort to get the KK River Trail designed and constructed, and will continue be an invaluable asset to the many projects surrounding the KK going forward.

Growing Power: A Milwaukee-based community agriculture organization,

Will Allen, founder of Growing Power, with youth from the program at the Community Food Center, an urban greenhouse in Milwaukee and the national headquarters of Growing Power (photo courtesy of Growing Power, www.growingpower.org)

Growing Power is a tremendous resource to the Greater Milwaukee area. Growing Powers mission statement is Inspiring communities to build sustainable food systems that are equitable and ecologically sound, creating a just world, one food-secure community at a time. The organization, led by founder Will Allen, provides educational opportunities about sustainable practices, urban and community-based agriculture including information about community gardening, composting, raising bees and urban livestock, aquaponics, and more. Growing Power has helped several groups on the south side create community gardens, including Los Cultivadores de Paz Growers of Peace Community Garden at the Prince of Peace Church on S. Howell Ave. Their outreach program would be a perfect partnership for the proposed community garden recommendations in this neighborhood plan. rivers, Milwaukee Riverkeeper is the largest and most active local river organization in the state. The group organizes river clean-ups, monitoring efforts, and paddling trips as well as advocates for the health of Milwaukees rivers (Kinnickinnic, Menomonee, and Milwaukee Rivers). Riverkeeper can provide leadership, support, and guidance related to the river rehabilitation projects and habitat restoration initiatives as well as continue to organize community involvement efforts on the KK long after construction is complete. efforts of community groups wishing to start or sustain neighborhood gardens by negotiating long term lease agreements with the City of Milwaukee. They also help residents develop and maintain sustainable community gardens in their neighborhoods. Greater Milwaukee Foundation: The NIDC (affiliated with DCD) and the Greater Milwaukee Foundation created the Healthy Neighborhoods Initiative which focuses on a neighborhoods positive attributes and works to engage neighbors and homeowners to invest in their neighborhoods and position them

Milwaukee Riverkeeper: The friends group for Milwaukees three major

Milwaukee Urban Gardens: Milwaukee Urban Gardens (MUG) supports

Neighborhood Improvement Development Corporation (NIDC) and the

Neighborhood youth planting project (photo courtesy of SSCHC)

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as good places to live. Lincoln Village is one of nine neighborhoods in the City of Milwaukee identified as Healthy Neighborhoods through this initiative in 2009. The Healthy Neighborhoods Initiative could be an excellent partner for neighborhood improvements such as community gardens, green streets, pedestrian enhancements, water quality and stormwater management techniques such as rain barrels, etc.

Urban Anthropology: Urban Anthropology, according to their website, is a

community based membership association dedicated to the celebration of cultural diversity and a holistic approach to urban problem-solving. Based in Lincoln Village, the group has a long history of community-based work in the neighborhood, and would be an excellent partner for implementing public art projects and other cultural and educational components of the neighborhood plan. urban nature center that teaches children and adults about the natural world using city greenspaces like public parks and waterways. The organization could provide valuable information on how to engage community members and educate them about the natural environment and how the health of the river ecosystem affects the health of the neighborhood.

Urban Ecology Center: The Milwaukee-based Urban Ecology Center is an

Steelhead trout in the KK River downsteam of the S. 8th St drop structure attempting to navigate upstream

Other organizations which could play a role in either obtaining funding or helping to implement various aspects of the project include the following:

Bicycle Federation of Wisconsin Lincoln Village Business Association Milwaukee Christian Center River Alliance of Wisconsin Sierra Club, Wisconsin John Muir Chapter Southside Organizing Committee Trout Unlimited of Wisconsin University of Wisconsin Milwaukee Great Lakes Water Institute Wisconsin Walks

Websites for all of the above listed organizations are provided in the Appendix under Relevant Links.
A boy holds up a fish he caught in the KK River (photo courtesy of SSCHC)

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4.3 fUNDING SOURCES


The tables on the following pages list funding sources that may potentially benefit neighborhood projects, including land acquisition, bicycle trail construction, habitat restoration, community education, public art installations, weatherization of homes, and more. Many of these programs are listed as potential funding sources in the Implementation Matrices in Section 4.1. Funding sources can generally be classified into the following categories:

City of Milwaukee agency grants or loans State of Wisconsin agency grants or loans Federal agency grants or loans Private corporation or non-profit organization grants or loans

Criteria for applicable projects, the grant matching requirement, and the application cycle are identified for each funding source. As competition for funding is high, communication with the sponsoring agency or organization prior to grant submission is essential to ensure a successful application. Several of the programs listed only accept applications from nonprofit organizations, and some only from local municipalities. Implementation of the neighborhood plan recommendations should engage many different stakeholders and groups with diverse backgrounds to take full advantage of the funding opportunities on offer. There is a unique opportunity beginning in 2010 through 2015 for the KK project to benefit from funds authorized through the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative (GLRI). This funding is anticipated to provide $475 million over five years to Great Lakes projects, and will likely be distributed to many existing grant programs at the Federal and State levels. This new source of funding is geared towards restoration initiatives within the Great Lakes, including habitat protection, conservation and restoration, nonpoint source pollution abatement, and many other issues which could be directly applicable to the KK River projects.
Looking upstream at the KK River from the drop structure near the S. 8th St pedestrian bridge (photo courtesy of MMSD)

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American Sportfishing Association's FishAmerica Foundation

Program Name

FishAmerica Foundation (partly On-the-ground habitat restoration 1:1 Local Match Encouraged funded by NOAA) and community participation related Awards $30,000 - $1 M to fishing and fisheries resources

Administered By

Applies To

Matching Requirements

Annually (Next Application June 2010)

Application Cycle

Contact
FishAmerica Foundation http://www.fishamerica.org

Ben & Jerry's Foundation Grants

Ben & Jerry's Foundation

Funds local organizations doing work in their community for social justice and the environment and which support movement building and collective action and empower constituents

No Local Match Required Rolling Application Process, Ben & Jerry's Foundation (Grants of $1,000 to Reviewed and Awarded http://www.benjerry.com/company/foundation/ $15,000) Quarterly

Bikes Belong Grant Program

Bikes Belong Coalition

Construction of bicycle facilities (i.e. Quarterly Rolling Application Process, Bikes Belong Coalition trails) which will serve to increase Maximum grant of $10,000 Reviewed and Awarded P.O. Box 2359 ridership and advocacy for bicycling Quarterly Boulder, CO 80306 http://www.bikesbelong.org

C.D. Besadny Conservation Grant

Natural Resources Foundation of Wisconsin

Local conservation projects including 50% Local Match, kiosks and interpretive signs, Grants of $100 to $1,500 invasive species removal, BioBlitz sponsorship, boardwalk construction, prairie restoration, and other projects that benefit the public Transportation alternatives improving air quality including public transit and bicycle/pedestrian facilities 80% Federal 20% Local

Annually (Next Application January 15, 2010)

Natural Resources Foundation of Wisconsin PO Box 2317 Madison, WI 53701-2317 (866) 264-4096 http://www.wisconservation.org/ Wisconsin Department of Transportation Central Office John Duffe (608) 264-8723 http://www.dot.wisconsin.gov/localgov/aid/cmaq.ht m Environmental Education Grant Program Office of Environmental Education 1200 Pennsylvania Avenue NW Washington, DC 20460 (202) 564-0451 http://www.epa.gov/enviroed/grants.html National Fish and Wildlife Foundation 1120 Connecticut Ave., N.W., Suite 900 Washington, DC 20036 http://www.nfwf.org/

Congestion Mitigation and Air Wisconsin Department of Quality Program (CMAQ) Transportation

Biennially (Next Application April 2011)

EPA Environmental Education Grant Program

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

Education enhancing the public's awareness, knowledge and skills concerning environmental quality

100% Grant Grants of $15,000 to $25,000

Annually (Next Application December 2009)

Five-Star Restoration Matching Grants Program

National Fish and Wildlife Foundation

Community-based wetland and riparian habitat restoration projects that foster stewardship through education, outreach and training activities Stimulus funding for 2010 - 2015 focusing on toxic substances, invasive species, nearshore health and nonpoint source pollution,

50% Local Match

Annually (Next Application February 2010)

Great Lakes Restoration Initiative

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (and other Federal Agencies)

No local match required

Annually (anticipated) U.S. Environmental Protection Agency CHAPtER 4: ImPLEmENtAtION 85 (Next Application January Great Lakes National Program Office 2010) 77 W. Jackson Boulevard (G-17J) Chicago, Illinois 60604-3511

Program Name
Great Lakes Revolving Loan Fund

Administered By
The Conservation Fund

Applies To
Provides loans for purchasing land or conservation easements for ecologically significant sites in the Great Lakes basin threatened by development Agricultural, urban, and forestry erosion control and nutrient loading prevention, public information and education programs

Matching Requirements
Loan Collateral Required

Application Cycle

Contact

Rolling Application Mike Kelly, Great Lakes Field Representative Process The Conservation Fund kellym@conservationfund.org http://www.conservationfund.org/great_lakes_revol ving_fund Annually (Next Application March 2010) Gary Overmier Great Lakes Commission 2805 S. Industrial Highway, Suite 100 Ann Arbor, MI 48104-6791 (734) 971-9135 http://glc.org/basin/funding.html Amy Bradley WI Department of Natural Resources Amy.Bradley@Wisconsin.gov http://dnr.wi.gov/org/caer/cfa/LR/Stewardship/subp rogram.html Amy Bradley WI Department of Natural Resources (608) 267-0497 Amy.Bradley@Wisconsin.gov http://dnr.wi.gov/org/caer/cfa/LR/Stewardship/subp rogram.html American Greenways Program Coordinator 1655 N. Fort Myer Drive, Suite 1300 Arlington, VA 22209-2156 (703) 525-6300 kodakawards@conservationfund.org http://www.conservationfund.org/kodak_awards Amy Bradley WI Department of Natural Resources (608) 267-0497 Amy.Bradley@Wisconsin.gov http://dnr.wi.gov/org/caer/cfa/LR/Stewardship/subp rogram.html Wisconsin Department of Transportation Central Office John Duffe (608) 264-8723

Great Lakes Basin Program Great Lakes Commission for Soil Erosion and Sediment Control

25% Local Match

Knowles-Nelson Stewardship Wisconsin Department of Program - Land Acquisition Natural Resources (Habitat Areas and Fisheries)

Acquiring land and easements for conservation and recreation purposes, developing and improving recreational facilities, and restoring wildlife habitat (nonprofit conservation groups are eligible) Acquiring land and easements for economic revitalization, improved public access, and preservation of urban rivers and green spaces (local governments and nonprofit conservation groups eligible) Ecological assessments, surveying, design activities, developing brochures and interpretative displays, constructing public access, and performing restoration activities Federal appropriation program that applies to the planning, acquiring, and developing of State and local recreation areas

50% State 50% Local

Annually (Next Application May 2010)

Knowles-Nelson Stewardship Wisconsin Department of Program - Local Assistance Natural Resources (Urban Rivers, Urban Green Spaces)

50% State 50% Local

Annually (Next Application May 2010)

Kodak American Greenways Eastman Kodak, The Program Conservation Fund, The National Geographic Society

Matching funds increase chance of award, Maximum grant of $2500

Annually (Next Application June 2010)

Land and Water Conservation Wisconsin Department of Fund (LWCF) Natural Resources

50% State 50% Local

Annually (Next Application May 2010)

Local Transportation Wisconsin Department of Enhancements (TE) Program Transportation

Providing facilities for pedestrians and bicycles, streetscaping and landscaping, preserving historic transportation structures

80% State 20% Local

Biennially (Next Application April 2010)

Migratory Bird Conservancy National Fish and Acquisition, restoration, and 86 K I N N I C K I N N I C R I V E R CO R R I D O R N E I G H B O R H O O D P L A N Wildlife Foundation, Migratory Bird Conservancy improved management of priority bird habitats

50% Local Match

Annually (Next Application April 2010)

Peter Stangel National Fish and Wildlife Foundation (404) 679-7099

Program Name

Administered By

Applies To
Funds projects to enhance the development, cultural diversity, accessibility and enjoyment of the arts for Milwaukee's citizens

Matching Requirements
Grants $3,000 to $7,000

Application Cycle
Annually

Contact
Milwaukee Arts Board ArtsBoard@milwaukee.gov http://www.mkedcd.org/artsboard/

Milwaukee Arts Board Grants City of Milwaukee Arts Board (affiliated with DCD)

Municipal Flood Control

Wisconsin Department of Land acquisition and development Natural Resources assistance to local governments and sewerage districts for municipal flood control management

30% Local Match

Annually (Next Application May 2010)

Jeffrey Soellner WI Department of Natural Resources (608) 267-7152 jeffrey.soellner@wisconsin.gov http://www.dnr.state.wi.us/org/caer/cfa/Ef/flood/gra nts.html NOAA Fisheries Restoration Center http://www.nmfs.noaa.gov/habitat/restoration/fundi ng_opportunities/funding_nationwide.htm

NOAA Open Rivers Initiative

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

Funds the removal of obsolete dams 1:1 Local Match Encouraged and other stream barriers to improve Awards $30,000 - $1 M fisheries, enhance public safety and boost local economies through benefits resulting from removal. Design, land acquisition, and construction of BMPs, including cropland protection, detention ponds, livestock waste management practices, stream bank protection projects and wetland construction Projects that conserve fish, wildlife, plants, and the habitats on which they depend 30% Local Match

Annually (Next Application November 2010)

Nonpoint Targeted Runoff Management (TRM) Grant Program

Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources

Annually (Next Application April 2010)

Kathy Thompson WI Department of Natural Resources (608) 267-7568 kathleen.thompson@dnr.state.wi.us http://dnr.wi.gov/org/caer/cfa/EF/NPS/nonpoint.ht ml National Fish and Wildlife Foundation Central Regional Office 1 Federal Drive Ft. Snelling, MN 55111 (612) 713-5173 http://www.nfwf.org/ Barbara Pardo Joint Venture Coordinator U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service One Federal Drive Fort Snelling, MN 55111-4056 barbara_pardo@fws.gov Tom Blotz WI Department of Natural Resources Milwaukee, WI (414) 263-8610 http://dnr.wi.gov/org/caer/cfa/LR/SECTION/rectrail s.html

NFWF General Matching Grants Program

National Fish and Wildlife Foundation

Local Match 2x Grant Allowance

Annually (Next Application April 2010)

North American Wetlands Conservation Fund

U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service

Wetland and upland habitat restoration projects that benefit migratory wetland bird species

50% Local Match

Annually (Next Application December 2010)

Recreational Trails Grant Program

Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources

Funded by Federal gas excise taxes to develop and maintain recreational trails and trail-related facilities

50% Local Match

Annually (Next Application May 2010)

Retail Investment Fund

City of Milwaukee Department of Helps fund retail development City Development projects in existing neighborhood business districts

1:1 Match

Rolling Application Process Lynnette Crump 4: ImPLEmENtAtION 87 CHAPtER Department of City Development Neighborhood and Business Development

Program Name

Administered By

Applies To
Land conservation and easements, nonpoint source pollution BMPs, habitat restoration, education, planning and design efforts for protection and restoration of river ecosystems Management plans, public education, data collection, organization of local support groups for river protrection (nonprofit conservation organizations eligible) Transportation improvements on eligible road and street in urban areas

Matching Requirements
25% Local Match ($50,000 maximum grant)

Application Cycle
Annually (Next Application May 1, 2010)

Contact
Sandy Manthei WI Department of Natural Resources Milwaukee, WI (414) 263-8569 http://dnr.wi.gov/org/caer/cfa/Grants/Rivers/riverpla nning.html Sandy Manthei WI Department of Natural Resources Milwaukee, WI (414) 263-8569 http://dnr.wi.gov/org/caer/cfa/Grants/Rivers/riverpla nning.html Wisconsin Department of Transportation Steve Coons (608) 267-4459

River Protection Management Wisconsin Department of Grant Program Natural Resources

River Protection Planning Grant Program

Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources

25% Local Match ($10,000 maximum grant)

Annually (Next Application May 1, 2010)

Surface Transportation Program - Urban (STP-U)

Wisconsin Department of Transportation

Biennially (Next Application Early 2011)

Sustain Our Great Lakes Community Grants Program

National Fish and Wildlife Federation (funded by private and federal partners)

Restoration, protection and No Local Match Required enhancement of shoreline and Awards $25,000 - $150,000 upland habitats, wetlands, tributaries and riparian corridors (esp. fish passage), invasive species protection, community education Large-scale restoration, protection $150,001 Minimum and enhancement of shoreline and Local Match upland habitats, wetlands, tributaries Awards $150,001 - $1.5M and riparian corridors (esp. fish passage), invasive species protection, land acquisition Assistance for qualifying low-income residents and landlords with lowincome tenants for making homes more energy efficient

Annually (Next Application October 2010)

Todd Hogrefe National Fish and Wildlife Foundation (612) 713-5185 http://www.sustainourgreatlakes.org

Sustain Our Great Lakes National Fish and Wildlife Stewardship Grants Program Federation (funded by private and federal partners)

Annually (Next Application October 2010)

Todd Hogrefe National Fish and Wildlife Foundation (612) 713-5185 http://www.sustainourgreatlakes.org

Targeted Home Performance Focus On Energy with Energy Star

Rolling Application Process Focus On Energy (800) 762-7077 http://www.focusonenergy.com/Residential/Target ed-Home-Performance.aspx

Urban Forestry Assistance Grants

Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources

Urban forestry plans, inventories, public awareness programs or materials, and tree planting, maintenance or removal

50% Local Match

Annually (Next Application October 2010)

Candice Sovinski WI Department of Natural Resources (608) 267-3775 http://dnr.wi.gov/org/caer/cfa/Grants/urbanforestry. html Kathy Thompson WI Department of Natural Resources (608) 267-7568 kathleen.thompson@dnr.state.wi.us

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projects such as detention ponds, filtration and infiltration practices,

Urban Nonpoint Source and

Wisconsin Department of

Urban stormwater and water quality

30 - 50% Local Match

Annually (Next Application April 2010)

Program Name
USDA Community Food Projects Competitive Grants

Administered By
United States Department of Agriculture

Applies To

Matching Requirements

Application Cycle
Annually (Next Application April 2010)

Contact
U.S. Department of Agiculture http://www.csrees.usda.gov/fo/fundview.cfm?fonu m=1080

Supports nonprofit organizations 1:1 Local Match working to help low-income people (Grants $10,000 - $300,000) gain access to nutritious fresh food supplies and increase their selfreliance Supports local artists working with a nonprofit community orgnanization on a community-based art project which involves community members 50% Match

Wisconsin Arts Board Grant Programs

Wisconsin Arts Board

Annually (Next Application October 2010)

Wisconsin Arts Board artsboard@wisconsin.gov

Wisconsin Coastal Management Program

Wisconsin Department of Administration

Wetland restoration, public education about stormwater impacts to Great Lakes

50 - 60% Local Match

Annually (Next Application November 2010)

Department of Administration Wisconsin Coastal Management Program (608) 267-7982

Wisconsin Safe Routes to Schools Program

Wisconsin Department of Transportation

Infrastructure and non-infrastructure improvement projects to enhance walking or biking routes to K-8 public schools to encourage healthy lifestyles and promote safety Assistance for low-income homeowners for energy efficiency and weathering of residential homes

100% Grant

Annually (Next Application date Unknown)

John Duffe Wisconsin DOT (608) 264-8723 http://www.dot.wisconsin.gov/localgov/aid/bike-pedfunding.htm Tara Pray Social Development Commission (414) 906-2700 http://homeenergyplus.wi.gov/category.asp?linkcat id=819&linkid=118&locid=25

Wisconsin's Weatherization Assistance Program

Home Energy Plus

CHAPtER 4: ImPLEmENtAtION 89

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APPENDIX

A . 1 P U B L I C / S tA K E H O L D E R I N P U t
A. Summary of Stakeholder Interviews Preliminary interviews were conducted by SSCHC staff with community organizations, neighborhood leaders, elected officials, students, local residents and business owners in the area in January - February 2009. Below is a list of the questions that were asked in the interviews and a summary of the responses. What qualities of the neighborhood would you like to see preserved or enhanced? Ethnic diversity/culture Green space Character of the housing What are the biggest challenges currently facing the neighborhood? Too dense Poverty Perception of crime What are some opportunities for improving the neighborhood now and in the future? Working together to keep the neighborhood/river clean Affordable housing, thoughtful community developments Recreational activities (passive and active) on the river Improve water quality Is the neighborhood improving or declining? What is making this happen? Are there specific sub-areas that you see this happening? Improving (but there is much work to be done) Lincoln Avenue Main Street Business District Growing commercial district on South 13th Street TIN neighborhood programs Crime reduction Neighborhood clean up efforts Is there anything else about the neighborhood that is important to you that youd like to talk about? Need better turnouts at neighborhood meetings Develop more private sector/government/non-profit collaborations to get things done Build on the uniqueness of the neighborhood Help businesses succeed Improve traffic patterns in neighborhood B. Summary of Comments from March 4th 2009 Public Open House (Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, Threats)
COmmERCIAL & StREEtS

Strengths: 1. Lincoln Avenue commercial corridor 2. Ethnic restaurants and stores 3. Small-scale mixed-use on Dakota 4. Walkable businesses Weaknesses: 1. Too many bars 2. Adult clubs and stores in neighborhood with children 13th Corridor undesirable businesses and vacant storefronts 3. Traffic congestion on Cleveland, 6th, Manitoba 4. Speeding on Harrison and other streets no police action 5. Biking not safe on streets with traffic 6. 7. Parking problems on Lincoln Opportunities: Local employment and ownership 1. Public gathering spaces 2. 3. Small shops along river and Harrison More pedestrian-friendly businesses, esp. on busy streets 4. Better/more grocery 5. 6. Redevelopment potential along 6th, Rail corridor, Cleveland

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Threats: Barriers like the freeway 1. 2. Lack of parking in lots or on street Parking from bars spills in to neighborhood 3. 4. Traffic on busy streets like Lincoln make crossing hard for pedestrians
RESIDENtIAL/HOUSING

COmmUNIty INVOLVEmENt, SAfEty, PERCEPtION

Strengths: 1. Affordable 2. Mixed housing single family, duplexes, multi-family 3. Lots of home ownership 4. Walkable to businesses, parks Weaknesses: 1. Lack of maintenance 2. Absentee landlords 3. Flooded/damaged homes in floodplain 4. Not energy efficient Opportunities: 1. Improve existing houses 2. Provide new affordable housing More duplexes and single-family 3. Respect existing context 4. FHA Loans 5. Threats: Not enough parking for density 1. 2. Nowhere for displaced residents to go in neighborhood Cheap/ugly apartments or multi-family 3. 4. Condos 5. Housing developments that dont fit the neighborhood Hard to find good renters 6. 7. New housing not affordable for residents 8. Transitional population

Strengths: 1. Diversity 2. Character of neighborhood and homes 3. Density - walkable 4. Location in relation to downtown and other amenities 5. Affordable 6. Community-oriented 7. Lots of parks & large parks 8. Big trees along streets Weaknesses: 1. Litter and lack of maintenance 2. Graffiti and vandalism 3. Absentee landlords not keeping up homes 4. Gang activity 5. Speeding 6. Communication barriers 7. Lack of policing 8. Freeway is a barrier Opportunities: 1. Inspire people to take pride in neighborhood 2. Encourage/incentivize clean-ups 3. Student/youth participation 4. Water use education campaign 5. Encourage recycling and litter pick-up Threats: Not enough community members involved in process 1. 2. Development that doesnt fit character of neighborhood 3. Negative neighborhood perception/image by some residents and visitors

APPENDIX 93

PARKS, OPEN SPACE, AND tRAILS

RIVER CORRIDOR

Strengths: Pulaski Park pool, sledding 1. 2. Kosciuszko Park new skating pond 3. New playground 4. Activities for all ages 5. Large parks, many trees Weaknesses: 1. Cleveland Park less asphalt, more green 2. Oak Leaf Bike Trail is on streets dangerous 3. Too much baseball, need more soccer fields 4. Not enough bike trails separated from street traffic 5. Playgrounds small and crowded Opportunities: 1. Bike path connection along river 2. Other natural trails 3. More green space 4. Community gardens 5. Educational opportunities 6. Pocket parks within neighborhood 7. Concerts in park series 8. Fishing opportunities 9. Better lighting for night activities 10. Canoe put-in Threats: 1. Parks not safe after dark 2. Parks need more maintenance, policing 3. Skateboarding 4. Parks seen as only for residents, not for larger community

Strengths: People enjoy living along river 1. 2. Past participation in river clean-ups Weaknesses: 1. Flooding 2. Sewage back-up during storms 3. Concrete crumbling unsafe 4. Graffiti 5. River used as a dump 6. Smell from river 7. Hang out for gangs 8. Bridges are constraints for flooding Opportunities: 1. More natural river could improve neighborhood 2. More habitat opportunities 3. Connected green space 4. More trails and public access 5. Increase property values Threats: 1. Removing houses without providing new housing for displaced residents in the neighborhood 2. People dont respect the river 3. New development along the river not fitting with character of neighborhood 4. Vegetation along river could hide bad activities 5. Pricing people out of their neighborhood 6. Pollution from upstream runoff 7. Too high of a price tag for improvements

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C. Comments Received at June 3rd, 2009 Public Open House


A NEw KINNICKINNIC RIVER:

CLEVELAND/mODRzEjEwSKI PARK:

Dont leave dead-ends; where possible, change dead-ends to loop to Parking issues Hayes and Arthur on 7th St too narrow, especially in If houses have new things like windows and appliances, what will
winter months happen to them? Can they be kept by owner or donated to a place like Habitat for Humanity Restore? Have shops or other attractions on pedestrian bridges like Ponte Veccio in Florence, Italy Make sure deconstruction of homes is done in an organized manner and recycle/sell the used materials at a place like I.M. Salvage on Cleveland The concrete is ugly Getting people down to the river in places is good, but most of the river should have natural vegetation restoration Dont have green mowed lawn plant ecological native like the Hank Aaron Trail & Stormwater Park Like the old character of Pulaski Park trees 13th St bridge pinches the current river, water flows down Harrison (13th 8th St) Go closer to Harrison With construction, there will be wear and tear on roads who will pay for the cost? It should be in the MMSD budget Where will construction equipment access the river? Where will it be stored? Roads/alleys need to be redone in MMSD budget, not as an upcharge in taxes for the residents There are a lot of retired people in the neighborhood who cant afford higher taxes. How will the project be funded Look at moving corridor to the south west of 13th to keep homes along 13th near Harrison (there are 3 houses, the middle one they have lived there for 60 years and dont want to go, one is elderly and not mobile) Too many dead-ends for Alternative B2 Too much traffic already on Arthur and Cleveland to close Harrison. Arthur is too small, Harrison gets a lot of traffic. one another (without removing additional homes)

Dead Ends are problems Lack of policing Lots of fights at swings and pavilion Pavilion is only open in summer Always people there after park closes Dogs are prohibited, but people always have dogs there Need more space for soccer or sports Amphitheater is not appropriate for our neighborhood Dog park or dog walk is needed outside of Cleveland Park Bridge connection to the playground should be kept Animal/habitat friendly Want access to the river Reference the dedicated park name (Modrzejewski Playground)

PULASKI PARK:

Like green around the river Pulaski Park has too much grass There is always trash in grass Want some natural space in Pulaski Park Old lagoon Pulaski Park (great fishing) Restore lagoon behind Pulaski H.S. (was natural with waterfall, now archery) Plant more trees in Pulaski Park

POCKEt PARKS:

Walks, benches Gazebos are hard to maintain Keep structures more open, so they are policeable Fishing access Farmers market

OtHER PARKS AND OPEN SPACES:

People bike too fast on the trails Want more trails, some for dogs too More natural spaces

APPENDIX 95

REDEVELOPmENt:

tRANSPORtAtION/CIRCULAtION:

Consider Victorian architectural style for new development Like new small neighborhood parks, they should be open to all public, Segments of the neighborhood population have opposed new Architectural images are not like what one would find in the
development in the past and will likely now as well neighborhood, look too much like for the wealthy Efforts should be made to encourage property owners to maintain their home Should be no new redevelopment, only improvement to existing River should not be changed, city should buy properties in flood plain No development at all in areas C and D. Let properties revert back to nature if current uses leave. Any brownfields should be remediated by natural process Create estuary feel to the river between I-94 and 6th. Allow boats to come up this far to make it more like the rest of the river to the east. There is a new WE energies substation on the triangle of land between the active and abandoned rail line just west of 6th Street. In the redevelopment site D (between 6th and I-94) consider more density, perhaps a taller building. A tall building could have views of the lake and create higher density which will help bring more shops to the area. If there is any place in the neighborhood for higher density it should be here Stress high quality architecture for all new development Prefer single-family over higher density housing types. Duplexes are a problem as they bring in too much rental residents and they increase parking demand on the city streets. Like image E7. Like the idea of residential over shops for 13th street. This would make it safer at night since more residents would bring some foot traffic to the street at all hours. The neighborhood needs more places for children to play. Currently they play in the street (ball games, bike riding, etc) and this causes safety issues. They also ride bikes down the sidewalks which can create hazards for pedestrians, especially the elderly. There is evidence that when one person fixes up their home the immediate neighbors will make improvements as well. not gated or private (residential)

Create a parkway along the KK river with a public walkway, much like Make sure that construction truck traffic that will come when the
OtHER:

San Antonio

river is reconstructed does not go down neighborhood streets. Who will pay for broken up roads if they do? There is too much traffic (vehicular) on Harrison. Consider traffic calming to make it safer for pedestrians. Open railings preferred on bridges, want to see river Streetscaping would help improve the business areas along 13th Need to get more pedestrians in the evenings in the business areas along 13th Street-this would help deter crime and nuisance Help improve pedestrian access from neighborhoods to river corridor, like increasing green space along streets/intersections Not enough street parking in some of the residential areas, duplex units add to problem as there can be 5 roommates living in a duplex and each might park a car on the street. Like improving crosswalks-people walk in the neighborhood and any improvements to aid them in crossing busy streets is welcome Some traffic calming would be good, some of the east/west streets are raceways for cars currently. Include community gardens along river and in neighborhood Make sure new housing does not create gentrification If river gets redone, make sure it becomes nicer and helps home values Dont take down existing businesses No new bridges No change in river width at this time

Neighborhood Association survey should be used in decision making Better meeting notification is needed for the residents, a lot of the
letters blew away. Can they be put between doors or in mailboxes?

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D. Urban Anthropology Survey of Lincoln Village Residents


Lincoln Village Final Survey Results Two questions in the LV door-to-door survey were asked on the KK River development. The first question (always in Spanish and English) is: A number of organizations (not us) are trying to redevelop the Kinnickinnic River in our neighborhood. They know they must tear down some homes along the bank to remove the cement slabs around the river. This is to avoid flooding. People then will have to move, but they will be paid for their homes. There could be as many as 70-80 homes lost, just to avoid the flooding. Some may want to add green space to the banks of the KK and this would mean more homes lost. What would be your preference? a. Remove the minimum number of homes to avoid flooding. b. Remove more homes and add more green space on the banks of river. The results are: Survey Item Remove the minimum number of homes Remove more homes/add green space Other (no opinion/didnt answer/remove no homes) Number (n=394) 265 91 38 Percent 67% 23% 10%

The second question is: If green space is added, what would you MOST like to see on this green space? Give me your top choices only. [CIRCLE UP TO THREE RESPONSES ONLY] a. Bicycle paths b. Fishing areas c. Picnic areas d. Condo or apartment buildings e. Community gardens f. Other Choices selected for the banks of the KK River (residents could select up to 3 options) Survey Item Number Percent of (n=904 choices selected choices selected) Bicycle paths 236 26% Fishing areas 152 17% Picnic areas 242 27% Condo or apartment buildings 35 4% Community gardens 219 24% Other (varied responses: dog park and walking path leading) 20 2% Other interesting preliminary results: While the ethnic makeup of LV is nearly half Mexican American, the other half is comprised of 106 nations, to date.
The door to door (evening/Saturday) survey is conducted using a random cluster sampling plan (15 of 50 clusters in Lincoln Village). The number of surveys that had to be completed was >372. This is the sample size required to ensure a 95% probability sample, with a 5% confidence interval, of the est. 12,000 LV residents over the age of 18.

APPENDIX 97

A.2 NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN GOALS AND OBjEC tIVES


The planning team developed goals and objectives for the neighborhood plan based on the list of design issues identified by the TRC as critical topics to be addressed by the neighborhood plan, public and stakeholder input, and direction from MMSD, SSCHC, and the TRC. For each topic a goal is identified along with supporting objectives.
CHANNEL REHABILItAtION

Goal: Ensure, through the public involvement process, that the technical design solutions for the river rehabilitation are integrated with the socioeconomic needs of the community. Objective 1: Ensure that the river rehabilitation work is conducted in ways that minimize negative impacts to the community and its residents and, whenever possible, are carried out in ways that enhance the community.
KK River at pedestrian bridge, drop structure, and combined sewer outfall near 8th Street

Objective 2: Identify opportunities to create positive benefits to the community through river corridor-related improvements to the transportation, open space, and recreational opportunities in the neighborhood. Objective 3: Recommend channel rehabilitation materials and design features which are sustainable, durable, stable, low-maintenance, and economically viable. Objective 4: Focus on naturalization of the river channel wherever possible, except where hard surfaces are needed to protect infrastructure or provide community benefits such as a bicycle path.
fLOOD mANAGEmENt

Goal: Establish an open and honest dialogue with the community regarding the risks related to flood management and communicate all of the alternative solutions considered, especially as they relate to property acquisitions and other disturbances to the existing neighborhood fabric. Objective 1: Provide information to the public when it becomes available to keep the neighborhood informed of the process and goals of the flood management efforts. Objective 2: Educate the community about the risks related to flooding, including human health and safety risks as well as property insurance and loss.

Aerial oblique photo of neighborhood looking north near Pulaski Park (photo courtesy of MMSD)

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RIVER EDGE PUBLIC SAfEty AND PUBLIC ACCESS

Goal: Provide a balance between minimizing the safety risks of proximity to the river and maximizing the value of neighborhood riverfront access. Objective 1: Recommend river edge treatments and amenities that create opportunities for interaction with the river while maintaining safe exit routes, visibility, and other strategies for reducing drowning risks.
AqUAtIC AND tERREStRIAL ECOSyStEm REStORAtION AND wAtER qUALIty ImPROVEmENt

Goal: Provide a framework of solutions for ecological restoration and water quality management to establish the foundation for an environmentally sustainable urban neighborhood that also improves long-term economic and social sustainability. Objective 1: Identify opportunities for habitat restoration within the river corridor. Objective 2: Identify best management practices for water quality treatment infrastructure. Objective 3: Identify strategies for greening the neighborhood and integrating stormwater management into existing streets, alleys, parks, and residences as well as the river corridor.
HOUSING KK River in Pulaski Park

Goal: Maintain affordability in the neighborhood while increasing overall value. Objective 1: Create a plan that allows for housing diversity which can emerge in an incremental manner which includes both tenants and owners and which can respond to the economy, changing demographic patterns, changing cultural values, and changing construction technologies. Objective 2: Identify opportunities for those residents displaced by the flood management project to remain in the neighborhood if desired. Objective 3: Identify opportunities to improve the existing housing stock in addition to providing new housing opportunities.
APPENDIX 99

Example of an existing neighborhood residential street

Objective 4: Minimize to the extent possible the number of homes which need to be acquired for the river rehabilitation and flood management project. Objective 5: Recommend policies and practices which will help existing residents afford to stay in the neighborhood should property values increase as a result of the river channel improvements.
COmmERCIAL AND ECONOmIC DEVELOPmENt

Goal: Improve and enhance existing commercial activities in the neighborhood while identifying new opportunities for economic development. Objective 1: Establish economic development plans which spring from the existing systems of circulation and craft a commercial pattern which can sustain retail, office, and industrial uses. Objective 2: Tie commercial development to local entrepreneurial talents and opportunities. Objective 3: Identify catalysts for development in a way that maximizes their potential for economic improvement.
INfRAStRUCtURE AND PUBLIC LAND

Lincoln Avenue commercial corridor

Goal: Improve the quantity and quality of public recreation and open space areas within the neighborhood. Objective 1: Identify infrastructure improvements in the corridor, including rehabilitation of public parks and open spaces, creation of trails, access to the water, and other recreational facilities. Objective 2: Examine creative ways of reducing the overall costs of maintenance and implementation as well as financing improvements and operational costs through public and private resources.
Shelter at Pulaski Park

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COmmUNIty INVOLVEmENt, EDUCAtION, AND StEwARDSHIP

Goal: Foster a community involvement process based on listening, education, and mutual trust and respect to create a neighborhood plan that is community-based and supported. Objective 1: Make every effort to reach out to community members and invite them to take part in the planning process. Objective 2: Minimize language barriers by specifically addressing Spanish-speaking residents in public outreach efforts and at public meetings. Objective 3: Integrate the community involvement process into the long-term efforts for land stewardship and support of public places. Objective 4: Identify educational opportunities for school groups and other organizations working with children.
Neighborhood children participating in river clean-up activities (photo courtesy of SSCHC)

APPENDIX 101

A . 3 R E L At I O N S H I P tO t H E N E A R S O U t H S I D E A R E A P L A N
Summarized below are several highlighted recommendations of the Near South Side Area Plan (NSSAP) that bear particular relationship to the issues encountered in the Kinnickinnic River Corridor (KKRC) Neighborhood Plan planning process, and how the KKRC plan addresses the recommendations or policies of the NSSAP.
RESIDENtIAL

Enhance streetscape amenities for the Lincoln corridor and provide


traffic calming at key pedestrian intersections KKRC: Two primary commercial areas are highlighted in the KKRC plan, the Lincoln Ave corridor and a secondary corridor along S. 13th St, primarily south of the river. Streetscape enhancements are recommended for both Lincoln Ave and S. 13th St. Lincoln is recognized as the primary business street for both the Lincoln Village neighborhood and for other adjacent neighborhoods, and recommendations are made to help enhance business development along both corridors. As in the NSSAP, mixed use buildings with ground floor retail and housing or office on upper floors are encouraged along commercial corridors.
OPEN SPACE

NSSAP:

Preserve single family and duplex housing through housing Increase residential densities around commercial clusters Encourage new subsidized housing to provide housing options Investigate the opportunity to provide new housing in the area
compatible with the areas income levels bounded by Interstate 94/43, the Kinnickinnic River, 6th Street, and Harrison Avenue. Consider single family, duplex, row houses or small multi-family buildings on the site while relating the new development to the River through green/sustainable site concepts rehabilitation programs

NSSAP:

Improve existing green space and weave new green spaces into the area Provide streetscape amenities to help soften and beautify the main Transform the KK River parkway into a major neighborhood amenity Encourage the greening of playgrounds at neighborhood school sites Enhance Cleveland park by reducing the amount of pavement and
adding greenery Continue to improve and maintain Pulaski Park as a neighborhood amenity arterials

KKRC: The KKRC plan also encourages the preservation and rehabilitation of existing housing stock and recommends promoting the Citys programs that fund renovation of residential properties. The plan suggests several redevelopment projects that would include a mix of housing types, open spaces, and some mixed-use development to address new housing possibilities. The KKRC plan also provides a development site concept for the parcel just north of the river, between 6th Street and the Interstate.
COmmERCIAL

NSSAP:

Enhance business development along Lincoln Avenue, which

should be reinforced as the areas primary commercial district. Cluster businesses near the intersection of Lincoln and 13th Encourage small scale, mixed uses with retail on the first floor and residential or office use on upper floors

KKRC: The plan builds upon all of the recommendations listed above. A major goal of this plan is to make the river corridor a safe and pleasant public space that enhances the neighborhood. The plan also provides recommendations regarding new small neighborhood green spaces that could be provided with redevelopment efforts. Green Streets are called for, providing green landscape techniques like rain gardens and pedestrian-friendly improvements such as enhanced crossings and traffic calming on busy neighborhood streets.

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A.4 REfERENCES AND RESOURCES


Relevant Articles and References

Americas Most Endangered Rivers of 2007. 17 Apr. 2007. American Rivers. http://act.americanrivers.org/site/News2?page=NewsArticle&id =10199. Bannerman, Roger, and Ellen Considine. 2003. Rain Gardens: A Howto Manual for Homeowners. Publication PUB-WT-776 2003. Madison, WI: Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources. Bergquist, Lee. $22 million PCB cleanup starts on Kinnickinnic River. 7 Jul. 2009. Milwaukee Journal Sentinel. http://www.jsonline.com/news/ wisconsin/50177287.html. Chandler, Kurt. The Lost River. 1 Sep. 2006. Milwaukee Magazine. http://www.milwaukeemagazine.com/currentissue/full_feature_story. asp?newMessageID=13114. Community Open Space Partnership. 2003a. The Economics of Parks and Open Spaces: Harnessing the Proximity Effect for Smart Growth. Available online at http://ouropenspaces.come/Issues/Econ-ProximityEffects.html. Community Open Space Partnership. 2003b. The Economics of Parks and Open Spaces: How Parks Pay for Themselves. Available online at http://ouropenspaces.come/Issues/Econ--Taxes.html. Curtis, John T. 1959. The Vegetation of Wisconsin: An Ordination of Plant Communities. Madison, WI: The University of Wisconsin Press. Editorial: Restoring a river. 21 Apr. 2007. Milwaukee Journal Sentinel. http://www.jsonline.com/news/opinion/29420294.html.

Eggers, Steve D., and Donald M. Reed. 1997. Wetland Plants and Plant Communities of Minnesota & Wisconsin. 2nd Edition. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, St. Paul District. Federal Interagency Stream Restoration Working Group (FISRWG). 1998. Stream Corridor Restoration: Principles, Processes, and Practices. Revised 2001. GPO Item No. 0120-A. Available online at: http://www.nrcs.usda.gov/technical/stream_restoration/newgra.html. National Parks Service. 1996. North Country National Scenic Trail: A Handbook for Trail Design, Construction, and Maintenance. Washington, D.C.: U.S. Department of the Interior. Available online at http://www.nps.gov/noco/pphtml/documents.html. Natural Lands Trust. 2001. Growing Greener: Conservation by Design. Available online at http://www.natlands.org/uploads/ document_33200515638.pdf. Pabst, Georgia. 25 Nov. 2006. Bike path may pave new way along KK river. Milwaukee Journal Sentinel. http://www.jsonline.com/news/ milwaukee/29224409.html. Prey, Jeff, Jim DAntuono, and Ruth Foxe. 1993. Nonpoint Source Control Plan for the East River Priority Watershed Project. Publication WR-274-93. Madison, WI: Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources. Prince Georges County Maryland. 1999. Low-Impact Development: An Integrated Design Approach. Largo, MD: Programs and Planning Division, Department of Environmental Resources. Rathke, David M., and Melvin J. Baughman. 1997. Recreational Trail Design and Construction. St. Paul, MN: University of Minnesota Extension Service. Available online at http://www.extension.umn. edu/distribution/naturalresources/DD6371.html.

APPENDIX 103

Shaw, Daniel, and Rusty Schmidt. 2003. Plants for Stormwater Design: Species Selection for the Upper Midwest. St. Paul, MN: Minnesota Pollution Control Agency. Available online at http:// www.pca.state.mn.us/publications/manuals/stormwaterplants.html. Schueler, T.R. 1995. Site Planning for Urban Stream Protection. Ellicott City, MD: Center for Watershed Protection. Southeastern Wisconsin Regional Planning Commission. Nov. - Dec. 1986. Major Storm Event Causes Flooding and Local Stormwater Drainage Problems in Southeastern Wisconsin. Newsletter Vol. 26, No. 6. State of New Hampshire Bureau of Trails. 2004. Best Management Practices for Erosion Control During Trail Maintenance and Construction. Concord, NH: New Hampshire Department of Resources and Economic Development, Division of Parks and Recreation. Available online at http://www.americantrails.org/ resources/trailbuilding/docs/BMPmanual2004.pdf. Thompson, Alice L., and Charles S. Luthin. 2004. Wetland Restoration Handbook for Wisconsin Landowners. 2nd Edition. Madison, WI: Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources. Trust for Public Land (TPL). 1999. The Economic Benefits of Parks and Open Space. San Francisco, CA: The Trust for Public Land.
Relevant Links Bicycle Federation of Wisconsin website: http://www.bfw.org

Great Lakes Water Institute, Kinnickinnic River Project website: http://www.glwi.uwm.edu/research/aquaticecology/kkriver/index.php Growing Power Outreach Programs website: http://www.growingpower.org/outreach_projects.htm Kinnickinnic River Environmental Restoration Project website (WDNR): http://www.dnr.wi.gov/org/water/wm/sms/kkriver/index.html
Lincoln Village Business Association website: http://www.lincolnvillagemilwaukee.org/ Milwaukee Christian Center website: http://www.mccwi.org/ Milwaukee Urban Gardens website: http://www.milwaukeeurbangardens.org/ River Alliance of Wisconsin website: http://www.wisconsinrivers.org/ Sierra Club, Wisconsin John Muir Chapter website: http://wisconsin.sierraclub.org/

Sixteenth Street Community Health Center, Kinnickinnic River Project website: http://www.sschc.org/kkplan/ Scenic Bridge Railings: http://www.bridgerailings.org/
Trout Unlimited Wisconsin website: http://www.wisconsintu.org/ University of Wisconsin Milwaukee Great Lakes Water Institute website: http://www.glwi.uwm.edu/

City of Milwaukee Comprehensive Plan website: http://www.mkedcd.org/planning/plans/CompPlan/index.html City of Milwaukee DCD Healthy Neighborhoods Initiative website: http://www.mkedcd.org/housing/nidc/HealthyNeighborhoods.html

Urban Anthropology website: http://www.urban-anthropology.org/


Urban Ecology Center website: http://www.urbanecologycenter.org/

Water Quality Initiative website: http://www.mmsd.com/wqi/index.cfm


Wisconsin Walks website: http://www.wisconsinwalks.org/

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