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Africa Rice Center (AfricaRice) - Annual Report 2011
$QHZULFHUHVHDUFKIRUGHYHORSPHQW
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Africa Rice Center
01 B.P. 2031 Cotonou, Benin
Telephone: (229) 6418 1313, 6418 1414, 6418 1515, 6418 1616
Fax: (229) 6422 7809
E-mail: AIricaRice¸cgiar.org
Nigeria Research Station
c/o International Institute oI Tropical
Agriculture (IITA),
Oyo Road, PMB 5320, Ibadan, Nigeria
Telephone: (234) 805 505 5951, (234) 805 505 5954
(234) 803 403 5281
Fax: (44) 208 711 3786
E-mail: I.nwilene¸cgiar.org
Sahel Research Station
B.P. 96, St-Louis, Senegal
Telephone: (221) 33 962 64 41, (221) 33 962 6493
Fax: (221) 33 962 6491
E-mail: AIricaRice-sahel¸cgiar.org
East and Southern Africa Research Station
Mikocheni B/Kawe,
Avocado Street, PO Box 33581,
Dar es Salaam, Tanzania
Telephone: (255) 222 780 768
Fax: (255) 222 780 768
E-mail: p.kiepe¸cgiar.org
Africa Rice Center Côte d`Ivoire
Abidjan Liason Office
01 B.P. 4029, Abidjan 01, Côte d`Ivoire
Telephone: (225) 20 21 01 20
Fax: (225) 20 22 01 33
E-mail: a.beye¸cgiar.org
© Copyright Africa Rice Center (AfricaRice) 2012
AIricaRice encourages Iair use oI this material. Proper
citation is requested. The designations used in the
presentation oI materials in this publication do not imply
the expression oI any opinion whatsoever by the AIrica
Rice Center (AIricaRice) concerning the legal status oI
any country, territory, city or area, or oI its authorities,
or concerning the delimitation oI its Irontiers and
boundaries.
Citation
AIrica Rice Center (AIricaRice). 2012. AIrica Rice
Center (AIricaRice) Annual Report 2011: A new
rice research Ior development strategy Ior AIrica.
Cotonou, Benin: 96 pp.
ISBN:
Print 978-92-9113-360-4
PDF 978-92-9113-361-1
Printing:
Pragati OIIset Pvt Ltd, Hyderabad, India
Photo credits:
All pictures are by staII members oI AIrica Rice Center
(AIricaRice), and networks and consortia convened by
the Center, except Ior those on pages 12 (Amy Beeler/
USAID), 13 (Bruno Portier), 24 and 25 (Tareke Berhe/
ATA).
1 AfricaRice AnnuaI Report 2011
$ERXW$IULFD5LFH&HQWHU$IULFD5LFH
AfricaRice is one of the 15 international agricultural
research Centers that are members of the CGIAR
Consortium. It is also an intergovernmental association
of African member countries.
The Center was createa in 1971 by 11 African countries.
Toaay its membership comprises 24 countries,
covering West, Central, East ana North African
regions, namely Benin, Burkina Faso, Cameroon,
Central African Republic, Chaa, Côte aIvoire,
Democratic Republic of Congo, Egypt, Gabon, the
Gambia, Ghana, Guinea, Guinea Bissau, Liberia,
Maaagascar, Mali, Mauritania, Niger, Nigeria,
Republic of Congo, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Togo ana
Uganaa.
AfricaRice temporary heaaquarters is basea in
Cotonou, Benin, research staff are also basea in
Senegal, Nigeria, Tan:ania ana Côte aIvoire.
For more information visit. www.AfricaRice.org
Contents
Message Irom the Board Chair and the
Director General 2
Boosting AIrica`s rice sector: a research Ior
development strategy 20112020 4
The new AIrica-wide Rice Breeding Task Force 7
Research in brieI 12
Ethiopia`s rice production boom 25
Donor profle Canada 27
Major events 31
Financial statements 48
Board oI Trustees 55
Senior staII and Associates 56
Postgraduate trainees 61
AIricaRice training programs 73
Publications 79
Abbreviations 92
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2 AfricaRice AnnuaI Report 2011
Message from the Board Chair and the Director GeneraI
The Centers have adapted themselves to a completely
new way oI working moving Irom the traditional
Center mode oI operation` to a new Program mode oI
operation`, through which we collaborate more closely
with sister Centers and a host oI new partners in AIrica
and globally. The transition also heightened Iunding
uncertainties and delays, as donors and the Centers
took time to understand the new Iunding structures
and procedures.
Despite all these changes and uncertainties, we are
proud to confrm that 2011 was perhaps the busiest
year in the history oI AIricaRice in terms oI research
and development (R&D), in addition to the missions
and external meetings in which our staII participated
and new partnerships that we have developed and
launched (see Major events` on page 30).
First oI all, 2011 was Ior AIricaRice a year oI com-
memoration oI past achievements as we celebrated
our 40th anniversary. It was a ftting tribute to our
visionary Iounding members, as the event was held
in partnership with Gambia (one oI the Iounding
members) in Banjul, just aIter the 28th Ordinary
Meeting oI the Council oI Ministers.
It was also a year oI many new beginnings. Not content
to rest on our past achievements, we continued to
reinvent ourselves, drawing on strong science and
eIIective partnerships, in response to new challenges
and to the many demands made by our member States
and partners.
To have greater relevance and impact, we spread
our wings in new strategic directions, including the
Iollowing.
· The Center reinIorced its strategic positioning
within AIrica by Iorming a strong partnership
with the AIrican Union (AU) Iormalized by
the signing oI a Memorandum oI Understanding
(MoU), underpinning the AU`s recognition oI
AIricaRice as a center oI excellence Ior rice research
in AIrica.
· We helped design new ways oI doing business as
part oI the CGIAR Research Program the Global
Rice Science Partnership (GRiSP), through which
we collaborate closely with our sister centers the
International Rice Research Institute (IRRI) in
Asia and the International Center Ior Tropical
Agriculture (CIAT) in Latin America, and with
other partners within AIrica and globally, while
maintaining leadership oI rice research in AIrica.
· We are also participating in the CGIAR Research
Programs on Climate change, agriculture and
Iood security` led by CIAT and Durable solutions
Ior water scarcity and land degradation` led by the
International Water Management Institute (IWMI).
· The Center is leveraging new research partnerships
through a strategic alliance with EMBRAPA, Brazil
(Iormalized through the signing oI an MoU), as part
oI our vision to capitalize on the research strengths
oI emerging countries.
· We launched our new Strategic Plan (20112020),
approved by the Council oI Ministers in September.
The Plan will guide the implementation oI all
our activities, taking into account the dynamic
new context in which AIricaRice is operating
(see Boosting AIrica`s rice sector: a research Ior
development strategy 20112020` on page 4).
· AIricaRice has revamped the Rice Task Force
mechanism across the continent in order to build
critical research mass at regional and national levels
and adopt a systematic collaborative approach to
rice research Ior development. The task Iorces
Iocus on fve themes: (1) breeding (see The new
AIrica-wide Rice Breeding Task Force` on page 7);
F
or most Centers of the CGIAR Consortium, 2011 will be rememberea as a year of transition, brought
about by the profouna reform process of the CGIAR System.
3 AfricaRice AnnuaI Report 2011
(2) agronomy; (3) post-harvest and value addition;
(4) policy; and (5) gender.
· In a move that will make our research more relevant
and impactIul, we have proIoundly shiIted the Iocus
oI the Center`s strategy through new projects Irom
supply-driven research to more demand- or market-
driven research, with greater prominence given to
the rice value chain, post-harvest, value addition
and mechanization.
· We have introduced a new thrust on capacity
development through new sources oI Iunding Ior
scholarships and the consolidation oI training
activities relating mainly to irrigated rice systems
in Saint-Louis, Senegal.
· AIricaRice has achieved greater visibility and
inIluence through participation in high-impact
meetings that it has not traditionally attended e.g.,
the AU AIrica Food Security Day, the Second Dakar
International Agricultural Forum, the First General
Assembly oI the Association Ior Strengthening
Agricultural Research in Eastern and Central AIrica
(ASARECA), the Fourth AIrica Rice Outlook, the
Youth Employment Promotion Day in Mali, and the
Comprehensive AIrica Agriculture Development
Programme (CAADP) Pillar 4 Workshop.
· Through new partnerships we are also leveraging
new Iunding sources to ensure sustainability e.g.,
with the Syngenta Foundation, the World Bank`s
West AIrica Agricultural Productivity Program, the
AIrican Development Bank (AIDB) Multinational
CGIAR Support, and with USAID`s Feed the Future
Program.
· And we are committed to making our Iinance
and administrative systems more accountable and
eIfcient by moving toward the adoption oI the
CGIAR One Corporate System (OCS), which is
expected to help align business practices oI CGIAR
Centers (management oI projects, fnance, human
resources and procurement).
This list, though not exhaustive, demonstrates the
strategic vision and the dynamism oI the Center in
terms oI research, partnership, policy advocacy and
constantly improved management. We are moving
Iorward in diIfcult times, Iulflling our mission oI
bringing rice research and development to the aid oI
AIrica`s poor.
Chair of the Boara of Trustees, Dr Peter Matlon (left), with
Director General, Dr Papa Abaoulaye Seck.
Peter Matlon
Papa A Seck
4 AfricaRice AnnuaI Report 2011
Boosting Africa's rice sector: a research for deveIopment strategy 2011-2020
A strategy` is deIined by the OxIord English
Dictionary as 'a plan oI action designed to achieve a
long-term or overall aim.¨ In agricultural research and
development, strategies typically cover a decade a
10-year time horizon.
As most oI our readers will know, AIricaRice is
no go it alone` organization. Rather, everything is
about partnership, Irom partnership with donors
right through to partnership with Iarmers. 'This is
not an AIricaRice strategy, but a strategy Ior AIrica,¨
explains director oI research Ior development Marco
Wopereis.
The background to this particular strategy included
detailed household and community surveys conducted
in 2009. Many oI the ideas in the strategy either arose
Irom, or were confrmed by, discussions at the Second
AIrica Rice Congress (Bamako, 2226 March 2010).
DraIts oI the strategy were also endorsed by the
Center`s Council oI Ministers and Board oI Trustees.
'Science Ior impact in partnership is what this is
about,¨ explains Wopereis. 'Everything we do needs
to be geared to something tangible that will make a
diIIerence in the rice value chain. The importance
is connecting people, right across the research-to-
development continuum and not to disperse eIIorts.
The strategy is based on many interactions with
partners and on a rigorous priority-setting exercise,
spelling out benefts per region, rice ecosystem and
discipline this is unique!¨
The backbone oI the strategy comprises seven Priority
Areas (PAs) that were defned at the Second AIrica
Rice Congress:
1. Conserving rice genetic resources and providing
smallholder Iarmers with climate-resilient rice
varieties that are better adapted to production
environments and consumer preIerences
2. Improving rural livelihoods by closing yield
gaps and through sustainable intensifcation and
diversifcation oI rice-based systems
3. Achieving socially acceptable expansion oI rice-
producing areas, while addressing environmental
concerns
4. Creating market opportunities Ior smallholder
Iarmers and processors by improving the quality
and competitiveness oI locally produced rice and
rice products
5. Facilitating the development oI the rice value
chain through improved technology targeting and
evidence-based policy-making
6. Mobilizing co-investments and linking with
development partners and the private sector to
stimulate uptake oI rice knowledge and technologies
7. Strengthening the capacities oI national rice
research and extension agents and rice value-chain
actors.
An important vehicle Ior research collaboration,
especially with and among the national agricultural
research systems (NARS), will be the re-established
Task Force mechanism, comprising six Task Forces,
which enable R&D partners working together to reach
critical mass in key thematic areas.
A major departure Irom previous strategic plans is
the planned creation oI rice sector development hubs`
to provide testing or proving grounds Ior new
technologies as a frst transitional step Irom research to
development. 'Rice Sector Development Hubs involve
large groups oI Iarmers (10005000) and other value-
chain actors, such as rice millers, input dealers and
rice marketers,¨ it says in the Strategy.
'The hubs are crucial because they provide the means
to integrate the research products that we develop
A
t the ena of 2011, AfricaRice launchea a new strategy for tackling the ongoing issues facing the rice
sector in Africa. So, what is it all about ana what are the implications for the next aecaae?
5 AfricaRice AnnuaI Report 2011
through thematic research,¨ explains Wopereis. 'They
will provide Ieedback to research and also allow us
to achieve outcomes and impact in a very systematic
manner.¨
The Strategy goes on to explain that, 'these partnerships
will be testing grounds Ior new rice technologies
and new institutional arrangements between value-
chain actors, and will Iollow a reverse-research
approach`, i.e. starting Irom the market. Partners will
pursue a prooI oI concept` approach to rice value-
chain development, productivity improvement and
sustainable management oI natural resources in rice-
based systems.¨ The hubs will be representative oI
key rice ecologies and diIIerent market opportunities
across the continent, and clearly linked with national
and regional development initiatives. The hubs will
help women and youth strengthen their roles rather
than being marginalized. The goal is to have 30 such
hubs across the continent by 2020.
AIricaRice is a major player in the Global Rice
Science Partnership (GRiSP), taking the lead in
GRiSP activities throughout the continent. The new
Rice-basea fooa proaucts are a relatively recent aaaition to the portfolio of AfricaRice interest, but form a vital (if small) part of the
ongoing strategy
6 AfricaRice AnnuaI Report 2011
strategy is thereIore key to GRiSP`s success in AIrica.
The global interaction and perspective provided
by GRiSP and other CGIAR Research Programs
leverages rice knowledge in thematic areas Irom
beyond AIrica. Meanwhile, the strategy itselI is
aligned with the Comprehensive AIrica Agriculture
Development Programme`s (CAADP) Pillar IV Ior
improving agricultural research and ensuring uptake
oI appropriate technologies. The strategy also aims
to contribute to the achievement oI the Millennium
Development Goals (MDGs) in AIrica, especially
MDG1 (alleviation oI poverty and hunger), MDG3
(gender equality and empowering women) and MDG7
(environmental sustainability).
The Strategy is also aligned with, and contributes to,
the Iour System-level outcomes oI the CGIAR Strategy
and Results Framework, namely (a) reducing rural
poverty, (b) improving Iood security, (c) improving
nutrition and health, and (d) sustainable management
oI natural resources.
'The Strategy sets a high expectation on the Center
and its partners,¨ says AIricaRice program leader Ior
policy, impact assessment and innovation systems
Aliou Diagne, 'as we actually quantiIy the expected
impact on the lives oI poor people involved in the rice
value chain.¨
The projected impact oI the research outlined in the
strategy was determined through an ex-ante impact
assessment that looked at the contribution oI the
envisaged research against a baseline scenario without
the 20112020 research agenda. Across the continent,
there should be an additional 14.5 million tonnes (Mt)
oI paddy rice in 2020 thanks to this work (45° more
rice than without the research). Moreover, imports will
have declined by an impressive two-thirds to 4.6 Mt.
Overall, some 11 million people members oI rice
Iarming households and rice consumers should be
liIted out oI poverty (on the basis oI a US$ 1.25 poverty
line in 2005) by the end oI 2020 as a direct result oI
increased production oI better-quality rice and lower
prices on the market.
'Reaching selI-suIfciency in rice is a giant leap Ior
sub-Saharan AIrica,¨ says AIricaRice director general
Papa Abdoulaye Seck, 'but one that I believe, in time,
we can achieve. Our new Strategy sets us frmly on that
road. By 2020, the continental selI-suIfciency ratio
will have increased Irom 60° to 87° and at least 10
countries should have reached Iull rice selI-suIfciency
with surplus Ior export.¨
Boosting Africas rice sector. A research for aevelop-
ment strategy 20112020, is available Ior Iree
download Irom the Center`s website.
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BoostingAfrica’sRiceSector
AresearchfordeveIopmentstrategy2011–2020
7 AfricaRice AnnuaI Report 2011
'AIricaRice is all about partnership Center and
national scientists working together as equals on a
level playing feld,¨ says AIricaRice senior rice breeder
and coordinator oI the AIrica-wide Rice Breeding Task
Force Moussa Sié. When that partnership includes
sharing oI costs, research responsibilities and benefts
you have the philosophy oI the task Iorces.
Sié is no stranger to working in research partnerships.
Having started his career in his home country oI
Burkina Faso, Sié progressed to become head oI the
Burkinabe rice research program. He frst worked at
AIricaRice in 1994 as an associated scientist` until
1997, returning the Iollowing year Ior a one-year
secondment as a visiting scientist. It was not until
2003 that he took up a Iull-time position at AIricaRice.
'Over the years, I have been involved in a number
oI networks,¨ he says. 'INGER |the International
Network Ior the Genetic Evaluation oI Rice|, the
Iormer AIricaRiceNARS breeding task Iorces, the
CORAF Rice Network, and ROCARIZ |the West
and Central AIrica Rice Research and Development
Network created Irom the merger oI the AIricaRice
NARS task Iorces and the CORAF Rice Network|.¨
Funding Ior ROCARIZ declined during the middle
third oI the 2000s, and the plug was fnally pulled
on the network in 2006. Meanwhile, Sié managed
to secure a minimum oI Iunds to continue shuttle-
breeding`, in which alternate rounds oI selection were
conducted in the felds oI the national programs and
AIricaRice. Using this method, Sié and his partners
identiIied the 60 designated lowland NERICA-L
varieties Irom over a thousand lines in 2006. 'The
scope oI the partnerships involved in shuttle-breeding
is rather less than that in a network or task Iorce,¨
says Sié, 'and the benefts take longer to reach those
countries outside oI the immediate partnership.¨
Moreover, the rice breeding and extension capacity
oI sub-Saharan AIrican national programs was
dwindling, simply because retiring staII in universities
and national research and extension services were not
being replaced. This declining national capacity was
highlighted at the highest levels, including by Iormer
United Nations secretary general Kof Annan in his
role as chairman oI the Alliance Ior a Green Revolution
in AIrica. 'AIrica needs trained rice breeders,¨ he said,
and 'most AIrican countries have none.¨
Participants at the Second AIrica Rice Congress in
March 2010 urged AIrican governments to renewed
commitment to rice research and development, and
supported AIricaRice in its proposal to revive the task
Iorce mechanism oI collaboration.
Thus, the new AIrica-wide Rice Breeding Task Force
was born. It Iocuses on the two aspects oI speeding up
the process oI evaluation Ior potential new varieties
and rebuilding AIrica`s capacity in rice breeding.
The Rice Breeding Task Force was made possible
by new Iunds coming on line in 2010 Irom the
Government oI Japan. The task Iorce also answers the
call Ior a multi-environment testing network Ior AIrica
that is an integral part oI the Global Rice Science
Partnership (GRiSP).
RebuiIding Africa's rice breeding capacity
Sié has strong views on the role oI breeding and he
declares boldly that biotechnology and marker-assisted
breeding are not to be seen as standalone methods,
rather they need to be integrated with conventional`
breeding. With so much emphasis on biotech since
about the mid-1990s, Sié bemoans the Iact that it is
'diIfcult to get breeders back to the feld. It is not a
case oI conventional breeding only or biotechnology
The new Africa-wide Rice Breeding Task Force
I
n June 2010, AfricaRice launchea an Africa-wiae Rice Breeaing Task Force, reviving a mechanism
that servea the rice research community in West Africa well in the 1990s ana early 2000s. Going
backwara is not usually consiaerea a positive thing ana therefore not something you might associate
with an active forwara-looking center like AfricaRice, so whats going on?
8 AfricaRice AnnuaI Report 2011
only, but rather crop breeding using biotechnology
as a tool.¨
To overcome this perceived bias, Sié took a novel
approach in recruiting national breeders into the
new Rice Breeding Task Force. 'I contacted national
directors oI |agricultural| research and asked them
to connect me with young active breeders or young
people who would like to become breeders (aspirant-
breeders`), the sorts oI people who were willing to
listen to us old-timers,¨ he says. Sié is a member
oI CAMES (Conseil AIricain et Malgache pour
l`Enseignement Supérieur), a council Ior university
teachers in Francophone AIrica, with which he was
Iormerly an associate proIessor. 'II I can work with
agricultural graduates who have recently completed
their bachelor`s or master`s degree, I can guide them
through their master`s or doctorate specialized in rice
breeding,¨ he says.
'II we want to maximize the potential Ior our breeders`
lines, we need to have standardized screening methods
and data analyses across all the countries involved,¨
says Sié. To this end, AIricaRice is running annual
training workshops to get everyone on the same page.
In the frst year (2010), the workshop Iocused on a
standardized screening protocol, while the second year
was on standardized methods oI data management
and handling, and the third year will continue on that
theme. 'The AIrica-wide Rice Breeding Task Force
Annual Meeting was held in Cotonou Irom 24 to 27
April 2012. Based on this year`s work plan, the rice-
breeding training course was divided into two Ior
Anglophone and Francophone countries.
Another valuable capacity-building activity is the
monitoring tour, in which a number oI Task Force
members visit one or more sites in a host country
to view the varietal trials in the feld. In the host
Bringing breeaers together to share experiences ana information ana to see new rice lines growing in the fiela is at the heart of the
new Africa-wiae Rice Breeaing Task Force
9 AfricaRice AnnuaI Report 2011
country, national researchers Irom other disciplines
(e.g. plant pathology, entomology and agronomy) also
participated in the monitoring tour to evaluate and
select best breeding materials Irom the Task Force
trials. This is a way oI promoting mutual learning
achieved through observation and discussion in the
feld. With such a variety oI material and sites to
see, the monitoring tours are run on the basis oI one
ecology per year.
ReaIizing the muIti-environment testing
network
Each breeder has his or her own research program (and
his or her own breeding materials), and it is notoriously
diIfcult Ior national breeders to test their material
beyond their own national border. This is the point
at which the Rice Breeding Task Force takes variety
screening to a whole new level.
The Breeding Task Force uses a very systematic
approach to varietal evaluation. The annual regional
trial is open to nominations Irom national breeders.
The Task Force currently (2012) includes 27 sub-
Saharan countries.
In addition to the NARS-developed materials,
these regional trials also include lines developed by
AIricaRice, IRRI and CIAT, and others coming out
oI other GRiSP and AIricaRice projects that have a
breeding component.
The idea is that the relevant breeder Irom each country
with an interest in a particular mega-environment
(irrigated lowland, rainIed lowland, rainIed upland,
high altitude or mangrove swamp) selects a number oI
lines to include in national trials. Selection is based on
data Irom the regional trial and personal observations
during monitoring tours. Each country represented in
the Task Force conducts at least one national trial per
year, involving a maximum oI 30 entries, visited by
Iarmers, rice millers, traders and the national varietal
release committee. The most promising entries are
then evaluated during another 2 years in at least
three representative sites in the country Iollowing
standardized protocols that satisIy the requirements
Ior varietal release and involving hundreds oI Iarmers
and other stakeholders such as rice millers and rice
traders.
II a variety is accepted Ior inclusion in the national
variety catalog oI an ECOWAS (Economic Community
oI West AIrican States) member country, that variety
should automatically be available Ior cultivation in all
ECOWAS states via the West AIrican catalog oI plant
species and varieties`.
DeaIing with a notorious bottIeneck: seed
InsuIfcient seed oI new varieties has been a barrier to
Iarmers` adoption oI varieties Ior decades. Moreover,
seed systems have almost always been divorced Irom
the providers oI the varieties the breeders.
Never one to shirk responsibilities, Sié states quite
categorically that breeders should be responsible Ior
the production oI breeder seed`. When the Iormal seed
sector works correctly, the seed service will use the
breeder seed to produce Ioundation seed`, which in
turn will be given out to so-called outgrowers (either
directly or via a development agency) who will grow
certifed seed` certifcation being granted by the
seed service aIter feld inspection. It is the certifed
seed that is sold to Iarmers. Not that AIricaRice
envisages a situation in which every Iarmer uses
certifed seed every year that is just too steep a
hill to climb! Rather, AIricaRice sees a situation in
which about a fIth (20°) oI the rice seed used each
year continent-wide is certifed, and Iarmers and the
inIormal seed sector provide the rest. In this way, an
average AIrican rice Iarmer would revert` to certifed
seed once every 5 years, and so the quality oI rice
grain should be maintained. Even this vision is a long
way Irom the current situation! 'It is important that
those millions oI Iarmers who rely on the inIormal
seed sector saving their own seed or acquiring seed
Irom neighbors or local markets have access to the
best available varieties¨, says AIricaRice director oI
research Ior development Marco Wopereis. In short,
10 AfricaRice AnnuaI Report 2011
that means making the varieties developed or selected
by the Task Force available to the whole rice-Iarming
community oI the continent.
'There is a clear need Ior more breeders,¨ states
Wopereis. The Task Force will help rebuild that
capacity. 'Through the Government oI Japan, which
sponsors the Task Force, we are also able to conduct
Beautiful ana bountiful growing Oryza barthii-basea hybria
panicles
UnIocking the potentiaI of wiId Oryza
barthii
Ory:a barthii is one oI two wild species in AIrica to
share the same basic genome as the cultivated species
(O. sativa and O. glaberrima), in Iact O. barthii is
considered by most as the species Irom which AIrican
rice (O. glaberrima) was domesticated. Like its
descendent, it has a number oI Ieatures that make it
interesting to the canny breeder: it has long panicles,
diverse grain sizes, long fag leaI and long awns. Long
panicles, grain size and weight might be considered
a prerequisite Ior high yield, while fag leaves and
awns both oIIer protection against bird damage
the fag leaI shielding the panicles Irom the sight oI a
bird fying overhead, and the awns making the grain
diIfcult to access. Moreover, the domestication oI
O. barthii as O. glaberrima resulted in a reduction
oI the species` diversity. 'This is normal Ior any crop
domestication,¨ says Mande Semon AIricaRice upland
rice breeder. 'What it means Ior me as a breeder is that
O. barthii harbors a lot oI diversity that is not available
in O. glaberrima.¨
'I chose to use O. barthii in part because it has
long slender grains that are heavier than those oI
O. glaberrima,¨ says Semon. 'Generating interspecifc
progenies Irom crosses involving O. barthii and
O. sativa provides an opportunity to develop new
varieties with increased yield potential, good grain
characteristics, insect pest and disease resistance, as
well as improved grain quality, good taste and aroma.¨
Some oI the new interspecifc lines have inherited
resistance to bacterial blight and stem borer Irom
their O. barthii parent. Moreover, they are very early
maturing (less than 90 days aIter sowing).
group training and individual training (MSc and PhD
level). This is important. The Task Force will help
strengthen breeding capacity and ensure that national
breeders can use the materials Irom the Task Force not
just to evaluate and Ior possible release, but also to
develop or improve their own varieties to get a better
ft with their consumers` preIerences and ecologies.¨
Ory:a barthii is a riverine species, never Iound in the
uplands (where O. glaberrima is Irequently cultivated).
II O. barthii itselI is grown in the uplands, it typically
lodges (Ialls over) and sheds all its grains prior to
harvest. However, taking the interspecifc lines with
O. barthii introgressions to the uplands seems to have
allowed traits Ior upland adaptation to be expressed,
where they never would in the wild.
11 AfricaRice AnnuaI Report 2011
Manaè Semon ana hela worker Ogunbayo A:i: assess the new plants in the hela
'We already have good lines available,¨ enthuses
Semon, 'combining short duration to avoid drought,
high yield and aroma. The aroma was a surprise, as
neither parent the O. barthii nor the O. sativa was
aromatic.¨ One case oI releasing previously hidden traits.
'Yield trials were carried out with 148 fxed lines at two
locations contrasting in altitude and soil acidity,¨ says
Semon. Selections Irom these were then evaluated in
Ethiopia, Côte d`Ivoire, Liberia, Ghana, Chad, Niger,
Benin, the Democratic Republic oI Congo (DRC)
and Nigeria. The 30 highest-yielding lines were then
nominated Ior regional evaluation in Rice Breeding
Task Force trials in Guinea, Mali, Nigeria, Togo and
Uganda.
Nwambam Iruka is a member oI the Nigerian NGO
Golden Farmers working in Abakaliki, Ebonyi
State. Because oI his links with the National Cereals
Research Institute (NCRI), Iruka was given seeds oI
35 interspecifc lines with O. barthii introgressions to
test. 'At the time when AIricaRice brought the new
varieties to us, local Iarmers had given up on upland
rice, because oI the decline in yield oI the local variety,
China best,¨ he says. The yield loss was blamed on
declining soil quality. 'Now, 2 years later, we have
two promising lines that are giving us 3.8 tonnes per
hectare in the rainIed uplands.¨ These yields are high
Ior the upland ecosystem in West AIrica, even given
that they are helped by the Iarmers` use oI 300 kg oI
Iertilizer per hectare (200 kg oI compound NPK and
100 kg oI urea) the yield oI existing varieties under
this level oI Iertilization is 22.5 t/ha.
'Ebonyi State has a rice production plan,¨ explains
Iruka, 'which encourages Iarmers to expand production
in the uplands and lowlands. We hope that in this third
year |2012| will be able to get the local Agricultural
Development Programme on board Ior upland rice.¨
'Ebonyi is one oI six states involved in the evaluation
process,¨ explains Semon. 'The protocol we have in
place is closely linked with the varietal release process,
and so we hope to see one or more oI the interspecifc
varieties with O. barthii introgressions oIIicially
released in Nigeria in 2014 or 2015.¨
12 AfricaRice AnnuaI Report 2011
Research in brief
Estimating bird damage: A first step in
deaIing with a major probIem
There is no getting away Irom the Iact that some
birds are major pests in cereal production, including
rice, in sub-Saharan AIrica. In Iact, the Red-billed
Quelea occurs in plague proportions like locusts and
is considered the most numerous bird in the world
the sight oI a swarm oI these birds heading their way
strikes Iear into cereal Iarmers.
'Recent studies on bird pests oI rice in sub-Saharan
AIrica are scarce,¨ says AIricaRice agricultural
economist Matty Demont. 'And until we got to work
on the subject, there were no updated estimates oI
bird-inficted losses in the Senegal River valley.¨
From Iarmer surveys conducted in 20 countries, the
Global Rice Science Partnership (GRiSP) identifed
birds as the second most important biotic constraint
to rice production in AIrica, aIter weeds. The GRiSP
proposal expects research to deliver US$ 2.6 billion
oI benefts to 31 AIrican countries by 2035, oI which
27.5° a staggering $715 million is supposed to
come Irom improved bird control.
'With that kind oI expectation, we need to take action
now,¨ says Demont. 'The starting point is to generate
data on bird-inficted crop losses. However, the huge
diversity oI the bird problem even among Iarms in
the same area means that detailed sampling oI felds
or birds would need to be conducted on a wide scale,
which is prohibitively expensive and labor-intensive.
Fortunately, a quick alternative was available. We
used a database oI practices and production costs oI
a panel oI irrigated-rice Iarmers surveyed annually
since 2002 in the Senegal River valley (SRV), and
econometrically isolated bird damage Irom production
practices.¨
Consequently, Demont and his colleague Mandiaye
Diagne teamed up with Yann de Mey oI the Centre
Ior Environmental Sciences, Hasselt University,
Belgium, to test a method that had never been
applied to bird pests oI cereals beIore damage
abatement econometrics`. 'We developed an indirect
estimation method,¨ explains Demont, 'that combined
a production Iunction with a damage-abatement
component.¨ Using this method, productive processes,
such as seeding, transplanting, Iertilizing and
irrigating, were separated Irom damage-limiting
processes, such as weeding and bird-scaring.
The data Ied into the model came Irom the Iarmer
surveys conducted Irom 2002 to 2007 by AIricaRice,
the extension agency (Société d`Aménagement et
d`Exploitation des terres du Delta et des vallées
du feuve Sénégal et de la Faléme, SAED) and the
NGO UJAK (Union des Jeunes Agriculteurs de
Koyli-Wirnde): data oI 473 Iarmerseasons Irom 111
Iarmers (not all Iarmers were surveyed every year).
The model indicated that between 2002 and 2007, an
average oI 13.2° oI potential rice production was lost
to birds. This equates to 4.7 billion FCFA per year,
or 7.1 million euros. However, losses can amount to
9.6 billion FCFA (14.7 million euros) in seasons with
extremely high bird pressure, such as the wet season
oI 2006. The same 111 Iarmers were surveyed in
2008, when they were asked to recall bird damage
A swarm of Rea-billea Quelea at some aistance from the running
man giving fust a hint of the numbers of these biras that can
congregate ana aevastate cereal crops, incluaing rice
13 AfricaRice AnnuaI Report 2011
Ior the same period (i.e., 20022007). The Iarmers`
perception oI bird-inficted losses averaged 15.2° oI
total production. The similarity between the Iarmers`
perception and the model results may suggest that the
model is valid. 'However, both estimation techniques
in this study are still indirect methods to determine
bird-inI licted crop loss,¨ says Demont. 'Future
research should cross-check the model estimates and
Iarmer perceptions with physical feld measurements
(through netting).¨
OI greatest concern was the fnding that the eIfcacy
oI traditional control eIIorts mainly bird scaring
carried out by children decreased sharply as the bird
population increased: as the number oI birds entering
the feld increases, the eIIectiveness oI traditional
scaring methods decreases.
'The kind oI data that we have been able to generate
|i.e., bird-inficted crop losses| is vital Ior Iarm manage-
ment decisions, allocation oI research Iunding at the
national level, and crop insurance programs,¨ explains
Demont. 'The avian risk now has a Iace we can
attach a monetary value to it and this may encourage
policy-makers to take the problem seriously.¨
Since the rice-price crisis oI 20072008, the Senegalese
government has committed to the GOANA program
oI expansion and intensifcation Ior achieving selI-
suIfciency in rice by 2015. This means at least tripling
production Irom 2008 levels. It is thereIore essential
Ior the country to 'stop Ieeding the birds instead oI
the urban consumers.¨
'The clear reduction in the productivity oI Iarm-level
control measures as the bird population increases
suggests that it is most important Ior the government
and other stakeholders to Iocus on the triple P`:
preaictive, preventive and protective measures,¨
states Demont. Predicting bird population changes
and movements requires monitoring; prevention oI
damage suggests some local bird-population control
and agronomic measures that make rice felds less
vulnerable to avian attack; and protection oI the
Iarmers requires some Iorm oI crop insurance. 'The
crop-insurance issue was a major driver Ior this work,¨
says Demont, 'as one oI the reasons given Ior the lack
oI bird-damage insurance in the country is the lack
oI viable data on the bird populations themselves.¨
In 80° oI the Iarming Iamilies, children were
employed in bird scaring to the point that over a
quarter oI these children missed more than a month
oI schooling. Thus, in addition to achieving Iood-
security objectives, tackling the bird problem will also
contribute to meeting key educational objectives such
as universal primary enrolment.
'A major contribution oI this work,¨ concludes
Demont, 'is the methodology. Wherever detailed
panel data are available on Iarmer practices and
production costs, including labor Ior bird-scaring,
damage-abatement econometrics provides an indirect
frst approximation oI the extent and incidence oI the
problem in anticipation oI more objective`, but costly
large-scale measurements oI physical damage, Ior
instance through netting.¨
The beauty of this aault male Black-heaaea Weaver belies the
species ability to aestroy cereal crops
14 AfricaRice AnnuaI Report 2011
Embedding moIecuIar markers in rice
breeding in Africa
Molecular markers provide rice breeders with a
signiIicant opportunity to develop varieties that
are resistant to pests and diseases and tolerant oI
abiotic stresses. As soon as markers associated
with traits oI interest are available, they can be
detected by laboratories with basic molecular-biology
equipment the basis Ior marker-assisted breeding.
It is now not only quicker to use molecular markers
Ior selection, but also oIten cheaper than conventional
selection in the feld or screen house, even though the
trait has to be confrmed by appropriate phenotyping
at the end oI the process. However, the implementation
and application oI marker-assisted breeding in sub-
Saharan AIrica is not an easy road.
AIricaRice has been at the IoreIront oI rice biotech-
nology i n AIrica si nce the mid-1990s. Early
biotechnology research at AIricaRice involved anther-
culture in the production oI the upland NERICA
varieties. In the late 1990s, molecular-breeding
technologies were introduced at AIricaRice, with
the aim oI speeding up the breeding process through
the use oI molecular markers. Molecular markers
were used to determine the molecular proIile oI
upland and lowland NERICA lines, to determine the
genetic diversity oI these lines and Ory:a glaberrima
accessions. These studies showed that the NERICA
Iamilies are diverse and could enhance the diversity
oI genetic material in Iarmers` felds when they are
adopted. Molecular markers were used to identiIy
markers associated with traits endemic to AIrica (Rice
yellow mottle virus, bacterial blight, AIrican rice gall
midge and drought). In addition, marker technology
was used to develop near-isogenic lines with the
rymv1-2 allele in the background oI elite lines Irom
NARS partners, chromosome substitution segment
lines and populations Ior nested association mapping.
Markers allow a breeder to quickly veriIy whether or
not a particular progeny has a particular gene or trait.
Over time, AIricaRice has equipped its laboratories
in Cotonou, Benin and Saint-Louis, Senegal to use
molecular markers on a routine basis. The breeding
team based in Ibadan, Nigeria beneIits Irom the
breeding laboratory oI its host, the International
Institute oI Tropical Agriculture (IITA), and the
team in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania uses Iacilities at
Mikocheni Agricultural Research Institute (MARI).
AIricaRice is working on a number oI traits Ior which
markers are available (see Table 1 Ior a list). Some
oI these markers were identifed through research
activities in which AIricaRice was a partner, others
were acquired directly Irom partners.
The Global Rice Science Partnership (GRiSP) has
enabled better integration oI gene discovery and pre-
breeding activities oI AIricaRice, the International Rice
Research Institute (IRRI), the International Center
Ior Tropical Agriculture (CIAT), Japan International
Research Center Ior Agricultural Sciences (JIRCAS),
Centre de coopération internationale en recherche
agronomique pour le développement (CIRAD) and
Institut de recherche pour le développement (IRD),
so that each benefts Irom the work oI the other R&D
partners.
Table 1. Ongoing marker-assisted selection (MAS) at
AIricaRice and other advanced research institutes
Trait Gene /
marker
Lead institute
(in gene
discovery)
RYMV resistance (1) rymv1-2 IRD
RYMV resistance (2) rymv2 IRD
Bacterial blight resistance Xa4 IRRI
xa5 IRRI
Xa7 IRRI
Blast resistance (feld) Pb1 JIRCAS
pi21 JIRCAS
AIrican rice gall midge afrgm AIricaRice
Salt tolerance saltol IRRI
Submergence tolerance sub1 IRRI
Drought tolerance (upland) DTY12.1 IRRI
Drought tolerance (lowland) DTY3.1 IRRI
Cold tolerance Ctb1, Ctb2 IRRI
qRCT6b IRRI
15 AfricaRice AnnuaI Report 2011
Using moIecuIar approaches to
strengthen rice-breeding programs in
Africa
AIricaRice uses markers and other biotech tools
to analyze the genetic diversity oI rice collections
available in its genebank. In conjunction with Iocused
phenotyping eIIorts, this will help breeders to choose
the most promising accessions Ior their breeding
programs. The tools also enable researchers to fnd
genes that conIer resistance to stresses endemic to
AIrica (i.e. pests and diseases), and others that conIer
tolerance to abiotic stresses in AIrican germplasm.
This research is expected to deliver useIul markers
associated with genes and quantitative trait loci
(QTLs) Ior breeding. For example, AIricaRice (in
collaboration with IRRI, CIAT, CIRAD, IRD and
the NARS oI Burkina Faso, Mali and Nigeria) is
using marker-assisted recurrent selection (MARS)
to accumulate Iavorable alleles Irom many QTLs Ior
highly polygenic traits such as drought in rainIed
lowland rice systems.
A new development is the use oI single nucleotide
polymorphism (SNP) markers a technology that
oIIers a vast number oI markers to enhance breeding
eIfciency. With GRiSP partners IRRI, CIAT, IRD
and JIRCAS, and the Generation Challenge Program
(GCP), Ory:a sativa- and O. glaberrima-specifc SNP
markers are being developed. Some 2200 SNPs are
being used by AIricaRice with the genotyping being
outsourced to service labs that have the equipment to
carry out high-throughput low-cost genotyping.
With continuous advances in sequencing technologies,
new techniques such as genotyping-by-sequencing are
emerging and will be oI interest Ior gene mapping or
diversity studies on closely related species such as
O. glaberrima. This genome-based selection is likely
to replace conventional marker-based genotyping and
provide a powerIul tool Ior high-resolution mapping
and large-scale gene discovery, and Iull access to
the genetic potential oI AIrican rice to help improve
AIrican Iarmers` livelihoods. 'The Iuture oI molecular
breeding is thereIore all about acquiring huge data
sets and developing appropriate mathematical models
that can analyze such datasets and predict genotypes
that will perIorm well under specifc environments,¨
explains AIricaRice molecular biologist Marie-Noelle
Ndjiondjop. 'This inIormation will then be used
to guide breeders in their work, enabling them to
make the best possible crosses Ior specifc consumer
preIerences and growth conditions.¨
AIricaRice member countries are keen to Iollow
the Center`s lead and AIricaRice is actively helping
them to acquire the necessary skills and equipment
to Iacilitate marker-assisted breeding. The biotech
Iacility in Cotonou is used as a regional hub Ior
biotechnology Ior rice breeding and enables national
(NARS) partners to learn on the job or to gain hands-
on experience. AIricaRice has also Iacilitated the
establishment oI biotechnology laboratories in Iour
West AIrican countries.
'The experience gained Irom working with our
partners has persuaded us that a strong structure that
integrates all the components oI biotech would be
most eIfcient in achieving our mandate,¨ explains
Ndjiondjop. The mandate is to have the NARS
partners competent in the use oI molecular techniques
Marie-Noëlle Nafionafop ana colleagues reaaing an acrylamiae
gel plate
16 AfricaRice AnnuaI Report 2011
on their own as well as in collaboration with others.
'For example, there is a critical need Ior long- and
short-term training due to the diIfculties oI accessing
molecular Iacilities. Moreover, molecular breeding is
evolving so rapidly that it is diIfcult Ior technicians
and scientists to keep up to date.¨ Consequently, a
genomic and genetic platIorm Ior rice in AIrica has
been created. The platIorm enables collaboration
and mutual support among the larger community oI
scientists, staII and students Irom NARS partners,
AIricaRice and advanced research institutes. AIrica-
Rice acts as the interIace between the partners.
The platIorm will use AIrican rice as its primary
resource, plus cost-eIIective, fexible and eIfcient
genotyping equipment able to process hundreds oI
samples quickly. 'The platIorm will also serve as a
bridge between NARS and the molecular-breeding
platIorm Iunded by the Bill & Melinda Gates
Foundation through the GCP,¨ explains Ndjiondjop.
The GCP molecular-breeding platIorm is a mega-
structure involving mainly advanced research insti-
tutes, while the AIricaRice platIorm will deal directly
with NARS partners and AIricaRice staII to provide
day-to-day support, addressing their specifc needs
with a fnal goal oI increasing their capacity to apply
molecular techniques and use molecular tools.
AIricaRice will interact with the GCP platIorm and
various private companies by outsourcing genotyping
and addressing issues that need very advanced
technologies.
'The AIricaRice platIorm will be crucial in helping
breeders to understand the changes involved in moving
to molecular breeding, Irom the tools and protocols,
to the statistical soItware and experimental designs
required Ior eIIective use oI molecular markers,¨
concludes Ndjiondjop.
Upgrading rice vaIue chains: The roIe of
poIicy sequencing
Like many other AIrican countries, Senegal was sorely
hit by the rice price crisis oI 2007 and 2008. However,
in November 2008 just 6 months aIter the global
rice price peak and in the wake oI the government`s
Grande OIIensive Agricole pour la Nourriture et
l`Abondance (GOANA) to achieve selI-suIfciency in
rice by 2015 the price oI local Senegal River valley
(SRV) rice dropped sharply.
The reason? Like many productivist attempts in the
past, the GOANA plan had increased production oI
local rice, but there was no commensurate increase
in demand.
'Historically, the Senegalese government has invested
more in rice production Iertilizer, fnance and inIra-
structure than in rice processing and marketing,¨
says AIricaRice agricultural economist Matty Demont.
In colonial times, cheap broken rice was imported to
Ieed the labor Iorce employed to grow groundnut Ior
export. Since independence in 1960, rice consumption
has grown at a staggering 7° per year. Senegal has
one oI the highest rates oI urbanization in AIrica
urbanization that Iuels rice consumption and demand.
Rice overtook millet and sorghum as the preIerred
staple in Senegal`s urban centers in the 1980s and
1990s.
The reasons Ior the city-dwellers` adherence to
imported rice are perIectly valid: a survey conducted Thinning plantlets reaay for transfer to rooting meaium
17 AfricaRice AnnuaI Report 2011
by AIricaRice and its partners beIore the Iood crisis
showed that 40° oI urban rice consumers did not
know that there was any domestically produced rice!
Others complained that it was unavailable (42°) and
poorly marketed (40°); while a quarter oI urban
dwellers said that the local rice is oI inIerior quality to
the imported rice. Given that urban dwellers comprise
65° oI all rice consumers in the country, SRV rice has
a long way to go iI it is going to replace the imported
commodity in the drive Ior selI-suIfciency.
With the issues oI delivery and acceptance coming to
the IoreIront as domestic rice production increases,
Demont and Iormer visiting research Iellow Amy
Rizzotto suggest that the government and other value-
chain stakeholders need to sequence policy actions to
eIIect the required changes needed Ior SRV rice to lead
the selI-suIfciency oIIensive`. And this based on the
assumption that value chains need to be buyer-driven,
iI local rice is going to deliver selI-suIfciency.
'We drew on a lot oI data and inIormation,¨ explains
Demont. 'We conducted semi-structured interviews
with a broad range oI SRV rice stakeholders Irom
Iarmers, extension agents, processors and traders, to
consumers and restaurateurs, and even the top three
rice importers. We organized a stakeholder workshop
to brainstorm in groups on marketing SRV rice. There
were the pre-Iood crisis survey data, and inIormation
Irom the experimental auctions conducted in 2010
and 2011.¨
From careIul study oI all this inIormation, Demont and
Rizzotto distilled some generic policy-sequencing
lessons` that should be applicable on a wider scale
than just Senegal alone.
1. Rice quality needs to be tailored to consumer
requirements as expressed in market demand. In
the drive Ior selI-suIfciency in AIrica, this will
usually be driven by the large and oIten import-
biased urban markets.
2. This should be Iollowed by large-scale investment
in rice productivity.
3. Processing and distribution also need to be scaled
up through investment in aggregation and storage
inIrastructure.
4. Once local rice oI the required quality is available
in marketable quantities, it should be branded and
advertised. This is to raise awareness and expectation
among consumers, so that the new brands capture a
share oI the market, otherwise it may be impossible
to modiIy long-term consumption habits and reverse
the import biases in urban end-markets.
5. Qualit y cont rol and generic promotion and
advertising strategies need to be established and
maintained, so that the brands become credible
products and their market share in urban end-
markets is maintained.
The application oI these lessons will diIIer in diIIerent
value-chain contexts. 'For example,¨ says Demont,
'Burkina Faso has the luxury oI having an urban
consumer base which is more than willing to swap
imported rice Ior local rice at the currently available
quality. Here, the priority is to increase production to
meet consumers` needs in terms oI volume.¨ Moreover,
the sequencing oI the policies is not as simple as (1)
Iollowed by (2) Iollowed by (3). 'All actions need to
be initiated more or less synchronously due to lags
between investment and impact,¨ says Demont, 'but
some actions can only be eIIective iI certain milestones
in previous actions are attained.¨ In particular, step (5)
shows that maintaining the quality oI the new brands
and maintaining their profle in the public arena is an
ongoing process.
In Senegal, the whole value chain is skewed by historic
and current investments in increasing productivity and
production without similar investments in processing
and marketing.
'For Senegal, we propose a three-stage approach,¨
explains Demont (see Figure). 'First, we` should look
at adding value to the local rice. This will involve
improving the quality so that it matches that oI
imported brands; Iacilitating contractual arrangements
18 AfricaRice AnnuaI Report 2011
between adjacent links in the value chain to ensure
quality Ior example, between large buyers in Dakar
and Iarmers.¨ This step also includes labeling and
branding.
A second step Ior Senegal would be to increase the
supply oI the branded product through productivity
enhancement and scaling up oI the inIrastructure
to enable aggregation and storage. 'OI course,
productivity enhancement is already a major theme
Ior the Senegalese government,¨ says Demont.
'The diIIiculty might be persuading Iarmers to
keep increasing their production, when they have
historically been punished by the market in terms oI
price at harvest. This is where contracting may play
a crucial role.¨
The third step is to raise demand Ior quality SRV
rice through generic promotion and advertising. It
also involves building the customer base by reaching
potential new consumers, and ensuring that the
product delivers what the publicity says it will.
'Each step` is really just a milestone,¨ indicates
Demont. 'The activities oI each step will continue
even as the next step starts overlap and ongoing
commitment.¨
'The good news,¨ says Demont, 'is that, since the
stakeholder workshop, the private sector has made its
own moves to upgrade the value chain.¨ For example,
14 rice importers launched a joint venture with
producers and processors the Société de Promotion et
de Commercialisation du Riz Sénégalais (SPCRS)
to buy, mill and market SRV rice to Senegalese
consumers, controlling quality through contracts with
millers and Iarmers. Other value-chain initiatives
involve high-quality and medium-quality SRV rice,
targeting diIIerent market segments. 'New aromatic
rice varieties that have been recently introduced in
the SRV are promising,¨ says Demont. 'They may
trigger Iurther value-chain development such that
the SRV will henceIorth be able to reach demanding
consumer segments in Dakar which were previously
inaccessible Ior local rice.¨
Thanks to generic promotion oI SRV rice by the
Senegalese government and many development
partners, the continued high price oI imported rice,
and the quality increases already evident in branded
SRV rice based on AIricaRice varieties, there has
already been positive uptake oI SRV rice by urban
consumers. 'The awareness oI SRV rice in Dakar has
risen dramatically,¨ says Demont. 'The latest round
oI experimental auctions in the capital (conducted in
April 2012) showed an awareness level oI 93° just
eight people out oI 120 were not aware oI SRV rice.
That`s a big leap Irom 60° in 20062007!¨
Generalizing Irom the SRV-specifc case, upgrading
rice value chains is complex many synchronous
19 AfricaRice AnnuaI Report 2011
actions are needed and the challenge Ior policy makers
is fnding (i) the optimal mix between supply-shiIting
(productivity-increasing), value-adding (quality,
labeling, branding) and demand-liIting (promotion,
advertising) strategies, and (ii) the optimal sequence
in which these actions need to take place.
Promoting smaII-scaIe mechanization
across the continent as the essentiaI
ingredient for rice intensification
AIricaRice is convinced that the adoption oI locally
adapted small-scale machinery is a vital step iI AIrica
is to achieve its potential oI becoming selI-suIfcient
in rice and going on to become a net exporter. The
situation is summed up by AIricaRice grain-quality
specialist John ManIul:
We cannot make any signihcant improvement in rice
proauction in sub-Saharan Africa without infecting
some mechani:ation along the value chain.
A 3-day workshop on Boosting agricultural mechani-
zation in rice-based systems in sub-Saharan AIrica`,
held at the AIricaRice Sahel station in June 2011,
echoed this Ieeling and made recommendations
Ior improving small-scale mechanization oI the
rice sector. These recommendations were aimed
at AIrican governments, international and local
manuIacturers, the national agricultural research
and extension services (NARES), research (namely,
AIricaRice, International Rice Research Institute and
Centre de coopération internationale en recherche
agronomique pour le développement) and the Coalition
Ior AIrican Rice Development (CARD) (see Box
Recommendations oI the GRiSP-sponsored workshop
on Boosting agricultural mechanization in rice-based
systems in sub-Saharan AIrica, Saint-Louis, Senegal,
68 June 2011`) .
The new rice strategy Ior AIrica reinIorces this need
through the establishment oI a new Rice Mechanization
Working Group (within the Rice Agronomy and Rice
Processing and Value-addition Task Forces) dedicated
to improving and increasing mechanization along the
rice value chain in AIrica through Iour oI the strategy`s
seven Priority Areas (see Box Priority Areas Ior rice
research Ior development in AIrica`).
'The problem starts all the way back at land prepara-
tion,¨ explains ManIul. 'The sort oI area expansion we
are talking about iI AIrica is to become a net exporter
oI rice cannot be managed by Iarmers through manual
labor alone there simply are not enough hours in
a day!¨
Proper land preparation is the basis oI a good crop and
oI eIfcient mechanization throughout the crop cycle.
First oI all, good land preparation involves killing or
removing weeds, enabling the Iarmer to plant in a
Recommendations of the GRiSP-sponsored work-
shop on Boosting agricultural mechanization in
rice-based systems in sub-Saharan Africa, Saint-
Louis, Senegal, 6-8 1une 2011
The workshop made a number oI specifc recommen-
dations Ior Iollow up by AIrican governments, inter-
national and local manuIacturers, NARES, research
and CARD. The research-related recommendations
were to:
· Contribute to the development oI policies to boost
mechanization in rice-based systems
· Aid collaboration between public and private sectors
in the development oI agricultural machinery Ior
rice-based systems
· IdentiIy needs and introduce prototypes Ior testing
under local conditions
· Help build local manuIacturing capacity
· Establish a network oI local manuIacturers and
international and national research (the Rice Mecha-
nization Working Group)
· Facilitate the exchange oI knowledge on agricultural
mechanization in rice-based systems within AIrica
and globally
· Facilitate SouthSouth cooperation among manuIac-
turers and researchers in AIrica, Asia and Latin
America, through exchange visits and training.
20 AfricaRice AnnuaI Report 2011
weed-Iree feld. The second important objective oI
land preparation is to get a leveled and even feld.
In lowland rice felds that are poorly leveled, rice plants
will not all grow at the same rate, because there will
be more water in depressions and less water cover
on ridges`, leading to diIIerences in development
rate. This will result in some plants maturing beIore
others. Both the uneven fooding and the delayed or
suboptimal growth oI the crop which makes the
rice less competitive against weeds will Iavor
weed inIestation. Moreover, in poorly leveled felds
mechanical weed control, using hand-operated rotary
hoes, will be less eIIective.
Thus, iI the feld is poorly leveled, it will be diIfcult to
get a crop Iully mature all at the same time ready Ior
eIfcient mechanized harvesting, and it will take
more time and energy to keep the crop Iree oI weeds.
Moreover, combine-harvesting (whether with small or
large harvesters) becomes nearly impossible iI felds
are very uneven, while in a heavily weed-inIested
feld combine-harvesting might lead to contamination
oI rice grains with weed seeds oI similar sizes and
shapes to rice grains.
So, iI the Iarmer starts with a reasonably level feld,
enabling uniIorm Ilooding and mechanical weed
control, the end oI the cropping season should see a
uniIormly ripe and reasonably weed-Iree crop on a
level feld ready Ior mechanical harvesting.
'This step is critical Ior grain quality,¨ explains
ManIul. 'Manual harvesting and threshing oI rice
felds are Iurther time-consuming activities Ior the
Iarmer, and all too oIten both processes are delayed.¨
The longer a mature crop sits in the feld waiting Ior
harvest, the lower the quality oI the harvested grain
and more grain is lost through shattering` (shedding
oI grains Irom the panicle or head). To make matters
worse, grain quality continues to deteriorate even
when the sheaves are cut, primarily because they
are usually stacked in or beside the feld awaiting
threshing. 'Mechanical harvesting and threshing can
Priority Areas for rice research for development
in Africa1
Through a priority-setting process involving consulta-
tion with stakeholders and rice experts, and inIormation
based on household surveys and national statistics that
began in June 2008, the Iollowing seven research-Ior-
development Priority Areas (PAs) were identifed:¡
1. Conserving rice genetic resources and providing
climate-resilient rice varieties to smallholder
Iarmers varieties that are better adapted to
production environments and consumer preIerences
2. Improving rural livelihoods by closing yield
gaps and through sustainable intensiñcation and
diversiñcation of rice-based systems
3. Achieving socially acceptable expansion of rice-
producing areas, while addressing environmental
concerns
4. Creating market opportunities for smallholder
farmers and processors by improving the quality
and the competitiveness of locally produced rice
and rice-based products
5. Facilitating the development oI the rice value
chain through improved technology targeting and
evidence-based policy-making
6. Mobilizing co-investments and linking with
development partners and the private sector
to stimulate uptake of rice knowledge and
technologies
7. Strengthening the capacities oI national rice
research and extension agents and rice value-chain
actors.
f Source: Aaaptea from Boosting Africas Rice Sector. A
research for aevelopment strategy 20112020 (AIricaRice,
2011, p. 29).
¡ The Iour PAs in which the Rice Mechanization Working
Group is expected to operate are shown in bold.
21 AfricaRice AnnuaI Report 2011
help maximize grain quality by reducing this delay-
induced deterioration,¨ says ManIul.
'One oI the advantages oI mechanization throughout
the rice value chain is that it should enable rice Iarmers
to concentrate on their core activity producing
rice,¨ explains AIricaRice program leader Ior policy,
innovation systems and impact assessment, Aliou
Diagne. He goes on to explain that appropriate-scale
processing machinery in the hands oI dedicated rice
processors (either private entrepreneurs or Iarmer
associations) would not only improve the quality oI
the fnal rice grain, but Iundamentally change the
structure oI the value chain. 'Farmers would Iarm and
processors would process. Separating these two steps
in the value chain would be a frst step in the wider
commercialization oI local rice,¨ he explains. To build
on the benefts oI better-quality paddy being produced
on Iarm, processors would be in a position to bulk the
paddy Irom a number oI Iarms and process volumes
that would be oI interest to wholesalers and other
traders. This is a potentially giant leap Ior AIrican rice
production, by moving away Irom a system in which
many smallholders currently do everything Irom land
preparation to sale oI grain.
'By improving quality at every step oI the chain, and
perhaps taking the extra step oI introducing contractual
arrangements between actors at adjacent steps, we will
have a system that will enable tracking oI rice Irom
feld to plate,¨ explains Diagne. 'With knowledge oI
origin and quality, is it just a small step to branding
and market recognition a situation that benefts
Iarmers, processors, traders and wholesalers, retailers,
and customers. Everyone should be a winner!¨
So much Ior the theory, what about the practice and
AIricaRice`s role in the mechanization oI smallholder
rice Iarming in AIrica?
AIricaRice sees its role as identiIying bottlenecks
in the value chain, identiIying and importing ma-
chines Irom other rice-producing regions oI the
world that could relieve those bottlenecks, testing
and adapting the machines to local conditions, and
fnally Iacilitating the manuIacture oI the adapted
machines with local expertise and materials. It is then
up to local small-scale manuIacturers to get on with
the job oI producing and selling the machines. 'The
goal,¨ explains AIricaRice agronomist Mamadou
Kabirou N`Diaye, 'is to have machines adapted to
local conditions, built and maintained locally.¨
The Center`s fagship` machine Ior the past 15 years
has been the ASI` threshercleaner, the development
oI which set the process Ior Iuture work in this area.
Some 10 years aIter its release in 1997, the thresher
cleaner was adapted and in use in six West AIrican
countries: Senegal, Mauritania, Mali, Burkina Faso,
Ghana and Côte d`Ivoire.
In January 2011, three threshercleaners were
displayed at the celebrations oI the 50th anniversary
oI independence in Chad. Three manuIacturers Irom
the Entreprise de Conception et d`Appui a l`Artisanat
(ECAA) had been trained in Cotonou, and all the
machines were also adapted to thresh three crops
rice, millet and sorghum. By the end oI the year, the
new manuIacturers had already sold 10 machines to
the national program Ior Iood security (PNSA), and
were expecting to sell 10 more in 2012.
The Chaaian version of the ASI threshercleaner aemonstratea
at the countrys 50th anniversary of inaepenaence
22 AfricaRice AnnuaI Report 2011
"What do you want from your rice,
madam?" - Consumer preferences for
rice attributes
What makes a good rice eating experience? What
makes a consumer choose any particular variety over
another? It seems to have something to do with where
you live and what you have access to. AIricaRice
researchers and students have been fnding out just
how diverse AIrican taste Ior rice really is.
Yield is only one characteristic oI a crop variety. For
Iarmers and consumers it is not necessarily the most
important one. Since the mid-1990s, participatory
varietal selection (PVS) trials have shown time and
again that even when yield is the most important
criterion in varietal selection, other Iactors are
also taken into consideration by rice Iarmers. With
emphasis shiIting toward demand-driven research
encompassing the whole value chain, it is perhaps
time to Iocus breeding on consumer demands as well
as those oI Iarmers.
'Products are consumed Ior the characteristics they
possess,¨ says Aliou Diagne AIricaRice program
leader Ior policy, innovation systems and impact
assessment. 'Variety choice depends on the attributes
oI the variety.¨
AIricaRice researchers have been conducting sensory
(consumer acceptance) tests oI raw-milled and cooked
rice in several West AIrican countries to determine
which at t ributes are preIerred by consumers.
AIricaRice research assistant Mamadou FoIana and
colleagues visited Iour rice-consuming locations in
Benin, testing three NERICA, two imported and two
local varieties with panels oI 125 consumers.
The locations diIIered in the availability oI rice
types: the port city and commercial capital, Cotonou,
has primarily imported rice on its markets; another
location had both imported and local varieties; while
the other two locations had imported, local and
NERICA varieties available.
The Center`s latest venture began in 2009 with the
discovery` oI a small combine-harvester adapted to
smallholder rice felds in the Philippines, built by the
Philippine Rice Research Institute (PhilRice). Since
then, the machine has been tested and adapted in the
Senegal River valley in northern Senegal. In particular,
the imported machine became blocked by the tougher
Sahel rice straw, so local manuIacturer Malick Ndiaye
(Iormer research assistant at AIricaRice who went
private to support the ASI work) reinIorced the cutting
system, and improved the thresher wheel and elevator.
Successful fiela trials with the mini-combine on smallholaer
plots shoula see these machines rollea out on a wiae scale in
the near future
AIter demonstration to Iarmers, the machine was also
adapted to Iour wheels Irom the original three. 'This
mini-combine` can harvest 1.5 to 2 hectares oI rice
per day,¨ says N`Diaye, 'requiring just three operators
to do so. This is at least double the speed oI hand-
harvesting and ASI threshing, which also takes eight
laborers to complete.¨ Demonstrations to date have
demonstrated losses oI just 2° and that the machine
produces very clean paddy. The pay-back time on
the investment oI 4 million FCFA in such a machine
is estimated at 3.5 years on the basis oI harvesting
45 ha per year.
23 AfricaRice AnnuaI Report 2011
'Consumers in all locations showed acceptance oI the
imported rices and oI NERICA 1 in relation to their
appearance as milled rice,¨ says FoIana. 'However,
no variety/brand received high scores oI acceptance
across all locations in terms oI the taste oI cooked rice.¨
More precisely, only three varieties reached a level oI
liked` in the sensory test oI cooked rice the two
imported brands and NERICA 4 and that only in
Cotonou. Overall, the results displayed vast disparities
among locations and individuals in terms oI varietal
acceptability once cooked, as even the least acceptable
variety Iound 21 supporters (out oI the total oI 500
testers) who either 'liked it¨ or 'liked it very much¨!
Saneliso Mhlanga worked Irom McGill University
(Canada) on data collected in Benin by Soul-KiIouly
Midingoyi oI the Institut national de recherches
agri coles du Bénin (INRAB), who surveyed 546
house holds in both rural and urban areas oI the Iour
geographical regions oI the country northeast,
northwest, center and south. 'Across the country,
consumers preIerred and were willing to pay a premium
Ior short grains, desired aroma, white kernels, clean
and unbroken rice,¨ says Mhlanga. 'The Beninese in
general also preIer parboiled rice over milled white
rice.¨ Moreover, consumers clearly linked country oI
origin with expected quality, always Iavoring imported
brands over local varieties.
Three types of rice with aifferent appearances which ao people
prefer?
In Nigeria, OlorunIemi Ogundele oI the Nigeria
Institute Ior Social and Economic Research (NISER)
Iound that the consumption and utilization oI various
types oI local rice are directly infuenced by the diverse
traditional Iood consumption patterns in the country.
For example, some consumers preIer a certain type
oI local rice Ior a particular dish, most likely because
oI its taste, color and stickiness aIter cooking. The
physical and chemical characteristics oI rice varieties
are used by consumers to identiIy and recognize the
diIIerent types oI rice in the market. Almost halI oI
the respondents in Ekiti State indicated the absence oI
Ioreign matter as their frst selection criterion, while
those who ate local rice preIerred its taste over that oI
imported brands. This implies that the most important
discriminating Iactor between imported and local rice
is the absence oI Ioreign matter.
Similar observations were made in Niger State, where
some people considered taste as the most important
criterion Ior selection, while others considered ease
oI cooking and whiteness as the most important
criteria these two groups with diIIerent preIerence
criteria consumed diIIerent varieties.
'Thus, absence oI Ioreign matter and degree oI
whiteness seem to be the most important physical
characteristics Ior Nigerian consumers,¨ says Diagne,
'while ease oI cooking and taste are the most
important cooking and sensory properties.¨
Similar work has been conducted, or is ongoing, in
Cameroon, Côte d`Ivoire, Gambia, Ghana, Mali,
Senegal, Togo and Uganda.
'A major lesson Irom this work is that we need to
develop local varieties that are at least oI equal quality
with the imported brands,¨ says AIricaRice crop
ecophysiologist Koichi Futakuchi. 'Given that none oI
the varieties, including imported rice, tested by FoIana
and his team gained any level oI broad acceptability
across the whole country in the sensory tests oI
cooked rice, it should be possible to develop varieties
and produce rice locally that is more acceptable than
24 AfricaRice AnnuaI Report 2011
the imported brands. For milled rice, imported rice
is apparently an excellent example and a target Ior
improvements in postharvest practices and varietal
quality characteristics.¨
'The people oI the AIrican continent are very diverse,¨
says grain-quality specialist John ManIul, 'so it is not
surprising that consumer preIerences Ior rice are also
diverse, both across and within countries.¨ This is in
stark contrast to a country like Japan, where consumer
preIerences are very narrow, and consequently all rice
work is geared to providing Ior those preIerences.
'This AIrican diversity is a good thing!¨ ManIul
declares. 'It means that almost every variety with good
physical and milling properties that is developed is
likely to fnd acceptance somewhere on the continent.¨
Within the Iramework oI the AIricaRiceCIDA
project Enhancing Iood security in AIrica through the
improvement oI rice postharvest handling, marketing
and the development oI new rice-based products` (see
Donor profle Canada, page 27), and the new Rice
Processing and Value Addition Task Force, ManIul and
others are seeking to develop a catalog oI consumer
preIerences across the continent and within countries.
'This will entail knowing what the main rice-based
dishes in each place actually are, what rice attributes
those dishes require and which varieties have those
attributes,¨ explains ManIul. 'Then, we should be
able to match varieties to countries and populations.¨ Sensory testing of rice unaer controllea conaitions
25 AfricaRice AnnuaI Report 2011
From just 6000 ha and 15,460 tonnes oI paddy in 2005,
the country grew 287,756 ha oI rice producing over a
million tonnes oI paddy in 2011. Moreover, the number
oI Iarmers growing rice in the country increased Irom
18,000 in 2006 to 556,442 in 2010.
'We attribute this phenomenal rise to three main
causes,¨ explains Tareke Berhe, Iormer SAA regional
rice coordinator, now senior rice advisor to the
Ethiopian Agricultural TransIormation Agency, and
a regular guest at the AIricaRice Science Week.
'First, the Ethiopian government`s interest in and
Iull commitment to rice promotion. Second, SAA`s
and other development partners` strong fnancial and
technical support. And third, availability oI a local
market Ior rice due to a value-chain model used Ior
the promotion oI rice as a Iood-security crop.¨
'The Ministry oI Agriculture and Rural Development
(MoARD), and SAA and its agricultural project,
Sasakawa Global 2000/Ethiopia (SG2000/Ethiopia)
started promotion oI rice as a Iood security crop in
2002/03,¨ says Aberra Debelo, country director oI
SG2000/Ethiopia. In 2002, NERICA varieties 17
were taken to Ethiopia Irom Guinea, where they
were proving popular in another SG2000 project.
Other varieties were sourced Irom AIricaRice, the
International Rice Research Institute (IRRI) and
Madagascar. In 2003, the Ethiopian Institute oI
Agricultural Research (EIAR), JICA and the United
Nations Development Programme (UNDP) established
rice varietal trials at 15 locations in the country.
By 2006, fve varieties had been released Ior cultiva tion
in the rainIed uplands across the country, including
NERICA 1, 2, 3 and 4, and three varieties Ior irrigated
production in Somali Region, including BG 90-2 (a
variety promoted by AIricaRice and released in 12 West
AIrican countries). However, Ethiopian Iarmers have
been innovative in their use oI the available varieties.
'We released rainIed NERICA and irrigated varieties
in the same area,¨ says Tareke. 'However, even though
the irrigated varieties yield 78 tonnes per hectare,
they mature later and consume more water. More
water means higher Iees to pay. ThereIore, Iarmers
preIer to grow the upland NERICA varieties because
they can get good yields with less water.¨ The Iarmers
concerned grow NERICA 14 and 6 and FOFIFA 3737
(Irom Madagascar) under aerobic conditions
fooding the beds or Iurrows once every 45 days,
and not keeping the plants under water Ior any length oI
time. Using this method, Iarmers are achieving yields oI
57 t/ha Irom these upland` varieties!
Ethiopia's rice production boom
Laay rice farmer in her fiela of NERICA 4, Dansha, Tigray (2009)
E
thiopia is not (yet) an AfricaRice member state, but with NERICA varieties, government commitment
ana the backing of the Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA) ana Sasakawa Africa
Association (SAA), its rice proauction has expanaea ana skyrocketea over the last 6 years.
0
500,000
1,000,000
1,500,000
2,000,000
2,500,000
3,000,000
3,500,000
4,000,000
2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019
Area (ha, actual)
Paddy production (t, actual)
Area (ha, projected)
Paddy production (t, projected)

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26 AfricaRice AnnuaI Report 2011
Promoting the 'Food Security Crop for
the Third MiIIennium'
'It is said that missionaries discovered wild rice in Gam-
bella and the Fogera area near Lake Tana in the early
1970s,¨ notes Tareke. This led to the frst inIormal`
rice research in these two regions in the late 1970s,
and the identifcation oI promising varieties Ior both
small- and large-scale production. In 1993, the Ministry
oI Agriculture launched a rice research and extension
program in the Fogera plain, using varieties Irom the
International Institute oI Tropical Agriculture (IITA).
In 2002, interest in rice was revived by SG2000/
Ethiopia in Amhara Region, with the introduction
oI varieties Irom AIricaRice and IRRI. EIAR also
became interested and encouraged Iour oI its research
centers to conduct rice research. Tareke visited
Ethiopia in 2002 and 2003 at the invitation oI SG2000/
Ethiopia, and then relocated to Addis Ababa in 2005
as regional rice coordinator.
In 2007, rice was launched as a Food Security Crop
Ior the Third Millennium` in Ethiopia and a National
Rice Promotion Committee was Iormed.
'The rapid expansion oI rice cultivation and mush-
rooming oI production is attributed to a number oI
Iactors,¨ says SG2000/Ethiopia rice agronomist Zewdie
Gebretsadik. 'Over 1600 Iarmers and extension
feld staII were trained on rice production packages
and more than 225 on rice post-harvest, processing
and utilization; while over 18 rice mills (capacity 1
tonne per hour) and 8 threshers were also diIIused.¨
In addition, more than 10 privately owned rice mills
became operational at Worreta in South Gondar and
GuraIerda in Illubabora.
The rice promotion strategies adopted in the country
included:
· Introduction and evaluation oI the best available
high-yielding varieties
· Ongoing support by the Ethiopian Seed Enterprise
to maintain and promote quality seed Rice utili:ation training in Mai Tsemri, Tigray (2009)
· Promotion and dissemination oI productivity-
enhancing agricultural inputs (seed and Iertilizer)
and postharvest technologies (rice threshers and
rice mills)
· Enhancement oI the market value oI rice by
intensive training on grain quality improvement
and using recipes Ior preparing rice in traditional
Ethiopian dishes
· Communicating rice knowledge to politicians,
proIessionals, Iarmers and the general public.
'By 2010, rice was growing in practically the whole
country,¨ says Tareke. 'And the process is by no
means over.¨
In 2010, Ethiopia became a member oI the Coalition
Ior AIrican Rice Development (CARD), which helped
it to refne its National Rice Research and Development
Strategy Ior the period 20102019, with technical
support Irom AIricaRice. The strategy projects conti-
nued growth in both rice area and production to over
three-quarters oI a million hectares and almost 4 million
tonnes. 'The scope Ior Ethiopian rice is huge,¨ says
Tareke, 'with vast tracts oI land suitable Ior upland and
lowland rice production, with or without water control.¨
Tareke`s 'vast tracts¨ are estimated at 5.4 million
hectares, almost seven times the area projected Ior 2019.
'Ethiopia is on target to become the third or Iourth
largest rice producer in AIrica,¨ says Aliou Diagne,
AIricaRice policy, impact assessment and innovation
systems program leader, 'behind Madagascar and
Nigeria, and just about on a par with Mali.¨
27 AfricaRice AnnuaI Report 2011
0
200
400
600
800
1000
1200
1400
2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011

8
6

W
K
R
X
V
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Donor profiIe - Canada
Canaaian funaing to AfricaRice, 20012011
Perhaps the frst obvious diIIerence is a switch Irom
collaborations and Iunding primarily channeled
through the International Development Research
Centre (IDRC) in the 1990s, to all Iunding and linkages
being channeled through the Canadian International
Development Agency (CIDA) in the 2000s. Three
projects were completed during the last decade and a
new one came online in 2011.
The Canada Fund for Africa, 2003-2007
A Seeds Ior LiIe` Project was launched, with Iunds
Irom the Canada Fund Ior AIrica (CFA), in August 2003
to restore Iarmers` livelihoods in war-aIIected western
Côte d`Ivoire and to help reduce the severe Iood and
seed shortage in the region. Seeds oI NERICA and other
improved rice varieties adapted to the specifc ecologies
oI the region were bought Irom Iarmers and distributed
in the war-devastated zone through UN agencies and
NGOs. Meanwhile, public awareness oI the plight oI rice
Iarmers and the importance oI restoring rice Iarming
as a means oI income generation Ior the rural poor was
raised through the media (both international and local).
In 20042006 in post-confict Sierra Leone, CFA
Iunds enabled seed oI both upland and lowland
NERICA varieties to be multiplied in the dry seasons
and Iarmers to grow these short-duration varieties in
order to reduce the hungry season`. Meanwhile, an
impact study demonstrated the value oI various upland
NERICA varieties, which covered 51,000 ha in Guinea
in 2003, aIter the major NERICA drive` there around
the turn oI the millennium.
With support Irom CFA and the EU, the East and
Central AIrica Rice Research Network (ECARRN)
was established in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, in
January 2005. The ECARRN Coordinator was also
appointed in January 2005 and a steering committee
inaugurated.
CFA Iunds were used to hold a regional rice-policy
and Iood-security workshop in Cotonou in November
2005, attended by 80 participants Irom 20 countries,
at which regional research and development priority
areas Ior promoting rice-policy impact in sub-Saharan
AIrica were identifed.
The spin-oIIs Irom the AIricaRiceCFA collaborations
were huge in terms oI the Center`s then expanding
presence and activities in East and Southern AIrica,
revitalizing stakeholder participation in AIricaRice
priority-setting exercises, leveraging other Iunds, and
in other ways.
Systemwide Initiative on HIV/AIDS and
AgricuIture (SWIHA)
The Iunding that enabled reactivation oI SWIHA
(initially launched in 2001) came Irom CFA through
CIDA. The Iunds enabled AIricaRice to recruit a new
coordinator in 2004, recommencement oI activities
in West and Central AIrica, and expansion into other
parts oI the continent. CFA Iunds were again used to
C
anaaa has been a faithful supporter of AfricaRice for over 20 years. In 2011, the countys total giving
to the Center increasea to its highest ever level. This is not the hrst time that Canaaa has been given
a high prohle in the pages of the AfricaRice annual report. back in 2000, we reportea on profects ana
collaborations over the previous aecaae. So, how has the relationship evolvea over the last 11 years?
28 AfricaRice AnnuaI Report 2011
enable AIricaRice/SWIHA to host the 2005 conIerence
on HIV/AIDS and Agriculture: Implications Ior Food
Security in West and Central AIrica`. CFA then Iunded
research into the impact oI HIV and AIDS on rural
livelihoods in Benin and Ghana in 2007, and the
impact oI rural non-Iarm (sugarcane agro-industrial)
activities on the lives oI those vulnerable to HIV and
AIDS in Benin.
Postharvest issues and consumer
acceptabiIity
In 2008, AIricaRice began a 3-year collaborative
project with McGill University, Montreal, to look
at postharvest operations, processing and consumer
acceptability challenges associated with NERICA and
other improved varieties. The project was Iunded by
CIDA through the CGIARCanada Linkage Fund.
Through a range oI activities, the project looked
at consumer preIerences in relation to rice grain
quality, and improving rice parboiling. Fieldwork was
conducted in Benin and Nigeria.
The main technological outcomes oI the project
were improved parboiling equipment namely an
improved stove, a modifed parboiler, and the use oI
briquettes made oI rice husk, turning a waste product
into an energy source. The project also generated
inIormation and insights that are infuencing ongoing
postharvest research. Seven students beneftted Irom
the parboiler work in pursuit oI their bachelor`s,
engineer, master`s or doctoral degrees, three Irom the
University oI Abomey-Calavi, Benin, and Iour Irom
McGill University. Last, but not least, the project
helped develop institutional linkages among the
project partners, comprising international researchers,
universities, national research programs, national
and NGO extension agencies, processors and Iarmer
organizations.
The 'big one'
In mid-2011, CIDA and AIricaRice launched a new
5-year CA$ 9.3 million (US$ 7 million) project Support
to Rice Research in AIrica` on Iood security in AIrica
with a Iocus on postharvest handling, marketing and
developing new rice-based products, Ior which CIDA
is contributing CA$ 7 million (US$ 5.27 million).
The project involves eight AIricaRice member states,
namely Cameroon, Gambia, Ghana, Mali, Nigeria,
Senegal, Sierra Leone and Uganda. Once again, the
principal Canadian partner is McGill University.
'Improving Iood security through postharvest
improvements is a wide feld,¨ declares initial project
coordinator Olupomi Ajayi, 'and this is a big, multi-
Iaceted project. It covers everything Irom harvest to
plate, and even an element oI varietal selection. It also
covers policy and training activities.¨
Despite the best eIIorts oI AIricaRice and partners,
local rice is still not competitive against imported
rice in many urban centers in AIrica why? The
premise behind many oI the project`s planned activities
is that those who handle rice, Irom Iarmers through
processors to marketers, don`t know the best practices
Ior achieving high-quality grain and don`t have the
best equipment to do so. 'We aim to rectiIy this
situation by introducing new and improved harvesting
and postharvest practices and equipment throughout
the value chain,¨ says Ajayi. 'For example, Ior the
Iarmers we can start with the mini-combine that has
been undergoing testing Ior the last 2 years, but we
also want to look at threshers, driers and cleaners that
are aIIordable Ior Iarmers and processors machines
that are made and maintained locally.¨
The project also hopes to identiIy and adapt milling
machines that will improve the separation oI husk and
bran. By maximizing the yields oI both white rice and
by-products, the project will be able to build on the
success oI the earlier AIricaRiceMcGill University
collaboration in reusing waste products (bran and
husk) as a source oI Iuel.
Identifed good practices will be tested in the new
rice sector development hubs` that Iorm a major
component oI the Center`s new strategic plan. 'The
29 AfricaRice AnnuaI Report 2011
development hubs will be the testing grounds Ior the
new technologies,¨ says Ajayi, 'and then NGOs will
help us out-scale those that are promising Ior wider
use.¨
On the research side, the project will enable screening
oI Ory:a glaberrima germplasm Ior the constituents
that make a cereal grain slow-digesting a useIul
weapon in the armory Ior helping those with Type
II diabetes. The project will also look at using low-
value broken rice as the basis oI a breakIast cereal
Iortifed` with protein-rich groundnut or soybean Ior
undernourished babies and children.
The project will Ieed into AIricaRice`s ongoing eIIorts
to harmonize rice policy across the region: policy
needs to be established on the basis oI evidence,
and the evidence will be Ied through to the regional
economic communities.
A fnal aspect oI the project is capacity building.
Training will be provided Ior rice stakeholders
throughout the value chain, Irom Iarmers, through
millers and parboilers, to marketers. There will also
be a drive to train scientists in grain quality analysis.
There is an opportunity Ior the graduate students at
McGill to continue their education beyond the master`s
level. A PhD program is being developed and graduate
students Irom McGill University could pursue
doctorates in the development and improvement oI
appropriate machinery, such as a machine to compact
husk into briquettes Ior use as Iuel.
'A good project needs to be fexible,¨ says Ajayi, 'and
this is our hope Ior this one over the coming years.
The technologies identifed and adapted, or developed
Irom scratch, need to be those that people are looking
Ior. Ultimately, the development oI new technologies
needs to be demand driven.¨
Staff and Board members
Adrian Q. Labor was the Center`s inIormation and
communications technology (ICT) manager, Irom
1999 to 2001 a position Iunded by IDRC. Michel
P. Dubé joined the Center in 2001 as director oI
administration and fnance (DAF), seeing us through
the Ivorian crisis in 20022003, but departed in 2004
beIore the relocation to Cotonou. Sarah M. Fernandes
joined AIricaRice in November 2011 as InIormation
and Knowledge Management OIfcer.
Since the mid-1990s, two Canadians have served on
the Center`s Board oI Trustees. First, Diana McLean
until 2001, and then Gaston Grenier Irom 2003/04 to
2009/10 (who was chairman Ior some oI his tenure).
'Canada and AIricaRice have built a strong and
IruitIul partnership over many years and through
CIDA, Canada has been one oI AIricaRice`s strongest
allies in the Iight against hunger and poverty in
AIrica,¨ concludes AIricaRice Director General Papa
Abdoulaye Seck.
Members of a local womens association celebrating their work
with the new CIDA profect at the Sierra Leone Agricultural
Research Institute (SLARI) by aancing arouna a pile of recently
harvestea NERICA paaay
30 AfricaRice AnnuaI Report 2011
Mechanical threshing is far more efficient than aoing it manually, ana is promotea by the new Support to Rice Research in Africa
profect funaea by CIDA
31 AfricaRice AnnuaI Report 2011
Major events
January
New Sahelian rice varieties bred by AfricaRice and
its partners released in Mali and Senegal
Three varieties developed through collaboration
between the AIricaRice Sahel Station and the Institute
d`Economie Rurale (IER) Mali have been released
in Diré in the Tombouctou Region oI Mali. WAS
62 (WAS 62-B-B-14-1-4-2), WAS 49 (WAS 49-B-
B-9-1-4-3) and WAS 197 (WAS 197-B-6-3-11) were
selected through the participatory varietal selection
(PVS) approach.
The varieties were released at a ceremony held on
6 January, attended by 40 participants Irom various
stakeholder organizations, including government
oIfcials, Iarmers, rice Iarmers` associations, chambers
oI agriculture, extension oIfcers, scientists, local and
international media representatives.
Local names were selected on the basis oI comments
oI the Iarmers who conducted the PVS trials: WAS
62 ÷ Sutura (meaning quietude); WAS 49 ÷ Saku
(satisIaction); and WAS 197 ÷ Wapmo (WAAPP rice).
The latter (an aromatic rice) was released in Senegal
in 2009 with the name Sahel 177.
The ceremony was organized jointly by the Regional
Agricultural Research Center (CRRA) in Gao and
the West AIrica Agricultural Productivity Program`s
(WAAPP) National Rice Center (CNS-Riz). The
ceremony was opened by Barema Diallo, who was
representing the regional governor.
Harvest ñeld day in Liberia
A harvest feld day was held in Saclepea, Nimba
County, Liberia on 22 January to harvest rice planted
under the SouthSouth Cooperation Project Iunded
by the United Nations Development Programme
(UNDP). The feld day was attended by Dr Sizi Subah
(Deputy Minister), Paul Jallah (Assistant Minister),
the City Mayor oI Saclepea, all the SouthSouth
Cooperation Project Iarmer groups Irom Nimba,
the Marketing Association oI Nimba, the youth
group and other interested Iarmers. Also present
were Nimba county traditional harvesters, singers
and dancers.
The project was implemented in three counties
Montserado, Bong and Nimba by the Central
Agricultural Research Institute (CARI) with back-
stopping by AIricaRice through the AIrican Rice
Initiative (ARI). The total area oI rice planted in the
three Counties in 2010 was 40 ha.
The day`s harvest covered 10 ha and the estimated
yields were 4 tonnes Irom 2 ha oI variety Suakoko-8
(2 t/ha) and 20 tonnes Irom 5 ha oI NERICA-L-19
(i.e. 4 t/ha). The project was so successIul that many
Iarmers were eager to join as benefciaries in 2011.
CAADP Pillar 4 Workshop
AIricaRice contributed to the discussion on the
implications oI CGIAR reIorm Ior investment in
research Ior development in AIrica at the workshop
Investing in a knowledge and inIormation base Ior
AIrican agriculture: A workshop Ior CAADP Pillar
4 institutions and development partners to discuss
mobilization and harmonization oI support Ior
Pillar 4 initiatives`, held in Zurich, Switzerland Irom
31 January to 4 February.
The workshop was attended by over 80 participants
representing the Comprehensive AIrica Agriculture
Development Programme (CAADP) Pil lar 4
institutions, CAADP institutions supporting other
pillars, organizations supporting agricultural research
at global and AIrica levels, the AIrican Union
Commission (AUC) and 11 development partners.
Participants recommended stronger links among
research, development partners, advisory services
and higher education in agriculture in the context oI
Pillar 4.
32 AfricaRice AnnuaI Report 2011
February
Regional committee for seed production, Senegal
A meeting oI the regional committee Ior seed
production took place at the oIfces oI the Direction
régionale du développement rural (DRDR) in Saint-
Louis, Senegal on 2 February. The meeting discussed
seed multiplication oI the three aromatic rice varieties
released in Senegal in 2009 (Sahel 177, Sahel 328,
Sahel 239). Three certifed seed producers are involved
with the program.
RISOCAS end-of-project workshop
The international conIerence on Crop Improvement,
Ideotyping and Modelling Ior AIrican Cropping
Systems under Climate Change (CIMAC) was held,
79 February, at the University oI Hohenheim,
Stuttgart, Germany, to mark the end oI the project
on Rice and sorghum crop adaptation strategies
Ior climate change in AIrica` (RISOCAS). The
project partners were the University oI Hohenheim
(project leader), AIricaRice, Centre de coopération
internationale en recherche agronomique pour le
développement (CIRAD) and national partners Irom
Madagascar, Mali and Senegal.
The aim oI the RISOCAS project was to develop coping
strategies Ior adaptation oI sorghum, upland rice and
irrigated rice to changing climatic conditions, along
with tools and methodologies to enable stakeholders
to develop such strategies Iurther, or to apply them to
other crops or environments. The potential users oI
the methodologies and tools are national research and
extension programs, agro-meteorological Iorecasting
and early-warning services.
Workshop on knowledge management
A workshop on knowledge management was held,
1518 February, in Cotonou, Benin, on the knowledge-
sharing tools promoted and supported by the CGIAR
InIormation and communications technology (ICT)
Knowledge Management (KM) program. A seminar
on How knowledge management and sharing can
help research` was organized as part oI this workshop.
March
Syngenta project planning
Two researchers Irom Sahel Station met with a
team Irom the Syngenta Foundation Ior Sustainable
Agriculture Irom 28 February to 5 March, visiting
the main station at Ndiaye, plus research sites at Ross
Bethio, Richard Toll and Gaya in northern Senegal.
The project-planning workshop Ior Senegal was then
held on 29 and 30 March.
GSR Mid-Term Review
The Green Super Rice (GSR) project underwent its
mid-term review in March. The review team included
scientists Irom the Chinese Academy oI Agricultural
Sciences (CAAS) and the International Rice Research
Institute (IRRI), and started its tour by visiting sites
in Mozambique and Mali Irom 1 to 7 March. On
1012 March, AIricaRice hybrid-rice breeder RaaIat
El-Namaky led visits to GSR project sites in Senegal
and the review team held discussions with breeders
at the Sahel Station. The sites visited included the
Sahel Station itselI, Institut sénégalais de recherches
agricoles (ISRA) Saint-Louis oIfce and a Iarmer`s
feld in Ross Bethio, where promising hybrid-rice
breeding lines are being evaluated in comparison
with local checks.
Board approves AfricaRice lead role in GRiSP in
Africa
At its 2011 meeting, held in Saint-Louis, Senegal,
710 March, the Center`s Board oI Trustees endorsed
33 AfricaRice AnnuaI Report 2011
AIricaRice`s lead role Ior the continent in the recently
launched Global Rice Science Partnership (GRiSP)
that aims to contribute to signifcantly lowering rice
prices and reducing global poverty by more than 10°.
The Board expressed keen interest in the Center`s new
research thrusts, including the development oI a new
generation oI climate-resilient rice technologies and
innovative approaches, such as the market-oriented
value-chain approach being adopted.
BeIore concluding the meeting, the Board also
approved the working budget Ior 2011 and took key
decisions on Board membership. Peter Matlon was
elected as the new Board Chairman.
2011 Carsky Award
At the 2011 Board Meeting, the 2011 Carsky Award
was presented on 10 March to AIricaRice senior
scientist Yacouba Séré Ior his liIetime achievement
in research on rice diseases and to Ms Maimouna
Ndour, research assistant, Ior her contribution to rice
value-chain work.
The annual award, which was instituted by AIricaRice
in honor oI the late Dr Robert Carsky, is conIerred on
the most outstanding Internationally Recruited StaII
(IRS) and the most outstanding General Support StaII
(GSS), who have demonstrated high standards oI
excellence and made exceptional contributions to rice
research and training and research support.
1IRCAS visit
Three scientists Irom the Japan International Research
Center Ior Agricultural Sciences (JIRCAS) visited
the Sahel Station with AIricaRice program leader
Ior Genetic Diversity and Improvement, Takashi
Kumashiro, on 2122 March to discuss areas oI
collaboration marker-assisted selection (MAS)
Ior shattering, blast and cold tolerance, and capacity-
building involving scientiIic exchange visits, and
including AIricaRice Sahel breeding research assistants.
ApriI
STRASA II launched
The second phase oI the ambitious Stress Tolerant Rice
Ior Poor Farmers in AIrica and South Asia (STRASA)
project was launched at workshops in New Delhi,
India (58 April) and Dhaka, Bangladesh (812 April).
The New Delhi workshop was Iollowed by a project
coordinators` meeting. Both workshops included a
presentation oI the achievements oI STRASA phase I
in AIrica.
Second International Dakar Agricultural Forum
At the Second AIricaRice Dakar International Agri-
culture Forum (1819 April), the Director General
2011 Dr Robert J. Carsky Awara presentea to Yacouba Sere
in recognition of his outstanaing service ana contribution to
AfricaRice
34 AfricaRice AnnuaI Report 2011
presented strategic inputs to the discussion on the
role oI agricultural innovation in the context oI
Iood security, and AIricaRice scientists participated
in a debate on global agricultural regulations and
governance in the context oI the high and volatile
agricultural commodity prices oI 20072008 and
20102011.
The event was organized in Dakar under the aegis
oI the President oI Senegal in collaboration with the
French Movement Ior a World Agricultural Organi-
zation (MOMAGRI). Participants included heads oI
state, vice presidents, prime ministers and agricultural
ministers Irom 40 countries, and representatives
Irom the donor community, R&D organizations and
Iarmers` associations.
The main purpose oI this high-level meeting was to
discuss issues relating to the Iollowing questions:
· Under which principles can we regulate agricultural
markets to prevent Iood crises and avoid repeated
agricultural crises?
· What instruments and international cooperation
should be put to use to improve Iood security and
fght poverty?
AIricaRice proposed that as part oI the drive Ior
Iood security Ior their populations developing
countries should strive to produce at least 80° oI
their basic IoodstuIIs. Developing countries should
also develop more integrated regional markets that
encompass neighboring countries and should consider
regional instead oI national selI-suIfciency as a goal
Ior many oI the key Iood staples, to make the costs oI
Iood imports more manageable, even when there are
price shocks.
The recommendations oI the Second Dakar Forum
included the Iollowing:
· Consideration oI agriculture and Iood as global
public goods
· Better regulation oI agricultural markets, parti-
cularly through the establishment oI a central
pricing regime, with fuctuation margins Ior major
agricultural commodities
· Establishment oI international and sub-regional
Iood reserves or buIIer stocks.
These recommendations were shared with the Econo-
mic Community oI West AIrican States (ECOWAS),
the AIrican Union, and G20 Finance Ministers and
Central Bank Governors.
The Presidents oI Senegal and Sierra Leone, together
with the Prime Minister oI Senegal, visited the
AIricaRice booth at the Forum and interacted with
the Director General.
The CGIAR-Canada Linkage Fund end-of-project
workshop
At the end oI a 3-year project Improving rice proces-
sing strategies Ior Iood security in West AIrica`, a
workshop was held on 26 April, in Cotonou. The
project was carried out in Benin and Nigeria jointly
with the McGill University, Montreal with support
Irom Canadian International Development Agency
(CIDA) through the CGIARCanada Linkage Fund
AfricaRice Director General Papa A. Seck (right) ana Regional
Representative, Senegal B. Jincent Baao aiscussing with Sene-
galese agriculture minister Khaaim Guèye (center) at the Secona
International Dakar Agricultural Forum
35 AfricaRice AnnuaI Report 2011
(CCLF). It Iocused on postharvest operations,
processing and consumer acceptability issues relating
to rice. At the workshop, the project partners reviewed
the activities and results oI the project and explored
the prospects Ior Iuture research.
Agricultural experts push for a strong seed sector
in West Africa
Underlining that seed security is a prerequisite Ior
achieving Iood security, the Food and Agriculture
Organization oI the United Nations (FAO) and
AIricaRice convened a Regional workshop on seed
policy in West AIrica` in Cotonou on 5 and 6 May. The
workshop was inaugurated by HE Michel Sogbossi,
Minister oI Agriculture, Livestock and Fisheries,
Benin.
The workshop was attended by decision-makers Irom
11 West AIrican countries and Irom Madagascar.
Representatives Irom ECOWAS, the West AIrican
Economic and Monetary Union (UEMOA), West and
Central AIrican Council Ior Agricultural Research
and Development (CORAF/WECARD), International
Fund Ior Agricultural Development (IFAD), AIrican
Development Bank (AIDB), Alliance Ior a Green
Revolution in AIrica (AGRA), IFDC, AIrican Seed
Trade Association (AFSTA) and AIrican Seed
Network (ASN) also took part.
The agricultural experts who participated in the
workshop urged decision-makers to support the
sustainable growth and development oI the West
AIrican seed sector, particularly Ior Iood-security
crops, such as rice, millet, sorghum, cowpea and
maize.
The workshop stressed the need to Iormulate, adopt
and implement coherent strategies and policies at
regional and national levels Ior the rapid development
oI viable seed enterprises, which would help increase
the steady supply oI quality seed to millions oI
smallholder Iarmers in West AIrica.
Key recommendations targeted to specifc stakeholder
groups were made by the participants to enable a
sustainable seed production and distribution eIIort in
the sub-regions, including the needs to:
· Develop improved varieties and ensure their rapid
delivery through eIIective seed systems
· Develop national action plans to support the
sustainable development oI seed industries
· Strengthen partnerships between the public and
private sectors on seed-related issues, with clear
delineation oI their respective roles
· Develop the capacity oI the Iormal and inIormal
seed sectors
Senior officer with FAOs Agriculture ana Consumer Protection
Department Robert G. Guei aaaresses aelegates at the Regional
workshop on seea policy in West Africa
36 AfricaRice AnnuaI Report 2011
· Integrate a value-chain approach in seed policies
· Develop regulatory Irameworks Ior rapid and
sustainable growth oI the seed industry
· Ensure the participation oI the whole range oI actors
in the Iormulation oI seed policies.
May
Second phase of the Africa component of STRASA
launched
The AIrica component oI the STRASA project Phase 2
was launched at AIricaRice in Cotonou, on 910 May,
with nearly 50 participants attending. These included
AIricaRice and IRRI scientists as well as project
partners Irom national programs, seed producers and
NGOs Irom 18 AIrican countries.
The achievements oI Phase 1 were reviewed and
work plans Ior 2011 were presented. The program
also included presentations and discussions on the
Green Super Rice project, a new consolidated PVS
protocol, and current seed systems and varietal release
procedures oI STRASA project countries.
Côte d`Ivoire President`s Inauguration Ceremony
In view oI AIricaRice`s historical ties with Côte
d`Ivoire, which is its permanent headquarters,
the Director General and the AIricaRice Country
Representative were invited by the Ministry oI
Scientifc Research and Technology to the inauguration
ceremony oI the new President in Yamoussoukro on
21 May.
The ceremony was attended by more than 20 heads oI
state, representatives Irom many other countries, UN
agencies and other international institutions.
AIter the ceremony, the Director General met with
the AIricaRice Board member Yo Tiemoko (Director
General oI the Cent re National de Recherche
Agronomique, CNRA, Côte d`Ivoire), the Director oI
the Cabinet oI the Ministry oI Science and Technology
and the Adviser to the Minister oI Education in Côte
d`Ivoire to discuss issues related to the Center`s
return to its headquarters, security concerns and
the assistance needed Irom the Government oI Côte
d`Ivoire.
The delegation also took the opportunity to visit
the AIricaRice headquarters in Bouaké, where the
Iacilities are well maintained and there is no damage
to property.
Africa Rice Breeding Task Force annual meeting
The annual meeting oI the AIrica Rice Breeding Task
Force was held, 1213 May, in Cotonou to review
progress made in the frst year and discuss plans
Ior 2011. The Breeding Task Force was launched
in June 2010 to regroup scarce human resources
devoted to rice breeding in AIrica and help build a
new generation oI rice breeders across the continent.
AfricaRice Grain Quality Specialist John Manful shows parti-
cipants the AfricaRice Grain Quality Lab auring the launch of
STRASA II
37 AfricaRice AnnuaI Report 2011
It adopts a systematic collaborative approach to rice
breeding that will build much-needed rice breeding
capacity, Iacilitate access oI AIrican rice breeders to
new materials, stimulate rice germplasm evaluation
across the continent and, in general, shorten the time
needed to deploy new climate-resilient and stress-
tolerant rice varieties Ior major production systems in
sub-Saharan AIrica (see Feature The new AIrica-wide
Rice Breeding Task Force`, page 7).
Postharvest and policy project launching workshop
From 31 May to 2 June, AIricaRice launched its
new project on Iood security in AIrica to enhance
the quality and marketability oI locally produced
rice through improved harvest and postharvest
technologies, which is Iunded by CIDA. (For details
see Donor profle Canada` on page 27.)
June
Africa`s rice stakeholders root for mechanization
During 68 June, AIricaRice hosted an international
workshop on Boosting agricultural mechanization
in rice-based systems in sub-Saharan AIrica` at its
Sahel Station in northern Senegal. (See Research in
brieI: Promoting small-scale mechanization across
the continent as the essential ingredient Ior rice
intensifcation` on page 19 Ior details.)
Measuring and assessing the impacts of crop
genetic improvement in Africa
Objective 3 oI the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation-
Iunded project DiIIusion and Impact oI Improved
Varieties in AIrica` was launched, on 1415 June, in
Cotonou. Objective 3 Iocuses on the assessment oI the
diIIusion and adoption oI improved pearl millet, rice
and sorghum varieties and their impact on poverty,
Iood security and selected Iactor productivity (land,
labor and Iertilizer) in Nigeria and Tanzania.
AIricaRice is responsible Ior rice in Nigeria, IRRI
is responsible Ior rice in Tanzania, and International
Crops Research Institute Ior the Semi-Arid Tropics
(ICRISAT) is responsible Ior pearl millet and sorghum
in Nigeria. The Department oI Economics oI the
School oI Oriental and AIrican Studies (University oI
London, UL-SOAS) Iocuses on analyses and syntheses
across commodities and countries.
Field Day in the Senegal River middle valley
On 23 June, the Sahel Station held a Field Day at its
research Iarm in Fanaye, northern Senegal, welcoming
60 participants Irom Iarmers` associations, ISRA,
Société d`Aménagement et d`Exploitation des terres
du Delta et des vallées du feuve Sénégal et de la
Faléme (SAED), Centre National de Recherche Agro-
nomique et de Développement Agricole (CNRADA,
Mauritania), the University oI Thies, Université
Gaston Berger, NGOs and private seed companies. On
show were AIricaRice`s breeding and agronomy trials.
AFROweeds project workshop
The annual workshop oI the AFROweeds project was
held, 2730 June in Cotonou to discuss with project
Participants at the Postharvest ana policy profect launching
workshop on a guiaea tour of the AfricaRice genebank ana
other facilities
38 AfricaRice AnnuaI Report 2011
partners the progress made and Iuture activities. It was
attended by 23 participants. The AFROweeds project
aims at establishing a viable AIricanEuropean weed
science network, consolidating existing knowledge
on weed management by building a user-Iriendly
web-based platIorm on weeds oI West and East
AIrican lowland rice-cropping systems and enhancing
the exploitation and dissemination oI good weed
management practices in lowland rice-cropping
systems.
It is jointly carried out by CIRAD, France and AIrica-
Rice with support Irom the European Union (EU)
and the countries oI the AIrican, Caribbean and
Pacifc group oI states (ACP) Science and Technology
Program.
JuIy
Field Days in the Senegal River delta
On 14 July, feld days were held at Matam, Podor and
Boundoum, northwest Senegal, including monitoring
and evaluation by Sahel Station staII.
Egyptian-Africa Forum on Seed Industry and
Biotechnology
AIricaRice took an active part in the Egyptian
AIrica Forum on Seed Industry and Agricultural
Biotechnology, presenting its work in both these areas.
The main objectives oI this Forum, held in Alexandria,
Egypt on 2426 July, were to fnd ways to:
· Enhance the seed industry in AIrica
· Increase collaboration both within and between
the seed industry and agricultural biotechnology.
The Forum recognized the current eIIorts oI inter-
national organizations to support the seed industry
and agricultural biotechnology in AIrica.
African Union and AfricaRice sign MoU to promote
Africa`s rice sector
In recognition oI the growing importance oI rice as a
strategic crop Ior Iood security and poverty reduction
in AIrica, the AIrican Union Commission (AUC) and
AIricaRice signed a Memorandum oI Understanding
(MoU) to jointly promote the rice sector in the
continent through research, development, supportive
policies and capacity building.
The MoU Iocuses on three main areas:
· Policy research and analysis
· Promoting production technologies and agricultural
innovation systems
· Provision oI policy communications and Iacilitating
dialogue to inIorm and improve the design and
implementation oI Iood and agricultural policies
in and among the Member States oI the AIrican
Union (AU).
Hailing this collaboration as a 'historic achievement¨,
Dr Papa Abdoulaye Seck, AIricaRice Director General
remarked, 'This will help create the political will to
move AIrica`s rice sector Iorward.¨
The MoU was signed at the AU headquarters in Addis
Ababa, Ethiopia by HE Rhoda Peace Tumusiime, AU
Commissioner Ior Rural Economy and Agriculture,
and by Dr Seck, on behalI oI AIricaRice`s 24 member
states.
The signing ceremony was Iollowed by a technical
meeting to explore areas oI collaboration, including
the development oI a regional value-chain approach
and a common market initiative Ior rice as part oI the
existing partnership between the AU Department oI
Rural Economy and Agriculture (AU-DREA), FAO
and the United Nations Economic Commission Ior
AIrica (UNECA) to develop regional value chains Ior
strategic agricultural commodities.
39 AfricaRice AnnuaI Report 2011
Fourth Africa Rice Outlook
A presentation on Investment in rice production
and expected time Irames oI impact` was made by
AIricaRice at the Fourth AIrica Rice Outlook, 2527
July in Durban, South AIrica. The AIrica Rice Outlook
seeks to bring together the market`s biggest rice
buyers, sellers and traders.
The objectives oI the Fourth AIrica Rice Outlook
were to:
· Examine AIrica`s rising consumption trends and
demand requirements
· Assess AIrican rice production and its impact on
global trade
· IdentiIy new rice import markets in Southern, East
and West AIrica
· Manage volatility by examining the impact oI
Ireight rates on the price oI rice
· Capitalize on the growing demand Ior NERICA
varieties
· Review grain-market interlinkages and the impact
on AIrica`s rice industry.
AIricaRice recommendations relating to some oI these
issues include:
· Emphasis on a value-chain approach
· Establish seed legislation to encourage involvement
oI the private sector in seed supply and trade
· Reduce tax on importation oI small-scale Iarm and
processing equipment to increase labor eIfciency
and grain quality
· Reduce Iertilizer prices (Iertilizers sold in AIrica
are at least double the price they sell Ior in Asia and
Europe, and sometimes up to six times the price)
· Improve research and extension capacity in
processing and marketing
· Increase the share oI the irrigated and rainIed
lowland agro-ecosystems in AIrican rice production
and scale up the use oI high-yielding varieties (e.g.
NERICA varieties).
August
Burkina Faso ambassador visits Sahel Station
The Ambassador oI Burkina Faso to Senegal, HE
Hippolyte Ouédrago, visited the Sahel Station on 8
August, where he had a long discussion with station
scientists. He was particularly impressed by the
quality oI the station`s inIrastructure in Saint-Louis.
He also visited the construction oI the new training
center, which will be a major asset to the Center in
strengthening national expertise throughout the rice
value chain.
Mitigating climate change impact on rice disease
resistance in East Africa
Two training workshops were held at AIricaRice, Dar
es Salaam, Tanzania the frst one, 1518 August,
covered rice pathology and simulation modeling
techniques and the second workshop, 1927 August,
Iocused on rice disease isolation and purifcation
techniques.
These courses were conducted as part oI the project
Mitigating the impact oI climate change on rice
disease resistance in East AIrica`, which is being
carried out by AIricaRice in partnership with the
University oI Göttingen, IRRI and national partners
in Rwanda, Tanzania and Uganda, with support Irom
German development cooperation.
The project addresses the urgent demand Ior climate-
prooI disease-resistant rice varieties and helps adapt
crop management practices to climate change.
40 AfricaRice AnnuaI Report 2011
Gender Task Force launched
In the wake oI the AIrica-wide Rice Breeding Task
Force established in 2010 (see Feature The new AIrica-
wide Rice Breeding Task Force` on page 7 Ior details),
the AIrica Rice Gender Task Force was launched in
Cotonou on 1618 August. The Task Force will ensure
an eIIective gender mainstreaming in rice research-
Ior-development and capacity-building activities in
order to deliver gender-Iriendly technologies that can
improve the quality and competitiveness oI locally
produced rice. More opportunities will be targeted
to promising young women scientists to pursue their
careers in rice science (visiting scientists, visiting
Iellows, MSc and PhD scholarships).
September
AfricaRice Science Week and GRiSP-Africa
Science Forum
GRiSP aims to mobilize the very best oI the world`s
rice science and involve the widest possible range
oI stakeholders in the technology generation and
dissemination process to address, among others,
AIrica`s major rice-development challenges.
The GRiSP-AIrica Science Forum, held at AIricaRice`s
temporary headquarters in Cotonou, Irom 12 to 16
September, was attended by over 100 international and
national rice experts, including representatives oI all
the key partners. Participants reviewed the progress
made by GRiSP in AIrica in 2011, particularly on the
development oI new research products ranging
Irom gene discovery
1
to the mini-combine
2
and policy
brieIs Ior decision-makers grouped under the six
GRiSP themes:
1. Harnessing genetic diversity to chart new produc-
tivity, quality and health horizons
2. Accelerating the development, delivery and
adoption oI improved rice varieties
3. Increasing the productivity, sustainability and
resilience oI rice-based production systems
4. Extracting more value through improved quality,
processing, market systems and new products
5. Technology evaluations, targeting and policy
options Ior enhanced impact
6. Supporting the growth oI the global rice sector.
Laying emphasis on the need Ior pooling intelligence
to better exploit the comparative advantages oI all the
partners to more eIfciently address the constraints
to rice production, AIricaRice Director General
Dr Seck spelled out 10 conditions that are essential Ior
GRiSP to become a successIul program and ensure
a high degree oI satisIaction among rice Iarmers and
consumers throughout the world.
The conditions include the need to respect the diversity
oI partnerships, regional diIIerences and institutional
Delegates getting aown to business at the launch of the Africa
Rice Genaer Task Force
1. See The genes that could beat the 'AIDS oI rice¨` in the GRiSP Annual Report
2011.
2. See Research in brieI: Promoting small-scale mechanization across the continent
as the essential ingredient Ior rice intensifcation` in this report and A mini-combine
Ior sub-Saharan AIrica` in the GRiSP Annual Report 2011.
41 AfricaRice AnnuaI Report 2011
identities in GRiSP, while rejecting hegemonic
thinking`. The conditions also include the need
Ior equitable resource allocation based on the real
requirements oI the various regions; the urgent need
to strengthen the capacity oI AIrican stakeholders; the
signifcant role oI the national partners within GRiSP;
the importance oI continuous dialog with policy-
makers; and the need to avoid bureaucracy, including
excessive evaluation with scientists spending more
time writing reports than doing research.
AIricaRice deputy director general (DDG) and
director oI research Ior development, Marco Wopereis
highlighted the major shiIt in Iocus Irom supply-driven
research, where the emphasis is mainly on increasing
rice production, to more demand- or market-driven
research, where the attention is given to the entire
rice value chain.
Achim Dobermann, IRRI deputy director general Ior
research and GRiSP program director, took an active
part in the GRiSP-AIrica Science Forum, expressing
his satisIaction with the progress made by the AIrica-
based team in 2011, particularly with regard to the new
way oI doing research.
In his capacity as outgoing chairman oI the AIricaRice
National Experts Committee, Babou Jobe (director
general oI the National Agriculture Research Institute,
Gambia) conIirmed '100° support¨ to GRiSP,
particularly its major thrust on strengthening national
capacity. He was pleased to learn that one-third oI the
Global Rice Science Scholarships had gone to AIrican
students in 2011.
28th Ordinary Session of the Council of Ministers
The 28th Ordinary Session oI the AIricaRice Council
oI Ministers (CoM) was held in Banjul chaired by
Gambia, on 22 and 23 September. The opening
message oI the President oI Gambia, delivered by the
Secretary General, recognized that AIricaRice has
been relentless in its advocacy Ior support to the rice
sector in sub-Saharan AIrica.
Recognizing that international public goods, such as
improved varieties, crop management options and
evidence-based policy recommendations, generated
by AIricaRice and its partners have contributed
signifcantly to boosting the rice sector in sub-Saharan
AIrica, the CoM encouraged non-member countries
in AIrica that are benefting Irom these goods to join
the Association.
3
The Council gave its Iull support to GRiSP, approved
the Center`s new Strategic Plan Ior 20112020
(see Boosting AIrica`s rice sector: A research Ior
development strategy 20112020` on page 4), and
asked the Center to develop an operational plan as
soon as possible to be implemented in collaboration The top table at AfricaRice Science Week ana GRiSP-Africa
Science Forum (left to right). Papa A. Seck (AfricaRice Director
General), Babou Jobe (Director General, National Agriculture
Research Institute, Gambia), Davia Aroaokoun (Director
General, Institut National ae Recherches Agricoles au Benin,
Benin), Achim Dobermann (GRiSP Director ana Deputy Director
General for Research, International Rice Research Institute)
3. AIrica Rice Center was established as the West AIrica Rice Development
Association in 1971, and the inter-governmental Association remains at the heart
oI the Center, a Ieature that distinguishes AIricaRice Irom all other CGIAR centers.
42 AfricaRice AnnuaI Report 2011
with national partners. AIter reviewing the research
and development activities oI the Center over the
previous 5 years, the Council commended the eIIorts
oI the Director General and staII.
At the end oI the Session, the Council made 10 key
resolutions and approved Chad`s assumption as Chair
oI the Council Ior the next 2 years.
AfricaRice 40th anniversary celebration
To coincide with the CoM, the Center`s 40th anni-
versary was celebrated in Banjul, Gambia on 24
September, under the theme 40 years oI rice research
at the service oI AIrica`. It was Iitting that the
anniversary was commemorated in Gambia one
oI the Iounding members oI the Association and one
oI the main supporters oI local rice on the continent.
AIricaRice`s celebration was inaugurated by the
Minister oI Trade oI Gambia in the presence oI
the outgoing and incoming CoM chairmen, other
representatives oI the CoM, members oI the diplomatic
corps and donor community, national and international
researchers, development partners, the private sector
and Iarmers` organizations.
At the inauguration, the Iarsightedness oI the
Iounding members oI the Association was praised,
the main achievements oI the Association despite
all the problems it has Iaced over the 40 years were
highlighted, and the dedicated contribution oI past
and present management, staII and partners, including
donors, was grateIully acknowledged.
The second halI oI the program, which was chaired by
the AIricaRice Board Chairman, included a keynote
address on Fostering small-scale rice production
Participants at the 28th Orainary Session of the AfricaRice Council of Ministers, Banful, Gambia
43 AfricaRice AnnuaI Report 2011
Ior Iood`, by Josué Dioné, Director oI Food Security
and Sustainable Development at the United Nations
Economic Commission Ior AIrica (UNECA). In
his address, Dr Dioné emphasized that Iostering
small-scale rice production requires the adoption
oI a regionally coordinated value-chain approach to
investing in technologies, inIrastructure, institutions
and policies.
As part oI the celebration program, Dr Dioné oIfcially
released the AIricaRice book Lessons from the Rice
Crisis. Policies for a fooa secure Africa, which was
published Ior the occasion. The book describes how the
policy research and advocacy conducted by AIricaRice
immediately beIore and during the 2008 rice crisis
were infuential in providing adequate inIormation
and options.
The program also included a panel discussion on
Investments in small-scale rice value chains: Chal-
lenges and opportunities`. The panelists represented
the entire range oI the rice value chains, bringing
attention to the need Ior a holistic approach to the rice
sector, taking into account the needs and priorities oI
all the actors oI the value chain.
Rice policy workshop
A workshop on the Competitiveness oI rice value
chains aIter the rice crisis: Lessons Irom case studies`
was organized, on 2526 September, as a side event
aIter the 40th anniversary celebration in Banjul.
Eighteen participants attended representatives oI
national agricultural research programs and national
statistical services Irom 11 countries, private sector,
the AIrican Union and AIricaRice.
The results presented by the various countries showed
that, in general, local rice production systems are
competitive and they make eIfcient use oI domestic
resources. But, in terms oI incentives, not all the rice
systems beneft Irom protection. There is a need Ior
Iurther research to identiIy the reasons why all the rice
systems are not beneftting Irom protection. In general,
it is the upland rice ecology that seems to have higher
domestic resource cost (DRC), showing that upland
rice systems need more eIfcient technologies to boost
perIormance.
October
GRiSP global forum (7 October) and ñrst meeting
of the GRiSP oversight committee (8 October), Los
Baños, Philippines
AIricaRice DDG Marco Wopereis attended these
meetings on behalI oI AIricaRice and presented an
overview oI results obtained through GRiSP in AIrica
at the GRiSP global Iorum.
Africa Food and Nutrition Security Day
AIricaRice was specially invited by the AUC to
the 2011 commemoration oI the AIrica Food and
Nutrition Security Day (AFNSD) on 31 October,
where the Director General aIfrmed the Center`s Iull
Participants at the 40th Anniversary Celebration of AfricaRice,
Banful, Gambia
44 AfricaRice AnnuaI Report 2011
commitment to the goals oI AFNSD in line with the
MoU recently signed with AUC. The 2011 AFNSD
was organized by the AUC and the New Partnership
Ior AIrica`s Development (NEPAD) and co-hosted by
the Government oI the Federal Democratic Republic
oI Ethiopia.
AFNSD, which was endorsed by the AIrican Heads oI
State and Governments during the 15th AU Summit,
serves as a rallying point Ior intensiIying commitments
at all levels to address the challenges oI Iood and
nutrition insecurity, and malnutrition on the continent.
The event was inaugurated by Dr Jean Ping, AUC
Chairman. In addition to AUC and NEPAD members,
representatives Irom the Agriculture Ministry oI
Ethiopia, the Government oI Malawi, the European
Union, UN agencies, AIricaRice and NGOs attended.
The program included an exhibition oI publications,
posters and multi-media products. A display by
AIricaRice showcased a wide range oI rice-based
Iood products.
November
Launch of Africa Rice Agronomy Task Force and
Rice Processing and Value Addition Task Force
The Rice Agronomy and Rice Processing and Value
Addition Task Forces were launched at AIricaRice
temporary headquarters in Cotonou, 1518 November.
The launch workshop was attended by participants
Irom 14 AIrican countries. Issues relating to mechani-
zation are dealt within these two Task Forces.
By end 2011, all oI the Task Forces proposed in the
Strategic Plan had become operational, with the
exception oI the Mechanization Task Force, which
is expected to become a joint working group` oI the
Agronomy and the Processing and Value Addition
Task Forces.
Participants at the launch of the Rice Agronomy ana Rice
Processing ana Jalue Aaaition Task Forces
Mme Mouyibatou Akintayo (extreme left) aisplaying a wiae
range of rice-basea fooa proaucts to Dr Yemi Akinbamifo,
Heaa of Agriculture ana Fooa Security Division, African Union
Commission (2na from left), HE Tumuslime Rhoaa Peace,
Commissioner, Rural Economy ana Agriculture, African Union
Commission (3ra from left), HE Dr Jean Ping, Chairperson of the
African Union Commission (4th from left) ana Dr Aliou Diagne,
AfricaRice representative (5th from left) at the Africa Fooa ana
Nutrition Security Day celebration
45 AfricaRice AnnuaI Report 2011
Workshop on VDZDK technology for sub-Saharan
Africa
A workshop, entitled Improving and sustaining rice
production under changing climatic conditions`, was
organized, 2224 November, in Kumasi, Ghana, to
showcase the principles and practices oI the sawah
technology. The technology was developed by ProI.
Toshiyuki Wakatsuki oI the Kinki University, Japan,
to improve soil and water management, irrigation and
Iertilizer eIfciency to increase rice productivity in
AIrican lowlands.
The workshop was organized under the auspices oI the
Council Ior Scientifc and Industrial Research (CSIR)
with technical and fnancial support Irom the Kinki
University, Japan, JIRCAS and AIricaRice. It brought
together participants Irom Japan, Ghana, Indonesia,
Nigeria and Senegal.
1IRCAS 2011 International Symposium
AIricaRice DDG Marco Wopereis, gave a keynote
presentation on Realizing AIrica`s rice promise`
during the opening oI the 2011 JIRCAS International
Symposium, Trends oI International Rice Research
and Japanese Scientifc Contribution Support to
GRiSP and CARD`, Tsukuba International Congress
Center, Epochal, Convention Hall 200, Tsukuba,
Ibaraki, Japan, 1415 November. The workshop
was attended by about 120 people. AIricaRice
weed scientist Jonne Rodenburg was awarded the
prestigious 2011 Japan International Award Ior Young
Agricultural Researchers Ior his work on weed science
in AIrica. He was one oI the three awardees, the others
being Irom the Philippines and Bangladesh.
December
African Development Bank meeting
On behalI oI AIricaRice, DDG Marco Wopereis
participated in a meeting with the Operations and
Development EIIectiveness Committee (CODE) oI the
Board oI AIDB in Tunis, Tunisia, on 1 December, to
answer questions regarding the Multinational CGIAR
Support to Agricultural Research Ior Development on
Strategic Commodities in AIrica (SARD-SC) project.
About 20 members oI the board attended.
Also present in this meeting were: Monty P. Jones
(FARA), Jonathan Wadsworth (Fund OIfce), Lystra
Antoine (Fund OIfce), Nteranya Sanginga (IITA),
Mohamed El-Mourid (ICRISAT), Dougou Keita,
Jonas Chianu (AI DB) and Bouchaib Boulanouar
(AIDB). It is expected that the project proposal will
be submitted Ior approval to the Iull board oI AIDB
in December 2011.
Training on experimental auctions held in Kampala
A training course on experimental auctions, fnanced by
CIDA, was organized by AIricaRice and the National
Crops Resources Research Institute (NaCRRI) Cereals
Program oI the National Agricultural Research
Organisation (NARO) in Kampala, Uganda Irom 4 to
9 December. One Iacilitator and eight trainees Irom
eight organizations were trained. The trainees came
Irom organizations in Cameroon, Gambia, Ghana,
Mali, Nigeria, Senegal, Sierra Leone and Uganda.
The training was unique in that it combined theo-
retical lectures with practical sessions a series
oI real experimental auctions was conducted, which
participants organized. The auctions aimed at eliciting
urban Ugandan consumers` willingness-to-pay
(WTP) Ior alternative NERICA rice varieties and the
determinants oI WTP. This was the frst training oI
its kind on experimental auctions in AIrica and was
a big success.
Enhancing smallholder access to improved rice
technologies in West and Central Africa
The phase 1 oI the IFAD-Iunded project Enhancing
Smallholder Access to NERICA Ior Alleviating Rural
Poverty in West and Central AIrica` came to an end in
46 AfricaRice AnnuaI Report 2011
December aIter 4 years oI activities. A fnal workshop
was held, 68 December, in Cotonou, to enable the
regional project coordinator and national project
coordinators Irom Democratic Republic oI Congo,
Guinea and Sierra Leone to discuss the project`s
achievements and challenges.
The participants explored the way Iorward in order
to ensure the sustainability oI the results achieved in
phase 1, highlighting the need Ior Iacilitating market
access Ior seed and grain producers, promotion
oI value addition Ior income generation, and
strengthening stakeholders` capacities in seed
production, marketing and enterprise development.
The main recommendation was to move Irom a seed-
production Iocus that was dominant in phase 1 to a
rice value-chain Iocus in phase 2.
Training course in grain quality evaluation
A basic course in rice grain quality evaluation was
conducted Irom 7 to 9 December Ior English-speaking
countries and Irom 12 to 14 December Ior French-
speaking countries in Cotonou. Participants Irom 12
countries involved in the STRASA project attended.
The course, which included both theory and practical
sessions, oIIered an opportunity Ior the participants
to learn about the basics oI assessing the quality
oI rice grain and preIerences Ior grain quality in
their respective countries, and to evaluate the grain
quality oI rice samples brought Irom their respective
countries.
Data collection and analysis training course
A training course on Data collection and analysis`
was organized in collaboration with national programs
participating in the AIrica Rice Breeding Task
Force, 1216 December, in Cotonou, to help rice
researchers adopt good principles oI data collection
and management, improve the quality and quantity
oI their research publications and conduct statistical
analyses. The course targeted scientifc staII involved
in the design oI experiments or the collection, analysis
and interpretation oI data Irom designed experiments
in the Breeding Task Force.
Youth Employment Program in Mali
In view oI AIricaRice`s new emphasis on improved
postharvest technologies, which will help open up
opportunities Ior local households to raise their
incomes by promoting the development oI new
rice-based products, the Center was invited by the
Government oI Mali to showcase its work at the
country`s National Youth Employment Program,
13 15 December.
The President oI Mali inaugurated the event in the
presence oI several members oI the government and
representatives Irom R&D institutions and youth
organizations. He promised to give priority to the
development oI small enterprises and to Iacilitate
youths` access to credit. AIter the inaugural ceremony,
the President visited the exhibition set up as part oI
the Youth Employment Program.
First ASARECA General Assembly
AIricaRice participated in the exhibition showcasing
agricultural research, extension, education, training
and development work under the theme Feeding Our
Region in the 21st Century` as part oI the First General
Assembly oI the Association Ior Strengthening
Agricult ural Research in Eastern and Central
AIrica (ASARECA) held in Entebbe, Uganda, 1416
December.
Over 350 agricultural researchers Irom across the
globe, as well as ministers Irom the 10 ASARECA
member countries (Burundi, Democratic Republic
oI Congo, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Kenya, Madagascar,
Rwanda, Sudan, Tanzania and Uganda) attended the
Assembly, which called Ior greater cooperation among
research, training, extension services and the private
sector within countries and across the sub-region.
47 AfricaRice AnnuaI Report 2011
The Assembly`s recommendations included the needs
to:
· Support Iarmers and their associations
· Strengthen extension
· Support NGOs
· Support the private sector and its strategic partners
· Address emerging issues underlying Iood insecurity
in the ASARECA region and the role oI agriculture
in overall regional transIormation
· Mainstream universities in the research and
development system.
Improving rice postharvest handling, marketing
and development of new rice-based products
The inaugural meeting oI the Project Steering
Committee oI the CIDA-Iunded project on Enhancing
Iood security in AIrica through the improvement
oI rice post-harvest handling, marketing and the
development oI new rice-based products` was held in
Cotonou on 15 December.
The meeting was at tended by 14 participants
representing CIDA, AIricaRice, the Commission de
la communauté économique et monétaire de l`AIrique
centrale (CEMAC), ECOWAS (represented by
UEMOA), McGill University, and the national project
coordinators Irom Cameroon, Ghana, Nigeria, Senegal
and Uganda. The progress made in 2011 in the project
implementation and the Project Implementation Plan
(PIP) were reviewed and the work plan and budget Ior
2012 discussed.
Workshop on National and Regional Variety
Catalogs
A workshop on Varietal release and national and
regional variety catalogs` was held, 1516 December,
in Cotonou, to raise awareness oI rice breeders
involved in the AIrica Rice Breeding Task Force on
issues relating to variety testing, characterization,
releases, cataloguing and maintenance; breeder/
Ioundation seed production; and harmonization oI
descriptors. Presentations on the current status oI
variety release and regional and national catalogs were
made by AIricaRice, the Institut du Sahel (INSAH)/
Comité permanent Inter-Etat pour la Lutte contre
la Sécheresse dans le Sahel (CILSS), UEMOA and
CORAF/WECARD.
The participants noted that a major eIIort has been
made in West AIrica regarding the harmonization
oI regulations relating to variety release and seed
certifcation over the past Iew years. The document
was adopted by ECOWAS in 2008 and by UEMOA
in 2009. At the end oI the workshop detailed action
plans were made Ior greater harmonization.
48 AfricaRice AnnuaI Report 2011
FinanciaI statements
Statement of financiaI position
As at 31 December 2011
ASSETS
2011 (US$) 2010 (US$)
Current assets
Cash and cash equivalent 12,155,406 10,567,088
Accounts receivable:
Donors 5,841,551 4,611,594
Employees (net oI allowances) 409,127 278,420
Others (net oI allowances) 273,324 412,691
Inventories 325,468 318,940
Prepaid expenses 447,405 284,135
Total current assets 19,452,281 16,472,868
Property and equipment
Property and equipment 12,544,953 10,407,080
Less: Accumulated depreciation (12,009,318) (9,599,034)
Total property and equipment ¬ Net 535,635 808,046
TOTAL ASSETS 19,987,916 17,280,914
LIABILITIES AND NET ASSETS
2011 (US$) 2010 (US$)
Current liabilities
Accounts payable:
Donors 2,771,273 1,974,036
Employees 424,756 380,634
Others 692,880 727,763
Employees investment account 214,136 214,000
Provisions and accruals 3,895,815 3,186,157
Total current liabilities 7,998,860 6,482,590
TOTAL LIABILITIES 7,998,860 6,482,590
Net assets
Unrestricted net assets:
Undesignated 11,453,421 9,990,278
Designated 535,635 808,046
TOTAL NET ASSETS 11,989,056 10,798,324
TOTAL LIABILITIES & NET ASSETS 19,987,916 17,280,914
49 AfricaRice AnnuaI Report 2011
Statement of activities
For the year ended 31 December 2011
Unrestricted Restricted Total
Bilateral Bilateral CGIAR Genebank 2011 2010
Temporarily Challenge Research Stability
Restricted Programs Program
(CRP)
Fund
US$ US$ US$ US$ US$ US$ US$
REVENUES, GAINS AND OTHER SUPPORT
Grants 1,280,889 11,278,445 602,885 8,233,655 343,000 21,738,874 20,321,262
Member states Operating
income
492,964 492,964 1,565,073
Member states Capital
development income
Other income 149,315 149,315 144,899
Total revenue, gains and
other support
1,923,168 11,278,445 602,885 8,233,655 343,000 22,381,153 22,031,234
EXPENSES AND LOSSES
Program related expenses 11,278,445 602,885 8,233,655 343,000 20,457,985 17,784,661
Management and general
expenses
2,898,843 2,898,843 3,731,745
Sub-total expenses and
losses
2,898,843 11,278,445 602,885 8,233,655 343,000 23,356,828 21,516,406
Indirect cost recovery (2,166,407) (2,166,407) (1,685,137)
Total expenses and losses 732,436 11,278,445 602,885 8,233,655 343,000 21,190,421 19,831,269
CHANGE IN NET ASSETS
Net surplus 1,190,732 1,190,732 2,199,965
50 AfricaRice AnnuaI Report 2011
TOTAL EXPENSES ¬ BY NATURAL CLASSIFICATION
Unrestricted Restricted Total
Bilateral Bilateral CGIAR Genebank 2011 2010
Temporarily Challenge Research Stability
Restricted Programs Program
(CRP)
Fund
US$ US$ US$ US$ US$ US$ US$
Personnel costs 1,661,187 3,357,600 128,619 2,446,285 97,099 7,690,790 6,486,785
Supplies & services 872,872 3,994,241 212,225 2,903,599 233,664 8,216,602 8,140,966
Collaborators and
partnerships costs
2,746,231 148,514 757,723 3,652,468 4,270,121
Operational travel 126,857 716,222 36,312 560,726 12,237 1,452,354 1,472,543
Depreciation 237,927 464,151 77,215 1,565,322 2,344,614 1,145,991
Sub-total expenses and
losses
2,898,843 11,278,445 602,885 8,233,655 343,000 23,356,828 21,516,406
Indirect cost recovery (2,166,407) (2,166,407) (1,685,137)
Total expenses and losses 732,436 11,278,445 602,885 8,233,655 343,000 21,190,421 19,831,269
51 AfricaRice AnnuaI Report 2011
Grants
For the year ended 31 December 2011
Donor Grant period Grant pledges
available
Accounts
receivable
Accounts
payable
Grant
2011
Grant
2010
UNRESTRICTED
US$ US$ US$ US$ US$
Australia JanDec `11 520,065 520,065
Belgium JanDec `11 760,824 760,824 647,396
Canada JanDec `11 656,619
France JanDec `11 246,449
Japan JanDec `11 379,365
Norway JanDec `11 244,706
Sweden JanDec `11 486,476
United Kingdom JanDec `11 1,030,918
USAID JanDec `11 500,000
World Bank JanDec `11 1,800,000
Total unrestricted grants 1,280,889 1,280,889 5,991,929
TEMPORARILY RESTRICTED BILATERAL GRANTS
AIDB (NERICA dissemination
project)
Jan `04Dec `11 1,230,000 15,383 200,833 579,585
Services to CARD Secretariat Oct `09Open 24,415 6,978 114 23,494
ANR Project ESCAPE Jul `11Nov `14 125,804 49,462 9,803
ACP AFROweeds Project Oct `09Oct `12 408,453 45,182 102,895 161,465
BADEA IRM training JanDec `09 320,000 (121,488)
BADEA 2010 IRM training Jul `10Dec `11 330,000 5,453 25,431 196,524
Consultancy services (Kabirou) AprDec `11 6,820 1,192 4,691
DiIIusion oI Improved Crop Varieties
in AIrica (DIVA)
Nov `09Dec `12 168,300 29,789 24,537 113,974
BIOV2 New DIIVA Obj. Jan `11Dec `12 250,000 4,702 102,248
Chinese Academy oI Agricultural
Sciences (CAAS)
Nov `08Oct `11 3,449,862 340 650,663 1,630,626
Canada Linkage Fund McGill
University
Apr `08Mar `11 209,711 50,601 72,593
CIDA Support to Rice Research in
AIrica
Mar `11Mar `16 7,136,573 255,053 1,270,871
CARD Regional Workshop July 10 Jul `10 79,584 79,511
CFC SPIRIVWA project Jan `00Dec `09 536,039 18,024
52 AfricaRice AnnuaI Report 2011
Donor Grant period Grant pledges
available
Accounts
receivable
Accounts
payable
Grant
2011
Grant
2010
US$ US$ US$ US$ US$
CFC NERICA dissemination in
Central AIrica project
Jan `08Mar `12 2,500,961 361,827 836,355 181,676
Conservation oI Food & Health
Foundation
Jul `06Dec `10 81,000 6,177
DFID16 Striga project University
oI SheIfeld
May `08Sep `11 53,250 2,280 16,282 37,664
Esso Rice development in Chad Jan `10Dec `11 214,242 63,905 147,187
EU Rice policy & technology
impact on Iood security
Jan `07Dec `10 1,203,184 49,176 457,262
EU RAP project Jan `09Dec `13 5,193,453 550,127 479,436 700,293
Rice policy (Incremental Fund) Jun `10Dec `12 2,743,300 1,061,777 813,519 811,038
FAO Liberia seed production
project
Aug `08Jun `10 168,475 2,188 (9,929)
FAO Seed systems study project JanDec `10 198,500 198,500
Seed policy workshop JanJun `11 50,000 50,000
Training oI APO Ior FAO May `11Dec `12 4,200 4,200
GIZRISOCASUniversity oI
Hohenheim project
Mar `08Feb `11 236,553 (12,872) (44,233)
GIZ Characterization oI bacterial
leaI blight
May `08Apr `10 86,420 4,552
GTZP8 GIZ MICCORDEA Jan `10Dec `12 1,608,000 54,716 595,033 436,811
GIZ Attributed grant JanDec `11 231,528 219,924 231,547
IBRDCGIAR Collaboration Fund
project
Jan `11Open 414,492 254,251 160,240
CCAFS Research Theme #5 project Dec `10May `11 15,000 15,000
IFAD NERICA seeds access
West and Central AIrica project
Dec `07Dec `12 1,500,000 51,644 219,950 658,224
IFAD ESA project Jan `09Dec `10 60,000 15,000
IFARCGIAR Iellowship programs Jan `09Open 55,000 8,609 8,067 27,324
IRRIAIricaRice abiotic stress
project
Jan `08Feb `14 4,800,000 166,674 1,446,674 874,001
JapanUNDP-TCDC Interspecifc
hybridization project
Jan `00Mar `12 380,000 251,360 257,548 283,801
Japan Increasing quality &
competitiveness local rice project
Jan `03Mar `12 100,000 100,630 99,326 81,143
Japan Development oI interspecifc
Ory:a glaberrima & O. sativa
progenies project
Jan `03Mar `12 100,000 114,642 58,889 102,112
53 AfricaRice AnnuaI Report 2011
Donor Grant period Grant pledges
available
Accounts
receivable
Accounts
payable
Grant
2011
Grant
2010
US$ US$ US$ US$ US$
Japan High yield varieties humid
zones project
Dec `05Mar `12 100,000 72,306 151,143 138,453
Japan Physiological & genetic
investigation agronomic characters
project
Jan `07Mar `12 100,000 63,266 62,561 70,392
Japan Development oI sustainable
rice Iarming systems project
Jan `08Mar `12 60,000 22,680 50,324 51,895
Japan Emergency rice initiative Apr `09Sep `10 4,800,000 287,738
Japan Breeding project Jan `10Dec `14 6,000,000 1,834,485 1,686,384 1,748,100
Japan SMART-IV Oct `09Sep `14 3,000,000 416,949 731,471 727,149
Japan Capacity building Saito Oct `09Dec `10 10,730 3,640
Japan Capacity building Sokei Oct `09Feb `11 48,349 (1,472) 26,885
Japan Capacity building Abe Sep `10Open 11,500 602 1,986 8,912
JapanCG Fellowship program Abe Nov `10Open 12,700 6,552 3,539 3,415
JapanCG Fellowship program
Saito
Nov `10Mar `11 7,000 8,152
JapanCG Fellowship Dr Michi Sep `11Open 7,192 4,212 2,980
Japan RYMV project Jan `00Mar `12 100,000 69,345 70,946 64,254
JICAAIricaRice Collaboration
project
Apr `04Open 164,035 29,269 67,772 198,866
JIRCAS Collab. project Benin Jun `10Open 4,000 3,852 1,248 78
MISU Competitiveness study Oct `10Aug `11 49,335 24,788 49,456
PADER project Feb `11Dec `12 54,820 54,820
Syngenta Proposal development JanDec `10 193,530 (1,640) 118,702
Syngenta Value chains Apr `11Mar `12 416,456 131,198 547,654
UNDP Liberia seed production
project
Apr `09Apr `11 296,604 82 93,100 90,224
UNDP KMV project Liberia Oct `08Jun `11 230,000 (44,982) 76,092
USAIDCORAF RYMV JanDec `10 39,000 39,000
USAID West AIrica rice initiative
project
Oct `08Sep `10 5,100,000 2,102,578
NOW-WOTRO Parasite project Apr `11Mar `15 139,923 3,368 25,672
Sub-total restricted bilateral grants 57,218,293 4,900,677 1,282,544 11,278,445 13,710,831
54 AfricaRice AnnuaI Report 2011
Donor Grant period Grant pledges
available
Accounts
receivable
Accounts
payable
Grant
2011
Grant
2010
CHALLENGE PROGRAMS
US$ US$ US$ US$ US$
Water and Food
WorldFish Project M439 Apr `05Mar `10 42,946 8,472
Generation Challenge Program
CIMMYTGCP Project
SP1-G4008-05
Jan `08Dec `10 19,200
1,320

CIMMYTGCP Project
SP3-G4007-08
Aug `07Jul `09 304,440 29,618
24,223
GCP I-bridges AIricaRiceIRD Aug `07Dec `09 80,000 9,000
GCP NAM population
AIricaRiceCIAT
Aug `08Dec `11 114,058 7,324 29,442 6,898
GCP Rice challenge initiative Jun `09Mar `14 2,717,754 147,695 569,206 517,965
GCP Drought avoidance root Nov `08Sep `11 100,800 30,276 4,237 60,944
Sub-total Challenge Program grants 3,379,198 77,538 147,695 602,885 618,502
CGIAR RESEARCH PROGRAMS (CRPs)
CCAFS CRP Total Jan `11Dec `15 584,980 98,927 47,318
GRiSP CRP Total Jan `11Dec `15 8,213,000 863,336 8,186,337
Sub-total CRP grants 8,797,980 863,336 98,927 8,233,655
CGIAR GENE BANK STABILITY
Fund Council Genebank Jan `11Dec `15 343,000 343,000
Sub-total Genebank Stability Fund
grants
343,000 343,000
Total restricted grants 69,738,471 5,841,551 1,529,166 20,457,985 14,329,333
Total grants 71,019,360 5,841,551 1,529,166 21,738,874 20,321,262
55 AfricaRice AnnuaI Report 2011
Chair Peter Matlon (USA) incoming chair
Getachew Engida (UK) outgoing chair
Vice-Chair Adama Traoré (Mali)
Members Barbara Becker (Germany)
Henri Carsalade (France)
Momodou Ceesay (Gambia)
Kiyoaki Maruyama (Japan)¡
Fatouma Seyni (Niger)
Thenjiwe Chikane (South AIrica)
Yo Tiemoko (Côte d`Ivoire)
Masaru Iwanaga (Japan)*
Ex-ofhcio Papa Abdoulaye Seck (Senegal), Director General, AIricaRice
* Joined in 2011.
¡ LeIt in 2011.
Board of Trustees (As on 31 December 2011)
AfricaRice Boara of Trustees (March 2011. Drs Yo Tiemoko ana Masa Iwanaga were unable to attena) ana staff members
56 AfricaRice AnnuaI Report 2011
Office of the Director GeneraI
Papa Abdoulaye Seck Director General
Samuel Bruce-Oliver Advisor to the Director General
Savitri Mohapatra Head oI Marketing and Communications
Mohamed Mouhidiny Abdou Internal Auditor
Yvette Dossa Donor Relations Assistant
Corporate Services Division
Aguibou Dahirou Tall Director oI Administration and Finance
George Maina Head oI Finance
Leny Medenilla Planning and Budget Manager
Josselyne Anani Human Resources OIfcer
Moussa Davou ICT Manager
Rama S. Venkatraman Webmaster
Abdoulaye Sanwidi Financial InIormation and System Administrator
Zéphirin Amoussou ¡ Purchasing OIfcer
Angelito Medenilla Procurement OIfcer
Safatou Yabré Travel and Administrative Assistant
Korotoumou Ouattara Principal Accountant
François Tosse Senior Accountant
Klana Dagnogo Operations and Facilities Manager
Gaston Sangaré ¡ Farm Manager
Damtotine Tiem Administrative Support Services OIfcer
Seyi Olaoye-Williams Administrative OIfcer (Nigeria)
Samba Soulé Bâ Administration and Finance OIfcer (Senegal)
Philomena P.J. Chundu Administrative Assistant (Tanzania)
Research for DeveIopment Division
Marco Wopereis Deputy Director General, Director oI Research Ior Development
Olupomi Ajayi Research Operations Coordinator
Boubié Vincent Bado Regional Representative, Senegal
Amadou M. Beye* Regional Representative, Côte d`Ivoire
Senior staff and Associates
(As on 31 December 2011)
57 AfricaRice AnnuaI Report 2011
Sitapha Diatta ¡ Regional Representative, Côte d`Ivoire
Paul Kiepe Regional Representative, Tanzania
Ashura Luzi-Kihupi ¡ Regional Representative, Tanzania
Francis Nwilene Regional Representative, Nigeria
S. Gopikrishna Warrier ¡ Science Writer
Thomas Adigun ¡ Librarian
Maïmouna Diatta French Editor/Translator
Emmanuel Onasanya Desktop Publishing Assistant
Fassouma Sanogo Translator
Genetic Diversity and Improvement Program
Takashi Kumashiro Program Leader
Ibnou Dieng Biometrician
Khady Nani Dramé Molecular Biologist (Tanzania)
RaaIat El-Namaky Hybrid Rice Breeder (Senegal)
Koichi Futakuchi Crop Ecophysiologist
John ManIul Grain Quality Specialist
Baboucarr Manneh Irrigated Rice Breeder (Senegal)
Marie-Noelle Ndjiondjop Molecular Biologist
Francis Nwilene Entomologist (Nigeria)
Kayodé Sanni Head oI Genetic Resources Unit, INGER-AIrica Coordinator
Mande Semon Upland Rice Breeder (Nigeria)
Yacouba Séré Plant Pathologist
Moussa Sié Senior Rice Breeder
Drissa Silué* Plant Pathologist
Karim Traoré Grain Quality and Seed Systems Expert (Senegal)
Negussie Shoatec Zenna High-altitude Rice Breeder (Tanzania)
Ramaiah Venuprasad Lowland Rice Breeder (Nigeria)
Kof Bimpong PDF Molecular Genetics Salinity Tolerance (Senegal)
Mamadou FoIana PDF Molecular Genetics Drought (Nigeria)
Seth Graham Acquaah* Research Assistant
Gbenga Akinwale Research Assistant (Nigeria)
58 AfricaRice AnnuaI Report 2011
Fatimata Bachabi Research Assistant
Saidu Bah Research Assistant
Daniel Tia Dro Research Assistant
Mohamed Abd El-Rahman ¡ Research Assistant (Senegal)
Kolade Fisayo Research Assistant
Ghislain KanIany* Research Assistant (Senegal)
Seleman R. Kaoneka Research Assistant (Tanzania)
Martin E. Ndomondo Research Assistant (Tanzania)
Ayoni Ogunbayo Research Assistant
Oyin Oladimeji Research Assistant (Nigeria)
Bosede Popoola Research Assistant (Nigeria)
SustainabIe Productivity Enhancement Program
Paul Kiepe Program Leader (Tanzania)
Susumu Abe Soil Scientist
Frank Mussgnug Cropping Systems Agronomist
Jonne Rodenburg Weed Scientist (Tanzania)
Kazuki Saito Agro-Physiologist
Sander Zwart Remote Sensing/Water Management Specialist
Alpha Bocar Balde* PDF Climate Risk Assessment (Senegal)
Côme Agossa Linsoussi* PDF Remote Sensing and GIS
Nhamo Nhamo ¡ PDF Soil Fertility and Agronomy (Tanzania)
Cyrille Adda Program Assistant
Amos Adeyinka Onasanya PDF Plant Pathology (Tanzania)
Kokou Ahouanton ¡ Research Assistant
Akolly Raissa* Program Administrative Assistant (Senegal)
Confdence Duku* Research Assistant
Gerald Kyalo ¡ Research Assistant (Tanzania)
Judith Hubert* Research Assistant (Tanzania)
Abibou Niang Research Assistant
Abdoulaye Sow Research Assistant (Senegal)
Abou Togola Research Assistant
59 AfricaRice AnnuaI Report 2011
Amadou Touré Research Assistant
Mel Valere* Research Assistant (Senegal)
PoIicy, Impact Assessment and Innovation Systems Program
Aliou Diagne Program Leader, Impact Assessment Economist
Rita Afavi Agboh-Noameshie Gender Specialist
Ibrahima Bamba ¡ Policy Economist
Matty Demont Agricultural Economist
Godswill Makombe Agricultural Economist (Tanzania)
Cara M. Raboanarielina* Social Scientist
Julian David Reece ¡ Agricultural Innovation Systems Scientist
Edwige Fiamohe* PDF Agricultural Economy
Ali A. Touré PDF Policy Economy
Esther Leah Achandi* Research Assistant (Tanzania)
Didier Alia Research Assistant
Mandiaye Diagne Research Assistant (Senegal)
Theophile Eyram Research Assistant
Abdoulaye Kaboré Research Assistant
Tebila Nakelse* Research Assistant
Maimouna Ndour Research Assistant (Senegal)
Jonas Wanvoeke ¡ Research Assistant
Rice Sector DeveIopment Program
Inoussa Akintayo Program Leader
Robert Anyang ¡ Extension Agronomist (Tanzania)
Amadou M. Beye Seed Systems Specialist (Côte d`Ivoire)
YoussouI Dembélé* Water Management Specialist
Sarah Michelle Fernandes* InIormation and Knowledge Management OIfcer
Mamadou Kabirou N`Diaye Senior Rice Agronomist and Coordinator, Rice Training Center
(Senegal)
Boubakary Cissé Program Assistant
Mansour Diop Research Assistant (Senegal)
N`kou Mobio Modeste Romaric Research Assistant (Côte d`Ivoire)
60 AfricaRice AnnuaI Report 2011
CoIIaborating Scientists
Bertrand Muller Agro-climatologist (CIRAD, Senegal)
Joel Huat Vegetable Agronomist (CIRAD)
Philippe Menozzi Entomologist (CIRAD)
Yoshimi Sokei ¡ Agronomist (JICA)
Tadashi Takita ¡ Breeder (JICA)
Seiji Yanagihara Rice Breeder (JIRCAS)
* Joined in 2011
¡ LeIt in 2011
AfricaRice team members ana partners auring the 2011 AfricaRice Science Week ana GRiSP-Africa Science Forum
61 AfricaRice AnnuaI Report 2011
Postgraduate trainees
Name and thesis topic Institution /
University
Country of
origin
Gender Sponsor Degree
Abdel Mohamed Rahman
Identifcation oI salinity tolerance
QTLs in traditional AIrican rice
germplasm
Katerlsheikh
University
Egypt M Bill & Melinda
Gates Foundation
(BMGF) via IRRI
PhD
Abiodun, 1oseph
The eIIectiveness oI insect screening
technique Ior developing durable
resistant rice cultivars to Rice yellow
mottle virus based on vector short-
range migration
Federal University
oI Technology,
Akure, Nigeria
Nigeria M Japan PhD
Adjibogoun, O. Rodrigue
EIIects oI late nitrogen application
and harvesting dates on grain quality
oI AIrican rice (Ory:a glaberrima
Steud.)
Université
d`Abomey-Calavi,
Benin
Benin M Japan MSc
Adjognon, Guigonan Serge
Analysis oI eIfciency and
perIormance oI rice value chain in
Togo
McGill
University,
Canada
Benin M Canada / Japan MSc
Affo, Nicole Belda 1ohana A.
Physico-chemical evaluation oI Ory:a
glaberrima varieties Irom the Genetic
Resources Unit at AIricaRice
Institut Régional
du Génie
Industriel des
Biotechnologies
et Sciences
Appliquées
(IRGIB)
Benin F Japan MSc
Ahounou, Miriame Elvrie
Amelioration varietale au ri: africain
(Oryza glaberrima)
University oI
Abomey-Calavi,
Benin
Benin F Japan MSc
Akpata, Midokpè Marina
Agronomy
Université de
Parakou, Bénin
Benin F Rural Development
Support
Programme
(PADER, IFAD/
EU)
Maitrise
Alabi, O. Alabi
Genetic analysis oI F
4
progenies oI
rice interspecifcs (Ory:a sativa × O.
glaberrima) Ior yield component traits
University oI
Ibadan, Nigeria
Nigeria M Japan MSc
Anagonou, 1oel Rodrigue
Human Resource Administration
IPC Le Citoyen Benin M AIricaRice MSc
62 AfricaRice AnnuaI Report 2011
Name and thesis topic Institution /
University
Country of
origin
Gender Sponsor Degree
Awotide, Bola Amoke
Assessing the impact oI improved rice
technology on income distribution and
poverty among rice Iarmers in Nigeria
University oI
Ibadan, Nigeria
Nigeria F European Union PhD
Ba, Aby Der
Changement climatique et strategie
aaaaptation . Contribution a la
recherche ae varietes ae ri: tolerantes
au froia et mise a four aes calenariers
culturaux aans la vallee au ßeuve
Senegal
Université Gaston
Berger, Senegal
Senegal F SelI PhD
Bama, Aissata Delphine
Impact aes regimes hyariques sur la
salinisation et la proauctivite ae la
ri:iculture aans les bas-fonas au Sine
Saloum au Senegal
Université Cheick
Anta Diop,
Senegal
Burkina
Faso
F AIrican Union PhD
Basse, Blaise Waly
Evaluation ae limpact aes varietes
Université Gaston
Berger, Senegal
Senegal M European Union PhD
Batureine, 1asper Mwesigwa
Characterization oI pathogen
host-environment relationships Ior
Magaporthe grisea in Uganda
Makerere
University,
Uganda
Uganda M Global Rice
Science
Scholarship
(GRiSS)
PhD
Bemerew, Mohamed
Genetic diversity analysis and impact
oI climate change on bacterial blight
oI rice caused by Xanthomonas ory:ae
pv. ory:ae in East AIrica
Georg August
University,
Gottingen,
Germany
Ethiopia M Federal Ministry
Ior Economic
Cooperation and
Development
(BMZ) / Deutsche
GesellschaIt Iür
Internationale
Zusammenarbeit
(GIZ)
PhD
Biaou Olaye, Igor
Comparison oI energy eIfciency
during rice parboiling oI improve and
traditional stores in Benin
Université
d`Abomey-Calavi,
Benin
Benin M Japan MSc
Bizimana, 1ean-Pierre
Comparison oI blast population
structure in three blast disease
hotspots in Rwanda
Makerere
University,
Uganda
Rwanda M BMZ/GIZ MSc
63 AfricaRice AnnuaI Report 2011
Name and thesis topic Institution /
University
Country of
origin
Gender Sponsor Degree
Cissoko, Mamadou
The molecular genetic basis oI
resistance in rice to parasitic weed
Striga
University oI
SheIfeld, UK
Côte
d`Ivoire
M Department Ior
International
Development
(DFID), UK
PhD
Daba, Ndour Diouf
Tolerance au ri: au froia
Cheick Anta
Diop University,
Senegal
Senegal F Stress Tolerant
Rice Ior Poor
Farmers in AIrica
and South Asia
(STRASA)
PhD
Dago, Faustin
EIIect oI Iertilizers on RYMV
epidemic
University oI
Cocody, Abidjan,
Côte d`Ivoire
Côte
d`Ivoire
M Japan PhD
Delidji, Kouami Ulrich Dimitri
Etuae comparative ae aifferentes
pratiques culturales sur le renaement
au ri:
GASA Formation,
Benin
Benin M Japan MSc
Demba, Alieu
Nitrogen use eIfciency oI Chinese
Green Super Rice` varieties under
low- and high-input conditions in the
Senegal River delta
University oI
Bonn, Germany
Gambia M Chinese Academy
oI Agricultural
Sciences (CAAS)
MSc
Dewa, Kassa Messan K.
Caracterisation agro morphologique
aes accessoires ae Oryza glaberrima
Steua. collectes sur le plateau ae
Danyi au Togo
Institut Togolaise
de Recherche
Agronomique
(ITRA), Togo
Togo M Japan DEA
Dia, Rokhaya
La aimension agronomique ae
lintroauction ae la variete hybriae
ae ri: aans la vallee au Fleuve au
Senegal
Université Gaston
Berger de Saint-
Louis, Sénégal
Senegal F GRiSP MSc
Diagne, Mandiaye
Productivity, technology adoption and
Iood trade Ior Iood security in AIrica
Université Gaston
Berger, Senegal /
Hohenheim
Senegal M German
Scholarship and
European Union
PhD
Dibba, Lamin
Assessing the impact oI improved
rice-based technology adoption on
household Iood security in the Gambia
University oI
Hohenheim,
Germany
Gambia M GRiSS PhD
Diop, Soudou
Introgression oI cold tolerance QTLs/
genes into popular AIrican rice
varieties
Check Anta
Diop University,
Senegal
Senegal M BMGF via IRRI MSc
64 AfricaRice AnnuaI Report 2011
Name and thesis topic Institution /
University
Country of
origin
Gender Sponsor Degree
Djedatin, Gustave
Identifcation and mapping oI
resistance genes to bacterial leaI
blight in rice
University oI
Abomey-Calavi,
Benin
Benin M USAID PhD
Dontsop, N. Paul Martin
Impact assessment oI NERICA
varieties on rice Iarmers` welIare in
Nigeria
University oI
Ibadan, Nigeria
Cameroon M European Union PhD
Dossa, Sylvester
Comparison oI Xanthomonas ory:ae
pv. ory:ae strains according to two
rice ecozones in Tanzania
Georg August
University,
Gottingen,
Germany
Benin M BMZ / GIZ MSc
Edah, Martin
Finance
Université
d`Abomey-Calavi
Benin M AIricaRice Maitrise
Edikou, Koba U. Espéro
Elaboration au catalogue aes
ri: cultives au Benin . analyse
ae la proceaure ae selection et
a´homologation aes varietes
Université
d`Abomey-Calavi
Benin M Japan Maitrise
Effa-Effa, Branly
QTL analysis Ior cold tolerance using
populations derived Irom crosses
between NERICA-L-19 × Plovdiv22
and NERICA-L-19 × Diamante
Université Check
Anta Diop,
Senegal
Gabon M BMGF via IRRI MSc
El Hassimi Sow, Mounirou
Criblage aune collection au ri: au
Niger pour la resistance au virus ae la
panachure faune (RYMJ) et etuae ae
la aiversite genetique
University oI
KwaZulu-Natal,
South AIrica
Niger M USAID PhD
Evans, Mark
Analysis oI the Iactors that determine
eIfciency in ricevegetable rotation
and the relative proftability oI
alternative crops production in the
lowland ecology
School oI
Oriental and
AIrican Studies,
University oI
London, UK
UK M European Union MSc
Ganiyu A. Shittu
Screening oI rice varieties Ior drought
tolerance
University oI
Ibadan, Nigeria
Nigeria M SelI PhD
65 AfricaRice AnnuaI Report 2011
Name and thesis topic Institution /
University
Country of
origin
Gender Sponsor Degree
Gayin, Kwesi 1oseph
Starch structure and Iunctional
properties oI Ory:a glaberrima
varieties
Guelph
University,
Canada
Ghana M GRiSS PhD
Gbenga, Akinwale Moses
Application oI marker assisted
backcrossing approach Ior developing
submergence tolerant rice varieties in
Nigeria
Federal University
oI Technology,
Akure, Nigeria
Nigeria M BMGF PhD
Gonou-Gbo, Zaki
Exploration ae la aiversite au gène
Pup1 associe a la tolerence a la
aehcience en phosphore aans le
germsplasm Africain
Université
d`Abomey-Calavi,
Benin
Benin M Japan MSc
Gouda, C. Arnaud
Mise au point methoaologique en
biologie moleculaire sur insectes
(marqueurs moleculaires bacterien)
Université
d`Abomey-Calvi,
Benin
Benin M CIRAD MSc
Houessou, A. Valentin
Savoirs paysans aans la gestion aes
mauvaises herbes aans les systèmes a
base ae ri:
Université
d`Abomey-Calavi,
Benin
Benin M Netherlands
Organisation Ior
Scientifc Research
Research
Ior Global
Development
(NWO-WOTRO)
MSc
Izumi, Naoki
IdentiIy the critical conditions to let
the price incentives work to constitute
the highly productive agricultural
business in West AIrica
School oI
Oriental and
AIrican Studies,
University oI
London, UK
Japan M European Union MSc
1omanga, Kennedy Elisha
EIIect oI Rice yellow mottle virus
on perIormance oI diIIerent rice
genotypes
Sokoine
University oI
Agriculture,
Morogoro,
Tanzania
Tanzania M SelI/University MSc
Kabiri, Stella
Understanding how hostparasite
interactions Ior economically
important parasitic weed species in
rainIed rice are diIIerentially aIIected
by present and expected Iuture
environmental conditions
Wageningen
University,
Netherlands
Uganda F NWO-WOTRO PhD
66 AfricaRice AnnuaI Report 2011
Name and thesis topic Institution /
University
Country of
origin
Gender Sponsor Degree
Kaboyo, Barungi Solomon
Distribution and population structure
oI Magnaporthe grisea in Uganda
Makerere
University,
Kampala, Uganda
Uganda M BMZ / GIZ MSc
Kalisa, Alain
Distribution and population structure
oI Magnaporthe grisea in Rwanda
Makerere
University,
Uganda
Rwanda M GTZ MSc
Kam, Honore
Marker-assisted selection Ior
improvement oI rice varieties resistant
to RYMV Ior West AIrica
University oI
Kwazulu-Natal,
South AIrica
Burkina
Faso
M USAID PhD
Kilese, 1ohn
Characterization oI rice germplasm
Ior cold tolerance through feld
evaluation and participatory selection
in the Southern Highlands oI Tanzania
Sokoine
University oI
Agriculture,
Morogoro,
Tanzania
Tanzania M BMGF MSc
Konaté, Kadougoudiou
Abdouramane
Criblage ae 500 echantillons aOryza
glaberrima pour la resistance a la
toxicite ferreuse a louest au Burkina
Faso
Université de
Ouagadougou,
Burkina Faso
Burkina
Faso
M Japan MSc
Koné, Bréma Moussa
Analyse ae la politique buagetaire
comme facteur contribuant
lemergence en tant que moteur ae la
croissance economique au Mali . cas
au ri: a lofhce au Niger
Université du
Mali, Institut
Supérieur de
Formation
Appliquée
Mali M European Union PhD
Koudamiloro, Augustin
Caracterisation et etuae
biomoleculaire aes insectes vecteurs
ae la panachure faune au ri: (RYMJ)
au Benin. Perspective ae contrôle
avec lhuile ae neem
University oI
Abomey-Calavi,
Benin
Benin M University PhD
Kyaw, Pyae Phyo
Competitive and comparative research
on the rice production in AIrican
countries
School oI
Oriental and
AIrican Studies,
University oI
London, UK
Myanmar M European Union MSc
67 AfricaRice AnnuaI Report 2011
Name and thesis topic Institution /
University
Country of
origin
Gender Sponsor Degree
Maganga, Reinfrid Martin
Analysis oI population structure oI
Magnaporthe grisea and cultivar
resistance in three major rice growing
regions oI Tanzania
Sokoine
University oI
Agriculture,
Morogoro,
Tanzania
Tanzania M BMZ/GIZ MSc
Mama, Atikatou
Biotechnology
Université de
Moulay Ismail,
Morocco
Benin F Generation
Challenge Program
(GCP)
MSc
Masongoso, Charles 1oseph
Characterization oI wild rice in
Tanzania and evaluation oI the extent
oI gene fow Irom wild to cultivated
and vice versa
University oI
Dar-es-Salaam,
Tanzania
Tanzania M SelI PhD
Mayaba, Tawelsi
Creation varietale au ri: aaaptes a la
culture ae bas-fona
Université de
Ouagadougou,
Burkina Faso
Togo M Japan MSc
Menza, Mwalimu
Developing and disseminating
locally adaptable and socially and
economically acceptable strategies
Ior prevention and damage control oI
parasitic weeds in rainIed systems in
sub-Saharan AIrica
Wageningen
University,
Netherlands
Kenya M NWO-WOTRO PhD
Montcho, David
Diversite et bases genetiques aes
traits lies a la vigueur vegetative et
a laaaptation au ri: africain aux
aifferentes conaitions hyarologiques
University oI
Abomey-Calavi,
Benin
Benin M BMGF PhD
Moukoumbi, Yonnelle
Diversite genetique et valorisation
NERICA ae bas-fona
University oI
Abomey-Calavi,
Benin
Gabon F United Nations
Educational,
Scientifc
and Cultural
Organization
(UNESCO)
PhD
Mwenda, Mesharck
Analysis oI population structure
oI bacterial leaI blight and cultivar
resistance in three major rice growing
regions oI Tanzania
Sokoine
University oI
Agriculture,
Morogoro,
Tanzania
Tanzania M BMZ / GIZ MSc
68 AfricaRice AnnuaI Report 2011
Name and thesis topic Institution /
University
Country of
origin
Gender Sponsor Degree
N`cho, Simon
Assessing current and Iuture
economic, social and environmental
impacts oI parasitic weeds in rice in
sub-Saharan AIrica
University oI
Wageningen
Côte
d`Ivoire
M NWO-WOTRO PhD
N`tcha, N`po
Audit
None Benin M AIricaRice Maitrise
Ndaw, Omar Faye
Study the salt tolerance using SSH-
microarrays and genetic transmission
oI this character in rice
Université Cheik
Anta Diop,
Senegal
Senegal M GRiSS PhD
Ndaw, Omar Faye
Study the salt tolerance using SSH-
microarrays and genetic transmission
oI this character in rice
Université Cheick
Anta Diop,
Senegal
Senegal M Japan MSc
Ndèye Seynabou Diouf
The impact oI NERICA varieties on
Iood security strategies in Senegal
Université Gaston
Berger, Senegal
Senegal F GRiSS PhD
Ndoye, Cheikh Tidiane
Profet ae aeveloppement aapplication
mobile pour la collecte et la gestion
automatisees ae aonnees aenquêtes
geo-referencees
Université Gaston
Berger, Senegal
Senegal M European Union MSc
Niang, Abibou
Quantifcation oI rice yield gap and
reducing the gap by good agricultural
practices (GAP) in West AIrica
Bonn University,
Germany
Senegal M GRiSS PhD
Nkima, Germain
Analysis oI Xanthomonas ory:ae
pv. ory:ae population structure and
cultivar resistance in Rwanda
Sokoine
University oI
Agriculture,
Morogoro,
Tanzania
Rwanda M BMZ / GIZ PhD
Nouwodjro, Paul Kanté
Impact economique potentiel ae ri:
hybriae
Université Gaston
Berger, Sénégal
Togo M GRiSP MSc
Occhiali, Giovanni
Cross country or Panel data regression
on the eIIect oI the implementation
oI new rice variety oI rice on women
labor supplied or eIfciency oI rural
local processing and distribution
markets
School oI
Oriental and
AIrican Studies,
University oI
London, UK
Italy M European Union MSc
69 AfricaRice AnnuaI Report 2011
Name and thesis topic Institution /
University
Country of
origin
Gender Sponsor Degree
Odu, Olatunbosun
Evaluation oI rice as dual purpose
crop in Nigeria
University oI
Ibadan, Nigeria
Nigeria M SelI PhD
Ogah, Emmanuel
Biocontrol potential oI Platygaster
aiplosisae an egg-larval parasitoid oI
AIRGM in Nigeria
University oI
Ibadan, Nigeria
Nigeria M SelI PhD
Ogwuike, Philomena Chima
Impact oI NERICA adoption on labor
productivity in Nigeria
University oI
Agriculture
Abeokuta, Ogun
State, Nigeria
Nigeria F European Union MSc
Okry, Florent
Strengthening rice seed systems and
agro-biodiversity conservation
Wageningen
University,
Netherlands
Benin M Netherlands
Organization
Ior International
Cooperation in
Higher Education
and Research
(NUFFIC)
PhD
Olou, Abikè Aurore
Techniques ae laboratoire ae
pathologie
Faculté des
sciences technique
d`Abomey-Calavi,
Benin
Benin F Japan Master
1
Olubiyi, Mayowa Raphael
Screening oI Ory:a glaberrima
accessions Ior tolerance to anaerobic
germination
University oI
Agriculture,
Abeokuta, Ogun
State, Nigeria
Nigeria M STRASA MSc
Onaga, Geoffrey
Impact oI climate change on pathogen
diversity, and rice gene expression in
response to Magnaporthe ory:ae
Georg August
University,
Gottingen,
Germany
Uganda M BMZ / GIZ PhD
Onasanya, Ruth Omotola
Characterization oI Rice yellow mottle
virus isolate genus Sobemovirus in
climate change prone areas in East
and Central AIrica
Federal University
oI Technology
Akure, Ondo
State, Nigeria
Nigeria F GRiSP PhD
Opata, 1ohn
Seed priming eIIects on riceweed
competition
University oI
Bonn,
Germany
Ghana M CAAS MSc
Opoku, Enoch
Residual eIIects oI Iallow
management options on soil Iertility
and rice grain yield oI upland rice
University oI
Bonn, Germany
Ghana M CAAS MSc
70 AfricaRice AnnuaI Report 2011
Name and thesis topic Institution /
University
Country of
origin
Gender Sponsor Degree
Oyelola, Yisa A.
Evaluation oI root and shoot
perIormance oI interspecifc (Ory:a
sativa × O. glaberrima) progenies
under drought
University oI
Ibadan
Nigeria M Japan MSc
Palanga, Kofñ
Genetic fngerprinting and grain
quality determination oI AIricaRice
irrigated lowland rice using molecular
markers
Check Anta
Diop University,
Senegal
Togo M BMGF via IRRI MSc
Partey, Samuel
EIIects oI legume green manuring and
biochar amendments on maintenance
oI green water and soil Iertility
indicators on rice cropping felds in
Ghana
University oI
Manchester, UK
Ghana M GRiSS PhD
Sakyu, Shiho
Women`s bargaining power in rice
production and its selling process
University oI East
Anglia, UK
Japan F Japan MSc
Sall, Amadou Tidiane
Identifcation oI restorer lines in
AIrican germplasm using SSRs
Check Anta
Diop University,
Senegal
Senegal M BMGF via IRRI MSc
Sané, Nañssatou
Rice value development in Senegal
Université Gaston
Berger, Sénégal
Senegal F Syngenta Maitrise
Sangaré, 1ean Rodrigue
NERICA et le sequençage aes
allèles aO. glaberrima reveles par
marqueurs microsatellites
Université
Abomey-Calavi,
Benin
Mali M GCP MSc
Santos, Carline Christelle
Analyse ae linßuence aes conaitions
agro ecologiques ae cultures sur la
resistance au ri: aux insectes ae stock
au Benin et possibilite aamelioration
ae la qualite par etuvage
Université
d`Abomey-Calavi,
Benin
Benin F Government oI
Benin / GRiSS
PhD
Schroder, Claudia
A qualitative research regarding
socio-economic and gender-related
issues in NERICA adoption by
smallholders in Benin
University oI
Hohenheim,
Germany
Germany F University /
European Union
MSc
71 AfricaRice AnnuaI Report 2011
Name and thesis topic Institution /
University
Country of
origin
Gender Sponsor Degree
Sock, Mamadou
Marker-assisted introgression oI blast
resistance into AIrican mega-varieties
oI rice
Université Check
Anta Diop,
Senegal
Senegal M BMGF via IRRI MSc
Sossa, Elvire Line
Analyse bibliographique et
experimentation en milieu paysan
sur le thème . Etuae ae larrière effet
ae la fertilisation et aes resiaus ae
recolte au preceaent cultural (Vigna
unguiculata) sur la proauction au
ri: ae bas-fona aans un système ae
culture ri:
Université
d`Abomey-Calavi,
Benin
Benin F European Union MSc
Sossou, Schedrac Emmanuel
ICT
Haute Ecole de
Commerce et
de Management
(HECM)
Benin M AIricaRice MSc
Souley, Issaka
RYMV isolates pathotyping,
serotyping and epidemiology in Niger
University oI
Cocody, Abidjan,
Côte d`Ivoire
Niger M Japan PhD
Taiwo, Stephen
Sustainable weed control and produc-
ti vity improvement in improved in-
land valleys in south-eastern Nigeria
Michael Okpara
University oI
Agriculture
Umudike, Nigeria
Nigeria M SelI PhD
Tambam, Beri Bonglim
Optimization conditions oI
phosphorus priming in contrasting
rice genotypes
University oI
Bonn,
Germany
Cameroon F CAAS MSc
Thiam, Maimouna
Identifcation oI novel salt tolerance
QTLs in populations derived Irom
NERICA-L-19 × IR4630-22-2 and
NERICA-L-19 × Hasawi
Université Check
Anta Diop,
Senegal
Senegal F BMGF via IRRI MSc
Tossou, K. Romuald
EIIects oI late nitrogen application
and harvesting dates on grain quality
oI AIrican rice (Ory:a glaberrima
Steud.)
Université
d`Abomey-Calavi,
Benin
Benin M Japan Maitrise
Tusekelege, Hezron Kumbala M.
Improvement oI selected rice variety
in Tanzania Ior bacterial leaI blight
resistance using marker-assisted
selection
Sokoine
University oI
Agriculture,
Mongoro,
Tanzania
Tanzania M GIZ PhD
72 AfricaRice AnnuaI Report 2011
Name and thesis topic Institution /
University
Country of
origin
Gender Sponsor Degree
Ukoha, Grace Ogonnaya
Weed competitiveness oI interspecifc
(Ory:a sativa × O. glaberrima)
genotypes in Ultisol
Michael Okpara
University oI
Agriculture,
Umudike, Nigeria
Nigeria F Japan MSc
van`t Klooster, Kris
Hydrological requirements oI
Rhamphicarpa hstulosa
Wageningen
University,
Netherlands
Netherlands M DFID MSc
Vido, Agossou Arthur
Etuae sur l´histoire au ri: africain
(Oryza glaberrima Steua.) aans le sua
Benin (XJIIe XIXe siècle)
Université de
Cocody Abidjan,
Côte d`Ivoire
Benin M Japan PhD
Wiredu, Nimo Alexander
Impact oI Iertilizer subsidy program
on Iarm level productivity and
Iood security: a case study oI rice
producers in northern Ghana
University oI
Hohenheim,
Germany
Ghana M GRiSS PhD
Yamazaki, Yuri
Exploring nutrient management
options to combat biotic and abiotic
stresses in wetland rice cultivation
Kinki University,
School oI
Agriculture, Japan
Japan F Japan MSc
Yao, Nasser
Marker-assisted selection Ior
improvement oI rice varieties resistant
to RYMV Ior West AIrica
University oI
KwaZulu-Natal,
South AIrica
Côte
d`Ivoire
M USAID PhD
Yelome, Octaviano Igor
Stage en ressources phytogenetiques
et amelioration aes plantes
Université
d`Abomey-Calavi,
Benin
Benin M GIZ MSc
Zossou, Espérance
Soutenir la poste-recolte et le marche
au ri: local en Afrique ae lOuest
Université de
Liege, Gembloux,
Belgium
Benin F Japan PhD
73 AfricaRice AnnuaI Report 2011
AfricaRice training programs
Training activities and workshops conducted by AfricaRice in 2011
Theme Workshop/
Training
Countries represented
and number of
participants
Place and
date
Total
number of
participants
Men Women
Training on seed
management Ior
Liberian technicians
Training Liberia 3 Cotonou,
Benin,
21 Feb to
3 Mar
3 3 0
In-house training oI
research technicians
and feld observers Ior
the GSS in the Irrigated
Lowland Breeding unit
Training Senegal
Gambia
Côte d`Ivoire
13
1
1
Ndiaye,
Senegal
19 to 20
April
15 12 3
Workshop on seed policy
in West AIrica
Workshop Ghana
Benin
Côte d`Ivoire
Senegal
Mali
Madagascar
Burkina Faso
Niger
Gambia
Nigeria
Mauritania
Guinea
Guinea-Bissau
Italy
Tunisia
Togo
2
8
3
3
3
1
2
2
1
3
1
1
1
4
1
1
Cotonou,
Benin,
5 to 6 May
37 34 3
74 AfricaRice AnnuaI Report 2011
Theme Workshop/
Training
Countries represented
and number of
participants
Place and
date
Total
number of
participants
Men Women
Launching and planning
workshop oI the AIrica
component oI
STRASA Phase II
Workshop Benin
Burkina Faso
Madagascar
Ghana
Liberia
Senegal
Sierra Leone
Mozambique
Mali
Guinea
Nigeria
Rwanda
Uganda
Gambia
Nigeria
Philippines
1
2
1
1
1
3
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
Cotonou,
Benin,
9 to 11 May
20 19 1
Training course on rice
production
Training Burkina Faso
Senegal
Mali
Mauritania
8
9
4
1
Saint-Louis,
Senegal,
16 May to
10 June
22 20 2
Inception workshop Ior
CIDA-Iunded project
Workshop Canada
Mali
Uganda
Sierra Leone
Cameroon
Ghana
Senegal
Gambia
Nigeria
AIricaRice
CIDA
1
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
15
1
Cotonou,
Benin,
30 May to
1 June
33 29 4
75 AfricaRice AnnuaI Report 2011
Theme Workshop/
Training
Countries represented
and number of
participants
Place and
date
Total
number of
participants
Men Women
Boosting agricultural
mechanization in rice
production in AIrica
Workshop Benin
Burkina Faso
France
Uganda
Togo
Mali
Nigeria
Ghana
Tanzania
Senegal
IRRI
India
5
1
1
2
1
2
2
2
2
6
3
2
Saint-Louis,
Senegal,
6 to 10 June
29 28 1
Capacity development
in rice agronomy in
West AIrica with special
reIerence to NERICA
varieties
Training Liberia
Burkina Faso
Italy
3
2
1
Cotonou,
Benin,
6 to 17 June
6 5 1
Launching workshop oI
objective 3 oI DiIIusion
and Impact oI Improved
Varieties in AIrica
(DIIVA) project
Workshop Nigeria
Tanzania
UK
Niger
2
1
1
1
Cotonou,
Benin,
14 to 15 June
5 4 1
GCP Rice Challenge
Initiative (Rice CI)
Workshop Nigeria
Burkina Faso
Mali
France
2
1
1
1
Ibadan,
Nigeria, 14
to 17 June
5 5 0
Training workshop on
impact assessment
Training Cameroon
Burkina Faso
Madagascar
Togo
Mali
DRC
Senegal
Chad
Gabon
Niger
8
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
Douala,
Cameroon,
20 to 24 June
17 15 2
76 AfricaRice AnnuaI Report 2011
Theme Workshop/
Training
Countries represented
and number of
participants
Place and
date
Total
number of
participants
Men Women
Training oI rice
producers Ior the
identifcation oI newly
released varieties in
Senegal
Training Senegal 30 Ross-Bethio
Senegal,
28 June
30 28 2
AFROweeds project 2nd
workshop
Workshop Benin
Burkina Faso
France
Côte d`Ivoire
Mozambique
Mali
Nigeria
Ghana
Rwanda
Senegal
3
1
3
2
1
2
1
1
1
1
Cotonou,
Benin,
28 to 29 June
19 17 2
Training workshop
on rice parboiling and
harvestingthreshing
technologies
Training Benin
Senegal
Burkina Faso
Niger
Mali
Tanzania
2
13
3
2
3
1
Saint-Louis,
Senegal,
1 to 5 August
24 11 13
Training workshop
on rice pathology and
simulation modeling
techniques
Training Rwanda
Uganda
Tanzania
2
3
9
Dar es
Salaam,
Tanzania,
15 to 18
August
14 9 5
Gender mainstreaming
in rice research in
AIrica: Strategy
workshop
Workshop Benin
Burkina Faso
Mali
Cameroon
Chad
Côte d`Ivoire
Ghana
Senegal
Gambia
Nigeria
Central AIrican
Republic
Philippines
Sweden
Uganda
Niger
Guinea
3
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
Cotonou,
Benin,
16 to 18
August
18 2 16
77 AfricaRice AnnuaI Report 2011
Theme Workshop/
Training
Countries represented
and number of
participants
Place and
date
Total
number of
participants
Men Women
Training course Ior
national scientists on
rice disease isolation and
purifcation techniques
Training Rwanda
Uganda
Tanzania
2
2
7
Dar es
Salaam,
Tanzania,
19 to 27
August
11 6 5
Workshop on the
competitiveness oI rice
value chains aIter the
rice crisis: Lessons
Irom case studies`
Workshop Cameroon
Senegal
Burkina Faso
Togo
Ethiopia
Rwanda
Guinea
Ghana
Gambia
Côte d`Ivoire
Nigeria
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
3
1
1
Banjul,
Gambia,
24 to 25
September
13 12 1
Rice value chain training
workshop
Workshop Nigeria
Ghana
Uganda
Cameroon
Mali
Senegal
Gambia
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
Tamale,
Ghana,
26
October to
1 November
7 6 1
Training on
experimental auctions
Training Sierra Leone
Gambia
Ghana
Nigeria
Cameroon
Mali
Senegal
Uganda
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
Kampala,
Uganda,
4 to 9
December
8 4 4
AIricaRice and IRRI
ESA Planning Meeting
Workshop Benin
Philippines
Mozambique
Burundi
Tanzania
2
1
3
1
18
Dar es
Salaam,
Tanzania,
5 to 7
December
25 18 7
End oI IFAD WCA
project workshop
Workshop DRC
Sierra Leone
Guinea
Côte d`Ivoire
Senegal
4
2
3
1
1
Cotonou,
Benin,
6 to 8
December
11 10 1
78 AfricaRice AnnuaI Report 2011
Theme Workshop/
Training
Countries represented
and number of
participants
Place and
date
Total
number of
participants
Men Women
Grain quality evaluation
training (Anglophone)
Training Ethiopia
Ghana
Rwanda
Nigeria
Gambia
Uganda
1
1
1
1
1
1
Cotonou,
Benin,
7 to 9
December
6 6 0
Grain quality evaluation
training (Francophone)
Training Benin
Burkina Faso
Guinea
Madagascar
Senegal
Mali
2
1
1
1
1
1
Cotonou,
Benin
12 to 14
December
7 6 1
Workshop on data
collection and analysis
Ior plant breeding
Workshop Burkina Faso
Côte d`Ivoire
Mali
Sierra Leone
Nigeria
Benin
Burundi
Madagascar
Uganda
Mozambique
Gambia
Senegal
Niger
Guinea
Togo
Tanzania
Ghana
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
Cotonou,
Benin
12 to 16
December
19 16 3

79 AfricaRice AnnuaI Report 2011
PubIications
*The names oI AIrica Rice Center (AIricaRice) authors are shown in bold
Papers pubIished in peer-reviewed journaIs*
Abe SS and Wakatsuki T. 2011. Sawah ecotechnology a trigger Ior a rice green revolution in sub-Saharan
AIrica: basic concept and policy implications. Outlook on Agriculture, 40(3): 221227.
Abe SS, Kotegawa T, Onishi T, Watanabe Y and Wakatsuki T. 2011. Soil particle accumulation in termite
(Macrotermes bellicosus) mounds and the implications Ior soil particle dynamics in a tropical savanna Ultisol.
Ecological Research, DOI 10.1007/s11284-011-0893-5.
Abe SS, Watanabe Y, Onishi T, Kotegawa T and Wakatsuki T. 2011. Nutrient storage in termite (Macrotermes
bellicosus) mounds and the implications Ior nutrient dynamics in a tropical savanna Ultisol. Soil Science ana
Plant Nutrition, 57(6): 786795.
Adda C, Atachi P, Hell K and Tamo M. 2011. Potential use oI the bushmint, Hyptis suaveolens, Ior the control
oI inIestation by the pink stalk borer, Sesamia calamistis on maize in southern Benin, West AIrica. Journal of
Insect Science, 11(33): 113.
Akanji BO, Ajele JO, Onasanya A and Oyelakin O. 2011. Genetic fngerprinting oI Pseuaomonas areguniosa
involved in nosocomial inIection as revealed by RAPD-PCR markers. Biotechnology, 10: 7077.
Akinwale MG, Gregorio G, Nwilene F, Akinyele BO, Ogunbayo SA and Odiyi AC. 2011. Heritability and
correlation coeIfcient analysis Ior yield and its components in rice (Ory:a sativa L.). African Journal of Plant
Science, 5(3): 207212.
Akinwale MG, Gregorio G, Nwilene F, Akinyele BO, Ogunbayo SA, Odiyi AC and Shittu A. 2011. Comparative
perIormance oI lowland hybrids and inbred rice varieties in Nigeria. International Journal of Plant Breeaing
ana Genetics, 5(3): 224234.
Amos O, Gasore ER, Nwilene FE, Ingelbretcht I, Lamo J, Wydra K, Ekperigin MM, Langa M, Séré Y, Onasanya
RO, Kiepe P and Kumashiro T. 2011. Genetic diversity and DNA fngerprinting oI Xanthomonas ory:ae pv.
ory:ae isolates Irom East and Central AIrica. |abstract|. Phytopathology, 101(6 supplement): S6S7.
Atachi P, Matchi B, Bachabi F, Yehouenou A and Rurema D. 2011. Les entomophages de la Cochenille du Manioc
Phenacoccus manihoti Matile-Ferrero, 1977 au Benin : inventaire des diIIérentes especes. LEntomologiste,
67(4): 227223.
Awotide BA, Awoyemi TT and Diagne A. 2011. Factors infuencing the use oI good quality improved rice seed
in Nigeria: implication Ior sustainable rice productivity. International Journal of Sustainable Development,
2(9): 5368.
Awotide BA, Awoyemi TT, Diagne A and Ojehomon VT. 2011. Impact oI access to subsidized certifed
improved rice seed on income: evidence Irom rice Iarming households in Nigeria. OIDA International Journal
of Sustainable Development, 2(12): 4360.
Awotide BA, Diagne A, Awoyemi TT and Ojehomon VET. 2011. Household endowments and poverty reduction
in rural Nigeria: evidence Irom rice Iarming households. Agricultural Journal, 6(5): 274284.
80 AfricaRice AnnuaI Report 2011
Bado V, Sawadogo A, Thio B, Bationo A, Traoré K and Cescas M. 2011. Nematode inIestation and N-eIIect
oI legumes on soil and crop yields in legumesorghum rotations. Agricultural Sciences, 2(2): 4955.
Bamba I, Diagne A, Manful 1 and Ajayi O. 2011. Historic opportunities Ior rice growers in Nigeria. Grain
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82 AfricaRice AnnuaI Report 2011
Moumeni A, Satoh K, Kondoh H, Asano T, Hosaka A, Venuprasad R, Serraj R, Kumar A, Leung H and Kikuchi
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Nwilene F, Onasanya A, Togola A, Ukwungwu M, Hamadoun A, Dakouo D, Woin N, Malick B, Nacro
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Books and book chapters
Africa Rice Center. 2011. Boosting Africas Rice Sector. A research for aevelopment strategy 20112020.
AIrica Rice Center, Cotonou, Benin.
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Seea Enterprises. Sowing the seeas of fooa security. CAB International, WallingIord, UK.
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African Seea Enterprises. Sowing the seeas of fooa security. CAB International, WallingIord, UK.
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and a Iamily. In. Van Mele P, Bentley JW and Guéi RG eds. African Seea Enterprises. Sowing the seeas of fooa
security. CAB International, WallingIord, UK.
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Nwilene FE, Togola A, Oyetunji OE, Onasanya A, Akinwale G, Ogah E, Abo E, Ukwungwu M, Youdeowei
A and Woin N. 2011. Is pesticide use sustainable in lowland rice intensifcation in West AIrica? In. Stoytcheva
M ed. Pesticiaes in the Moaern Worla Risks ana benehts. InTech Open Access Publisher, Rijeka, Croatia.
Okry F, Dalohoun DN, Diawara S, Barry MB and Van Mele P. 2011. Guinea: networks that work. In. Van Mele
P, Bentley JW and Guéi RG eds. African Seea Enterprises. Sowing the seeas of fooa security. CAB International,
WallingIord, UK.
Reece 1D, Dalohoun DN, Drammeh E, Van Mele P and Bah S. 2011. The Gambia: capturing the media. In.
Van Mele P, Bentley JW and Guéi RG eds. African Seea Enterprises. Sowing the seeas of fooa security. CAB
International, WallingIord, UK.
Van Mele P, Bentley JW and Guéi RG eds. 2011. African Seea Enterprises. Sowing the seeas of fooa security.
CAB International, WallingIord, UK.
Van Mele P, Randriamilandy K, Ralisoa N and Rabeson R. 2011. Madagascar: coping with relieI aid and politics.
In. Van Mele P, Bentley JW and Guéi RG eds. African Seea Enterprises. Sowing the seeas of fooa security.
CAB International, WallingIord, UK.
Van Mele P, Ugen MA, Wanyama D, Anyang R, Rubyogo JC and Sperling L. 2011. Uganda: dreams oI starting
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Conference papers and proceedings
Africa Rice Center. 2011. Innovation ana Partnerships to Reali:e Africas Rice Potential. Proceeaings of the
Secona Africa Rice Congress, Bamako, Mali, 2226 March 2010. AIrica Rice Center, Cotonou, Benin. www.
aIricarice.org/warda/arc.asp.
Africa Rice Center. 2011. Report oI the Second AIrica Rice Congress, Innovations and Partnerships to Realize
AIrica`s Rice Potential, Bamako, Mali, 2226 March 2010. In. Innovation ana Partnerships to Reali:e Africas
Rice Potential. Proceeaings of the Secona Africa Rice Congress, Bamako, Mali, 2226 March 2010. AIrica
Rice Center, Cotonou, Benin. www.aIricarice.org/workshop/ARC/Report.pdI.
Africa Rice Center. 2011. Second AIrica Rice Congress, Bamako, Mali, 2226 March 2010: Declaration. In.
Innovation ana Partnerships to Reali:e Africas Rice Potential. Proceeaings of the Secona Africa Rice Congress,
Bamako, Mali, 2226 March 2010. AIrica Rice Center, Cotonou, Benin. www.aIricarice.org/workshop/ARC/
declaration.pdI.
Bado BV, Aw A and Ndiaye M. 2011. Long-term eIIect oI continuous cropping oI irrigated rice on soil and
yield trends in the Sahel oI West AIrica. In. Innovation ana Partnerships to Reali:e Africas Rice Potential.
Proceeaings of the Secona Africa Rice Congress, Bamako, Mali, 2226 March 2010. AIrica Rice Center, Cotonou,
Benin. www.aIricarice.org/workshop/ARC/2.10°20Bado°20ed2.pdI.
Bakari M, Ngadi M, Kok R, Raghavan V and Diagne A. 2011. Energy analysis Ior small- and medium-scale
rural rice parboiling in sub-Saharan AIrica. In. Innovation ana Partnerships to Reali:e Africas Rice Potential.
Proceeaings of the Secona Africa Rice Congress, Bamako, Mali, 2226 March 2010. AIrica Rice Center, Cotonou,
Benin. www.aIricarice.org/workshop/ARC/6.6°20Bakari°20fn.pdI.
87 AfricaRice AnnuaI Report 2011
Bimpong K, Manneh B, Zwart S, Futakuchi K and Kumashiro T. 2011. Climate change impact and strategies
on rice production in AIrica, approaches to predict CC impact and devise strategies. Paper presented at the
CCAFS workshop on Developing Climate-smart Crops Ior a 2030 World, Addis Ababa, 313 December.
Bleoussi TMR, Fofana M, Bokossa I and Futakuchi K. 2011. EIIect oI parboiling and storage on grain physical
and cooking characteristics oI the some NERICA rice varieties. In. Innovation ana Partnerships to Reali:e
Africas Rice Potential. Proceeaings of the Secona Africa Rice Congress, Bamako, Mali, 2226 March 2010.
AIrica Rice Center, Cotonou, Benin. www.aIricarice.org/workshop/ARC/3.3°20Bleoussi°20fn.pdI.
Demont M. 2011. Le riz local aIricain est-il compétitive ? Paper presented at the conIerence Trente ans de
partenariat Mali-Fondation Syngenta pour une Agriculture Durable, quels impacts pour l`agriculture malienne ?`,
Bamako, Mali, 57 October.
Demont M. 2011. The way Iorward Ior HarvestPlus` consumer acceptance research. Presentation at HarvestPlus
Workshop on Farmer Adoption and Consumer Acceptance oI BioIortifed Varieties oI Staple Crops, International
Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI), Washington, DC, 89 November.
Demont M. 2011. Reviewing science behind consumer attitudes, willingness-to-pay. Presentation at European
Commission JRC-IPTS and Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) International Workshop on Socio-
Economics oI GMO Crops, Seville, Spain, 2324 November.
Diagne M, Diagne A and Demont M. 2011. Adoption and impact oI an award winning post-harvest technology:
the ASI rice thresher in the Senegal River valley (SRV). Presentation at the GRiSP workshop Boosting agricultural
mechanization in rice-based systems in sub-Saharan AIrica, Saint-Louis, Senegal, 68 June. www.aIricarice.
org/workshop/grisp-mech/PPT/Diagne,°20aIricarice.pdI.
Dramé KN, Saito K, Koné B, Chabi A, Dakouo D, Annan-AIIul E, Monh S, Abo E and Sié M. 2011. Coping
with iron toxicity in the lowlands oI sub-Saharan AIrica: experience Irom AIrica Rice Center. In. Innovation
ana Partnerships to Reali:e Africas Rice Potential. Proceeaings of the Secona Africa Rice Congress, Bamako,
Mali, 2226 March 2010. AIrica Rice Center, Cotonou, Benin. www.aIricarice.org/workshop/ARC/1.9°20
Drame°20ed2.pdI.
DuIey I, Hiel M-P, Hakizimana P, Draye X, Lutts S, Koné B, Dramé KN, Konaté KA, Sié M and Bertin P.
2011. Multi-environment QTL mapping and consistency across environments oI resistance mechanisms to
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Misiko M. 2011. Indigenous seed institutions in Iragile communities. In. Innovation ana Partnerships to Reali:e
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89 AfricaRice AnnuaI Report 2011
Seck PA. 2011. AIrican agriculture science highlights Irom scientifc partners. In. African Agricultural Innovation
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Reports and other pubIications
Africa Rice Center. 2011. Africa Rice Center (AfricaRice) Annual Report 2010. Builaing African capacity on
policy analysis ana impact assessment. AIrica Rice Center, Cotonou, Benin.
Africa Rice Center. 2011. Prohle of AfricaRice. |brochure|. AIrica Rice Center, Cotonou, Benin.
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Workshop Ior New Collaboration between JIRCAS and AIricaRice. JIRCAS Working Report 70: iii. AIrica
Rice Center, Cotonou, Benin and Japan International Research Center Ior Agricultural Sciences (JIRCAS),
Tsukuba, Japan.
Futakuchi K, Ndjiondjop MN, Sié M and Wopereis MCS. 2011. Rice breeding Ior drought-prone environments
at AIrica Rice Center. In. Yanagihara S ed. Next Challenges in Rice Development Ior AIrica: Workshop Ior
New Collaboration between JIRCAS and AIricaRice. JIRCAS Working Report 70: 2935. AIrica Rice Center,
Cotonou, Benin and Japan International Research Center Ior Agricultural Sciences (JIRCAS), Tsukuba, Japan.
Futakuchi K, Sié M and Wopereis MCS. 2011. Rice breeding strategy at AIricaRice. In. Yanagihara S ed. Next
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Ior Agricultural Sciences (JIRCAS), Tsukuba, Japan.
90 AfricaRice AnnuaI Report 2011
Kumshiro T. 2011. JIRCAS strategy Ior rice improvement Ior sub-Saharan AIrica. In. Yanagihara S ed. Next
Challenges in Rice Development Ior AIrica: Workshop Ior New Collaboration between JIRCAS and AIricaRice.
JIRCAS Working Report 70: 1517. AIrica Rice Center, Cotonou, Benin and Japan International Research Center
Ior Agricultural Sciences (JIRCAS), Tsukuba, Japan.
Mohapatra S. 2011. Quality matters. Rice Toaay, 10(1): 3637.
Mohapatra S. 2011. The pillars oI AIrica`s agriculture. Rice Toaay, 10(2): 2225.
Mohapatra S. 2011. Beware oI bronzing. Rice Toaay, 10(3): 3839.
Mohapatra S. 2011. Unleashing the Iorce. Rice Toaay, 10(4): 2021.
Nakano Y, Bamba I, Diagne A, Otsuka K and Kajisa K. 2011. The possibility oI a rice green revolution in
large-scale irrigation schemes in sub-Saharan AIrica. Worla Bank Policy Research Working Paper 5560. The
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Ndjiondjop MN. 2011. Use oI molecular markers in rice improvement at AIricaRice. In. Yanagihara S ed. Next
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JIRCAS Working Report 70: 6576. AIrica Rice Center, Cotonou, Benin and Japan International Research Center
Ior Agricultural Sciences (JIRCAS), Tsukuba, Japan.
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oI upland and lowland NERICA and modern Asian genotypes at AIrica Rice Center. In. Yanagihara S ed. Next
Challenges in Rice Development Ior AIrica: Workshop Ior New Collaboration between JIRCAS and AIricaRice.
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Seck PA. 2011. Feeding the world in 2050. Rice Toaay, 10(4): 1213.
Séré Y, Sy AA, Sié M, Akator SK, Onasanya A, Kabore B, Conde CK, Traore M and Kiepe P. 2011.
Importance oI varietal improvement Ior blast disease control in AIrica. In. Yanagihara S ed. Next Challenges
in Rice Development Ior AIrica: Workshop Ior New Collaboration between JIRCAS and AIricaRice. JIRCAS
Working Report 70: 7790. AIrica Rice Center, Cotonou, Benin and Japan International Research Center Ior
Agricultural Sciences (JIRCAS), Tsukuba, Japan.
Somado EA, Kiepe P and Niang A. 2011. Alleviating phosphorus defciency in rice-based systems in humid
AIrica. In. Yanagihara S ed. Next Challenges in Rice Development Ior AIrica: Workshop Ior New Collaboration
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Wopereis MCS and Kumshiro T. 2011. Concluding remarks. In. Yanagihara S ed. Next Challenges in Rice
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92 AfricaRice AnnuaI Report 2011
Abbreviations
ACP AIrican, Caribbean and Pacifc group oI states
ADRAO Association pour le développement de la riziculture en AIrique de l`Ouest (Iormer
French name oI AIricaRice)
AIDB AIrican Development Bank
AFNSD AIrica Food and Nutrition Security Day
AIricaRice AIrica Rice Center
AFSTA AIrican Seed Trade Association
AGRA Alliance Ior a Green Revolution in AIrica
AIDS acquired immunodefciency syndrome
ANR Agence National de la Recherche
APO Assistant ProIessional OIfcer
ARI AIrican Rice Initiative
ASARECA Association Ior Strengthening Agricultural Research in Eastern and Central AIrica
ASI ADRAOSAEDISRA threshercleaner
ASN AIrican Seed Network
AU AIrican Union
AUC AIrican Union Commission
AU-DREA AU Department oI Rural Economy and Agriculture
BADEA Arab Bank Ior Economic Development in AIrica
BMGF Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation
BMZ Federal Ministry Ior Economic Cooperation and Development (Germany)
CA$ Canadian dollar(s)
CAADP Comprehensive AIrica Agriculture Development Programme
CAAS Chinese Academy oI Agricultural Sciences
CAMES Conseil AIricain et Malgache pour l`Enseignement Supérieur
CARD Coalition Ior AIrican Rice Development
CARI Central Agricultural Research Institute (Liberia)
CCAFS Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security (CGIAR Research Program)
CCLF CGIARCanada Linkage Fund
CEMAC Commission de la communauté économique et monétaire de l`AIrique centrale
CFA Canada Fund Ior AIrica
CFC Common Fund Ior Commodities
CG CGIAR
CI Challenge Initiative
CIAT International Center Ior Tropical Agriculture
CIDA Canadian International Development Agency
CILSS Comité permanent Inter-Etats de Lutte contre la Sécheresse dans le Sahel
93 AfricaRice AnnuaI Report 2011
CIMAC Crop Improvement, Ideotyping and Modelling Ior AIrica Cropping Systems under
Climate Change (international conIerence)
CIMMYT International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center
CIRAD Centre de coopération internationale en recherche agronomique pour le
développement (France)
CNRA Centre National de Recherche Agronomique (Côte d`Ivoire)
CNRADA Centre National de Recherche Agronomique et de Développement Agricole
(Mauritania)
CNS-Riz National Rice Center (WAAPP, Mali)
CODE Operations and Development EIIectiveness Committee (AIDB Board)
CoM Council oI Ministers (AIricaRice)
CORAF/WECARD West and Central AIrican Council Ior Research and Development
CRP CGIAR Research Program
CRRA Regional Agricultural Research Center (Mali)
CSIR Council Ior Scientifc and Industrial Research
DAF director oI administration and fnance
DDG Deputy Director General
DFID Department Ior International Development (UK)
DIIVA DiIIusion and Impact oI Improved Crop Varieties in AIrica
DIVA DiIIusion oI Improved Crop Varieties in AIrica
DOI Digital Object Identifer
DRC Democratic Republic oI Congo
domestic resource cost
DRDR Direction régionale du développement rural (Senegal)
ECAA Entreprise de Conception et d`Appui a l`Artisanat (Chad)
ECARRN East and Central AIrica Rice Research Network
ECOWAS Economic Community oI West AIrican States
ed. editor
eds editors
EIAR Ethiopian Institute oI Agricultural Research
ESA East and Southern AIrica
ESCAPE Changement Environnementaux et Socio en AIrique : Passe, Présent et Future
EU European Union
FAO Food and Agriculture Organization oI the United Nations
FARA Forum Ior Agricultural Research in AIrica
FCFA CFA Iranc
GAP good agricultural practices
GCP Generation Challenge Program (CGIAR)
94 AfricaRice AnnuaI Report 2011
GIS geographic inIormation system(s)
GIZ Deutsche GesellschaIt Iür Internazionale Zusammenarbeit
GMO genetically modifed organism
GOANA Grande OIIensive Agricole pour la Nourriture et l`Abondance (Senegal)
GRiSP Global Rice Science Partnership
GRiSS Global Rice Science Scholarship
GSR Green Super Rice (project)
HE His Excellency (honorifc)
HECM Haute Ecole de Commerce et de Management
HIV Human immunodefciency virus
IBRD International Bank Ior Reconstruction and Development (World Bank)
ICABR International Consortium on Agricultural Biotechnology Research
ICRISAT International Crops Research Institute Ior the Semi-Arid Tropics
ICT inIormation and communications technology
IDRC International Development Research Centre
IER Institute d`Economie Rurale (Mali)
IFAD International Fund Ior Agricultural Development
IFPRI International Food Policy Research Institute
IITA International Institute oI Tropical Agriculture
INGER International Network Ior the Genetic Evaluation oI Rice
INRAB Institut national de recherches agricoles du Bénin
INSAH Institut du Sahel
IRD Institut de recherche pour le développement (France)
IRGIB Institut Régional du Génie Industriel des Biotechnologies et Sciences Appliquées
IRM integrated rice management
IRRI International Rice Research Institute
ISRA Institut sénégalais de recherches agricoles (Senegal)
ITRA Institut Togolaise de Recherche Agronomique (Togo)
JICA Japan International Cooperation Agency
JIRCAS Japan International Research Center Ior Agricultural Sciences
JRC-IPTS Joint Research Centre Institute Ior Prospective Technological Studies (EU)
KM knowledge management
KMV Kokoya Millennium Village (Liberia)
LATE local average treatment eIIect
MARI Mikocheni Agricultural Research Institute (Tanzania)
MARS marker-assisted recurrent selection
MAS marker-assisted selection
MDG Millennium Development Goal
95 AfricaRice AnnuaI Report 2011
MICCORDEA Mitigating the Impact oI Climate Change on Rice Disease Resistance in East
AIrica
MISU Michigan State University
MoARD Ministry oI Agriculture and Rural Development (Ethiopia)
MOMAGRI Movement Ior a World Agricultural Organization
MoU Memorandum oI Understanding
MSc Master oI Science (postgraduate degree)
Mt million tonnes
NaCRRI National Crops Resources Research Institute (Uganda)
NAM Nested Association Mapping (project)
NARES national agricultural research and extension service(s)
NARO National Agricultural Research Organisation (Uganda)
NARS national agricultural research system(s)
NCRI National Cereals Research Institute (Nigeria)
NEPAD New Partnership Ior AIrica`s Development
NERICA New Rice Ior AIrica (Iamily oI interspecifc rice varieties Ior uplands)
NERICA-L New Rice Ior AIrica (Iamily oI interspecifc rice varieties Ior lowlands)
NGO non-governmental organization
NISER Nigeria Institute Ior Social and Economic Research
NUFFIC Netherlands Organization Ior International Cooperation in Higher Education and
Research
NWO-WOTRO Netherlands Organisation Ior Scientifc Research Research Ior Global
Development
p. page
PA Priority Area
PADER Programme d`Appui au Développement Rural
PDF Post-Doctoral Fellow
PhD Doctor oI Philosophy (doctoral degree)
PhilRice Philippine Rice Research Institute
PIP Project Implementation Plan
PNSA national program Ior Iood security (Chad)
pv. pathovar
PVS participatory varietal selection
QTL quantitative trait locus
R&D research and development
RAP Realising the agricultural potential Inland Valley Lowlands in SSA while
maintaining their environmental services
RAPD-PCR random amplifcation oI polymorphic DNA polymerase chain reaction
96 AfricaRice AnnuaI Report 2011
RISOCAS Developing rice and sorghum crop adaptation strategies Ior climate change in
vulnerable environments in AIrica
ROCARIZ West and Central AIrica Rice Research and Development Network
RYMV Rice yellow mottle virus
SAA Sasakawa AIrica Association
SAED Société d`Aménagement et d`Exploitation des terres du Delta et des vallées du
feuve Sénégal et de la Faléme (Senegal)
SARD-SC Multinational CGIAR Support to Agricultural Research Ior Development on
Strategic Commodities in AIrica (project)
SG2000 Sasakawa Global 2000
SMART-IV Sawah, Market Access and Rice Technologies Ior Inland Valleys
SNP single nucleotide polymorphism
SPCRS Société de Promotion et de Commercialisation du Riz Sénégalais
SPIRIVWA Sustainable Productivity Improvement Ior Rice in Inland Valleys oI West AIrica
spp. (unspecifed) species (plural)
SRV Senegal River valley
SSA sub-Saharan AIrica
SSH Suppression Subtractive Hybridization
SSR simple sequence repeat
STRASA Stress Tolerant Rice Ior Poor Farmers in AIrica and South Asia
SW southwest
SWIHA Systemwide Initiative on HIV/AIDS and Agriculture
TCDC Technical Cooperation among Developing Countries (UNDP)
UEMOA West AIrican Economic and Monetary Union
UJAK Union des Jeunes Agriculteurs de Koyli-Wirnde (Senegal)
UK United Kingdom (oI Great Britain and Northern Ireland)
UL-SOAS School oI Oriental and AIrican Studies (University oI London, UK)
UN United Nations
UNDP United Nations Development Programme
UNECA United Nations Economic Commission Ior AIrica
UNESCO United Nations Educational, Scientifc and Cultural Organization
US United States
USAID US Agency Ior International Development
vol. volume
WAAPP West AIrica Agricultural Productivity Program (World Bank)
WCA West and Central AIrica
WECARD West and Central AIrican Council Ior Research and Development
WTP willingness-to-pay
CGIAR is a global partnership that unites organizations engaged in research Ior a Iood secure Iuture.

CGIAR research is dedicated to reducing rural poverty, increasing Iood security, improving human health and
nutrition, and ensuring more sustainable management oI natural resources. It is carried out by 15 Centers, that
are members oI the CGIAR Consortium, in close collaboration with hundreds oI partner organizations, including
national and regional research institutes, civil society organizations, academia, and the private sector.

The 15 Research Centers generate and disseminate knowledge, technologies, and policies Ior agricultural devel-
opment through the CGIAR Research Programs. The CGIAR Fund provides reliable and predictable multi-year
Iunding to enable research planning over the long term, resource allocation based on agreed priorities, and the
timely and predictable disbursement oI Iunds. The multi-donor trust Iund fnances research carried out by the Cent-
ers through the CGIAR Research Programs.

For more inIormation, visit www.cgiar.org
The Centers:
AIricaRice AIrica Rice Center (Cotonou, Benin)
Bioversity Bioversity International (Rome, Italy)
CIAT International Center Ior Tropical Agriculture (Cali, Colombia)
CIFOR Center Ior International Forestry Research (Bogor, Indonesia)
CIMMYT International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (Mexico, DF, Mexico)
CIP International Potato Center (Lima, Peru)
ICARDA International Center Ior Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas (Aleppo, Syria)
ICRISAT International Crops Research Institute Ior the Semi-Arid Tropics (Patancheru, India)
IFPRI International Food Policy Research Institute (Washington, DC, USA)
IITA International Institute oI Tropical Agriculture (Ibadan, Nigeria)
ILRI International Livestock Research Institute (Nairobi, Kenya)
IRRI International Rice Research Institute (Los Baños, Philippines)
IWMI International Water Management Institute (Colombo, Sri Lanka)
World AgroIorestry World AgroIorestry Centre (Nairobi, Kenya)
WorldFish WorldFish Center (Penang, Malaysia)
About CGIAR
Africa Rice Center (AfricaRice)
01 B.P. 2031 Cotonou, Benin
Telephone: (229) 6418 1313 Fax: (229) 6422 7809 E-mail: AIricaRice¸cgiar.org
www.AIricaRice.org

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