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JOURNAL

Clarks Summit, Pa. NOVEMBER 28 TO DECEMBER 3, 2012 50 www.theabingtonjournal.com


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An edition of The Times Leader
THE ABINGTON
Wilkes-Barre, Pa.
7
7
9
9
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ArtsEtc.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13
Calendar. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2
Classified. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18
Crosswords. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8
Obituaries. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5
School. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9, 10, 11
Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16
INSIDE
Which artist is
displaying his
exhibit at Laura
Craig Galleries? See
Page 13 for details
and photos.
Sensuous
ART
The borough of
Dalton held its
tree lighting
ceremony Nov. 23.
For additional
photos,
see Page 3.
Dalton
delight
LACKAWANNA COUNTY-
Lackawanna County Commis-
sioner Patrick OMalley intro-
duced on Nov. 14 a resolution
that, if adopted, will require all
non -union employees of the
county to be residents of the
county.
According to a press release
from the commissioners office,
there are a total of about 50
county employees who live out-
side those boundaries.
The effect of this residency
resolution will lead to additional
real estate taxes, the release
states. The income generated by
the monies will be spent in our
county to businesses, and in turn
will help our economy.
OMalley explained he feels the
economy will grow as a result of
the little things: workers stopping
for coffee, cigarettes or gas on
the way to work and buying their
groceries at in-county stores.
He said although the proposed
resolution is only in its early
stages at this point, his hope is
that it will be finalized and voted
on sometime between now and
January. He said he is following
up a part of his campaign plat-
form and it is important to him.
He said he would like to even-
tually bring it into union contract
negotiations.
Although OMalley is unsure at
this time whether the resolution
will affect current employees who
live out of county, or only those
hired in the future, he said his
plan is to give those hired in the
future six months after starting
the job to move into the county.
He said if it does include current
workers, they will likely have one
year to relocate.
According to Douglas Hill,
Proposal:
employees
must reside
in county
BY ELIZABETH BAUMEISTER
lbaumeister@theabingtonjournal.com
See County, Page 12
CLARKS SUMMIT - Maitri
and Pari Pancholy will demon-
strate the process of making
Rangoli (sand art) at The
Abington Community Library
host a Diwali Celebration Dec.
8. The sisters have been making
sand art since kindergarten.
Maitri Pancholy enjoys making
peacocks, while Pari prefers
flower designs. The cost for
guests to make a design will be
$1.
The event, from 4 to 6 p.m.,
will feature ethnic refreshments
including a variety of breads,
entrees, and desserts from all
over India. Different types of
music, including vocal music,
classical dance, classical and
current Bollywood tunes will
highlight the day. The cost for
adults will be $5. Refreshments
will be free for children.
According to Dr. Dipti Pan-
choly, event organizer, Rangoli
has a story to tell. In history,
once it was known that a king
was defeated, everyone cele-
brated by decorating their home
using special symbols through
elaborate sand art.
The library is like a temple
of learning, she said. We
thought it would be a good
place to do the event.
Maitri Pancholy thinks the
Ninth-grader Nikitha creates a henna design on the arm of Pari Pancho-
ly. Both girls will participate in the Diwali Celebration Dec. 8 at the
Abington Community Library.
Lighting up the library
Diwali Celebration set for Dec. 8
See Diwali, Page 12
BY ROBERT TOMKAVAGE
rtomkavage@theabingtonjournal.com
WAVERLY - Making
changes to your diet ulti-
mately involves looking at
what you currently eat,
according to Janet Dunn-
Davenport, healthy cooking
instructor and life coach.
For example, when making
a salad, have you considered
substituting field greens,
escarole, spinach or arugula
for iceberg lettuce which is
without much nutritional
value? Eating more greens
rich in Vitamin A and Beta
Carotene, is only part of
Dunn-Davenports overall
strategy to include healthier
wholesome choices in our
diets.
I can have control over
my health by simply watch-
ing what Im eating and
reducing some thingsBe a
scientist and explore. I hope
to inspire people to eat bet-
ter, to live better and have
more joy in our life, she
said. One way to achieve is
by adding more whole
grains and greens in your
life. said Dunn-Davenport,
ABINGTON JOURNAL PHOTOS/JOAN MEAD-MATSUI
Healthy Holiday Cooking Class
instructor, Janet Dunn-Daven-
port, shown in the Waverly Com-
munity House kitchen, will teach
the community to cook healthy,
leave stress behind and love the
holidays.
Learn
how to eat
healthy
BY JOAN MEAD-MATSUI
Abington Journal Correspondent
See Healthy, Page 12
F
or many of the adults in attendance at the Model
Trains Through the Ages event at Steamtown Na-
tional Historic site Nov. 23 through 25 came an op-
portunity to reminisce about the good old days, when tiny
railroad tracks circled the Christmas trees in their homes.
And for many of the children staring wide-eyed at the
working models on display came a time of new discovery
of an old tradition nurtured by their grandparents and per-
haps parents.
ABINGTON JOURNAL PHOTOS/ELIZABETH BAUMESITER
Maryn Kukuchka, of Tunkhannock, sits watching a model train move around the Christmas
tree display during Model Trains Through the Ages at Steamtown National Historic Site
Nov. 23.
Were being
kids this
weekend.
Thats what
were
really doing.
Ron Moore, 64,
Scranton
Remember when
By Elizabeth Baumeister lbaumeister@theabingtonjournal.com
One of the pieces on display
from the collection of Clem
OJevich
A large scale model train on
display at the Model Trains
Through the Ages event
Model train
event a time
to reminisce,
discover
See Remember, Page 12
GLENBURNTWP. - Envi-
ronmental Protection Agency
(EPA) officials Nov. 20 demon-
strated a newonline database
that displays chromiumpollu-
tion levels in the area around
the former Precision National
Plating site on Ackerly Road.
This is a tool being used by
the public to get a better under-
standing of the work weve
done over the years, said Da-
vid Polish, EPAcommunity
involvement coordinator.
The EPAdatabase, which is
one of only a fewin the nation,
represents a newchapter in the
history of combating hexava-
lent chromiumcontamination
around the site. The chromium
leached into the environment
during operations at the plant,
which closed its doors in1999.
Hexavalent chromiumis a
particularly toxic formof the
element chromium. The chem-
ical has various types of indus-
trial applications, but is known
to cause cancer in humans.
The newdatabase, or data
viewer, displays an aerial
photograph of the region to
showthe location of each ac-
tive testing well over time.
Chromiumconcentration data
for each public wellprivate
wells results are excluded from
the dataare rendered in a line
graph and a table. The line
graph, with time on the hori-
zontal axis and contamination
levels in micrograms per liter
of water on the vertical axis,
provides a picture of contam-
ination levels over the life of
each well.
The table provides more
Database
shows test
sites in
Glenburn
BY GERARD E. NOLAN
Abington Journal Correspondent
See Database, Page 12
C M Y K
PAGE 2A www.theabingtonjournal.com The Abington JournalClarks Summit, PA WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 2012
YOUR COMMUNITY
211 S. State St., CLARKS SUMMIT, PA 18411 570-587-1148
NEWS@THEABINGTONJOURNAL.COM
EDITOR KRISTIE GRIER CERUTI
585-1604 / kgrier@theabingtonjournal.com
STAFF WRITERS AND PHOTOGRAPHERS
ELIZABETH BAUMEISTER
585-1606 / lbaumeister@theabingtonjournal.com
ROBERT TOMKAVAGE
585-1600 / rtomkavage@theabingtonjournal.com
RETAIL ADVERTISING ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES
JILL ANDES
970-7188 / jill.andes@timesleader.com
AUBREE ARMEZZANI
970-7291/ aarmezzani@timesleader.com
CLASSIFIED ADVISOR
LINDA BYRNES
970-7189 / lbyrnes@timesleader.com
COVERAGE AREA: The Abington Journal, a weekly community newspaper
that is part of Impressions Media in Wilkes-Barre, PA, covers the Abingtons
area of Lackawanna and Wyoming counties. This includes but is not limited to
Clarks Summit, Clarks Green, South Abington, Newton, Ransom, Glenburn,
Dalton, La Plume, Factoryville, Waverly, Tunkhannock and the Abington
Heights, Lackawanna Trail and Lakeland school districts.
Our circulation hovers between 2,000 and 3,000 readers. We try to get to as
many events as possible, but staff and space limitations make it impossible to
cover everything. If you have news about your family, town or organization,
please send it to us and well do our best to publish it. Photographs (with
captions) are welcome.
CORRECTIONS, clarifications: The Abington Journal will correct errors of
fact or clarify any misunderstandings created by a story. Call 587-1148. Have a
story idea? Please call. Wed like to hear about it. Letters: The Abington Journal
prints all letters, which have local interest. Send letters to: Editor, The Abington
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and include a phone number where we can reach the author. Editor reserves
the right to edit or reject any item submitted. Deadline is noon, Friday prior to
publication. Want a photo that has appeared? We can provide color prints of
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to order.
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week. See box at right for subscription prices. Local subscriptions should arrive
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ton Journal (USPS 542-460), 211 S. State St., PO Box 277, Clarks Summit, PA
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Clarks Summit, PA, 18411. $20 per year, in Lackawanna and Wyoming counties
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ISSN. NO. 1931-8871, VOL. 86, ISSUE NO. 47
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to The Abington Journal, 211 South
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COPYRIGHT 2012: Entire contents copyrighted. All rights reserved. No
part of this publication may be reproduced by any means without the express
written consent of the publisher.
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Return completed formwith payment to: The Abington Journal, 211S. State St.,
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THE ABINGTON
JOURNAL
Be a Santa to a Senior, the campaign that last year delivered more than1,800 gifts to local
needy seniors, is planned again this holiday season as older adults continue to face financial chal-
lenges and loneliness.The area office of the Home Instead Senior Care network, is joining with sever-
al local businesses and community organizations Compassionate Care Hospice, Gino Merli Veterans
Center, Golden Living Center, Highland Manor, Meals on Wheels of NEPA, Oakwood Terrace and
Serving Seniors, Inc. together with Abington Community Library, Geisinger Community Medical
Center, Gertrude Hawk Chocolates, Keystone College, Marshalls, Peebles, Walgreens and Wal-Mart
to provide gifts and companionship to seniors who otherwise might not receive either. Seniors faced
with medical bills and the escalating cost of living typically find they have little or nothing left at the
end of the year, said Bob Vielee, owner of the Home Instead Senior Care office serving Lackawanna
County. Community members are invited to help struggling seniors by picking up ornaments and gift
requests fromChristmas trees, located at: Abington Community Library, 1200 WGrove Street, Clarks
Summit; Marshalls, 1118 Commerce Boulevard, Dickson City; Peebles, 89 Brooklyn Street, Carbon-
dale and State Routes 435 and 502, Moscow; Walgreens, 330 S. Main Street, Scranton and Wal-
Mart, 900 Commerce Boulevard, Dickson City. Trees will be up nowthrough Dec. 10. The items
should be purchased and returned unwrapped to the store, along with the ornaments attached. A
gift-wrapping party, hosted by the Sports Management and Recreation Teamat Keystone College,
will be held at the school Dec. 12. Shown, fromleft: Janet Zaleski, Activity Director at Oakwood
Terrace and Jessica Engel, Community Service Representative at Home Instead Senior Care.
Be a Santa to a Senior seeks gifts
HOLIDAY EVENTS
November 28: Canadian
Pacific Railways U.S. Holiday
Train visit to NEPA, at Steam-
town National Historic Site in
downtown Scranton from 5:45
6:15 p.m. Visitors are en-
couraged to arrive at least
15-30 minutes early. The train
will then depart Scranton for
Binghamton, New York on the
former Lackawanna Railroads
mainline, expecting to cross
the historic Tunkhannock
Viaduct between 7 7:15 p.m.
Entertainers aboard the U.S.
train include The Claytones
and Canadian Country Music
Hall of Famer, Tracey Brown.
Info: facebook.com/CPHoli-
dayTrain or www.cpr.ca.
December 1: Fourth An-
nual Living Christmas Village,
at Grace Bible Church in
Dunmore, continuing Dec. 2
from 4 - 7 p.m. Features live-
music from several local high
school choirs. The walk-
through village includes a
journey through the streets of
Bethlehem, Santas Workshop
for children, puppets, a Live
Nativity, hot cocoa and coo-
kies and more. Cost: free.
Info: 342.5651 or graceb-
iblepa.com.
The Misericordia University
Alumni Associations 14th
Annual Brunch with Santa, at
the Banks Student Life Center
from10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
The event will feature a
brunch served in the Cougars
Den. Children will have the
opportunity to meet Santa. A
professional photographer will
be on hand. Cost: $10 for
adults; $5 for children 5-12
years of age and free to chil-
dren under 5. Seating is limit-
ed and reservations are re-
quired. Info/tickets: 674.6768.
Factoryville Borough Tree
Lighting Ceremony, at the
Borough Hall at 4:30 p.m.
December 4: Empty Stock-
ing Fund Benefit Concert, at
The University of Scranton
Houlihan-McLean Center at
7:30 p.m. Includes The Uni-
versity of Scranton Bands,
Choirs, and Strings. Admis-
sion: one new toy or piece of
childrens clothing, or cash
donation. Benefits children of
local families in need. Info:
941.7624.
DAILY EVENTS
November 28: WYCCC
Educational Luncheon, at
Twigs Cafe in Tunkhannock
from11:45 a.m. - 1 p.m. Beth
Bevan will share her 20- plus
years of human resource expe-
riences. Seating will be limit-
ed to one representative per
business. Request for addi-
tional representatives as well
as non-members will be wait-
listed until all members have
been accommodated. Reserva-
tions: 875.8325 or Debo-
rah@wyccc.com.
November 29: The Lacka-
wanna County Commissioners
Job Fair Mixer, at the Electric
City Trolley Museum from 6 - 8
p.m. The purpose of the mixer is
for local business executives to
network with the commission-
ers.
November 30: Stuffed Animal
Sleepover and Story time, at the
Abington Community Library,
from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. Children
ages 3-8 can treat their favorite
stuffed animals to a sleepover at
the library and enjoy a story
time before kissing them good-
night.
December 1: Griffin Pond
Animal Shelter Volunteer Meet-
ing, at Lackawanna College, 501
Vine St, Scranton at 11 a.m.
Myasthenia Support Group
Meeting on Plasmapheresis, at
Allied Services Graf Communi-
ty Room, Charles Luger Out-
patient Center, 475 Morgan
Highway, Scranton, at 11 a.m.
Guest speakers Yanzheng
Zhang, MD and Dan Leberf-
inger, BS, MT, HP (ASCP) of
the Geisinger Wyoming Valley
Apheresis Program will present
An Introduction to Plasmaphe-
resis &The Opportunity of Per-
forming the Process Periph-
erally. Info: 687.6009 or myas-
thenia.org.
December 2: Lackawanna
Trail Boys Basketball Brunch,
at Gins Tavern in Factoryville
from 9 a.m. to noon. Cost: $10
for adults, $8 for children. All
proceeds will benefit the boys
basketball team.
December 5: Lourdes-
monts 26th Annual S.O.B.E.R.
Party, at the Viewmont Mall
Tree Court at noon. includes
light refreshments, entertain-
ment by LaSalle Academy
Choir of St. Cecelia, RSVP
(deadline Dec. 3): 702.8360.
COMMUNITY
CALENDAR
The name of the Lions San-
ta Project Coordinator was
misspelled in the Nov. 21 issue
of The Abington Journal. The
correct spelling is Heather
Kusma. We regret the error.
EDITORS NOTE
Dear Editor:
Nature has again tested
communities in many re-
gions served by Frontier
Communications. The brutal
effects of Hurricane Sandy
have taken lives, destroyed
property and disrupted life
and commerce across much
of the eastern United
States. The men and wom-
en of Frontier Communi-
cations join the nation in
supporting recovery efforts.
I want to thank our de-
voted employees who
worked around the clock to
keep our facilities oper-
ating, even during pro-
longed commercial power
outages. Our technicians
have struggled through
flooding and downed trees
to deploy generators and
backup batteries to keep
telecommunication facilities
functioning. They have used
chainsaws to gain access to
our facilities to repair dam-
aged and severed fiber and
telecommunications lines.
They have risked their per-
sonal well-being and left
their families in their ef-
forts to serve all our cus-
tomers, especially critical
facilities such as 911 emer-
gency centers and hospitals.
They are doing all they can
to restore telecommunica-
tions service as fast as pos-
sible.
I appreciate our call cen-
ter representatives, who
worked non-stop with
customers to coordinate
response efforts. They
have spoken to thou-
sands who have experi-
enced personal loss and
ongoing danger. They
have heard your stories
and truly understand the
magnitude of this histor-
ic storm. They live in
the communities Frontier
serves and are feeling
feel the effects of Sandy
firsthand.
Last, but certainly not
least, I thank our cus-
tomers for their under-
standing and patience
during this difficult
time. Our customers are
our inspiration for in-
novation and the reason
we constantly strive to
create products and ser-
vices that meet their
changing needs. Custom-
ers are at the center of
all we do.
For more information
and regular updates
please bookmark this
page or visit www.fron-
tier.com/weatheralerts.
You can also find this
information on our Face-
book pages and Twitter
feeds or by calling Fron-
tier at 1.877.854.1705.
Ken Arndt
President, Northeast
and Southeast regions
Frontier Communi-
cations
LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
The Abington Lions Club
will sponsor its 50th annual
Santa Project for Abington
children through second
grade. On Dec. 11 to 13, San-
ta will visit homes in Clarks
Summit, Clarks Green, Chin-
chilla, Waverly, Glenburn
Twp., Dalton, Newton and
Ransom and will present
children, whose names have
been submitted, with a small
gift, free of charge.
Residents are asked to
leave their porch lights on
until Santa has made his
visit. For safety, animals
should be tied. In the event
of snow, Santa would appre-
ciate clean sidewalks. Santa
will make most of his visits
between approximately 5:30
and 8:30 p.m.
For more information,
contact Santa Project Co-
ordinator Heather Kusma
at 570.587.5062.
All parents wishing to
participate must complete
and mail this form. Due to
scheduling, no forms will
be accepted after Dec. 6.
Additional forms may be
downloaded and printed
online at abingtonlions.org.
Abington Lions assist Santa Claus
Dear Editor:
Every year during the holi-
day season, we take time to
reflect and give thanks for the
many gifts in our lives. We
gather with family and loved
ones to share a touch of home.
Its during this special season
the American Red Cross asks
you to take the time to give
something that means some-
thing to the men and women
of the U.S. Armed Forces, our
nations veterans, and their
military families who may be
separated from their loved
ones or far from home.
You are invited to send holi-
day greeting cards with mess-
ages of thanks and support to
our troops. Red Cross volun-
teers will screen, sort and
deliver your cards to military
installations as well as VA and
military hospitals across the
U.S. and around the world.
Visit www.redcross.org/
holidaymail for details and
guidelines or call our office at
570.207.0100 regarding how
you can send a card. Once
youve read the guidelines,
mail your card by Dec. 7 to:
Holiday Mail for Heroes, P.O.
Box 5456, Capitol Heights,
MD, 20791-5456. (Cards post-
marked after Dec. 7 cannot be
guaranteed delivery.)
Spread the word to your
friends, family and neighbors
and lets give something that
means something to our mil-
itary men and women, veter-
ans and their families around
the world in gratitude for their
service.
Carmon Flynn, Executive
Director
American Red Cross,
Lackawanna, Bradford-
Sullivan and Wyoming
County chapters
Factoryville Borough will
host its annual tree lighting
ceremony Dec. 1 at 4:30 p.m.
at the Borough Hall. The
event includes crafts, refresh-
ments, music and a visit from
Santa. During the event, the
Factoryville United Methodist
Church will host a living Na-
tivity and free soup and bread.
Factoryville to
light holiday
tree Dec. 1
The Clarks Green Bor-
ough invites the public to
a Winter Health and Safe-
ty Fair Dec. 15 from 10
a.m. to 2 p.m. at Our
Lady of Peace School,
410 North Abington Road.
Participants will learn
how to protect their
health and safety while
sampling holiday treats
and music at this free
event.
Presentations community
presentations will be in-
cluded.Santa will have
gifts for children ages 12
and younger.
Clarks Green to host health fair
C M Y K
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 2012 THE ABINGTON JOURNALCLARKS SUMMIT, PA WWW.THEABINGTONJOURNAL.COM PAGE 3A
* Annual Percentage Rate shown is for loans with auto draft of payments from a Citizens Savings Bank Deposit Account. Payment for rates shown are based on
$1,000 borrowed and are as follows: For 60 months at 3.99% ($18.41); 120 months at 4.25% ($10.24). Rates subject to change without notice. If the loan is
paid off within 24 months of the origination date, the borrower will be responsible to reimburse Citizens Savings Bank for all third party origination fees paid. No
bank fees except the cost of recording the mortgage.
800.692.6279
www.citizens-savings.com
3.99
%
APR
*
5 Year Fixed Rate
4.25
%
APR
*
10 Year Fixed Rate
Home Equity Loans
NO BANK FEES
Member FDIC
T
he Community Ho-
liday Tree Lighting,
sponsored by the
Dalton Business & Profes-
sional Association, was
held at the park next to
Dalton Fire Company,
North Turnpike Rd. the
evening of Nov. 23. Light
refreshments were served
and holiday music was
provided by the Lacka-
wanna Trail High School
Band.
Christmas in Dalton
ABINGTON JOURNAL PHOTOS/ALICE STUFFLE
ABOVE: Santa arrives in style for the Community Tree Lighting,
courtesy of the Dalton Fire Company.
ABOVE: Santa greets the
children when he arrives in
Dalton.
ABOVE: Ella Naylor, 7, Reese Vida, 6 and Cole Vida, 9, sing along. FRONT COVER: Tessa Skot-
leski, 5, Dalton gets a lift from dad, Tom Skotleski.
RANSOMTWP. - Conversa-
tion regarding unpaid bills alleg-
edly owed to RansomTownship
by RansomRecreational Shoot-
ing Sports, LLC(RRSS) contin-
ued at the township Planning
Commission meeting Nov. 19.
According to the township,
the business owes money for
engineering services regarding a
rifle development planned for
1500 RansomRoad. For an
unspecified reason, however,
invoices were not sent to the
developer until they were sever-
al months outstanding. After
receiving them, RRSSManager
AndrewMassimilian expressed
doubt that the full amount re-
quested was legitimately owed.
It was noted at the Nov. 9
meeting that Massimilian, who
was present, submitted a check
for a portion of the fees, along
with a letter including a list of
fees he is contesting.
The letter, which was read
aloud, stated the contested
portion of the fees represents
services not reimbursable by the
developer under the Pennsylva-
nia Municipal Planning Code
and include, but are not limited
to, charges for services unnec-
essary to reviewthe plans, bill-
ing irregularities, (e.g. billing
both the township and RRSS
for the same meeting), charges
for meetings where RRSSplans
were not being discussed by the
engineer, charges for mistakes
made by the engineer, charges
for services unrelated to the
engineering.
The letter then requests a
reviewand repeal of those fees.
It was noted the contested fees
total close to $6,000.
Planning Commission At-
torney Donna DeVita informed
Massimilian he will need to
submit a more detailed list of
what he is contesting and why.
He replied he has more details
and will submit thempromptly.
It was noted the current devel-
opment plan is set to expire Dec.
26, and the next meeting is Dec.
17.
Massimilian made a request
for an extension on the plans at
the previous months Planning
Commission meeting Oct. 15.
At that time, however, the Plan-
ning Commission voted 5-1to
table it until the bills in question
are paid or a payment plan
agreed upon.
Massimilian inquired again at
the Nov. 19 meeting whether or
not it is legal according to the
Municipal Planning Code for
the Planning Commission to
delay or deny the application
based on the billing dispute.
Attorney DeVita said she was
not aware of anything in the
code prohibiting it, but that she
would again look into it.
According to Massimilian,
Section 506 of the code states
otherwise.
The Planning Commission,
however, voted again to table the
extension request until the Dec
17 meeting, by which time the
disputed bills may be reviewed.
BY ELIZABETH BAUMEISTER
lbaumeister@theabingtonjournal.com
Froma letter fromRansom
Recreational Shooting Sports, LLC
to the RansomTownship Planning
Commission:
(The) contested portion of
the fees represents services
not reimbursable by the de-
veloper.... charges for ser-
vices unnecessary to review
the plans, billing irregular-
ities... charges for meetings
where RSSS plans were not
being discussed by the engi-
neer, charges for mistakes
made by the engineer, charg-
es for services unrelated to
the engineering.
Range billing dispute
continues in Ransom
D
alton resident Joan New-
man went out of her way
to care for her animals
during the recent Hurricane
Sandy. Newman loaded up her
therapy dog, Trooper, and one
pet fish in a large soup bowl
and headed to the Ramada,
Clarks Summit.
Its a really funny story,
Newman said. I walked in with
my dog and fish in a big soup
bowl. I asked themif it was OK
if I put the bowl on the service
counter. And they let me even
though many people without
power were checking in.
She added that her dog was a
bit hit.
Awoman wrote a song
about himand played it for
everyone in the lobby, New-
man said.
Prior to heading to the hotel,
Newmans pet fish were in
jeopardy when the temperature
of her salt water aquarium
dipped to 40 degrees. Newman
was able to save one fish using
Sternos and a chafing dish to
provide water of the correct
temperature. It was nursed back
to health and is doing well.
Asecond fish did not survive.
Warm water, heart saves pet fish
BY ROBERT TOMKAVAGE
rtomkavage@theabingtonjournal.com
Grocery bags
for donation
were distributed
Nov. 11 to those
attending the
worship service
at the Waverly
United Metho-
dist Church. The
food was taken
to the Abington
Ecumenical
Food Pantry
housed at the
Dalton United
Methodist
Church.
Food pantry benefits from churchs generosity
GLENBURN TWP. -Glen-
burn Twp. supervisors an-
nounced their proposed budget
for 2013 at a meeting Nov. 20.
The proposed budget, which
is subject to public review, will
be finalized in a month. In-
cluded in the budget are funds
allocated for upgrades to the
township building, employee
salaries, police protection and
road maintenance. The total
budget is $550,461.
The supervisors have bud-
geted $50,000 for upgrades to
the township building. The
upgrades will include a new
roof on the township garage, a
refurbished handicapped-ac-
cessible ramp, painting and
possibly a power generator.
The amount budget for road
work is $130,000 and $114,000
has been designated for em-
ployee salaries. The super-
visors also added $1,167 to
help the Waverly Police pur-
chase three Tasers.
Supervisors highlighted that
the proposed budget keeps
taxes at the same level.
We feel that weve been hit
by enough tax increases, Su-
pervisor Bill Wicks said.
The township will finish this
year with a budget surplus,
which has been a trend in re-
cent years, the supervisors
said.
In other business, Supervisor
Wicks updated the supervisors
on the coalition of municipal-
ities against Scrantons com-
muter tax increase. The group,
called Scranton Taxing Our
People, will challenge the tax
in court Dec. 10. The super-
visors contributed $200 to
S.T.O.P.s legal fund. Wicks
serves on the legal committee
for the coalition.
Weve been meeting with
our attorney to fight it, Wicks
said.
No tax increase in
Glenburn Twp.
BY GERARD E. NOLAN
Abington Journal Correspondent
The Marleys Mission Board
of Directors announced U.S.
Senator Bob Casey agreed to
serve as Honorary Co-chair of
the Third Annual Blue Ribbon
Gala Feb. 16, 2013.
I amquite pleased to be a
part of Marleys Mission as the
Honorary Co-chair of this
years Blue Ribbon Gala, said
Sen. Casey. Marleys Mission
is an organization that provides
unique treatment for children
who cannot find help in tradi-
tional settings, and it is very
important to me that this orga-
nization expands with each
year so that more children can
be treated. Moreover, it is im-
portant to me that any child,
regardless of economic back-
ground, receives the help they
need at no cost to them, remov-
ing any barriers to treatment.
Senator Bob Casey has
been a tireless advocate for
children and families in his
career on both a national and
statewide level, said Gene
Talerico, President of Marleys
Mission. We can think of no
better person to spread our
message of hope and healing
than someone who has provid-
ed hope to so many for so
long.
According to the organiza-
tion, among many other mea-
sures supporting children,
Casey introduced legislation
requiring mandatory reporting
of child abuse, improving the
Childrens Health Insurance
Program(CHIP) and increas-
ing availability of quality child
care for economically disad-
vantaged families. Casey sup-
ported legislation that provides
assistance to children in foster
care.
Co-chairs of the 2013 Blue
Ribbon Gala are Kathleen
Bolling Bell and Gretchen
Wintermantel, who both volun-
teered on the Gala Committee
in 2011and 2012. The Blue
Ribbon Gala, which is the
organizations major fundrais-
er, will be held at the Hilton
Hotel and Conference Center,
100 Adams Ave. in Scranton,
from6 to11p.m. The theme of
this years Gala is Building
Our Future, celebrating the
fact that Marleys Mission now
owns a 32.4-acre property in
Newton Township and will
build a campus there Spring,
2013. For more information on
the Third Annual Blue Ribbon
Gala, visit www.marleysmis-
sion.com/blue-ribbon-ga-
la-2013/.
Marleys Mission, which is
currently based in Lake Ariel,
is a non-profit organization
that provides Equine-Assisted
Psychotherapy at no cost to
children and families who have
experienced trauma. To date,
Marleys Mission has treated
more than180 children from
seven counties since opening
its doors in July 2010.
Marleys Mission names Sen. Casey
honorary co-chair for Gala
Hope Chest
Auction recap
More than 100 attended the event
at Backyard Ale House, Scranton.
Marleys Mission auctioned six
wooden hope chests.
Five were provided by Woods & Co
of Clarks Summit.
A sixth chest was handcrafted,
painted and sponsored by Al and
Linda Day of Equinunk.
The artists who donated their talent
and time, and their respective hope
chest sponsors, included:
Artist Trinka Ravaioli, sponsored by
2013 Blue Ribbon Gala co-chairs
Gretchen Wintermantel & Kathleen
Bolling Bell and Zoe, Charlotte and
Lilly Haggerty
Artist Rachael Boles, sponsored by
the Seitzinger Family and the
Talerico Family;
Artist Karina Singer, sponsored by
Woods & Co.
Artist Kathy Barrett, sponsored by
Barrett and JMJ Designs
Artist Bridget Feeney, sponsored by
Backyard Ale House.
Ken Rivenburg, Rivenburgs Auction
Gallery, participated.
Appetizers were donated by
Mendicinos Restaurant in Moscow,
Russells Restaurant in Dunmore
and Constantinos Catering in
Dunmore.
C M Y K
PAGE 4A www.theabingtonjournal.com The Abington JournalClarks Summit, PA WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 2012
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Tunkhannocks Month Long Wreath Hunt
November 20 - December 15
The Tunkhannock Business and Professional Association wants
you to learn all that Tunkhannock has to offer, so join us for some
shopping fun! Entry cards are available at the participating businesses.
Each of the Wreaths Around Tunkhannock participating businesses
has a uniquely decorated wreath on display.
Visit a minimum of six stores each week of the contest.
Each Saturday of the contest, two drawings will be held, each valued at
over $250. Each prize drawing will be a random assortment of $25 gift
cards from the participating businesses.
Find addresses for participating businesses & more information
at www.tunkhannockbusiness.com
cards from the participatin b s
Beads and Baubles
Mary-Go-Round
Sassy Albert Soaps
Popcorn Etc.
Paradise Gifts
Greenwoods Furniture
Dietrich Theater
Wyoming County
Press Examiner
Tunkhannock Public
Library
J.R.s Hallmark
Endless Mountains
Quiltworks
Wisnosky Jewelry
Whipple Performing
Arts Studio
Shadowbrook Inn and
Resort
Creekside Gardens
Still Chic Boutique
Jennifer L. Gifts and
Antiques
Monzies Floral Design
and Friends
Purkeys Pink Apple
Restaurant
The Finan Detail
Electric Heart
Melange - A Country
Concoction
Country Gift Box
McCain Electric
Walburn Photography
Majestic III Salon
Earthy Eats and More
Keystone Truck Caps
T urkey ... Y our B est B et
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O RDER NO W ...
Fresh Turkeys
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OrderM onday through Saturday
8 A.M .-5 P.M .
Pallm ans Poultry Farm
1511 Sum m itLake Road,ClarksSum m it
(570)587-3258 DALTON - At the Dal-
ton Council meeting, Nov.
8, President Bill Salva
mentioned that Dalton
Council was requested by
the Lackawanna County
Borough Association to
contribute $200 to stop
the commuter tax.
Jared Gard, who repre-
sented Dalton in a meet-
ing about this matter,
mentioned that individuals
who do not live in Scran-
ton, would have to pay a
1 percent commuter taxto
work in Scranton.
President Bill Salva
asked Gard if the tax is
starting at $200 and then
increasing. Gard replied
that it was not discussed.
Salva entertained a mo-
tion to approve the dona-
tion. Board member Bill
Montgomery asked to ta-
ble it until they find out
if the donation is higher
than $200. Board member
Lorraine Daniels assured
that the donation is $200.
Daniels added that she
would like to pass the
motion because it would
help the people of Dalton.
We dont have to take
the second step if it be-
comes expensive, she
said. She made the mo-
tion to donate $200 to
stop the commuter tax.
Nobody seconded this mo-
tion; therefore, the motion
died.
We will not make a
donation at the time, said
Salva. It doesnt mean it
cant be revisited.
In other business, Salva
thanked firefighter Mark
Sujkowski and the rest of
the Dalton Fire Company
for making their firehouse
a shelter for the citizens
of Dalton during Hurri-
cane Sandy.
Sujkowski said that
there was a lot of work
done by the fire depart-
ment and the police. He
gave a copy of the Coun-
ty EMA (Emergency Med-
ical Associates) Respon-
sive Recovery cost to Bob
Carpenter and noted a
local damage assessment.
Right now, the countys
gathering the members
together to submit to the
state to see what sort of
qualifications we have
with the state, but theyre
looking for initial damage
assessments, he said.
.
Salva asked Sujkowski
to host an open-house
training session about
generators.
Sujkowski agreed to
advertise the training ses-
sion.
Dalton Borough thanks firefighters
BY BEN FREDA
Abington Journal Correspondent
The Dietrich Theaters Fas-
sett Studio was filled with
candy, creativity and holiday
spirit Nov. 12 as baker Gina
Sherwood and her daughter
Carly taught teens and adults
the basics of building and
designing gingerbread houses.
The Tunkhannock Business
and Professional Association
will host a Gingerbread House
contest as part of Tunkhan-
nocks Christmas in Our
Hometown: Dec 7 and 8.
Rules are available at
www.tunkhannockbusiness-
.com.
Budding architects
ABINGTON JOURNAL/NATALIE MENNICUCCI
Carly Sherwood, Meshoppen, assists by demonstrating decorating
techniques at the Gingerbread House Workshop held Nov. 12, at the
Dietrich Theater. Local baker Gina Sherwood held the class to teach
construction and applying decorations to homemade gingerbread de-
signs.
The Mission Statement for the Waverly United Methodist Church is:
To joyfully follow and share Jesus. On Nov. 12, the mission statement
was put into action. Eighty Thanksgiving meals were prepared for the
patrons of the Abington Ecumenical Food Pantry housed at the Dalton
United Methodist Church. Each meal consisted of turkey, stuffing,
mashed potatoes, gravy, green beans, cranberry sauce and cake.
Shown above are those who helped prepare the meals, Kathy Cra-
ven, Holly Gilpin, Rev. Barbara Snyder, Dave Gilpin, Evalyn Rudat, Ron
Hackman, Shirley Rosencrance and Georgia Bass.
Waverly UMC prepares dinners
DALTON - The first-ever
Pub for Paws Benefit will be
held at McGraths Pub in
Dalton on December 2 from 5
to 10 p.m.
I think its wonderful that
the community is supporting
the benefit, said Beverly
Bright, Development Coor-
dinator of Griffin Pond Ani-
mal Shelter. Were taking
care of hundreds of animals
until they find a home.
Pub for Paws will feature
live music by local bands,
prizes, gift baskets, and 50/50
drawings. There will be a
cover charge of $20. It will be
reduced to $10 for anyone
who brings a bag of pet food
or supplies for donation. The
drinks are no additional
charge,and will be donated by
McGraths Pub owners/broth-
ers Jimmy and Joe McGrath.
Jimmy McGrath had a
Rottweiler named Haus
McGrath, who was killed by
an unknown hit-and-run driv-
er on Oct. 31. Jimmys friend
Linda Serniak suggested hav-
ing a benefit, which would
help other pets, in honor of
him. Fifty percent of the ben-
efits proceeds will be donat-
ed to the Griffin Pond Animal
Shelter in Clarks Summit.
The other half will be donat-
ed to True-Friends Animal
Welfare Center in Montrose.
We really appreciate anyone
helping us, said Linda Stau-
denmayer, manager of True-
Friends Animal Welfare Cen-
ter. Most of our shelters
depend on donations. Any
donations are greatly appre-
ciated. They help us to help
many animals.
The live music will start
with Ken and Mark from
Graces Downfall from 5 to 6
p.m. Rick and John from
Nowhere Slow will play from
6 to 7 p.m.; Aaron and Guido
from Ourafter from 7 to 8
p.m.; Byrant and Jay Green
from 8 to 9 p.m.; and Mace in
Dickson at 9 p.m.
"We really appreciate the
thoughtfulness and generosity
of McGraths Pub," said Dory
Browning, director of True-
Friends.
To help with the event or
donate, please contact Jimmy
at McGraths Pub by calling
570.563.2668.
I hope its going to be a
good turnout, said Jimmy
McGrath. It should be a lot
of fun. Hopefully, we can do
this every year.
Pet benefit
scheduled
BY BEN FREDA
Abington Journal Correspondent
Our Lady of Peace
School in Clarks Green will
host a Merry Market-
place Dec. 2, from 11 a.m.
to 4 p.m. Co-chairs Barba-
ra Braatz and Maria Dona-
hue helped the PTG dream
up the event. Carolers from
the Wayne County Chorale
Society (11:30 a.m.- 1:30
p.m.) will sing holiday
tunes. The women have
gathered vendors to offer
unique specialty items of
all price ranges. Children
are welcome. Santas elves
will be on hand to help
children shop for their
secret gifts. And for those
who dont want to bake or
just like sweets? A Christ-
mas cookie walk will be
held. Free gift wrapping for
boxed items. Childrens
crafts for those age 3-11
will take place. A lunch will
be offered by Duffys Cof-
feehouse.
Our Lady of Peace aims to
make shopping Merry
Barbara Braatz and Maria Donahue, co-chairs of The Merry
Marketplace at Our Lady of Peace School in Clarks Green.
The University of Scranton
Singers, joined by acclaimed
trumpeter Mark Gould, will
present their 45th Annual
Noel Night Dec. 1, in the
Houlihan-McLean Center
(Mulberry Street at Jefferson
Avenue).
The performance begins at
8 p.m.
Doors will open at 7 p.m.,
with prelude music beginning
at 7:05 p.m.
A Christmas gift to the
community, the Noel Night
concert is free and open to the
public, and seating is on a
first-come, first-seated basis.
The ensemble will perform
works by G. F. Handel, Mor-
ten Lauridsen, Ned Rorem,
Boris Ord, Igor Stravinsky,
Randol Alan Bass, Mark Si-
rett and others.
For additional information
regarding this event, contact
Cheryl Y. Boga, director of
Performance Music, at 941-
7624, or atwww.scranton.edu/
music.
The University of Scranton Singers will present the 45h Annual Noel Night concert, a free performance, open
to the public, Dec. 1, at 8 p.m. in the Houlihan-McLean Center, with a prelude beginning at 7:05 p.m.
University Singers present 45th
Annual Noel Night Dec. 1
C M Y K
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 2012 THE ABINGTON JOURNALCLARKS SUMMIT, PA WWW.THEABINGTONJOURNAL.COM PAGE 5A
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THE FROYO
CAPITAL!
OBITUARY
Leonard
Steenburg,
90, a resident
of Clarks
Summit since
2006, died
Saturday, Nov.
17, after a courageous battle
with multiple myeloma. Leo-
nard was born in Cherry Val-
ley, N.Y. on April 14, 1922 to
Jesse and Helen (Morton)
Steenburg.
He attended Cherry Valley
school excelling in sports,
particularly baseball.
Leonard married the love of
his life, Doris Hamm and
owned and operated dairy
farms in Hartwick Seminary
and Elba, N.Y. After his re-
tirement from Niagara Mo-
hawk, they spent time trav-
eling and enjoying a few
months of the year in Florida.
He was a long time resident
of Elba, N.Y. prior to his
living with his eldest daugh-
ter, Joan (Steenburg) Girts in
Clarks Summit. He was an
incredible Godly prayer war-
rior for his three daughters
Joan Steenburg Girts, Cheryl
Steenburg Whitten and Karen
Steenburg Dilcher, son-in-
laws, grand children, great
grandchildren, family and
friends. He was so proud of
all his family as was seen in
the gallery of pictures in his
room.
He served faithfully in vari-
ous leadership capacities at
First Baptist Church of Elba
where he had a longtime
membership. He was inven-
tive and a problem-solver,
able to fix anything. His love
of gardening was evident in
his beautiful roses, various
other flowers and wonderful
fruits and vegetables which
he shared with many. Wood-
working was another passion,
and he created many pieces
for his daughters, grandchil-
dren, and great grandchil-
dren. He enjoyed daily watch-
ing the various birds that feed
at his feeders. Leonard could
best be described as a hard
working, gentle, compassion-
ate man that had a generous
spirit. He loved telling stories
about his life to his children,
grandchildren and great-
grandchildren. His faith in
God and strength will remain
as an inspiration to all who
knew him. He will be missed
dearly by his family and
friends.
Leonard was predeceased
by his wife, Doris (Hamm)
Steenburg; sister Melva
(Steenburg) Nowak; and son-
in-law Larry Girts. He is
survived by three daughters,
Joan Girts of Clarks Summit.,
Cheryl and David Whitten of
Standish, Maine and Karen
and Harry Dilcher of Muncy;
eight grandchildren and their
mates; and 15 great- grand-
children. Visiting hours will
be held from 7-9 p.m., Nov.
20 at First Baptist Church of
Elba, N.Y. The funeral ser-
vice will be held Nov. 21, at 1
p.m. at First Baptist Church
of Elba. Interment will follow
at the Maple Lawn Cemetery,
Elba, N.Y. Arrangements are
in care of Burdett & Sanford
Funeral Home. Local ar-
rangements are being handled
by the Lawrence E. Young
Funeral Home.
Those desiring may con-
tribute in his memory to:
Guiding Eyes for the Blind,
Hospice of Genesee County,
or First Baptist Church of
Elba.
Leonard William
Steenburg
November 17, 2012
Jessie B.
Burns Win-
ters, 85, of
Clarks Sum-
mit, died Sun-
day, Nov. 18, at
Mountain
ViewCare Center.
Born Aug. 27, 1927, in
Scranton, daughter of the late
Joseph H. and Marjorie Monie
Burns, she was educated in
Throop schools, was a1945
graduate of Throop High
School and a graduate of Lack-
awanna Business College. She
was a Clarks Summit resident
since1955, having moved from
Scranton. She was a title clerk
for several years at Scranton
Dodge, Scranton, and later
worked in the trust department
at PNCBank, Scranton. She
was a member of the Clarks
Summit United Methodist
Church, Clarks Summit.
She was a loving mother and
grandmother who cherished
her grandchildren and great-
grandchildren. Her grand-
children shared much joy and
happiness with her. She en-
joyed dancing and golf, and
was a former member of the
Scranton Canoe Club, Lake
Winola.
The family wishes to express
their sincere appreciation to the
staff at Mountain ViewCare
Center for the care and kind-
ness they provide.
Surviving are two daughters,
Gail Sinisko and husband,
Michael, Beaufort, S.C.; and
Barbara Winters, Clarks Sum-
mit and Moorestown, N.J.; a
brother, Douglas Burns and
wife, Ann, Throop; three
granddaughters, Stephanie
Petko and husband, David, and
their children, Megan and Lori,
Monroe, N.Y.; Heather Woods
and husband, Jason, and their
children, Tristen, Samantha
and Marissa, Columbia, S.C.;
and Courtney Fugate and hus-
band, Scott, and their children,
Adler and Brinkley, Beaufort,
S.C.; two nieces, Linda Burns,
Throop; and Bonnie Janus and
husband, Walter, Clarks Sum-
mit; and a nephew, Joseph
Burns III and wife, Margot,
Atlanta, Gashes was also pre-
ceded in death by a brother,
Joseph H. Burns Jr.
For more information, direc-
tions or to send an online con-
dolence, visit www.jennings
calvey.com.
Jessie B. Burns
Winters
November 18, 2012
WAVERLY TWP. - Wa-
verly Township could be next
in line for Marcellus shale
money, according to Super-
visors at the Nov. 12 meeting.
At this point only a test well
exists. Township Supervisors
plan to make an ordinance,
but agreed to defer the sub-
ject until there are further
developments.
It was planned to advertise
the 2013 budget after the Nov.
12 meeting. There are no tax
changes in the budget.
Also in the township:
* The Waverly township
newsletter will be mailed the
townships support of the
effort to stop a commuter tax
planned by the City of Scran-
ton.
* Due to the growing pop-
ularity of the new Frisbee
golf course, the township is
considering selling discs to
patrons during the weekend
and normal office hours.
* There has been no update
regarding the township ad-
dress change. Supervisor Dr.
Douglas Klamp expressed
frustration with receiving and
sending mail and Supervisor
Tom Durbin noted how the
address change affects billing
when buying items online as
the address is not found.
Township manager Bill
White said he planned to
speak to the Dalton postmas-
ter again soon.
Waverly may receive funds for gas drilling
BY BRITTNEY PIERCE
Abington Journal Correspondent
The graphics firmBig Fish Design, owned
by Kerrie Gilbert of Clarks Summit, and the
marketing communications company River
Rock Communications, owned by Catherine
Bolton of Lake Ariel, have announced a deci-
sion to partner.
The agency will operate under the name of
River Rock during the transition to the new
partnership and will be located at the River
Rock building in Jefferson Township. Together
their clients include Fidelity Bank, Buck Hill
Falls, The Allergy Center of Delta Medix and
Delta Medix, Inc. and Akzo Salt, Inc.
Gilbert served as co-creative director for
Paolin &Sweeney, an advertising/public rela-
tions firmin Cherry Hill, N.J. While there, she
oversawand managed their art department
.After a decade of experience in the advertising
and graphic design industry, Gilbert founded
Big Fish Design, a firmspecializing in graphic
design, corporate identity and advertising.
Gilberts clients have included Mercy Hospi-
tal, Bamford Construction, US Foodservice/
Bevaco Division, PGEnergy and Pennsylvania
Enterprises, Inc. She was responsible for the
formation of a newcorporate identity system
for northeastern Pennsylvanias gas company,
PGEnergy, while it underwent a major restruc-
turing process. She was instrumental in cre-
ating Mercy Hospitals Continuumof Care
program.
Prior to returning to northeast Pennsylvania
where she served as project director for Wall
Street West, Bolton was the president and chief
operating officer for the Public Relations So-
ciety of America (PRSA). At PRSA, Bolton
was an advocate for the public relations profes-
sion and a frequent speaker on the crisis com-
munications and planning. Bolton is an adjunct
professor at Marywood University.
Big Fish, River Rock
announce partnership
Anthony
Petrone Jr.,
75, died
Wednesday,
Nov. 21 at
Common-
wealth
Home Health & Hospice
of NEPA shortly after
being admitted. His wife
of 39 years is the former
Patricia Ellen Drury.
They had been residents
of South Abington Twp.
since 1991.
Born May 18, 1937, in
Queens, N.Y., son of the
late Anthony and Jennie
Ciccone Petrone, he was
a 1956 graduate of An-
drew Jackson High
School, Queens and later
furthered his studies in
electrical engineering at
Hofstra University, Far-
mingdale Technical
School and Queens Col-
lege. He was employed
more than 31 years by
Grumman Manufacturing,
where he worked as an
electrical mechanical de-
signer. During his profes-
sional career he received
many honors for his
work. He was most proud
to have worked on the
ground support team for
Apollo 13 and receive
recognition, which in-
cluded having his name
on a plaque placed on the
moon.
He was a faithful mem-
ber of Our Lady of the
Snows Parish, Clarks
Summit, where he was a
dedicated Eucharistic
minister, member of the
Mens Club, an adult aco-
lyte and supporter of the
Tiny Team Christmas pro-
gram. He also served for
many years as a Euchar-
istic minister and guitar
player for the youth mu-
sic ministry at his former
parish, Our Lady Perpetu-
al Help, Lindenhurst,
N.Y. He was a faithful
regular at the First Friday
Mass Mens Group and
Tuesday luncheons with
the retirees of Grumman.
A loving husband, de-
voted father and grandfa-
ther, Anthony will be
sadly missed for his kind
and gentle ways. He was
a self-taught musician
from an early age, and
enjoyed playing guitar,
the piano/keyboard and
most of all, accordion.
One of his greatest joys
was playing for family
gatherings, providing en-
tertainment for all. He
was also an avid chess
player, and in his youth
enjoyed time on his boat
with family and friends.
Tony was a Mr. Fix-It
to all those close to him
and often created a solu-
tion for just about any-
thing broken.
Also surviving are his
son, Anthony III; daugh-
ters, Cara Marie and Jen-
nie; his brother, Joseph
Petrone; sisters, Jean Riz-
zuti, Virginia Parlato,
Gloria Rampolla and Ro-
semary Perry; and grand-
children, Cheyanne and
Angelo Matisko; all live
out of state. He also has
numerous nieces, neph-
ews and cousins.
Memorial contributions
may be made to Our Lady
of the Snows Parish, 301
S. State St., Clarks Sum-
mit, PA 18411; or Make-
A-Wish Foundation, 1327
Pittston Ave., Scranton,
PA 18505. To send an
online condolence, visit
www.jenningscalvey.com.
Anthony Petrone Jr.
November 21, 2012
Clarks Summit Cub Scout Pack 160 seeks new members
C M Y K
PAGE 6A www.theabingtonjournal.com The Abington JournalClarks Summit, PA WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 2012
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Open 7 days
Sun.-Thurs. 11:30-10:00
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Full menu available
for take out
808 Scranton CarbondaleHwy.
Dickson City, PA 18519
570-483-4305
www.masarupa.com
Under New
Ownership
Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Suchecki of Old Forge, an-
nounce the engagement of their daughter, Jennifer A.
Suchecki, to Stephen E. Page, son of Cyndi Roe of
Clarks Summit and Robert Page of Columbus, Ohio.
The future bride and groom recently graduated
from The University of Scranton with a bachelor of
science degree in Exercise Science. Jenn is pursuing
her doctorate of physical therapy at The University of
Scranton. Stephen is employed as a physical therapy
technician at ProCare Physical Therapy and is plan-
ning on returning to The University of Scranton to
pursue his doctorate in physical therapy in the sum-
mer of 2013.
The winter wedding will be January 5, 2013 in
Clarks Summit.
Jennifer A. Suchecki and Stephen E. Page
Suchecki to wed Page
Northeastern Lodge #63 Fraternal Order of Police recently
awarded four $500 scholarships to college -bound students
who are pursuing a career in criminal justice.
Sgt. Don Bishop,
Honesdale Police
and Chairman of
the FOP scholar-
ship committee
presents a $500
check to Joseph
Perechinsky, Lake-
land High School
graduate. Pe-
rechinsky is at-
tending Keystone
College and study-
ing criminal jus-
tice.
President James
Gray of Lodge #63
presents Neil
Hawk, Abington
Heights High
School graduate, a
$500 check. Hawk
is attending West
Chester University
and studying
criminal justice.
Student scholars
The Clarks Summit Cub
Scout Pack 160 meet once a
week with their den and once
a month with their pack of
all ages between 1st and 5th
grade. The Scouts are spon-
sored by Clarks Summit Unit-
ed Methodist Church and are
always recruiting members.
Monthly meetings usually fea-
ture a guest speaker. Recently,
Naturalist at the Carbon
County Environment Center,
Jeannie Carl, spoke and in-
troduced lived birds of prey
to the boys, including a
Barred Owl, a Red Tail Hawk
and a Screech Owl.
Also at their meeting, mem-
bers of Cub Scout Pack 160
collected food dnations for
the Dalton Food Pantry,
which has been existence for
30 years. It is run by the
Abington Ecumenical Minis-
terium.
ABINGTON JOURNAL/ALEXANDRA BATSON
The Clarks
Summit Cub
Scout Pack 160
recently collect-
ed items for the
Dalton Food
Pantry.
Navy Cmdr. Michelle
D. Morse, whose hus-
band, John, is the son of
Linda L. Phillips of
Clarks Summit, along
with 5,500 Sailors and
Marines assigned to the
Enterprise Carrier Strike
Group (CSG) recently
arrived in Norfolk, Va,
following a seven-and-a-
half-month deployment
supporting operations in
the Mediterranean and
the Arabian Seas.
USS Enterprises return
to Norfolk will be the
25th and final home-
coming in her 51 years of
distinguished service. The
aircraft carrier is sched-
uled to be inactivated
Dec. 1, in a ceremony at
Norfolk Naval Station.
While deployed, En-
terprise CSG served in
the U.S. 5th and 6th
Fleet areas of responsib-
ility (AOR), conducting
maritime security oper-
ations, theater security
cooperation efforts and
missions in support of
Operation Enduring Free-
dom.
During her 238 days
away from Norfolk, Big
E, as Enterprise is affec-
tionately known, safely
steamed 80, 968 miles
and Carrier Air Wing 1
(CVW-1) flew more than
8, 000 sorties in support
of Operation Enduring
Freedom and exercises in
the 5th and 6th Fleet
AORs.
Enterprise was commis-
sioned Nov. 25, 1961 as
the eighth ship to bear
the name Enterprise. Big
E was the worlds first
nuclear-powered aircraft
carrier. During her 51
years of service, Enter-
prise deployed 25 times
and participated in every
major conflict since the
Cuban Missile Crisis.
Enterprise has been
homeported in both Ala-
meda, Calif., and Nor-
folk, Va., and conducted
operations in every re-
gion of the world.
The December inactiva-
tion ceremony will be the
last official public event
for Enterprise, and will
serve as a celebration of
life for the ship and the
more than 100, 000 Sail-
ors who have served
aboard the ship.
For more information
on USS Enterprise, her
legendary history, and
Inactivation Week events,
visit www.enterprise.na-
vy.mil
Aircraft carrier back in U.S.
C M Y K
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 2012 THE ABINGTON JOURNALCLARKS SUMMIT, PA WWW.THEABINGTONJOURNAL.COM PAGE 7A
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- Branch Team with more than 200 Years Combined Experience!
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Navigating today's mortgage approval process is challenging and requires the advice of an
experienced Mortgage Professional. Eric McCabe, a life-long resident of Northeast, PA, has
built his career helping area families realize their dream of homeownership. If you would
like to see exactly what it takes to own a new home for your family, Eric is ready
and eager to help.
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Eric McCabe
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400 Tird Avenue, Suite 100 - Kingston, PA 18704
100 E Grove Street
Clarks Summit
586-1961
www.medicineshoppe.com
Helping kids
stay healthy.
FREE
KIDS VITAMIN CLUB
FREE vitamins every 30 days! Simply come into Te Medicine
Shoppe Pharmacy to receive your FREE KIDS Complete
Multivitamin chewables 30-count bottle!
Not valid with other oers. Parent must come in and sign each child
up for a 30 day supply of chewable vitamins. While supplies last.
The 11th annual OMalley Free Christmas Party will be held Dec. 16 from 1 to 3 p.m. at the Keyser Valley
Community Center, located on the corner of Keyser Ave. and Jackson St. in Scranton.
Children from pre-school to fifth grade are welcome at the event.
The party will consist of a picture with Santa Claus, Goodfellas pizza, orange drink, candy canes, a
coupon for a cheeseburger and fries from McDonalds and a free childrens meal from the Texas Road-
house. Entertained will be provided by DJ Jason Miller.
Guests are asked to RSVP to 346.1828 with the number of children attending by Dec. 13.
OMalley Christmas Party set for Dec. 16
Delta Me-
dix announces
the addition of
Terrence P.
Lenahan,
M.D. to their
multi-special-
ty group of
physicians
and surgeons. Lenahan brings
his expertise in Pulmonary
Medicine and Critical Care.
Lenahan, a native of Scran-
ton, graduated from The Uni-
versity of Scranton, Magna
Cum Laude, with a B.S. in
Biology in 1983. He then re-
ceived his Doctorate in Med-
icine from Jefferson Medical
College, Philadelphia in 1987.
Lenahan completed a three-
year residency in Internal
Medicine at Thomas Jefferson
University Hospital, Philadel-
phia and a three-year Fellow-
ship in Pulmonary Disease
and Critical Care Medicine at
Hahnemann University Hospi-
tal in Philadelphia, where he
received the Resident Teach-
ing Award in his final year.
He has maintained a private
practice at Regional Hospital
of Scranton and Moses Taylor
Hospital, since he returned to
the area in 1993.
He will continue to see
patients at the Delta Medix
offices, Scranton, as well as at
the Delta Medix ENT/Allergy
Center, Dickson City.
Lenahan resides in Clarks
Summit with his wife Mary
Kay and their three children.
Delta Medix adds
C.S. resident
Lenahan
The Home
Health Divi-
sion of Allied
Services
Integrated
Health Sys-
tem has been
named to the
2012 Home-
Care Elite List for the fifth
consecutive year. Only 15
percent of the 487 home
health agencies in Pennsylva-
nia were named to this com-
pilation of the top-perform-
ing home health agencies in
the United States.
The list of HomeCare Elite
agencies is ranked by an
analysis of performance mea-
sures in quality outcomes,
process measure implemen-
tation and financial perform-
ance. Agencies that have
earned recognition among the
HomeCare Elite demon-
strated that they not only can
adapt to an evolving market-
place but continue to excel in
both clinical and financial
outcomes.
For the past 30 years,
Allied Services Home Health
has provided services to help
people remain safely at home
when they require the ser-
vices of a skilled clinician,
said Mary Lou Knabel, Al-
lied Services HomeCare
Services. Allied Services
Home Health division serves
Lackawanna, Luzerne,
Wayne and Wyoming coun-
ties, as well as Pike, Monroe
and Susquehanna counties on
a limited basis. Patients typ-
ically receive a combination
of nursing care, physical,
occupational and speech
therapy, medical social work,
and home health aide visits to
address their health care
needs.
Allied Services Home
Health patients show better
walking and bed mobility,
decreased pain and acute care
admissions, and increased
levels of patient/caregiver
medication education and
patient satisfaction than the
national average. Allied Ser-
vices Home Health is accred-
ited by the Join Commission,
the nations oldest and largest
standards-setting and accred-
iting body in health care.
Joint Commission accred-
itation reflects and orga-
nizations commitment to
improving the quality of care
it provides to patients.
We believe we have the
finest home health staff in
Northeastern Pennsylvania,
said Bill Conaboy, Esq., Pres-
ident/CEO, Allied Services
Integrated Health System.
They collaborate across our
continuum of care to provide
the best home health services
to our patients, and we are
proud they have once again
been recognized."
Allied Services
earns recognition
Bill Conaboy
Francene Pisano Dudziec, a northeastern
Pa. native, is trying to help other families
experience the same feeling of family unity
she enjoys with her children while they travel
the state admiring Christmas light displays.
The site was created to use as a guide for
families to visit Christmas lights, holiday
light shows, impressive decorated homes and
inflatable displays that are free to the public.
Dudziec is the creator of LocateTheLight-
s.com, a website designed to list holiday
homes and light displays while helping area
families locate them, whether they are large
public city displays or small ones at a private
residence on Main Street in your hometown.
Its the second best Christmas list to be
on, said Pisano Dudziec.
Knowing that families take pride in the
work they put in to their displays, Pisano
Dudziecs vision was to create a Christmas
light clearinghouse to remove the guesswork
that families sometimes experience when
theycheck out light displays. LocateThe-
Lights.com is a virtual scrapbook that allows
a family in the area to browse a display
throughout the states without leaving the
comfort of their homes.
For more information, contact Francene
Pisano Dudziec 570.510.5352 or lighting-
director@locatethelights.com to be listed.
Local woman launches holiday website
C M Y K
PAGE 8A THE ABINGTON JOURNALCLARKS SUMMIT, PA WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 2012
CROSSWORDS
ANSWERS ON PAGE17
The Griffin Pond
Animal Shelter, 967
Griffin Pond Rd.,
Clarks Summit, is
open for the adop-
tion of pets from
noon to 4:30 p.m.,
daily. Wish list items
are always appre-
ciated, especially cat
litter and paper tow-
els.
Adopt a cage at the
Griffin Pond Animal Shel-
ter for one month and
your $20 donation will go
toward care and feeding
of the animal in that cage
for the month you choose.
A card will be placed on
the cage identifying the
sponsor for that month.
Send the following
Adopt-a-Cage informa-
tion, including name,
address, city, state and
zip, phone number,
sponsor month, choice of
dog, cat or small animal
cage and how you would
like your sponsor card to
appear, along with $20
for each cage to The
Griffin Pond Animal Shel-
ter, 967 Griffin Pond Rd.,
Clarks Summit, PA 1841 1.
My name is ... Opal
Name: Opal
Age: Senior
Sex: Female
Breed: Collie mix
About me: Imvery sweet and easygoing. Im
easy to walk on a leash and amhousebroken. I need
regular brushing. I do well with people of all sizes. I
like other dogs and dont harmcats.
Remember to contact the Griffin Pond Animal
Shelter at 586.3700 if your pet is lost or goes astray.
Lisa and Paul Bartoletti, owners
of CareGivers America, 700 South
State Street, Clarks Summit will
offer a festive atmosphere for a
Dec.11 After Hours Business Card
Exchange hosted at their locations
Wellness Center from 5:30 to 7:30
p.m. as part of the Abington Busi-
ness and Professional Association
Business in the Mix Series. The
Wellness Center is located in the
upper building of the complex,
however, parking will be available
at both buildings.
Complimentary hors doeuvres
will be provided by event co-host
Beta Bread and its owner Michael
Bonczar. Beverages and soft drinks
will be provided by CareGivers
America. A 50/50 raffle will be
held during the event.
Each Abington Business and
Professional Association member is
encouraged to bring one non-mem-
ber
Reservations are appreciated and
can be made to 570.587.9045 or
LauraABPA@aol.com by Dec. 7.
ABPAoffers a recipe for holiday fun at its upcoming After Hours Card Exchange Dec.
11co-hosted by CareGivers America and Beta Bread. Shown, fromleft, are Becky
Jacobs, Caregivers America; Gail Rees, Abington Business and Professional Associ-
ation Mixer Co-Chairperson; Lisa and Paul Bartoletti, CareGivers America owners;
Amy Dichiara, Caregivers America and Kristie Grier Ceruti, Abington Business and
Professional Association Mixer Co-Chairperson.
ABPA offers recipe
for holiday fun
There will be a Holiday
Party Dec. 6 at Cangieros
Restaurant, 1315 Main Street,
Dickson City to benefit the
Griffin Pond Animal Shelter.
A $20 donation which will
include food and soda, is
requested to attend the eve-
ning festivities.
Send a reservation to Grif-
fin Pond Animal Shelter, 967
Griffin Pond Road, Clarks
Summit or call 570.585.0513.
Holiday party to
benefit shelter
The Lackawanna County
Electric City Trolley has set up
special excursions for the holi-
day season. Santa on the Trol-
ley excursions are slated for
Dec. 1and 2, 8 and 9, 15 and16
and 22. It will depart the Trolley
Museumat 9:30 a.m., 11a.m.,
12:30 p.m., 2 p.m. and 3:30 p.m.
The10-mile Thanksgiving
and Santa rides head to the
Trolley Works Building by PNC
Field, Moosic and then back to
the museum.
Reservations are suggested.
Contact The Trolley Museumat
570.963.6590.
Santa on the Trolley
in December
C M Y K
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 2012 THE ABINGTON JOURNALCLARKS SUMMIT, PA WWW.THEABINGTONJOURNAL.COM PAGE 9A
Principal Jane Quinn announc-
es the Our Lady of Peace School
Honor Roll for the First Quarter
marking period.
Grade 6-1: High Honors -
Michael Giallorenzi, Nicholas
Gershey
Honors: Margaret Chesnick,
Anna Cuff, Theresa Daly, Nicholas
Genco, Julia Horchos, Hannah
Hughes, Matthew Mariotti, An-
drew Noto, Grace Okrepkie, Luke
Wesolowski, Elisa Yanni
Grade 6-2: High Honors:
Kathryn Dwonczyk, Lauren Ger-
shey, Emma Tully
Honors: Mary Bormes, Bren-
dan Braatz, Rachel Burdyn, Bryce
Genello, Norman Kanavy, Andrew
Mariotti, Maureen Noles
Grade 7-1: High Honors:
Sam Bednarz, Alexis Blackburn,
Tricia Caucci, Evan Florey, Brigid
Lynett, Antonia Milas, Michael
Oravic, Maria Terrinonio
Honors: Michael Durr, Timmy
Christman, Sam Dickson, Joseph
Donahue, Gianna Emiliani, Sharon
Houlihan, Angie Kanavy, Conor
McCall, Andrea, McDarby, Abby
Molnar, Henry Rusak, Ellie Wright,
Ally Zolin
Grade 7-2: High Honors:
Ben Feibus, Tyler Maddock, Addy
Singh, Kristina Thomas
Honors: Julia Burke, Kyle
Chrysler, Chris Cobb, Mary Come-
rford, Alex DElia, Grace Farrell,
Nicholas Giallorenzi, Lizzie Gum-
ula, Rose Hricko, Luke Johnson,
Stephen Kirby, Allyson Marquardt,
Sarah Murray, Abby Pietrowski,
Shea Quinn, Ben Weis
Grade 8-1: High Honors:
Gregory Bormes, Kyle Brier, Riley
Hesser
Honors: Michael Cestone,
Grace Evans, Tom FitzPatrick,
Emily Goryeb, Gabrielle Horchos,
Abby Rothwell
Grade 8-2: Honors: Cait-
lin Andrews, Shane Colleran, Mary
Graff, Nicholas LaBelle, Tarquin
McGurrin, Dagny Rippon, Ann
Wesolowski.
HONOR ROLL
Keystone College in La Plume and Countryside Conservancy representatives recently gathered to cele-
brate the addition of a 1.25-mile segment to the Conservancys Trolley Trail Project.
Through the donation of a trail license agreement, Keystone College has become the latest partner in
Phase Two (Factoryville to Dalton) of the Trolley Trail, a historic right-of-way that once transported Keystone
students to campus via the Northern Electric Trolley. Both organizations are excited for the non-motorized
recreational trail to extend into Wyoming County and eventually link trail users from Clarks Summit to Lake
Winola.
Shown from left: Cheryl Ellsworth, Conservancy Trail Coordinator; Sharon Burke, Keystone College Exec-
utive Director of Institutional Advancement; Bill Kern, Conservancy Executive Director; Attorney Dorrance
Belin, Conservancy Board Member; Keystone College Professor Howard Jennings, Conservancy Board Mem-
ber; Jim Dougherty, Conservancy Board President and Keystone College President Dr. Edward G. Boehm Jr.
Keystone, Countryside Conservancy enter
into trail agreement
Trail Rotary recently pre-
sented the third grade students
of the Lackawanna Trail Ele-
mentary Center with dictio-
naries.
Approximately 100 students
received dictionaries at no
charge.
AT RIGHT: Trail Rotary Repre-
sentative Gene Puerner, Jackson
Pieretti, Kamryn Mercer, John
Halter, and Cora Rivera .
Rotary presents dictionaries to third graders
Dizzy?
Hearing Loss?
Ringing?
Ear Wax?
THESE PROBLEMS ARE OUR SPECIALTY!
Dr. Erica Schoenberg Gallagher
Doctor of Audiology
7
1
6
3
0
0
Abington Audiology & Balance Center
604 South State St., Clarks Summit, PA (570)587-EARS(3277)
Hearing and
Balance Specialist
Hearing Aids / Balance Testing
Doctor of Audiology
Stop in and HEAR what we have to say...
THHES ESEE THHES ESEE
BBala ann BBala ann
Ca ll 1- 8 00- 2 73- 7130 To Ad vertis e
R eligious S ervice C alendar
O UR LADY O F
THE S NO W S
S t. Ben ed ict
S ATUR DAY
VIGIL M AS S ES
4 p .m . S t. Ben ed ict
5 p .m . Ou rL ad yof
the S n ows
6:30 p .m . Ou rL ad y
ofthe S n ows
S UNDAY
7 a.m . Ou rL ad yof
the S n ows
8 a.m . S t. Ben ed ict
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ofthe S n ows
11:00 a.m . S t. Ben ed ict
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ofthe S n ows
12:20 S t. Ben ed ict
CO NFES S IO NS
S ATUR DAYS
3:00 p .m . S t. Ben ed ict
6:00 p .m . Ou rL ad y
ofthe S n ows
(570) 586- 1741
Ca tholic Luthera n
TR INITY LUTHER AN CHUR CH
205 W . Grove S treet
Rev. George M athewsP astor
W ors hip S e rvic e s
S atu rd ay7:00 p .m .
Con tem p oraryS u n d ayS ervice 8:15 a.m .
Trad ition al S ervice 9:30 a.m .
www.Trin ityL u theran cs.com
Call ou rP reschool:
586- 5590
Chu rch Office
587- 1088
THE CHUR CH
O F THE EP IP HANY
25 Chu rch Hill,
Glen b u rn Twp ., P A.
(2 M ilesNorth of
ClarksS u m m it)
Com e join u sfor
worship on
S UND AY
8:00am & 10:30am
HOL Y EUCHARIS T
9:00 S u n d ayS chool
& Ad u ltF oru m
W ED NES D AY
9:30AM
HOL Y EUCHARIS T
5 63- 15 64
www.ep ip han y
glen b u rn .org
God sheart& han d sin
the Ab in gton s
FIR S T BAP TIS T CHUR CH
O F ABINGTO N
1216 N. Ab in gton Rd
( corn erofAb in gton & Carb on d ale)
Com e Join UsF or
S ervicesS u n d ay
M orn in g 11:00 a.m .
P astorK en n eth K n ap p
(570) 587- 4492
Ba p tis t
Chris tia n
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14014 Orchard D rive, ClarksS u m m it
Acros s f rom Red BarnV illage,N ewtonT wp.
P astorD an M organ tin i
(570) 587- 2885
Worship Service: Sunday 10:00AM
Time of Prayer: Sunday 11:15AM
Bible Study: Wednesday 6:00PM
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101 Carb on d ale Rd
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5 8 6-63 06
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239 Northern Blvd.
Clarks Summit, PA
Evening & Weekend Appointments Available
(570) 585-8888
Mountain View Dental
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New Patients Welcome!
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HOLIDAY OPEN HOUSE
Thurs, Nov. 29th, 9-8 Fri, Nov. 30th, 9-8
Sat, Dec. 1st, 9-5 Sun, Dec. 2nd, 12-5
Featuring Crabtree & Evelyn Toiletry Products
& Mrs. Prindables Apples
310 S. Blakely St., Dunmore, PA 344-8109
Hours Daily 9-8 Sat. 9-5 Sun. 12-5
Delivery Available We Ship Anywhere!
PERSONAL TOUCH
Gourmet Gift Baskets
& Toiletry Baskets
C M Y K
PAGE 10A www.theabingtonjournal.com The Abington JournalClarks Summit, PA WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 2012
On Oct. 23, students from Baptist Bible College and Seminary donated their time and effort to help rake
leaves, winterize flower beds and generally spruce up the grounds around the Clarks Green Borough
Building and the Park located on the opposite side of North Abington Road. Spencer Fountain, Josh Mow-
ers, Justin Massa, Liz Cronin, Hannah Holton, Carrie Limbert, Tamra Lenfesty, Kathleen Frandsen, Gina
Parone, Allie Onahen, Jared August and Renelle Theodore, through their commitment to Community Ser-
vice, donated their labor to assist Clarks Greens Public Works Department in continuing the tradition of
keeping the Borough properties clean and green.
BBC students help clean Clarks Green
Shown, Fran Tartella, a representative from the Anthracite Heritage
Museum, talked to Clarks Summit Elementary School students about
the history of the coal industry in Pennsylvania.
C.S. Elementary students
learn about coal industry
The Guidance Depart-
ment at Lackawanna
Trail High School held
its annual career fair
Nov. 14.
Representatives from
nine colleges and 16 oc-
cupations were on hand
to speak to the students
in grades 7 to 12.
Colleges represented
were: Keystone College,
Kings College, Lacka-
wanna College, Penn
State University, Johnson
College, University of
Scranton, Misericordia
University, Kings Col-
lege, McCann School of
Business and Technology
and Fortis Institute.
Occupations covered
were: Financial Advis-
ing, Gas Industry, Phys-
ical Therapy, Athletic
Training, Cosmetology,
Nursing, State Police,
Probation, Veterinarian
and Veterinarian Tech-
nician, Teaching, Jour-
nalism, Ultrasound Tech-
nician/Sonography, Phy-
sician, Chiropractor, Per-
sonal Training and
Sports Management.
Approximately 550
students took advantage
of the event to talk to
and learn about different
colleges and occupa-
tions.
Lackawanna Trail hosts career fair
Ryan Dixon from
the McCann
School of Busi-
ness speaks
with students
PHOTOS COURTESY ALICE STUFFLE
Erich Aten representing a company in the gas industry.
Pavel Togobitsky came a
long way to become a better
teacher and pastor.
A teacher at Novosibirsk
Theological Biblical Seminary
in Novosibirsk, Siberia, Togo-
bitsky traveled nearly 6,000
miles in October to attend a
one-week on-campus module
for the Doctor of Philosophy
program at Baptist Bible Sem-
inary in Clarks Summit. He
intends to use the knowledge
and degree to help raise the
level of education offered at
Novosibirsk Theological Bib-
lical Seminary.
Even though he is far from
home and family, Togobitsky
said the Baptist Bible Semi-
nary experience is dream
come true.
It has been wonderful,
Togobitsky said.
Doctoral-level programs
include the Doctor of Ministry
and Doctor of Philosophy
degrees. These help students
increase their capacity to
serve in a current ministry or
prepare them to excel in a new
one, such as teaching at the
seminary level. Five different
D.Min. concentrations enable
students to focus on an area of
their choice, such as counsel-
ing and spiritual development,
pastoral ministry, theological
studies, global ministry and
communication.
Doctor of Philosophy stu-
dents are prepared for re-
search, writing and leadership.
Also providing flexibility, the
Ph.D. program allows students
to focus in the areas of Old
Testament, New Testament,
Systematic Theology or Bible
Exposition. BBS doctoral
programs draw students from
around the world. Along with
students from Jamaica and
Canada, Togobitsky was
joined by colleague Evgeny
Bakhmutsky from Moscow,
Russia. Bakhmutsky is the
Vice President of The Union
of Evangelical Christian-Bap-
tists of Russia.
Im really blessed. I like
being here, Bakhmutsky said.
I like the professors, their
wisdom, their openness and
the good spirit. Everyone is
very friendly and programs
are ministry-oriented. The
faculty is open to students and
students questions.
Bakhmutsky came to Clarks
Summit despite some con-
cerns he had for the safety of
his church at home. Churches
in many areas of Russia are in
the midst of a persecution by
government officials. Some
churches practicing outside
the government supported
Russia Orthodox Church have
been destroyed.
Students in doctoral or mas-
ters level programs at BBS
have many options from
which to choose. Academic
programs range from a 30-
credit Master of Ministry -
available in a totally online
format - to the terminal Ph.D.
and Doctor of Ministry de-
grees. Online, on-campus and
hybrid options are available at
each degree level and include
the Master of Divinity pro-
gram, which offers a totally
online option with a unique
one-year paid internship.
The new M.A. degree in
Biblical Apologetics is a dy-
namic program fully accred-
ited online 30-credit hour
program. It is designed to
strengthen and equip pastors
and ministry leaders to better
understand, articulate, defend,
and contextualize the Chris-
tian faith in a credible, com-
passionate and contemporary
manner.
Fall doctoral
modules draw
students to BBC
Members of the Keys-
tone College community
gathered Nov. 13 to dedi-
cate a new Veterans Day
Memorial in front of
Harris Hall on campus.
The black granite
memorial features the
logos of the United
States Army, Navy, Air
Force, Marines, and
Coast Guard as well as
the symbol of soldiers
who have served as pris-
oners of war or are Mis-
sing In Action.
Funds for the memo-
rial were raised by mem-
bers of the Keystone
College Armed Forces
Club and other members
of the Keystone commu-
nity.
Following the dedi-
cation, the annual Veter-
ans Day luncheon for
members of the college
community and honored
guests was held in the
Theatre in Brooks.
Keystones Veterans
Day ceremonies are held
each year to honor those
who have served and
who currently serve in
our nations armed
forces and those who
have given their lives in
service of their country.
ABINGTON JOURNAL PHOTOS/EMILY TAYLOR
Keystone College President Dr. Edward G. Boehm Jr.
speaks at the new Veterans Memorial in front of Harris Hall
at Keystone College Nov. 13.
A new Veteran Memorial outside Harris Hall at Keystone
College, La Plume.
Keystone College
dedicates Veterans
Memorial on campus
The Abington Heights Civ-
ic League Christmas Potluck
Dinner and installation of
new members will be held
Dec. 3 at the clubhouse, 115
Colburn Ave., Clarks Summit
at 6 p.m. For more informa-
tion, call 587.3101.
Meetings are usually held at
7:30 p.m. the first Monday of
each month September
through June.
A.H. Civic League
to host potluck
On Dec. 1, Santa Claus is
leaving his sleigh at the
North Pole and arriving by
special train at six communi-
ties in the Lackawanna Val-
ley during the Christmas in
a Small Town program.
Families are encouraged to
assemble at the communi-
ties train stations to wel-
come Santa as the train pulls
into town. At each stop,
Santa and his friends will
greet all of the children,
hearing their lists for special
Christmas wishes. After the
visit with Santa, families can
enjoy refreshments, live
entertainment and special
activities.
The Valley View High
School Marching Band will
perform at the Archbald and
Jessup train stations, greet-
ing Santa with holiday mu-
sic and entertaining the
crowd. New for this year, the
Scranton High School
Marching Band will be per-
forming at the Scranton
stop. The Santa Train and its
crew will be available for
photo opportunities while at
each station.
All activities are free.
Train rides for the public are
not available.
The schedule is as follows:
Carbondale Train Station-
10:30 a.m., Archbald Train
Station- 11:35 a.m., Jessup
Train Station- 12:20 p.m.,
Olyphant Train Station- 1
p.m., Dickson City Train
Station- 1:45 p.m., and State
Office Bldg. parking lot-
2:45 p.m.
Santa visits
area by train
C M Y K
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 2012 THE ABINGTON JOURNALCLARKS SUMMIT, PA WWW.THEABINGTONJOURNAL.COM PAGE11A
FACTORYVILLE - At the
Lackawanna Trail board
meeting, Nov. 12, Elemen-
tary Center principal Tania
Stoker shared with the board
activities for Veterans Day.
She mentioned that art
teacher Demora created an
art project for elementary
students.
We cut out 600 hands
(cutouts), and made a huge
flag out of those hands, red
white and blue hands, she
said. He (Mr. Demora)
really should be commended
for the work he put into
that.
Stoker showed her fellow
board members a photo of
this flag which has students
names and thank-you mess-
ages to the Veterans. The
actual flag is displayed in the
elementary centers multi-
purpose room.
Stoker also announced that
Mrs. Pardue and Mrs. Fran-
ko created a slideshow using
PowerPoint with photos of
Veterans related to the facul-
ty and staff.
We also had any student,
who did not have pictures,
bring in items for care pack-
ages and we actually got a
wonderful response, said
Stoker. We have so much
stuff downstairs that were
looking for anybody thats
overseas right now who
could use a care package.
We have a lot of families
names coming in but if
theres anybody else who has
any military family members
right now overseas, we can
create some extra care pack-
ages for them.
Stoker mentioned that her
father Ronald Stoker, who
was a Vietnam War veteran,
was a guest speaker at the
elementary center.
In his secondary report,
Principal John Rushefski
announced that the high
school hosted a Veterans
Day program.
Director of Special Educa-
tion Stephanie Russell is
working on the Child Count
report, which looks at active
students who receive special
education service. She is
scheduling Tuesdays at the
high school for greater ac-
cessibility to speak with the
high school teachers and to
schedule IEP (Individualized
Educational Program).
I also formed a commit-
tee to review processes and
procedures in the special
education department, she
said. What were looking to
do is to streamline our com-
munication and our proc-
esses.
Russell acknowledged
high school science teacher
Steve Jervis, whom she
spoke to at IEP meetings.
Hes very accommodat-
ing and very eager to work
with all the students, and do
whats necessary, she said.
Superintendent Matthew
Rakauskas announced that
Jan. 21 and March 28 will be
make-up days for the school
cancellations due to power
outages from Hurricane
Sandy.
In other business:
* Board member Judith
Johnson made a motion to
add the following names to
the district substitute lists:
Wendy Mickle, Clarks Sum-
mit, art and math; Rachel
Sapio, Factoryville, special
education; Eleanor Kane,
Factoryville, teachers assist-
ant and cafe; Tiffany Car-
penter, Factoryville, teacher
assistant and secretary; and
Willard Kresge, Factoryville,
maintenance sub. All clear-
ances are on file. The board
approved 9-0.
* Board member Frank
Tylutki made a motion that
Chris Bergey be approved as
a volunteer Junior High
assistant basketball coach.
All clearances are on file.
The board approved.
* Board member Mark
Lombardi made a motion to
accept Frank Tylutkis resig-
nation as school board mem-
ber, effective January
2013.The board approved
9-0.
L.T. honors
Veterans
BY BEN FREDA
Abington Journal Correspondent
Just before Thanksgiving
vacation, about 6 first
through seventh grade stu-
dents from Abington
Christian Academy (ACA)
loaded 20 shoebox-sized
packages into the back of a
car belonging to Louise
Cator, ACAs business
manager.
Some boxes were covered
in colorful wrapping paper.
Others were decorated in
drawings and phrases such
as Merry Christmas or
God Loves You. Inside
the boxes were small toys,
toiletry items, gloves,
markers and candy.
The boxes are headed for
a local Operation Christ-
mas Child (OCC) Drop-off
Center, then to a regional
office in Maryland, where
the boxes will be packed
up and sent overseas to
children in dire circum-
stances in countries such
as Uganda, Cambodia and
the Dominican Republic.
Seth Young, of Clarks
Summit, a first grade stu-
dent, said he is very hap-
py to help kids who dont
have things."
Seventh-grader Eva Rap-
penglueck, of Benton, said
the annual schoolwide pro-
ject is a lot of fun and it
shows children around the
world that someone cares
for them.
She also said the student
body watched a video
showing children in other
countries opening shoe
boxes that had been gath-
ered and distributed by
Operation Christmas Child.
It was amazing to see
children from the other
side of the world getting
shoe boxes like the ones
we packed, she said.
They were so excited to
receive something as sim-
ple as a bouncy ball or a
toothbrush.
Last year over 720,000
children received shoe box-
es full of simple gifts. This
year Operation Christmas
Child announced that it
shipped its 100 millionth
box since it began its min-
istry in 1993.
Shown, front row: Louise Cator. Middle row, from left: Jaelen Some-
rville, Seth Young, Monica Lam, Damian Drutherosky and Madison
Castellano. Back row: Eva Rappenglueck.
Students send
Christmas goodwill
around world
The Lakeland Jr./Sr. High School senior officer, from left: Hugh
Doyle (Secretary), Matt Morrell (President), Mora Hoyle (Treasurer),
Michael Thomas (Vice President).
Lakeland class officers set
Shown above: Misericordia University freshman Adam Candelori of
Clarks Summit, left and Ross Baver of Bernville, right, were among
more than 600 new students at the campus who spent the Orien-
tation Day of Service volunteering throughout nearby communities.
The Orientation Day of Service introduces incoming students to
the communities surrounding campus and gives them the opportuni-
ty to give back to the community as well.
Freshman Ross Baver of Bernville, said one of reasons he chose
Misericordia was for the community atmosphere he found there and
was happy to take part in the Orientation Day of Service. Baver plans
to earn his undergraduate degree in psychology and his graduate
degree in Misericordias Doctor of Physical Therapy Program. Paint-
ing alongside Adam Candelori of Clarks Summit, at the Back Moun-
tain Trail, the two agreed that it was important and rewarding to help
the community. I think it is great that we get out here to do this
before we get too involved in our classes, sports and other activ-
ities, Candelori said.
Area students give back
CLARKSGREEN- The
Clarks GreenBoroughCoun-
cil meetingNov. 14dealt
mainlywiththe councils
reactiontothe proposedcom-
muter taxinthe cityof Scran-
ton, the 2013budget andup-
comingevents.
The commuter taxwas
mentionedduringGerard
Hetmans presentationfor the
Lackawanna CountyDepart-
ment of CommunityRela-
tions. CouncilwomanMarnie
ODea Palmer askedwhythe
countyhas not commentedon
the commuter tax. Hetman
explainedthat while the coun-
tyis aware of the tax, they
have noofficial positionon
it. He saidhe wouldbringthe
matter upagainas the court
date onthe taxis next month.
Later inthe meeting, Palm-
er reportedthe results of this
months AbingtonCouncil of
Governments (ACOG) meet-
ingwhere the taxwas dis-
cussed. ACOGhadagreedto
asktheir municipalities for
$200eachtocontribute to
legal fees for the groupSTOP
(ScrantonTaxingOur People)
whoare takingthe matter to
court. Clarks Greencouncil
agreedtocontribute the $200
tothe cause.
Council alsodiscussedthe
2013budget for the borough.
Theyreceiveda draft of the
tentative budget andapproved
it for advertisinganddis-
cussionat the next workses-
sionNov. 28. The Winter
HealthandSafetyevent will
be heldDec. 15at Our Ladyof
Peace School from10a.m. to
2p.m. Council discussedthe
formationof a Centennial
Committee tobeginplanning
Clarks Greens Centennial
celebration. Mayor William
Thorburn, Marnie ODea
Palmer andLynnEarleywere
chosentorepresent council on
the committee.
C.G. discusses
commuter tax
BY EMILY CULLEY
Abington Journal Correspondent
C M Y K
PAGE 12A www.theabingtonjournal.com The Abington JournalClarks Summit, PA WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 2012
The event, presented
for the second year by the
Steamtown National His-
toric Site and its partner,
the Lackawanna Histor-
ical Society, aimed to
provide something for
everyone, whether young
or young-at-heart.
Its primary focus, ac-
cording to a press release,
was on model railroad-
ing as a holiday tradi-
tion, and the program
included various model
train exhibits, demonstra-
tions and races. It was
run by local volunteers,
who contributed model
trains from their personal
collections for display, as
well as their time.
One of those volun-
teers, Dan Emick, 80, of
Scranton, said hes been
interested in trains his
whole life. He said his
favorite train from his
collection is an Amer-
ican Flyer, his first one,
which he got in 1932.
Emick said he has good
childhood memories of
beginning to set up the
train set at Thanksgiving
with his father, and fin-
ishing it by Christmas.
In our day, it was a big
deal, said Ron Moore,
64, of Scranton, another
of the program volun-
teers. Christmas and
trains went together.
He explained this is
why he was there helping
out at the event. He en-
joys doing what he did
when he was a kid and
watching other kids get
excited about the same
thing.
Were being kids this
weekend, he said.
Thats what were really
doing.
The event was well
attended, not only by
locals, but visitors from
out of state, and Emick
said the annual program
grew considerably from
last years.
Mark Brennan, program
spokesperson, described
it as a fun event, say-
ing, It adds a nice touch
to the park. It gives vis-
itors something to look at
and reminisce about.
Clem OJevich, right, and his grandson Robert Gorski display
some trains from their collection and Nanticoke shop Warrior Run
Locomotive Works at the Model Trains Through the Ages event.
AT LEFT: Jack
Doyle, of Boston,
Mass., takes a
turn at running a
model train on
display at
Steamtown
National Historic
Site with his
mother Michelle,
brother Jack and
grandmother
Mary Alice
Doyle, of Clarks
Summit.
ABINGTON JOURNAL PHOTOS/ELIZABETH BAUMEISTER
Isabella Hill, of Elmhurst, gives Alex Polzer, of Elmhurst, a lift so
he can better see a model train as it passes by on the track on
one of the exhibits during the Model Trains Through the Ages
program at Steamtown National Historic Site.
AT LEFT:Model
Trains Through
the Ages event
attendees at
Steamtown
National Historic
Site take turns at
running one of
the model trains.
From left: Pro-
gram exhibitor
Mike Passero, of
Scranton and
Gabrielle, Anna-
belle and Jack
Wilson, of Jasper,
Mich. The Wilson
family was origi-
nally from Clarks
Summit.
REMEMBER
Continued from Page 1
who has been teaching
healthy cooking, primarily
vegetarian cooking for 10
years. She ascribes to the
creed, Food is our med-
icine.
The Waverly Community
House invites anyone who
would like to learn new and
different ways to take care of
yourself through the process
of making your own great
meals, to attend a demo
holiday Tao cooking class
Nov. 29 from 6 to 8 p.m. in
the Comms commercial
kitchen. Instructors Janet
Dunn-Davenport and Joanna
Bach will teach participants
to prepare healthy simple
festive foods using easy,
delicious and healthy recipes
without all the pressure and
calories. A series of six-
session classes will begin in
January and more informa-
tion will be available at the
demo class.
Eating healthy has been
nearly a lifelong mission for
Dunn-Davenport, whose
affinity for the culinary arts
is part of her lineage that
dates back to her great
grandmother, who had a
logging camp in the Adiron-
dacks and later owned a ho-
tel in New York.
Cooking is part of who I
am, she said. The overall
theme in her cooking classes
is to teach how to cook your
own food efficiently
using healthy food choices.
It doesnt have to be expen-
sive or take a lot of time. It
can be extremely healthy and
fun. I really enjoy cook-
ing. I want to help to inspire
people to get back to that
(cooking)
Dunn-Davenport became a
yoga teacher in the 1970s and
said she was really interested
in cooking her own food.
She has reaped the benefits
and convenience of her own
organic garden and raised her
children teaching them to
cook when they were very
young because I wanted
them to learn how to make
their own food, she said.
So I knew the importance
of thatso I believe in how
much healthier it is to pre-
pare your own food She
has taken many cooking
classes including in New
York at the Institute of In-
tegrative Nutrition and has
traveled to and taken cooking
classes in Thailand, and
French cooking classes in
Vermont.
I happen to love Thai
food. Its very simple, very
healthycoconut milk, coco-
nut oil, organic, lemongrass,
and cilantroI love prepar-
ing soups from Thai-
landIts so bright and deli-
cious. And its all really
fast.
In the cooking classes, she
and Bach will cook cuisine
from around the world in-
cluding Thailand, Turkey,
Italy, India and Syria. The
classes will cover cooking
seasonal vegetarian food
using herbs and whole grains
to make soups, stews, salads
and for juicing and smooth-
ies.
Dunn-Davenport said,
Once we get done, well sit
and well commune eat our
food. It will be a whole
healthy meal.
The cost per class is $50 or
$270 for the series of six
classes, to be held in Janu-
ary.
To learn more about Dunn-
Davenport, visit her web site,
taoofdelicioushealth.com, or
for more information regard-
ing the classes, contact Janet
at 242.7232 or Joanna at
445.0124.
The Waverly Community
House is located at 1115
North Abington Road, Wa-
verly.
HEALTHY
Continued from Page 1
program will be educational
for guests looking to broad-
en their horizons.
Its a really good way to
show other people about
Indian culture, she said.
Its becoming more popular
in America and this cele-
bration will help people
learn a little more about the
traditions.
Nikitha, a ninth-grade
student, will organize henna
demonstrations. According
to Nikitha, the most popular
designs are peacocks, man-
gos and a variety of floral
designs. Peacocks are the
national bird of India and
mango is the national fruit.
The cost for guests to get a
henna designed on them
will be $2 for children under
10; $4 for all other ages.
According to Dipti Pan-
choly, Diwali is a five-day
festival in which different
prayers are offered each day.
One day is specially set
aside for forgiveness and
throwing out demons and
negativity, one day for
prayer for wealth and good
health to come into the
home. Another day, the
prayer is for wealth to come
into business. Another day is
set aside for feasting.
The final day dedicated to
brothers and sisters.
Wherever the brother
may be, he would try to get
to his sisters home to get
together and exchange pre-
sents, Dipti Pancholy said.
According to Maitri Pan-
choly, one of the traditions is
cleaning the house to help
the gods feel welcome.
Another tradition of Di-
wali is that friends and fam-
ily exchange presents.
Most Indians celebrate
Diwali as the day of home-
coming for King Rama,
according to Dipti Pancholy.
Rama and his queen, Sita,
were placed in exile by his
stepmother as part of a
promise made by the king.
The king promised the
queen that he would give
her any one wish because
she had saved his life. Her
wish was that for 14 years,
her son, who was younger,
would rule. During the exile,
the queen was abducted by
the king of another far away
kingdom, called Lanka.
Through the help of a south-
ern kingdom, Rama was
able to retrieve his queen.
Because it was the darkest
night, they couldnt find
their way back to the king-
dom and the citizens were
concerned that he would get
lost and not find their way
home. Citizens lit oil lamps
throughout the night so that
the couple could find their
way home.
That is the reason why
we still light lamps, Dipti
Pancholy said.
During the events Story
Time, Maitri and Pari Pan-
choly will explain the story
and traditions of Diwali.
The setting off of fire-
crackers, another Diwali
tradition, will take place
outside the library at the end
of the program.
Guests are asked to regis-
ter by Dec. 6 by either stop-
ping at the library or calling
587.3440.
PHOTO COURTESY LEELA BAIKADI
Shown above is an example of Rangoli art.
Henna
art,
shown,
is
popular
during
Diwali
cele-
bra-
tions in
India.
Nikitha draws a floral pattern
on the arm of Pari Pancholy.
DIWALI
Continued from Page 1
executive director of the
County Commissioners
Association of Pennsylva-
nia, such a resolution is not
uncommon or unusual both
at the county and local mu-
nicipal levels. He said, how-
ever, it is much easier to
carry out countywide.
Hill explained the com-
mon reasoning behind it is
that an individual working
for the citizens in a county
should know the citizens,
understand the issues and
be involved in the county.
He added that some believe
those being paid out of the
countys tax funds should
be county taxpayers.
OMalley echoed these
sentiments. He believes
living in the county makes
a county worker a better
citizen in the community.
In the big scheme of
things, he said, I think its
a plusThe area that you
live in is the area that
youre concerned about.
COUNTY
Continued from Page 1
detailed data on the precise
levels of contamination for
each test.
Atime slider feature al-
lows a user to access data hun-
dreds of tests at well locations
for any time in the last 40
years, beginning with the first
testing well constructed in
1970. The wells test surface
water and groundwater at dif-
ferent levels of rock under-
ground.
Some wells are nested,
which means they are designed
to test contamination at differ-
ent levels underground in the
same location. The viewer
sorts data for each layer of
rock under the site.
The geology of the region is
unique, EPAonsite coordinator
Ann DiDonato said, noting that
the much of the rock is frac-
tured, or cracked, and the un-
derground layers are irregular.
Despite the uneven geology of
the site, EPAcontractors have
determined the dimensions of
the contamination plume,
which refers to the affected
area.
Theyve done an amazing
job tracking these areas down,
DiDonato said, noting that the
dimensions of the plume are
fairly well-defined now.
EPAcontractors, funded by
Precision National Plating,
have initiated several rounds of
calciumpolysulfide injections
into the ground. Calciumpoly-
sulfide converts the hexavalent
chromiuminto a trivalent
form, which does not have the
same toxic characteristics.
The injections have worked
well, according to Ann DiD-
onato, the EPAs onsite coor-
dinator for the Precision site.
Occasionally, the levels in a
particular well will spike, a
phenomenon that the officials
call rebounds. DiDonato said
the rebounds indicate that
some of the chromiumrecently
dislodged fromwithin a rock
fracture, or crack, and released
into the aquifer.
Overall, however, concentra-
tions are dropping. There is no
timeline for ceasing the clea-
nup, which will continue for
the foreseeable future. About
half-a-dozen testing wells are
added yearly, DiDonato said.
The viewer does not replace
any other EPAwebsite related
to the site and is only meant to
enhance public understanding,
the EPAofficials said.
Township Solicitor Malcolm
MacGregor said the viewer is
the result of the hard work of
Glenburn residents and boards
of supervisors over the years.
Its a pretty impressive
thing, he said.
To access the viewer, visit
https://gis2.westonproject.net/
EPA_Precision_Viewer/
DATABASE
Continued from Page 1
Keystone Colleges Division of Education recently contributed
$1,000 to the United Way of Lackawanna and Wayne Counties
Success by Six program.
Shown, from left: Dr. Fran Langan, Keystone College Education Division chairperson; Gary Drapek, president
and CEO of the United Way of Lackawanna and Wayne Counties; Keystone College President Dr. Edward G.
Boehm, Jr.; Dr. Heather Shanks-McElroy, Keystone College associate professor; Joe Hogan, Keystone Col-
lege instructor.
Keystone
donates
C M Y K
ArtsEtc...
Last weekend the Dietrichs
Fassett Studio was filled with
candy, creativity and holiday
spirit as local baker Gina Sher-
wood and her daughter Carly (a
budding baker and future culi-
nary school student) taught
teens and adults the basics of
building and designing their
own gingerbread houses. Gina
had the class split up into five
groups to work on their own
gingerbread creations. Even
though each group started out
with the same materials, each
house looked unique based on
the architectural details and
designs that were incorporated
into each structure. The work-
shop was free of charge thanks
to Gina, Carly and the Tunk-
hannock Business and Profes-
sional Association.
This class will hopefully
inspire some newcomers to the
upcoming Gingerbread House
Contest that is part of Tunk-
hannocks Christmas in Our
Hometown. Contest rules can
be found at www.tunkhannock-
business.com.
Speaking of holiday festiv-
ities, the Dietrich Radio Play-
ers live performance is less
than a week away. Join us on
Tuesday, Dec. 4 at 7 p.m. for
their free show, which will
showcase favorite radio come-
dies that all relate to the holi-
days. They include Irma
Wants Extra Money for Christ-
mas, Fibber Paints the
Christmas Tree White and
Lou Prepares for a Big Party
from The Abbott and Costello
Program. The show will fea-
ture old-fashioned sound ef-
fects and live music. Admis-
sion is free and tickets can be
reserved by calling
570.996.1500. A light recep-
tion will follow the show. We
would like to thank the Penn-
sylvania Council on the Arts
for sponsoring this program.
While at the radio show or
movies, be sure to check out
the Dietrichs galleries. They
are a sight to behold! Our
amazing volunteers and staff
members have truly outdone
themselves this year. So much
time and artistry was put into
the exhibit. We would especial-
ly like to thank Carolyn North-
erner, Carol Brown, Amy and
Steve Colley, Patrick Robinson,
Mark Mitchell, Margie Young,
Sarah Sidorek and Jim Rosen-
grant for their contributions.
We are also looking for coo-
kie elves to help out with our
upcoming Homemade Cookie
Walk that will be held at the
theater during Christmas in
Our Hometown: Dec. 7 and 8.
All proceeds from the walk
will be used to support chil-
drens programming at the
Dietrich. If there is anyone who
would like to bake two or more
dozen Christmas cookies for
our cookie walk fundraiser
please bring the cookies and
MORE THAN
MOVIES
Dietrich Theater
Erica Rogler
See Dietrich, Page 14
Visual Arts/
Performing
Arts
New Visions Presents:
Half and Half, A Half
Metal, Half Rock Experi-
ence, Dec. 1at NewVisions
Studio and Gallery, 201
Vine St, Scranton. Features:
Without A Martyr at 9:15
p.m., Where Horizons
Meet at 8:30 p.m., special
guest appearance by Nick
Van Wagenen of Silhouette
Lies and Crock Pot Abduc-
tion C.P.A. at 7:45 p.m.,
Birds Eye View at 7 p.m.
Doors open at 6:30 p.m.
and show starts at 7 p.m.
Cost: $7 at the door. Info:
878.3970 or NewVisions-
Studio.com.
One-man Interpreta-
tion of Dickens A
Christmas Carol, Nov. 30
at the First Presbyterian
ChurchinClarks Summit at
7 p.m. Performed by Rev.
Timothy Coombs, of Trin-
ity Presbyterian Church,
Scotia, N.Y. Cost: free. In-
fo: 586-6306 or fpccs.org.
Dietrich Radio Players
Performance, Dec.4 at the
Dietrich Theater in down-
town Tunkhannock at 7
p.m. Cost: free. Info/reser-
vations: 996.1500.
Empty Stocking Fund
Benefit Concert, Dec. 4 at
The University of Scranton
Houlihan-McLean Center
at 7:30 p.m. Includes The
University of Scranton
Bands, Choirs and Strings.
Admission: one new toy or
piece of childrens clothing
or cash donation. Benefits
children of local families in
need. Info: 941.7624.
Literary Arts
Book signing, Green
Ridge Arcadia Images of
America by Margo L. Az-
zarelli, Dec. 1 at Books-A-
Million, 100 Viewmont
Mall, Scranton, from 2 - 4
p.m. Book tells the history
of Green Ridge through
vintage photos. Info:
346.6179.
Arts, Crafts
and More
Festive Book Sale and
Christmas Boutique, Nov.
29 from 4 - 8 p.m., Nov. 30
from 4 - 9 p.m. and Dec. 1
from 9 a.m. - 4 p.m. at the
Inn at Montrose, 26 South
Main Street.
Last weeks winner:
Margaret Koehler
of Clarks Green
Last weeks answer:
Mackenzie Foy
T
he title of Karl Neuroths
exhibit at Laura Craig
Galleries is appropriately
titled, Natura Sensus which in
Latin means sensuous nature.
Laura Craig, gallery owner, said
of his collection of work, Karl
Neuroths artworks resonate with
a sense of presence, and what is
right. His rich, and yes, sensuous
use of color, line and texture de-
scribe a wide range of subject
(often expressed in abstract
terms) and provide a glimpse into
the deeper sense of the reality he
experiences in the process of cre-
ating his artwork. This is a gift.
Craig categorizes his works in
the exhibition, which will run
through Dec. 7, as mixed media
to a greater or lesser degree.
Prints, drawings, paintings, and
other material, including wood or
other objects of interest to Neu-
roth, are bonded by archival
means to a cradle, which he may
then in-paint, or paint out, draw
on or otherwise manipulate dur-
ing the course of creating a piece,
said Craig. Black and whites
ABINGTON JOURNAL/JOAN MEAD-MATSUI
Karl Neu-
roth said
the art in
his exhibit
is centered
on pattern,
although I
got really
involved in
trying to
make the
pattern
more subtle
and at the
same time,
I think a
little more
enigmatic
or complex
by not using
ink at all on
some of
those
prints.
A deeper sense
Said Laura Craig of Karl Neuroths work: Black and whites may sit with many
colors, frenetic drawings reside with silent white on whiteThe results are
always fresh, exciting, and creative.
BY JOAN MEAD-MATSUI
Abington Journal Correspondent
See Sense, Page 15
Its the idea of being able to assem-
ble a whole wall, or just a few pieces
or it could be larger and larger, with
more and more prints. I really like the
idea that the person who acquires the
work is able to have a hand in arrang-
ing the overall pattern.
Karl Neuroth, artist
Contestants can only win once in a 60-day period.
Ballet Theatre of Scranton
and Marywood University will
present their 37th annual per-
formances of The Nutcracker
Dec. 26 through 28 at 2 and
7:30 p.m. each day. This origi-
nal Scranton production was
first presented by the Compa-
nys founder Constance Rey-
nolds in1976, and continues
under the direction of Joanne
Arduino, Artistic Director.
Since its first presentation,
more than 350,000 citizens
fromwithin a 60- mile radius,
have enjoyed the production
and have made it a part of their
holiday week. Ballet Theatre of
Scranton has maintained the
free production through the
dedication of its Board, Direc-
tors and Dancers and the gene-
rosity of local benefactors.
More than150 people are in-
volved in the annual event
including professional design-
ers, technicians and guest art-
ists.
The Nutcracker is a magical
story told through ballet to the
famous Tchaikovsky music.
Toys coming to life, snowfall-
ing on dancing snowflakes and
a 20- foot growing Christmas
tree are just a fewhighlights of
Ballet Theatre of Scrantons
Nutcracker gift.
While there is no charge for
tickets, reserved seat tickets are
available at the Marywood box
office (2300 Adams Avenue,
Scranton) two hours prior to the
each specific performance.
For additional information,
call 347.2867.
Abington area
residents in the
performance
include: Rebecca
Fiorillo, reclining
and Amy Pisan-
chyn, standing.
Nutcracker set for Dec. 26
Who directed "Rise of the Guardians"?
C M Y K
PAGE 14A www.theabingtonjournal.com The Abington JournalClarks Summit, PA WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 2012
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A special book cart will
be set aside in the Chil-
drens Room at the Abing-
ton Community Library
during December to hold
the picture book collec-
tion of Christmas and ho-
liday books for easy
browsing by parents and
children. Look for old
favorites and classics as
well as some new titles
just purchased, such as the
following:
Fa La La by Leslie
Patricelli. The star of this
book for toddlers is an
exuberant baby excited
that Christmas is on its
way. He/she narrates a
host of holiday activities:
picking out a tree, car-
oling, and awaiting San-
tas arrival, while the il-
lustrations add personality
and humor to the text.
Christmas Parade by
Sandra Boynton. Boyn-
tons menagerie of cows,
mice, ducks, chickens,
pigs and hippos march
across the pages and her
rhyming text brims with
holiday cheer.
The Christmas Quiet
Book by Deborah Under-
wood. Furred animal-chil-
dren explore quiet times
of the season, such as
snow angel quiet,
knocking with mittens
quiet, mistletoe quiet,
listening for sleigh bells
quiet and finally,
Christmas morning
quiet.
Just Right for Christ-
mas by Birdie Black.
Scraps of red cloth, first
from a cloak sewn for a
princess, find their way
into a jacket for the kitch-
en maids mother, a hat
for badgers pa, gloves for
squirrels wife, and final-
ly, a scarf for mouses son
create gifts that felt just
right on Christmas morn-
ing.
Christmastime by Ali-
son Jay. Secret clues, plus
hidden allusions to classic
Christmas carols, turn this
picture book into an inter-
active holiday treasure
hunt, as each page tells a
story of a Yuletide adven-
ture in Santas sleigh, end-
ing at home in time for a
comfy Christmas morning.
The Christmas Tug-
boat: How the Rockefeller
Center Christmas Tree
Came to New York City
by George Matteson and
Adele Ursone. The daugh-
ter of a tugboat captain
narrates an account of the
long-ago year she helped
her father deliver the
enormous tree to New
York City by way of the
Hudson River. Paintings
by illustrator James Ran-
some capture life on the
tugboat but also depict
wider views of the city,
the river, and the towed
barges unusual festive
cargo.
Christmas Wombat by
Jackie French. Wombat
embarks on an eventful
Christmas Eve journey
that transforms him from
homebody to world trav-
eler overnight. He stum-
bles across plentiful sup-
plies of carrots, his favor-
ite snack, stares down
some reindeer, and curls
up to catch naps on the
back of Santas sleigh.
LIBRARY NEWS
BY MARY ANN MCGRATH
The Abington Community Library is
located at 1200 W. Grove St., Clarks
Summit. Visit our website,
www.lclshome.org/abington to
register online for events or call the
library at (570) 587-3440.
Dont have a library card? Register
for one at http://www.lclshome.org/
libraryinfo/library_card_reg.asp.
The Music Box Players will present the time-
less holiday classic Its a Wonderful Life: A Live
Radio Play, based on the Frank Capra film and
adapted for the stage by Joe Landry. It will run
Nov. 24 through Dec. 16 at The Music Box Din-
ner Playhouse, 196 Hughes Street, Swoyersville.
Its December 24, 1946 in Studio A at WCYG
Radio and a cast of actors are preparing to pre-
sent Its a Wonderful Life live to their listening
audience.
A holiday buffet catered by Ellis Market Cater-
ing will be served 90 minutes before each per-
formance. The event will feature a cash bar. Tick-
ets are on sale for dinner and show or show only.
Performances begin Thursdays through Saturdays
at 8 p.m. and Sundays at 3 p.m. Tickets may be
purchased by calling 283.2195 or 800.698.PLAY.
Shown are Jenelle Craig, Scott Colin and Annjanette
Roczniak.
Its a Wonderful Life
radio play Nov. 24
T
hirteen-year-old Ga-
briele Hanstein, Scran-
ton, said she was not
familiar with Marleys Mission
until her grandmother showed
her a newspaper that contained
information regarding the mis-
sions 2011art contest.
It just seemed like a lot of
fun when my grandmother
showed it to me in the paper,
said Hanstein, a seventh grade
student at St. Pauls School,
Scranton.
She entered the contest and
was voted the 2011Peoples
Choice Award winner. Her
winning entry was a drawing of
a horse using colored pencils,
watercolor and ink as her medi-
ums, and she found her in-
spiration for her drawing from
a photograph taken by her
father, Fred Hanstein.
According to Nicole Severs,
Marleys Mission Blue Ribbon
Gala Art Committee co-chair,
the theme of the Second An-
nual art contest is What Does
a Forever Home Mean to
You? reflecting the fact that
Marleys Mission has just pur-
chased 32 acres of land in
Newton Township and will
serve as the forever home for
the Mission. All entries for the
art contest must be postmarked
and/or received by Dec. 3. The
contest is open to children
kindergarten through12th
grade fromacross the United
States.
Severs added, In my opin-
ion, the Art Contest allows
children across the country to
be a part of something so in-
credibly life changing in our
community. In art, there is no
right or wrong, its a personal
connection felt by the heart. By
participating in the Art Contest,
participants have a means to
express themselves. Marleys
Mission is all about the chil-
dren and the Art Contest allows
us to give children an opportu-
nity to make a difference in the
world by raising awareness and
supporting such an important
organization.
Courtenay Degnon, Marleys
Mission Blue Ribbon Gala Art
Committee co-chair added, I
was so honored to be asked to
be a co-chair for this years art
contest and centerpiece project
for Marleys Missions 2013
Blue Ribbon Gala. The pieces
that were displayed at Star-
bucks in Scranton last Decem-
ber, as well as the centerpieces
that were on display at the gala
in February, were magnificent.
My hope is that each parent or
teacher, while working with
their children, shares with them
an age appropriate piece of
information about what Mar-
leys Mission is and howthey
help children. I can definitely
see the future through our chil-
drens eyes. I knowthat their
artwork will inspire many to
learn more about this amazing
organization and hopefully
inspire themto help out so that
many children can have a
brighter future.
The public will have an op-
portunity to vote for a Peoples
Choice Winner at the First
Friday event at Starbucks, in
the Steamtown Mall Dec. 7,
6:30 to 8 p.m. Severs noted that
supporters can come and cast
their vote for a $1with all pro-
ceeds going directly to the
mission to help children who
have suffered abuse and/or
trauma.
The Third Annual Marleys
Mission Blue Ribbon Gala is
on the calendar for Feb. 16,
2013. For more information
regarding the art contest, con-
tact art@marleysmission.com
with questions or visit marleys-
mission.com/gala-art/ for gui-
delines and entry forms.
Call all budding artists
BY JOAN MEAD-MATSUI
Abington Journal Correspondent
ABINGTON JOURNAL/JOAN MEAD-MATSUI
Gabriele Hanstein, Marleys Mis-
sion 2011 Art Contest Peoples
Choice Award winner, said she
found her inspiration from a pho-
tograph taken by her father.
Want to enter the art contest?
According to Nicole Severs, Co-Chair Art Committee Marleys Mission Blue
Ribbon Gala, the art contest guidelines are as follows:
* Children should illustrate their interpretation of this years theme on a
8.5 by 11-inch sheet of white paper. White cardstock is acceptable, but not
construction or lined paper.
* The illustration must be depicted horizontally.
* Children can use crayons, pastels, markers, Tempera or watercolor
paints. NO lead or colored pencils;
* Artwork must be the childs own creation;
* Tracings and direct copies of other art cannot be considered;
Once submitted, all entries will become property of Marleys Mission. By
submitting the artwork, permission is granted to Marleys Mission to
produce and reproduce the artwork as well as the childs first initial and
last name and childs age.
All entries must be postmarked and/or received by Mon., Dec. 3.
Tips:
* Use eye -catching color. Bolder colors reproduce well. Light -colored
artwork will not show up if reproduced in the future.
* Be careful with erase marks and pencil outlines.
* Fill up the page and be careful not to have the drawing get too close to
the edges of the paper.
* Make sure facial features on people and animals are bold so they will
reproduce well, if they are reproduced in the future.
* Be creative! Make it your own. There is no right or wrong with your
interpretation of what the theme means to you.
Art contest information and forms to be completed and taped to the back
of each childs entry can be found at marleysmission.com under the Blue
Ribbon Gala link and clicking on the 2012-2013 Art Contest tab.
the recipe for them to the
Dietrich Theater Thursday,
Dec. 6 from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m.
or Friday Dec. 7 from10 a.m.
to 1 p.m. Any and all help
would be appreciated.
During Christmas in Our
Hometown, the Dietrich will
have free showings of Emmet
Otters Jug-Band Christmas
on Friday, Dec. 7 and Sat-
urday, Dec. 8 at 5:30 and 7
p.m. This is one of my all
time favorite Christmas mo-
vies. These showing are spon-
sored by Ace-Robbins Heat-
ing Oil and Propane and are
brought to you in part by the
Jim Henson Legacy Founda-
tion. Tickets will be first
come, first served.
We also will be bringing
you our annual Holiday
Workshop Saturday, Dec. 8
from11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
Join us for a morning of coo-
kie decorating, holiday crafts,
singing and balloon creations
by Silly Sally. Admission is
free and all ages are welcome.
We would like to thank Ace-
Robbins for also sponsoring
this event.
As you can see, the Die-
trich is so much more than
the movies.
DIETRICH
Continued from Page 13
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 2012 PAGE15A
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Having barely recovered
from eating myself into
oblivion during the annual
Thanksgiving feast, youd
think that the last thing Id
want to contemplate was a
book about food, but Mi-
chael Ablemans Fields of
Plenty is so gorgeous, pas-
sionate and thought-provok-
ing I couldnt resist. At this
time of year, when we cele-
brate the harvest, it seems
fitting to read about the men
and women who feed us. The
books subtitle: A farmers
journey in search of real food
and the people who grow it,
explains the premise of this
memoir of this three-month
pilgrimage across the United
States Ableman made with
his elder son, Aaron in a
cranky VW Bus a few sum-
mers ago.
The Ablemans odyssey
focuses on 25 farmers, from
California to Maine, who,
whether they produce figs,
artisanal cheeses, potatoes,
salad greens, ice cream or
free-range chickens, are de-
voted to organic, humane,
sustainable practices. Al-
though the people we get to
meet raise an astounding va-
riety of food, they have a lot
in common. Their farms,
which range from tiny roof-
top plots in big cities to per-
haps 200 acres, are miniscule
when compared to the 10,000
or more acres on a typical in-
dustrial farm. They are pas-
sionate about flavor, quality
and the land they husband
and would probably agree
with Bob Cannard, a Califor-
nia farmer, most of whose
produce winds up in the
kitchen of Alice Waters fa-
mous restaurant, Chez Pa-
nisse, in that they strive to
create a truly healthy food-
production ecosystem, one
that somehow blends the will
of the farmer with the will
and wisdom of nature.
You may be tempted to
think that the farmers in this
book are just trying to cash in
on the current interest in or-
ganic foods, but most have
been at their calling for 20
years or longer, and some,
like John and Ida Thurman,
growers in the rural black
community of Pembroke
Township in Illinois, learned
to farm organically from
their parents and grandpar-
ents because their financial
circumstances wouldnt al-
low anything else.
The chapter, titled Mar-
gins, that introduces us to
the Thurmans is probably my
favorite. It takes us first to
the infamous Chicago hous-
ing project, Cabrini Green,
which was built in the 1950s
to, as Ableman puts it:
warehouse poor, unemploy-
ed and primarily black resi-
dents. Here, in the shadows
of the prison-like project, ur-
ban farmers are busily at
work growing heirloom to-
matoes on tiny plots fertil-
ized by compost that consists
of everything from cherry
pie filling to discarded arug-
ula salads and steaks from
the garbage of high-end res-
taurants. According to the
author, every major city now
has elements of guerrilla
gardening, where growers
transform abandoned lots,
vandalized pocket parks,
rooftops and even sidewalk
soil, into plots of food and
flowers. Later, when we visit
the Thurmans, we learn that
sustainable farming can have
important socio-political
implications.
The collards, sweet pota-
toes, beans and pasture-
raised chickens the Thur-
mans grow provide food for
the locals and for a neighbor-
hood in Chicago that would
otherwise never see any
fresh food, the author ex-
plains, pointing out that the
neighborhood in Chicago
where the Thurmans sell
their produce at a farmers
market does not have a sin-
gle grocery store. Living as
we do, in an area where there
seems to be a grocery store
on every other block, I took
for granted that all Ameri-
cans had easy access to fresh
food until I read this book.
The passion of the farmers
in this book for flavor and
freshness, their pride in the
quality of their produce re-
minded me of the best corn I
ever ate. We lived, at the
time, in a suburb of Pitts-
burgh, and had been invited
to a friends cabin for a party.
We were tasked with provid-
ing the corn that would be
wrapped in damp burlap and
roasted over the coals a few
hours later. The farmers who
grew the corn a pair of el-
derly sisters were regarded
locally as being a little pecu-
liar, since the old gals would
only sell you corn if you
waited while they picked it
and promised to eat it the ve-
ry same day. However, every-
one agreed their corn was
spectacular. And it was:
plump ears bursting with fla-
vor, so crisp and sweet I
couldnt stop eating them. I
dont think I realized, until I
had a tiny plot of my own and
reveled in eating a sun-
warmed tomato right in the
garden, that that corn was so
delicious because it was
grown with a passionate
commitment and eaten with-
in hours of its picking. When
you read Fields of Plenty,
youll quickly realize, as I
did when I ate that corn and
those tomatoes, that the plas-
tic-wrapped, hot-house
grown produce thats been
languishing in a cooler for
days, and that we normally
consider to be fresh, will
never, never taste as good as
the foods the farmers in this
book grow.
Just as eating lovingly hus-
banded food is a sensual
pleasure, so is this book it-
self. Everything about it --
from the thick, creamy paper
of its pages, to Ablemans
splendid photographs and
equally evocative prose and
the tasty recipes from the
farmers that accompany
each chapter makes Fields
of Plenty a delicious book
about stewardship, family
and dedication to quality. Af-
ter reading it, youll want to
take your own field trip to
search out the delicious food
available at farm stands,
farmers markets, and, if
youre lucky, in your own
back yard.
With
Jane Julius
Honchell
SEE JANE READ
Fields of Plenty
celebrates food and the
farmers who grow it.
Jane Julius Honchell, who resides in
Glenburn Twp., is a well-known
features writer and columnist. She is
an associate professor at Keystone
College, La Plume, where she serves
as Director of Theater. "See Jane
Read" appears monthly in The
Abington Journal.
Whether you remember crowding around a radio with your family to
hear the latest radio drama or if you are among the younger set who
cannot remember life without CD players or ipods, the Dietrich Radio
Players invite you to join them for an evening that celebrates those
golden days of radio. On Dec. 4 at 7 p.m. at the Dietrich Theater, 11
radio thespians will regale attendees with a live show full of holiday
cheer and comedy. Admission to the show is free and tickets are avail-
able at the Dietrich ticket booth or by calling 570.996.1500. Shown,
from left: Joe Barone, Owen Frazier, Pam Frazier, Ian Frazier, Carol
Broll and Hoyt Keiser.
Dietrich Radio Players
in the holiday spirit
may sit with many colors,
frenetic drawings reside with
silent white on whiteThe
results are always fresh, excit-
ing, and creative.
The 6-inch by 6-inch, 12-
inch by12-inch and 24-inch
by 24-inch cradles are mod-
ular, allowing collectors to
add or change their arrange-
ments of Neuroths individual
works, which may stand
alone or combine to create a
variety of newvisual experi-
ences.
Neuroth said the art in his
exhibit is centered on pattern,
although I got really in-
volved in trying to make the
pattern more subtle and at the
same time, I think a little
more enigmatic or complex
by not using ink at all on
some of those prints, he said.
I relied on the embossed
effect and along with the
proper lighting; it is a work
that I think has some merit.
Its the idea of being able to
assemble a whole wall, or just
a fewpieces or it could be
larger and larger, with more
and more prints. I really like
the idea that the person who
acquires the work is able to
have a hand in arranging the
overall pattern. Thats some-
thing that has interested me
for a long time, whether it is
on the inkless white prints or
the ones which I employ
color.
He is the founder of the
Fine Arts Department, a for-
mer professor of fine arts and
former department chair at
Keystone College, La Plume,
and is represented by Laura
Craig Galleries, 307 Linden
Street, Scranton. For more
information, email lcraiggal-
leries@gmail.comor call
570.963.7995.
SENSE
Continued from Page 13
C M Y K
SPORTS
A
lex Chapman experi-
enced an accomplished
career as a member of
the Abington Heights girls
soccer team. It just didnt end
they way she would have liked.
Just a fewgoals away from
breaking the schools goals
record, Chapman suffered an
ACL(Anterior Cruciate Liga-
ment) tear, ending her season.
Despite the disappointing
end, Chapman characterized
her years on the teamas en-
joyable.
I met a lot of great friends
and have a lot of great memo-
ries that will last for the rest of
my life, she said. The team
was really closeespecially
this year. We were like a big
family.
Winning the district title all
four years was a lot of fun.
While it was difficult not
being able to finish her season,
Chapman credits her team-
mates for easing the pain and
frustration.
The girls definitely showed
a lot of support, she said.
They visited me after the sur-
gery and offered to give rides
because I cant drive.
They made it 10 times eas-
ier.
Watching the teamplay in the
district and state playoffs was
tough for the all-region player.
It was hard sitting and
watching my teammates play,
Chapman said I wish that I
could have helped. When I was
watching, I sawthings that I
knewI could help with, but
obviously I couldnt. I just tried
to be as supportive as possible.
Abington Heights head
coach E.T. Hunter described
Chapman as a player to be
counted on in a big situation.
She was a standout player
and a really natural forward,
Hunter said. She had dry
spells like all good players do,
but when she bounced back she
was very difficult to control
and hold back.
Hunter added that the seniors
mentality was always positive,
even after the injury.
Along with her ability as a
player, she has a very good
head on her shoulders, he said.
Her demeanor and attitude is
always positive. She was always
very supportive of the girls. Her
commitment to the teamdidnt
slowdown at all after her in-
jury. She was on the sidelines
for every game and practice.
Champan hopes to be able to
return for the spring track and
field season to compete in the
javelin and shot put events.
Ive been doing everything
the trainers tell me to do, she
said. They are really great and
are always encouraging me.
Chapman has been in rehabil-
itation three times a week at
ProCare Physical Therapy.
Ive been lifting to build up
my upper body strength just in
case Imable to compete, she
said.
Standout player
working to bounce
back from injury
ABINGTON JOURNAL FILE PHOTO
Abington Heights girls soccer player Alex Chapman (19) tries to ad-
vance the ball past Lakelands Isabelle Standefer (2) during a game in
2011.
BY ROBERT TOMKAVAGE
rtomkavage@theabingtonjournal.com
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 2012
PECKVILLE- Allentown
Central Catholics combina-
tion of a stingy defense and
punishing running game
proved to be too much for
Abington Heights High
School football players.
Vikings running back
Colin McDermott rushed
for 256 yards on 35 carries.
The senior also scored all
three Central Catholic
touchdowns in their 23-0
win over the Comets in a
PIAAClass AAAfirst-
round contest at John Henz-
es Veterans Memorial Stadi-
umNov. 24.
Weve been feeding the
ball to Colin all year, Al-
lentown Central Catholic
head coach John Cupples
said. Hes a workhorse and
our offensive line has been
doing a great job.
Abington Heights threat-
ened early, moving the ball
to the Allentown Central
Catholic 29-yard line, but
JCShowwas unable to haul
in a fourth down pass from
quarterback Dante Pasqual-
ichio near the goal line.
Pasqualichio came away
with the only Comets take-
away of the game, when he
intercepted Central Catholic
quarterback Anthony Beck,
ending the Vikings drive.
Central Catholic broke
the scoreless tie with 6:35
left in the second quarter
when McDermott capped a
12-play, 73-yard drive with a
3-yard touchdown run. The
Vikings were unable to
convert the extra point when
Jamie Henzes recovered the
fumbled snap.
I think the difference
maker was our offensive
line getting a complete push
upfront, McDermott said.
It was just awesome.
The game really turned
when Ryan Beville returned
a Comets punt 62 yards to
the Abington Heights 2-
yard line. Apenalty on the
Vikings sideline moved the
ball back to the17, but
McDermott scored five
plays later on a 2-yard
touchdown run.
There are a lot of big
plays that can happen over
the course of the football
game, Abington Heights
head coach Joe Repshis
said. They made a play
with the punt return that
gave themsome momen-
tum. They are a very athletic
and physical football team. I
give themall the credit in
the world.
On the first drive of the
second half, McDermott
picked up 56 yards, includ-
ing a 44-yard touchdown in
which he broke several
tackles on his way to the end
zone, stretching the Vikings
lead to 20-0 with11:16 left
in the third quarter.
Whatever it takes,
McDermott said of his long
touchdown run. This was a
big win for us.
During the Vikings next
possession, McDermott
broke off a 47- yard run
down to the Abington
Heights 6-yard line, but the
Comets defense held touch,
forcing a 22-yard field goal
by Rob Fidati.
Imextremely proud of
our players, Repshis said.
They played the full 48
minutes and never quit.
They had a great season and
a lot to be proud of. It wasnt
the result we were looking
for but Imstill extremely
proud of them.
On the ensuing drive,
Abington Heights moved
the ball down to the Central
Catholic 9-yard line, but
three straight incompletions
ended their scoring chance.
ABINGTON JOURNAL/STEPHANIE WALKOWSKI
Abington Heights junior wide receiver Nathan Hollander caught two passes for 26 yards in the Comets 23-0 loss to Allentown Central
Catholic in a PIAA Class AAA first-round contest at John Henzes Veterans Memorial Stadium Nov. 24.
A.C.C. runs over Comets
BY ROBERT TOMKAVAGE
rtomkavage@theabingtonjournal.com
ABINGTON JOURNAL/STEPHANIE WALKOWSKI
Simon Patrick Williams is tackled by Allentown Central Catholic
players.
Trevor Gabura, a former
National League player and
MJ Jonsson, a former Amer-
ican League player were both
awarded the Freach Keen
Award for Little League base-
ball players. They were select-
ed by the league based on
performance, dedication and
sportsmanship throughout
their Little League career.
Both boys also participated in
the Freach Keen Essay Con-
test. They are 7th grade stu-
dents at Abington Heights
Middle School.
Trevor Gabura, a former National League player, and MJ Jonsson a
former American League player were both awarded the Freach Keen
Award for Little League baseball players.
Little Leaguers receive awards
For the third consecutive
year, the Abington Heights
boys soccer team received
the N.S.C.A.A. (National
Soccer Coaches Association
of America) Team Academ-
ic Award awarded for ex-
emplary performance in the
classroom as a team. The
N.S.C.A.A. is the largest
coaching association of any
sport (youth/high school/
college) in the United
States. The Abington
Heights boys soccer pro-
gram is the only soccer
team, boys or girls, in
Northeastern Pennsylvania
to receive the award during
the past three seasons. The
team posted a 3.44 overall
GPA, based on a 4.0 scale,
for the 2011-12 academic
year. Only 130 boys pro-
grams received this award
nationally, while only six
earned the award in Penn-
sylvania: Central Bucks
South, Cocalico, Manheim
Central, Parkland, Slippery
Rock and West Chester
Rustin.
The award just indicates
that our team can excel on
the field as well as the class-
room, Abington Heights
head coach Steve Klingman
said. I am very proud of
the effort of our team in
both areas.
Abington Heights has
won 16 district champion-
ships in boys soccer, the
most recent in 2011 (AAA)
and 2009 (AA), and was the
district finalist (AAA) in
both 2012 and 2010.
.
AH boys soccer team honored
for success in the classroom
The Abington Heights Varsi-
ty and Junior Varsity Football
Cheerleaders recently conduct-
ed a clothing drive to benefit
United Neighborhood Centers
of NEPAs Angels Attic. The
cheerleaders, along with fam-
ily members, gathered gently
used clothing to donate to the
needy in our area.
Shown, seated, from left, junior varsity Hannah Gaul and Hannah Men-
do. Back row: Varsity Captains Ally Lamanna, Alexandra Albright, Court-
ney Norton and Jessica Kurey.
Cheerleaders donate clothes
C M Y K
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 2012 THE ABINGTON JOURNALCLARKS SUMMIT, PA WWW.THEABINGTONJOURNAL.COM PAGE17A
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SCRANTONPREP
THE JESUIT COLLEGE PREPARATORY SCHOOL OF NORTHEASTERN PENNSYLVANIA
www.SCRANTONPREP.com (570) 941-PREP
ENTRANCE EXAM
Saturday, December 1st, Call to Register
Registration begins at 8:30 am
100%of Preps 2012 graduates were accepted
into a four-year college program.
Of the 100%acceptance, 85%were accepted
to the college of their rst choice.
The Class of 2012 average best SAT scores
were: Critical Reading-586, Math-594,
Writing-580.
The Class of 2012 received in excess of $28
million in performance based scholarships.
Students come fromcounties
throughout northeastern Pennsylvania
and NewYork State.
The Seven Year Programwith the
University of Scranton challenges students
with college level work in their junior and
senior years of high school.
Afordable tuition and nancial aid
make Prep nancially viable.
B
e
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M
Lackawanna Trail Jr./Sr. High School hosted a boys basket-
bal scrimmage game Nov. 24 that also featured North Pocono
and Mid Valley.
Lions start with
scrimmage
PHOTO COURTESY ALICE STUFFLE
John Kwiatkowski goes up for a layup in Lackawanna Trails first
scrimmage. The Lions first home game is Dec. 7 against Tunkhannock.
Pocono Snow Juniors
Soccer Club of Lacka-
wanna/Luzerne counties
2002 boys team added
themselves to a presti-
gious list of teams that
have gone back to-
back winning in regional
tournaments at the U-10
level.
On the weekend of
Nov.18,19, the boys com-
peted in the Hempfield
Fall Classic hosted by
the Penn Legacy Soccer
Club in Lancaster.
Through the weekend,
the club played three
group games in their
Boys U-10 division, re-
cording wins against
Chambersburg FC Elite
13-3, West Mont United
Union (Limerick) 3-0
and Chestnut Hill Blue
Lightening 5-2.
In the final, the Poco-
no Snow Juniors were
drawn against a strong
Main Line Soccer Club
(Philadelphia) team that
had progressed unbeaten
through their section.
The final was a tense
affair with both teams
evenly matched in the
early going and Pocono
Snow Juniors had to
return from a 1-0 deficit
to even proceedings
midway through the first
half courtesy of an 18-
yard strike from Ava
Butner.
Pocono Snow Juniors
were eventually able take
the go-ahead goal on the
stroke of half time
through a penalty dis-
patched by Cooper Le-
wis. With a 2-1 lead, the
second half featured a
more controlled and
dominant performance
by the Snow and they
put the game out of
reach with yet another
penalty: Lewis stepping
up to record his second
goal of the game. Poco-
no Snow Juniors won
the final 3-1.
Pocono Snow Juniors
2002 Boys competed in
the Lehigh Valley Youth
Soccer League this fall,
wining all 10 games in
league play. The per-
formance at the Hemp-
field Fall Classic Tour-
nament completes a run
through the first half of
the season year. In addi-
tion to the win at the
Hempfield Fall Classic,
the team also won the
Dale Marsh Tournament
held in Stroudsburg in
October.
Pocono Snow Juniors
Soccer Club is a Non-
Profit Elite Youth Soccer
Club located in Ply-
mouth, and is a youth
partner of the Pocono
Snow Soccer Club of
the National Premier
Soccer League, north-
eastern Pa.s only Minor
League Soccer franchise
based in Stroudsburg.
Team members Pocono Snow Juniors Soccer Club U10 boys are, front row, from left: Jonah
Pascal, Thomas Iskra, Wyoming Seminary Lower School; Ava Buttner, Valley View Intermediate
School; Maddox Haas, Schuyler Ave. Elementary; Shay Gillen, Valley View Intermediate School.
Back row: David Paramo, Bancroft Elementary; Ryan Cesarini, Valley View Intermediate School;
Aidan Crum, South Abington Elementary; Cooper Lewis, Alex DeRome Dallas Elementary
School; Zack Kovalchik Valley View Intermediate School; Coach Winga Siwale (Club Director).
Not pictured; Bryce Chopyak Dallas Elementary School; Coach Robert Hadvance.
Pocono Snows win tournaments
Tatiana Klacko, 13, from
Scranton and Nathalie Joan-
lanne, 15, fromDallas won the
Girls14 Under and Girls16
Under titles at the Birchwood
Turkey Classic Tennis Cham-
pionships held in Clarks Sum-
mit.
Klacko, seeded 2nd, did not
lose a set throughout the event.
In the finals she faced Marina
Zardet of Coplay. Klacko won,
6-3, 7-5.
Joanlanne also won her divi-
sion without dropping a set. In
the final she faced Emily Jons-
son of Clarks Summit in a re-
match as Joanlanne and Jonsson
played in two prior tournaments
with Jonsson prevailing.
This time, Joanlanne was up
to the challenge, winning the
final 6-3, 6-3.
In the boys16- Under Boys
doubles, Brandon Ostrowski of
Dalton and Tony Kutz of Clarks
Summit won the event defeating
Dominick Mitchell of Clarks
Summit and Maz Voyce also of
Clarks Summit in the deciding
match 8-1.
In other events, Jimmy Tress-
ler of Clarks Summit placed 2nd
in the Boys14 Under losing to
Daniel Lynn of Easton 6-4,6-4.
The next junior tournament at
Birchwood will be the Birch-
wood Holiday Classic Decem-
ber 26 28. Deadline for entry
is midnight Dec. 20.
Girls win tennis titles
Tatiana Klacko of Scranton and Marina Zardet of Coplay.
Alley Cats Bowling
League-Scores from11/20/12
Team Standings: Bob-
cats-32, Lynx-31, Calicos-31,
Siamese-29, Tigers-24.5,
Manx-21.5 Wildcats-18,
Ghost-5
High Individual Game:
Mary Jo Long-190, Maxine
Gilligan and Anna Aten-181,
Jean Cacciamani-160
High Individual Series:
Anna Aten-482, Maxine Gilli-
gan-469, Jean Cacciama-
ni-425
High Team Game:
Lynx-690, Bobcats-662,
Manx-652
High Team Series:
Lynx-1930, Tigers-1865, Bob-
cats-1843
Bowling Scores
Two weeks
into basketball
season and
sophomore
guard Ross
Danzig, of
Clarks Green,
is off to quite a
start.
For the second straight week,
the graduate of Abington
Heights High School and Blair
Academy, N.J., has been named
Landmark Conference Player
of the Week, this time after
leading18th-ranked University
of Scranton mens basketball
teamto a come-from-behind
60-57 win at Misericordia Nov.
20.
Danzig scored a game-high
24 points on11-for-19 shooting,
pulled down four rebounds,
made two steals and blocked a
shot as the Royals (3-0) over-
came a 35-22 halftime deficit
to pull out the victory. He was
named Landmark Conference
Player of the Week for the
opening week of the season
after leading the Royals to the
title in the Radisson Invitation-
al in the Long Center.
Danzig selected
as Landmark
Player of Week
Danzig
CROSSWORD ANSWERS FROM PAGE 8
WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 28, 2012 Abington Journal PAGE 18
100 Announcements
200 Auctions
300 Personal Services
400 Automotive
500 Employment
600 Financial
700 Merchandise
800 Pets & Animals
900 Real Estate
1000 Service Directory
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* All lease payment plus tax and tags 24 month term with $2000 down. 10,500 miles allowed per year.
All applicable rebates applied. See dealer for details. Expires 11/30/12.
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$
15,225
2.0L, 4cyl., SYNC, 5 Spd.
Stk #013114
3 at this Price
45 others
available
2013 Ford Escape SE 4x4
Lease for
$
269 24 mos*
MSRP -
$
25,149
* All lease payment plus tax and tags 24 month term with $2000 down. 10,500 miles allowed per year.
All applicable rebates applied. See dealer for details. Expires 11/30/12.
Buy for
$
25,149
SYNC, 1.6L, Ecoboost, 4 cyl.
4 at this Price
35 others
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Stk #013475
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$
289 24 mos*
* All lease payment plus tax and tags 24 month term with $2000 down. 10,500 miles allowed per year.
All applicable rebates applied. See dealer for details. Expires 11/30/12.
* All lease payment plus tax and tags 24 month term with $2000 down. 10,500 miles allowed per year.
All applicable rebates applied. See dealer for details. Expires 11/30/12.
MSRP -
$
32,580
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38,350
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33,250
*
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399 24 mos*
2013 Ford F-150 Supercab
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$
29,000
2013 Ford Explorer 4x4
* All lease payment plus tax and tags 24 month term with $2000 down. 10,500 miles allowed per year.
All applicable rebates applied. See dealer for details. Expires 11/30/12.
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$
544
89
24 mos*
MSRP
$
34,315
Stk #013153
2012 Ford F-250 XL Reg. Cab 4x4
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$
29,269
Buy for
$
31,269
Plus 0% 60 mos.** Plus 5.9% 72 mos.
**
Stk# 012992
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Pkg., Tow Hitch & Plow Pkg.
2 at this Price
21 others
available
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MSRP -
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45,490
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$
41,500
or
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Don Hull
Sales Consultant
Darryl Jayne
General Sales Manager
Doug Higgins
Pre-Owned Sales Manager
Stephanie Abraham
Finance Director
Casey Grow
Director of Social Media
Liz Hopkins
Internet Sales
John Orue
Sales Consultant
Keith Kime
Sales Consultant
Joe Dickhut
Sales Consultant
Andy Noone
Sales Consultant
Kurtis Medeiros
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$
269
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36 MONTHS
30,000 TOTAL MILES
NO DOWN PAYMENT
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$394 Total Due at Signing
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1-800-982-4054
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HOURS: MONDAY THRU THURSDAY 9:00 A.M. TO8:30 P.M.
FRIDAY 9:00 A.M. TO5:00 P.M. SATURDAY 9:00 A.M. TO2:00 P.M. CLOSED SUNDAY
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120 Found
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135 Legals/
Public Notices
LEGAL NOTICE
Glenburn Township
Preliminary
2013 Budget
The Glenburn Town-
ship Supervisors
have completed the
Glenburn Township
2013 Preliminary
Budget slated for
approval at the
December 17, 2012
Township Meeting.
It will be available
for public inspection
at the Township
Building located at
54 Waterford Road,
Dalton. Office hours
are 9:00 am to
12:00 noon Monday
through Thursday.
Joanne Benson
Township Secre-
tary/Treasurer
LEGAL NOTICE
Marworths Annual
Report for Fiscal
Year 2011-2011 has
been written and is
available for review.
Anyone wishing to
have a copy of the
report may obtain
one by writing to:
Marworth
Administration
PO Box 36
Lily Lake Road
Waverly, PA 18471
135 Legals/
Public Notices
LEGAL NOTICES
The Abington
Journal is a
newspaper of
general circula-
tion and meets
the require-
ments by
Newspaper
Advertising Act
45 Pa.C.S.A.
Section 301.
DEADLINE:
Mondays at 4 pm
for current week
Deadline varies
during holiday
weeks
RATE:
$1.00 line/$12.
per inch
For information or
questions
regarding legal
notices
you may call
Marti Peznowski
570-970-7371
or email to:
mpeznowski@
timesleader.com
or fax to
570-831-7312
or mail to
The Times Leader
15 N. Main Street
Wilkes-Barre, PA
18711
LEGAL NOTICE
Notice is given that
the South Abington
Township Board of
Supervisors, at the
reorganization
meeting to be held
January 7, 2013,
intends to appoint
Timothy P. Farrell,
certified public
accountant, to
make an examina-
tion of all of the
account of South
Abington Township
for the year 2012.
The compensation
of the certified pub-
lic accountant will
be set at the organ-
ization meeting.
David G. ONeill
Manager
135 Legals/
Public Notices
LEGAL NOTICE
At the regular
meeting of the
South Abington
Township Board of
Supervisors held,
Monday, November
26, 2012, the tenta-
tive budget for 2013
was adopted. The
tentative budget
may be viewed at
the South Abington
Township Offices at
the Township Build-
ing, 104 Shady Lane
Road, Chinchilla, PA
18410, Monday
through Friday, dur-
ing the hours of
9:00 am and 3:30
pm. The final budg-
et is scheduled for
adoption at the
South Abington
Township Board of
Supervisors meet-
ing to be held
Thursday, Decem-
ber 27, 2012 at
12:00 pm
David G. ONeill
Manager
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ESTATE NOTICE
ESTATE OF Mary L.
Jenkin a/k/a Mary
Jenkin, 1302 W. Gib-
son St., Scran- ton,
PA (died Nov-
ember 11, 2012) Let-
ters Testament- ary
were issued on
November 20, 2012,
to Cynthia Dagger
and Ralph L. Jenkin,
Co-Executors, all
persons having
claims against the
Estate or who
are indebted to the
Estate shall make
payment or make
claims to Cynthia
Dagger and Ralph. L
Jenkin, Co-Execu-
tors of the Estate, or
to Charles F. Wilson,
Esq., Attorney for
the Estate, 800
Penn Security Bank
Building, 142 North
Washington Ave.,
Scranton, PA 18503.
135 Legals/
Public Notices
ESTATE NOTICE
IN RE: THERESA
BENDERSKY,
deceased, late of
the City of Carbon-
dale, Lackawanna
County, Pennsylva-
nia (died December
11, 2010). Notice is
hereby given that
Letters Testamen-
tary on the above
estate have been
granted to Diane
Calabro n/b/m/
Diane Calabro
Moody.
All persons indebt-
ed to the said
estate are required
to make payment
and those having
claims to present
the same without
delay to the Admin-
istrator named
above or to James
M. Tressler,
Esquire, Tressler
Law, LLC, 220 Penn
Avenue, 3rd Floor,
Scranton, PA 18503
TRESSLER LAW,
LLC
James M. Tressler,
Esquire
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basement, garage
or attic and call the
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ESTATE NOTICE
ESTATE OF THOM-
AS R. BRITT, late of
Dalton, Lackawanna
County and State of
Pennsylvania, de-
ceased, who died
on the 17th day of
August 2012.
Letters Testament-
ary having been
granted, all persons
having claims or
demands against
the estate of the
decedent shall
make them known
and present them,
and all persons
indebted to the
decedent shall
make payment
thereof without de-
lay to Phoebe A.
Britt, RR 4, Box
4156, Dalton, PA
18414, or to Mattes
& Mattes, PC, 324
N. Washington Ave.,
Scranton, PA 18503.
Find A NewFriend
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PAGE 19 Abington Journal WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 28, 2012
COCCIA
FORD
LINCOLN
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PLUS $1500 LINCOLN COMPETITIVE CONQUEST REBATE
AVAILABLE FOR ALL QUALIFIED OWNERS & LESSEES
SEE DEALER FOR DETAILS. NOT
INCLUDED IN LEASE PRICE
CURRENT LINCOLN LESSEES
RECEIVE ADDITIONAL RENEWAL CASH
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied **Lease payments based on 24 month lease 21,000 allowable
miles. First months payment, $645 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 11/30/12.
NEW 2013 LINCOLN MKX AWD
3.7L V6, Premium Pkg., Auto. Temp Control,
18 Alum. Wheels, Advanced Trac, CD, Leather Heated/Cooled
Seats, Keyless Entry w/Keypad, Satellite Radio, Side Air Curtains,
Reverse Sensing Sys., Pwr. Liftgate,
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HID Headlamps, THX Sound Sys w/CD, 19 Premium Alum.
Wheels, Pwr. Heat/Cool Leather Seats, SYNC, Dual Zone
Electronic Auto Temp Control, Personal Safety Sys., Safety
Canopy Sys., Anti-Theft Sys.,
60
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$
2000
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0
A
P
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*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied **Lease payments based on 24 month lease 21,000 allowable miles. First months payment, $645 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 11/30/12.
NEW 2012 LINCOLN MKZ AWD
PRICE INCLUDES 4YR/50,OOOMILE
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Leather Seats,
Message Center, Side Air Curtains, PL,
PW, Fog Lamps, CD, Personal Safety
with Anti-Theft Sys., SYNC,
$
289
LEASE
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24
MOS.
MSRP $39,015
YOUR PRICE $32,999
COCCIADISCOUNT OFF MSRP ...............1,716
VIN#3LCR837994
1ST MONTHS LEASE PAYMENT FREE
0
$
2000
60
M
O
S
% A
P
R
PRICE INCLUDES 4YR/50,OOOMILE
LIMITED MAINTENANCE PLAN
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied **Lease payments based on 24 month lease 21,000 allowable
miles. First months payment, $645 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 11/30/12.
NEW 2013 LINCOLN MKS AWD
MSRP $48,480
YOUR PRICE $43,999
COCCIADISCOUNT OFF MSRP..........4,976
VIN#1LDG609947
PRICE INCLUDES 4YR/50,OOOMILE
LIMITED MAINTENANCE PLAN
SEE DEALER FOR DETAILS. NOT
INCLUDED IN LEASE PRICE
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied **Lease payments based on 24 month lease 21,000 allowable
miles. First months payment, $645 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 11/30/12.
NEW 2012 LINCOLN MKZ HYBRID
Leather Seats, Message Center, Side Air Curtains, PL,
PW, Fog Lamps, CD, Personal Safety with Anti-Theft
Sys., SYNC, Pwr. Moonroof, 17 Chrome Wheels,
Ultimate Pkg., Technology Pkg., Navigation Pkg., Blis
w/Cross Traffic Alert, Rear Camera, THX Sound System
$
369
LEASE FOR
24
MOS.
MSRP $41,920
YOUR PRICE $35,499
COCCIADISCOUNT OFF MSRP..........2,421
VIN#3LCR839390
3.5L V6, , Pwr. Heat/Cool
Leather Seats, Trailer Tow Pkg., PL, PW, Reverse Camera Sys.,
Keyless Entry with Keypad, SYNC, Push Button Start, Voice
Activated THX Audio Sys., Blind Spot Monitoring Sys.,
Navigation Sys., 3rd Row Seat, 20 Polished Alum. Wheels,
Pwr. Panoramic Vista Roof, Technology Pkg.
.9%
$
2500
60
MOS
1
A
P
R
1ST MONTHS LEASE PAYMENT FREE
PRICE INCLUDES 4YR/50,OOOMILE
LIMITED MAINTENANCE PLAN
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied **Lease payments based on 24 month lease 21,000 allowable
miles. First months payment, $645 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 11/30/12.
NEW 2013 LINCOLN MKT AWD
MSRP $57,345
YOUR PRICE $50,999
COCCIADISCOUNT OFF MSRP..........6,346
VIN#2LDBL54992
PRICE INCLUDES 4YR/50,OOO
MILE LIMITED MAINTENANCE PLAN
$
639
LEASE FOR
24
MOS.
1ST MONTHS LEASE PAYMENT FREE 1ST MONTHS LEASE PAYMENT FREE
$
399
LEASE FOR
24
MOS.
$
399
LEASE FOR
24
MOS.
WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 28, 2012 Abington Journal PAGE 20
135 Legals/
Public Notices
135 Legals/
Public Notices
LEGAL NOTICE
IN THE COURT OF COMMON PLEAS OF
LACKAWANNA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA,
CIVIL ACTION, LAW, NO. 51701-10
North Pocono School District vs.
Nancy Trygar
Notice is hereby given that the above was
named as Defendant in a civil action insti-
tuted by plaintiff. This is an action to
recover delinquent real estate taxes for
the year 2009, for the property located at
T-399, Jefferson Township, Pennsylvania,
PIN Number 13904-020-00605. A tax
claim in the amount of $3,194.39 was filed
on or about July 26, 2010 for this claim and
a Writ of Scire Facias was filed.
You are hereby notified to plead to the writ
in this case, on or before 20 days from the
date of this publication or a Judgment will
be entered.
If you wish to defend, you must enter a
written appearance personally or by attor-
ney and file your defenses or objections in
writing with the court. You are warned
that if you fail to do so, the case may pro-
ceed without you and a judgment may be
entered without further notice for the relief
requested by the plaintiff. You may lose
property or other rights important to you.
You should take this paper to your lawyer
at once. If you do not have a lawyer or
cannot afford one, go to or telephone the
offices set forth below to find out where
you can get legal help.
Northern Pennsylvania Legal Services,
507 Linden Street, Suite 300,
Scranton, PA 18503-1631,
Telephone (570) 342-0184
Lawyer Referral Service,
Lackawanna Bar Association,
204 Wyoming Avenue, Suite 205,
Scranton, PA 18503-1010,
Telephone (570) 969-9600
Portnoff Law Associates, Ltd., P.O. Box
391, Norristown, PA 19404-0391,
(866) 211-9466
LEGAL NOTICE
IN THE COURT OF COMMON PLEAS OF
LACKAWANNA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA,
CIVIL ACTION, LAW, NO. 51248-09
North Pocono School District vs. William
Romancho, III and Karen Geda
Notice is hereby given that the above was
named as defendant in a civil action insti-
tuted by plaintiff. This is an action to
recover delinquent real estate taxes for
the year 2008, for the property located at
131 Keene Street, Moscow, Pennsylvania,
PIN No. 19807-040-008. A tax claim in the
amount of $1,794.54 was filed on or about
July 20, 2009 for this claim and a Writ of
Scire Facias was filed.
You are hereby notified to plead to the writ
in this case, on or before 20 days from the
date of this publication or a Judgment will
be entered.
If you wish to defend, you must enter a
written appearance personally or by attor-
ney and file your defenses or objections in
writing with the court. You are warned
that if you fail to do so, the case may pro-
ceed without you and a judgment may be
entered without further notice for the relief
requested by the plaintiff. You may lose
property or other rights important to you.
You should take this paper to your lawyer
at once. If you do not have a lawyer or
cannot afford one, go to or telephone the
offices set forth below to find out where
you can get legal help.
Northern Pennsylvania Legal Services,
507 Linden Street, Suite 300,
Scranton, PA 18503-1631,
Telephone (570) 342-0184
Lawyer Referral Service,
Lackawanna Bar Association, 204
Wyoming Avenue, Suite 205,
Scranton, PA 18503-1010,
Telephone (570) 969-9600
Portnoff Law Associates, Ltd.,
P.O. Box 391, Norristown, PA 19404-0391
(866) 211-9466
LEGAL NOTICE
IN THE COURT OF COMMON PLEAS OF
LACKAWANNA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA,
CIVIL ACTION, LAW, NO. 51279-09
Mid Valley School District vs. David M.
Sobolewski, Jr. and Crystal Sobolewski
Notice is hereby given that the above
were named as Defendants in a civil action
instituted by plaintiff. This is an action to
recover delinquent real estate taxes for
the year 2008, for the property located at
319 Boulevard Avenue, Dickson City,
Pennsylvania, PIN Number 12412-010-049.
A tax claim in the amount of $1,207.68 was
filed on or about July 22, 2009 for this
claim and a Writ of Scire Facias was filed.
You are hereby notified to plead to the writ
in this case, on or before 20 days from the
date of this publication or a Judgment will
be entered.
If you wish to defend, you must enter a
written appearance personally or by attor-
ney and file your defenses or objections in
writing with the court. You are warned
that if you fail to do so, the case may pro-
ceed without you and a judgment may be
entered without further notice for the relief
requested by the plaintiff. You may lose
property or other rights important to you.
You should take this paper to your lawyer
at once. If you do not have a lawyer or
cannot afford one, go to or telephone the
offices set forth below to find out where
you can get legal help.
Northern Pennsylvania Legal Services,
507 Linden Street, Suite 300, Scranton,
PA 18503-1631, Telephone
(570) 342-0184
Lawyer Referral Service,
Lackawanna Bar Association,
204 Wyoming Avenue, Suite 205,
Scranton, PA 18503-1010, Telephone
(570) 969-9600
Portnoff Law Associates, Ltd., P.O. Box
391, Norristown, PA 19404-0391,
(866) 211-9466
LEGAL NOTICE
IN THE COURT OF COMMON PLEAS OF
LACKAWANNA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA,
CIVIL ACTION, LAW, NO. 50983-09
Abington Heights School District vs.
Thomas R. Kudrako, Jr. and
Judith M. Kudrako
Notice is hereby given that the above
were named as defendants in a civil action
instituted by plaintiff. This is an action to
recover delinquent real estate taxes for
the year 2008, for the property located at
T-365, Ransom Township, Pennsylvania,
Tax Parcel 16402-010-01404. A tax claim
in the amount of $2,650.16 was filed on or
about June 16, 2009 for this claim and a
Writ of Scire Facias was filed.
You are hereby notified to plead to the writ
in this case, on or before 20 days from the
date of this publication or a Judgment will
be entered.
If you wish to defend, you must enter a
written appearance personally or by attor-
ney and file your defenses or objections in
writing with the court. You are warned
that if you fail to do so, the case may pro-
ceed without you and a judgment may be
entered without further notice for the relief
requested by the plaintiff. You may lose
property or other rights important to you.
You should take this paper to your lawyer
at once. If you do not have a lawyer or
cannot afford one, go to or telephone the
offices set forth below to find out where
you can get legal help.
Northern Pennsylvania Legal Services,
507 Linden Street, Suite 300, Scranton,
PA 18503-1631,
Telephone (570) 342-0184
Lawyer Referral Service, Lackawanna Bar
Association, 204 Wyoming Avenue, Suite
205, Scranton, PA 18503-1010,
Telephone (570) 969-9600
Portnoff Law Associates, Ltd., P.O. Box
391, Norristown, PA 19404-0391,
(866) 211-9466
135 Legals/
Public Notices
ESTATE NOTICE
Estate of Katherine
U. Dunn, late of Dal-
ton, Pennsylvania.
Letters Testamen-
tary in the above
estate having been
granted, creditors
shall make demand
and debtors shall
make payment to
David F. Dunn, 324
South Turnpike
Road, Dalton, PA
18414, Co-Executor,
or to Debra D.
Stiles, 208 North
Turnpike Rd., Dal-
ton, PA 18414, Co-
Executor or to
James W. Reid,
Esquire, Oliver,
Price & Rhodes,
Attorneys for the
Estate, 1212 South
Abington Road, P.O.
Box 240, Clarks
Summit, PA 18411.
LEGAL NOTICE
ESTATE OF DONNA
M. HODGKINS,
DECEASED LATE OF
SCRANTON, PENN-
SYLVANIA (DIED
NOVEMBER 8,
2012)
All persons indebted
to said Estate are
required to make
payment, and those
having claims or
demands to present
the same without
delay, to Carol A.
Catalano and Mary
P. Bisignani, Execu-
tors, c/o Attorney
Joseph F. Gaughan,
300 Mulberry
Street, Suite 303,
Scranton, PA 18503
LAW OFFICES OF
JOSEPH F.
GAUGHAN, P.C.
Joseph F. Gaughan,
Esquire, Attorney
for the Estate
ESTATE NOTICE
ESTATE OF LOIS
KOSIK. Late of Cov-
ington Township,
Pennsylvania. (Died
September 28,
2012) Letters of
Administration hav-
ing been granted to
Edwin Michael
Kosik. All persons
having claims
against the Estate
or indebted to the
Estate shall make
payment or present
claims to Douglas P.
Thomas, Attorney
for the Estate, 415
Wyoming Avenue,
Scranton, PA 18503
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LEGAL NOTICE
Notice is given that
the reorganization
meeting of the
South Abington
Township Board
of Supervisors is
scheduled for Tues-
day, January 7,
2013 at 7:00 pm.
The regular meeting
will immediately fol-
low at approximate-
ly 7:15 pm.
Notice is given the
South Abington
Township Board
of Auditors will
hold its reorganiza-
tion meeting on
Wednesday, Janu-
ary 8, 2013 at
7:00 pm.
Notice is given the
South Abington
Township Sewer
Authority will hold
its reorganization
meeting on
Wednesday, Janu-
ary 2, 2013 at
7:00 pm.
All above listed
meetings will be
held at the South
Abington Township
Municipal Building,
104 Shady Lane
Road, Chinchilla, PA
18410
David G. ONeill
Manager
ESTATE NOTICE
Estate of Margaret
Taccki, late of
Clarks Summit,
Pennsylvania. (died
August 26, 2012).
Letters Testamen-
tary on the above
estate having been
granted, all persons
having claims and
demands against
the estate of the
above decedent
shall make them
known and present
them; all of the per-
sons indebted to the
said decedent shall
make payment
thereof without
delay to Joseph
John Taccki, Execu-
tor, or Patrick J.
Lavelle, Esquire,
1000 South State
Street, Clarks Sum-
mit, PA 18411.
Patrick J. Lavelle,
Esquire. Attorney
for the Estate
NOTICE OF
ORGANIZATION
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN THAT Certifi-
cate of Organization
for Domestic Limit-
ed LIability Compa-
ny of TJ GRZEN-
DA, L.L.C. was
filed with and
approved by the
Pennsylvania
Department of
State on November
5, 2012, in accor-
dance with the pro-
visions of the Penn-
sylvania Limited Lia-
bility Company Law
of 1994.
SCOTT R.
SANDERSON
ESQUIRE
The Sanderson
Law Firm
135 Legals/
Public Notices
LEGAL NOTICE
IN THE COURT OF
COMMON PLEAS
OF LACKAWANNA
COUNTY, PENNSYL-
VANIA, CIVIL
ACTION, LAW, NO.
51881-10
North Pocono
School District vs.
Mark R. Lamura
Notice is hereby
given that the above
was named as
Defendant in a civil
action instituted by
plaintiff. This is an
action to recover
delinquent real
estate taxes for the
year 2009, for the
property located at
Country Club Road,
Thornhurst Town-
ship, Pennsylvania,
PIN Number 24500-
040-01901. A tax
claim in the amount
of $2,236.56 was
filed on or about
August 4, 2010 for
this claim and a Writ
of Scire Facias was
filed.
You are hereby noti-
fied to plead to the
writ in this case, on
or before 20 days
from the date of this
publication or a
Judgment will be
entered.
If you wish to
defend, you must
enter a written
appearance per-
sonally or by attor-
ney and file your
defenses or objec-
tions in writing with
the court. You are
warned that if you
fail to do so, the
case may proceed
without you and a
judgment may be
entered without fur-
ther notice for the
relief requested by
the plaintiff. You
may lose property
or other rights
important to you.
You should take this
paper to your
lawyer at once. If
you do not have a
lawyer or cannot
afford one, go to or
telephone the
offices set forth
below to find out
where you can get
legal help.
Northern Pennsyl-
vania Legal Ser-
vices, 507 Linden
Street,
Suite 300, Scran-
ton, PA 18503-1631
(570) 342-0184
Lawyer Referral
Service, Lackawan-
na Bar Association,
204 Wyoming Ave.,
Suite 205, Scran-
ton, PA 18503-1010,
(570) 969-9600
Portnoff Law Asso-
ciates, Ltd., P.O.
Box 391, Norris-
town, PA 19404-
0391,
(866) 211-9466
ARTICLES OF
INCORPORATION
Notice is hereby
given that on Octo-
ber 25, 2012, Key-
stone Chapter
UNICO National has
been incorporated
under the provisions
of the Pennsylvania
Non-Profit corpora-
tion Law of 1988, as
amended. The Pur-
poses of the corpo-
ration are to further
the ideals of UNICO
National both
nationally and local-
ly, to promote anti
bias; collegiate
scholarships;
research for cures
from Cooleys ane-
mia; cancer and
mental heath disor-
ders; as well as Ital-
ian heritage and cul-
ture; and other
charitable purpos-
es.
STEPHEN J. EVERS
ESQUIRE
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
Its a showroom in print!
Classifieds got
the directions!
LEGAL NOTICE
ALL AMERICAN
SELF STORAGE,
905 Stanton Road
Mid-Valley
Industrial Park,
Olyphant, PA will
offer for sale the
property of John
Kane. Unit #MV246.
Personal and
household belong-
ings. Sale date is
12/01/12 at 10:00am
at the above
location.
150 Special Notices
ADOPT
Adopting your
newborn is our
dream. Joy filled
home, endless
love, security.
Randi & Chuck
1-888-223-7941
FOSTER PARENT(S)
NEEDED
IMMEDIATELY
for teens or sibling
groups.
Compensation,
training, and 24
hour on-call sup-
port provided.
Please call
FRIENDSHIP
HOUSE (570)
342-8305 x 2058.
Compensation up
to $1200.00 per
month per child.
WADE OR HELEN
GRIFFITH please
contact Kim Patton
at 2209 N. Toombs
St. Valdosta, GA
31602 concerning
your fathers will.
150 Special Notices
IF YOURE NOT SELLING
YOUR JUNK VEHICLES AND
HEAVY EQUIPMENT TO
HAPPY HAPPY
TRAILS TRAILS
YOUR LOSING MONEY
WEEKL WEEKLY Y
SPECIAL SPECIAL
Extra $100 for
school busses
570-760-2035
570-542-2277
6am to 9pm
406 ATVs/Dune
Buggies
TOMAHAWK`11
ATV, 110 CC. Brand
New Tomahawk
Kids Quad. Only
$695 takes it away!
570-817-2952
Wilkes-Barre
409 Autos under
$5000
FORD 95 F150
4x4. 1 Owner.
91K. 4.8 engine,
auto. Runs
great. New
paint, stake
body with
metal floor.
570-675-5046.
Leave message,
will return call.
NOW $4,295
412 Autos for Sale
DODGE 02
VIPER GTS
10,000 MILES V10
6speed, collec-
tors, this baby is
1 of only 750 GTS
coupes built in
2002 and only 1 of
83 painted Race
Yellow it still wears
its original tires
showing how it
was babied. This
car is spotless
throughout and is
ready for its new
home. This vehicle
is shown by
appointment only.
$39,999 or trade.
570-760-2365
Boat? Car? Truck?
Motorcycle? Air-
plane? Whatever it
is, sell it with a
Classified ad.
570-829-7130
TOYOTA 04 CELICA GT
112K miles. Blue,
5 speed. Air,
power
windows/locks,
CD/cassette, Key-
less entry, sun-
roof, new battery.
Car drives and
has current PA
inspection. Slight
rust on corner of
passenger door.
Clutch slips on
hard acceleration.
This is why its
thousands less
than Blue Book
value. $6,500
OBO. Make an
offer! Call
570-592-1629
415 Autos-Antique
& Classic
CHEVROLET `76
PICKUP
4 Cylinder
Very Good
Condition!
NEW PRICE
$1,500.
570-362-3626
Ask for Lee
CHEVY 30 HOTROD COUPE
$47,000
GREAT DEALS!
MERCEDES 29
Kit Car $5,500
OR TRADE
JUST REDUCED
(570) 655-4884
MAZDA `88 RX-7
CONVERTIBLE
1 owner, garage
kept, 65k original
miles, black with
grey leather interior,
all original & never
seen snow. $7,995.
Call 570-237-5119
MERCEDES-BENZ `73
450SL
Convertible with
removable hard top,
power windows, AM
/FM radio with cas-
sette player, CD
player, automatic, 4
new tires. Cham-
pagne exterior; Ital-
ian red leather inte-
rior inside. Garage
kept, excellent con-
dition. Priced to Sell!
$23,000.
Call 570-825-6272
439 Motorcycles
SCOOTER 12
BRAND NEW
All ready to ride,
electric start, auto-
matic transmission,
disk brakes, rear
luggage trunk,
under seat storage,
around 100 mpg,
fully street legal, all
ready to go! only
$1,595. Call
570-817-2952
SUZUKI 01 VS 800
GL INTRUDER
Garage kept, no
rust, lots of
chrome, black with
teal green flake.
Includes storage
jack & 2 helmets.
$3600
570-410-1026
YAMAHA 08 STAR
RAIDER RAVEN EDITION
Mint condition.
Very low miles.
Asking $7400.
Call for details.
570-472-2327
YAMAHA 97
ROYALSTAR 1300
12,000 miles. With
windshield. Runs
excellent. Many
extras including
gunfighter seat,
leather bags, extra
pipes. New tires &
battery. Asking
$4,000 firm.
(570) 814-1548
457 Wanted to Buy
Auto
All
Junk
Cars &
Trucks
Wanted
Highest
Prices
Paid In
CA$H
FREE
PICKUP
570-574-1275
548 Medical/Health
CIRCULATOR RN
PIER DIEM
Needed for day
shift position in
busy Surgery
Center. Surgical
experience
required.
No weekends/
holidays. Please
send resume to:
pjresume1@
hotmail.com
No cover letter
necessary.
600
FINANCIAL
610 Business
Opportunities
LEARN TO OPERATE
A MINI-OFFICE
OUTLET FROM
HOME
Free online training,
flex hours, great
income potential!
www.123IAmFree
.com
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
630 Money To Loan
We can erase
your bad credit -
100% GUARAN-
TEED. Attorneys
for the Federal
Trade Commission
say theyve never
seen a legitimate
credit repair opera-
tion. No one can
legally remove
accurate and timely
information from
your credit report.
Its a process that
starts with you and
involves time and a
conscious effort to
pay your debts.
Learn about manag-
ing credit and debt
at ftc. gov/credit. A
message from The
Times Leader and
the FTC.
700
MERCHANDISE
744 Furniture &
Accessories
CHAIRS, (2)
Genuine
leather, cus-
tom made
recliners.
Taupe color,
like new. $550
each.
570-675-5046
DEN
FURNITURE
Wood/cloth. Reg-
ular size sofa,
chair and
ottoman. Coffee
table, 2 end
tables. Excellent
condition. $325
for all.
570-675-5046
Find Something?
Lose Something?
Get it back where it
belongs
with a Lost/Found ad!
570-829-7130
754 Machinery &
Equipment
SNOW
BLOWER.
Craftsman. 12
HP, 32 dual
stage. Electric
start. Track
Drive. $525.
570-675-5046
758 Miscellaneous
GARAGE SALE
LEFTOVER ITEMS
SCOOTER/RAZOR
$8. Booster car
seat $3. ladies
scrubs size XL $1.
each. Easy bake
oven $5. Dance
master game mat
$4. Riding school
sticky mosaics $8.
Christmas musical
bear in rocking chair
$5. Moon sand play
set $5. Girls vel-
veteen dress size 8
$4. Girls red/black
dress size 12 $4.
570-287-3056
766 Office
Equipment
DESK. Traditional
size office desk.
Cherry, large.
Hutch, side shelves
and file drawers.
Great for business
of home office.
$200 OBO
570-825-9654
776 Sporting Goods
SKI RACK Bar-
recrafters Sierra
SX-ll. Adjusts to 40-
52. Holds 5 pairs
skis or 2 snow-
boards. Never used.
$25. 570-709-1288
786 Toys & Games
CONTROLLERS, (2)
PC game. Saitek,
$20 for both.
GAMES, (10)
Playstation, $20 for
all. Scott 570-288-
5314 between noon
and 6 pm for details
796 Wanted to Buy
Merchandise
CA$H P CA$H PAID AID
1930-1970s
Guitars,
Microphones
Radio/Amplifier
Tubes and
Theater Sound
Equipment.
Call Don
Sugar Loaf NY.
715-377-2558
800
PETS & ANIMALS
810 Cats
KITTENS. Adorable
& fluffy. FREE to
good homes.
570-256-7854
815 Dogs
PAWS
TO CONSIDER....
ENHANCE
YOUR PET
CLASSIFIED
AD ONLINE
Call 829-7130
Place your pet ad
and provide us your
email address
This will create a
seller account
online and login
information will be
emailed to you from
gadzoo.com
The World of Pets
Unleashed
You can then use
your account to
enhance your online
ad. Post up to 6
captioned photos
of your pet
Expand your text to
include more
information, include
your contact
information such
as e-mail, address
phone number and
or website.
815 Dogs
POMERANIAN
AKC, 10 weeks,
1 male, black
$400. 1 sable
male, 10 weeks
$400.
1st & 2nd shots
Vet checked.
Home Raised.
Champion blood
line.
570-864-2643
900
REAL ESTATE
FOR SALE
906 Homes for Sale
Having trouble
paying your mort-
gage? Falling
behind on your
payments? You
may get mail from
people who promise
to forestall your
foreclosure for a fee
in advance. Report
them to the Federal
Trade Commission,
the nations con-
sumer protection
agency. Call 1-877-
FTC-HELP or click
on ftc.gov. A mes-
sage from The
Times Leader and
the FTC.
DALLAS
3 bedroom, 2 bath,
modern country
kitchen with Corian
counters, family
room with fireplace,
wet bar and walkout
to patio, multi-level
decks. All appli-
ances included.
$217,000.
570-675-0446
evenings.
LAFLIN
20 OLD MILL RD
For Sale By Owner
Beautiful
Custom Built.
Minutes from I-81
Turnpike & Casino.
Move In Condition!
3 to 4 bedroom
Tri-level, Master
bath, 2 full baths &
1 powder room,
central vacuum
system. Living &
dining rooms, fam-
ily room with fire-
place. Gas heat,
central air, large
basement, deck,
three car garage
& 2nd large lot
included.....
$395,000
570-237-0101
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
NANTICOKE
1472 S. Hanover St.
Well maintained
bi-level. This home
features 2 bed-
rooms, 1 3/4 baths,
recreation room
with propane stove.
Walk out to a 3
season porch. Pro-
fessionally land-
scaped yard. 1 car
garage, storage
shed, new appli-
ances, ceiling fans.
Close to LCCC.
$153,900.
Call 570-735-7594
SHAVERTOWN
9 room house, 4
bedrooms, 2 1/2
baths, heated sun-
room, 2 car
attached garage.
570-947-1200
TUNKHANNOCK AREA
REDUCED!
3 bedroom home
on 6 acres
2 baths, concrete
porch 3/4 around
the house, garage.
Stonework, stone
fireplace, heat with
wood or oil.
Commercial cook
stove. Beautiful
view. Well above
flood or high water.
Some farm equip-
ment. With gas & oil
rights. $250,000
570-665-9054
912 Lots & Acreage
JENKINS TOWNSHIP
New Section in
Highland Hills,
Only 3 lots left
in Charles
Place. Call
570-498-9244
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
**BEAUMONT**
Between Dallas &
Tunkhannock.
FREE HEAT &
GARBAGE!
2 bedroom apt.
$575 /month.
Tunkhannock S.D.
Call 1-877-839-
0666 or online at
cipllc.ucanrent.it
FORTY
FORT
A AV VAILABLE AILABLE
1-2 1-2
BEDROOMS BEDROOMS
RENOV RENOVA ATED TED
America
Realty Rentals
RENOVATED 1-2
BEDROOMS TO
PERFECTION.
1 BEDROOM
STARTS AT $500
+ UTILITIES.
2 BEDROOMS
$750. & UP
PLUS UTILITIES.
All new maple
kitchens,
appliances,
some carports,
fireplaces,
porches, etc.
EMPLOYMENT
VERIFICATION
REQUIRED, NO
PETS/NO
SMOKING/
2 YEAR SAME
RENT.
MANAGED.
570-288-1422
HARVEYS LAKE
2 bedroom, 1 bath,
eat-in kitchen,
washer/dryer hook-
up, off street
parking. $600 +
gas heat.
570-606-7917
leave message
KINGSTON
Bright, spacious, 3
bedroom 1st floor
duplex in beautiful
residential neigh-
borhood. Wall to
wall, living & dining
rooms, kitchen with
refrigerator, gas
stove, dishwasher,
garbage disposal,
washer/dryer, air &
full basement. Front
& rear porches, off-
street parking &
garage. $925/
month + utilities.
Security & refer-
ences required. No
pets or smokers.
(570)905-4342
PARSONS
2nd floor, 2 bed-
rooms, washer,
dryer, fridge, stove
& heat included.
$685/month +
security. No pets.
570-332-9355
PITTSTON AREA
1 bedroom efficien-
cy apartment, 2nd
floor. Newly remod-
eled. $375/mo.+ util-
ities + security.
Call 570-241-2012
West Pittston
THE HITCHNER THE HITCHNER
530 Exeter Ave
Now
Accepting
Applications!
3 bedroom -
$625
Elevator,
parking lot,
central air,
appliances, wi-fi
access & more.
Income
Qualifications
required.
570-344-5999
WEST WYOMING
425 West 8th Street
2nd floor, 2 bed-
room with off street
parking, washer/
dryer hook up,
stove. No pets.
$525/mo + security.
Sewer & garbage
included, other utili-
ties by tenant.
570-760-0458
WILKES-BARRE
1 bedroom
apartment. $400/
month + utilities &
1 month security.
139 Sambourne
St. Section 8 OK.
No pets.
570-460-6173
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
WILKES-BARRE
3 bedrooms, 1 bath,
refrigerator, stove
& dishwasher,
washer/dryer
hookup, off-street
parking, pets ok
with fee, $750/
month, plus security
and utilities.
Call 570-650-1575
WILKES-BARRE/
NORTH
Half Double Block,
2 bedroom, refrig-
erator and stove
included,
washer/dryer hook-
up, no pets or no
smokers. $500 per/
month + utilities.
References, securi-
ty & lease.
570-825-5138
944 Commercial
Properties
RETAIL/OFFICE
PLAINS
ACROSS FROM
SIDE
ENTRANCE TO
MOHEGAN
SUN CASINO
High traffic,
approximately
900 sq. ft.
Convenient
location.
$1,600. month.
Some utilities
paid by owner.
570-760-5530
Collect cash, not dust!
Clean out your
basement, garage
or attic and call the
Classified depart-
ment today at 570-
829-7130!
947 Garages
WYOMING
4 Car Garage for
rent $65/month
per stall, 6 month
minimum lease
required.
For appointments
call 570-237-0260
950 Half Doubles
AVOCA
3 bedrooms, 1 bath,
refrigerator, washer
/dryer hookup,
Garage. Pets nego-
tiable. $600/month,
+ utilities, 1 month
security &
references.
570-852-9204
PLYMOUTH
House for Rent. 3
Bedrooms, 1.5 bath.
$675 + utilities.
Water, sewer & all
appliances includ-
ed. Fenced back
yard. One month
security up front, no
partial payment.
Section 8 OK.
Call Steve at
570-592-5764
PLYMOUTH
Shawnee Ave.
3 bedrooms, back
yard, basement.
$550/month +
utilities and sewer.
570-332-5723
953Houses for Rent
CLARKS SUMMIT
4 bedrooms,
2 baths, all appli-
ances, washer/
dryer hookup, no
pets. $1,500/month
+ utilities & security.
Month to month
lease.
(610) 256-5352
PIKES CREEK
3 bedrooms. Lake
Lehman School Dist
$1,000/month +
security. No Pets.
Call 570-477-3599
WEST PITTSTON
3 bedroom, 1 bath
single family home.
Nice neighborhood,
end of quiet street.
Completely reno-
vated and remod-
eled. Eat in kitchen,
new carpeting,
front, side porches,
small yard. No
smoking & no pets
preferred
570-704-8820
1000
SERVICE
DIRECTORY
1015 Appliance
Service
ECO-FRIENDLY
APPLIANCE TECH.
25 Years Experi-
ence fixing major
appliances: Washer,
Dryer, Refrigerator,
Dishwasher, Com-
pactors. Most
brands. Free phone
advice & all work
guaranteed. No
service charge for
visit. 570-706-6577
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
Motorcycle for sale?
Let them see it here
in the Classifieds!
570-829-7130
Say it HERE
in the Classifieds!
570-829-7130
PAGE 21 Abington Journal WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 28, 2012
WE HAVE LIFT TRUCKS
VISIT US & SHOP 24/7 AT WWW.VALLEYCHEVROLET.COM
EXIT 170B OFF 1-81 TO EXIT 1 - BEAR RIGHT ON BUSINESS ROUTE 309 TO SIXTH LIGHT. JUST BELOW WYOMING VALLEY MALL
Chevy Runs Deep
570-821-2778
VALLEY CHEVROLET
601 Kidder Street, Wilkes-Barre, PA
821-2772 1-800-444-7172
www.valleychevrolet.com
*All prices plus tax & tags. Prices include all applicable rebates trade-in bonus cash (if applicable); Business Choice rebate (if applicable); VYU Snowplow bonus cash (if applicable); All Star Edition
(if applicable); Conquest private offers (if applicable on specic vehicles); LOWAPR in lieu of certain rebates to well qualied buyers. See dealer for details. PRICES SUBJECT TO CHANGE DUE TO
RELEASE OF INCENTIVES AND PUBLICATION DATES. Artwork for illustration purpose only. Not responsible for typographical errors. Enter to win 2013 Spark - no purchase necessary.
STOP BY DEALERSHIP & ENTER TO WIN
A 2013 CHEVY SPARK
Go To VALLEYCHEVROLET.COM - Homepage
Click On Link To Enter Sweepstakes!
2012 CHEVY IMPALA
LS SEDAN
Stk. #12063, 3.5L V6 Automatic, Dual Zone Air Conditioning, Stabilitrak,
Six-Way Power Driver Seat, PW, PDL, Tilt, OnStar, XM Satellite Radio
2013 CHEVY EQUINOX
LS FWD
Stk. #13152, 2.4L DOHC 4 Cyl.,
6 Speed Automatic, A/C, OnStar
w/ Turn-By-Turn Navigation,
Bluetooth for Phone, AM/FM/
CD, 17 Aluminum Wheels, PW,
PDL, Cruise, Remote Keyless
Entry, XM Satellite Radio
MSRP $24,580
Stk. #12257, VORTEC 4.8L V8 AT, Cruise, AM/FM Stereo,
Deep Tinted Glass, Stabilitrak, 17 Steel Wheels, Folding Rear Seat
2012 CHEVY SILVERADO 1500
EXTENDED CAB 4WD W/T
MSRP
$31,565
$
23,995
*
2013 CHEVY SUBURBAN 1500
4X4
MSRP $46,135
2013 CHEVY SONIC
LS 4DOOR
Stk. #13135, ECOTEC 1.8L VVT
4 Cyl., 5 Speed Manual Trans., Air,
Tinted Glass, Stabilitrak, Drivers
Command Center, PDL, Keyless
Entry, OnStar Directions &
Connections w/ Automatic Crash
Response, Bluetooth For Phone,
Steering Wheel Controls.
2012 CHEVY SILVERADO 3500HD 4X4
DUMP TRUCK DURAMAX DIESEL
#12394, Duramax 6.6L V8 Turbo
Diesel, Allison 6 Speed Automatic,
PW, PDL, Air, Power Mirrors,
Roof Marker Lamps, Locking
Rear Dierential, Cruise,
O Road Skid Plate Package,
Snow Plow Prep Pkg.
MSRP
$53,642
Sale Price Starting At
$
42,475
*
Sale Price Starting At
$
21,999
*
Sale Price Starting At
$
14,699
*
Sale Price Starting At
$
22,999
*
$
43,999
*
Sale Price Starting At
Sale Price Starting At
Stk. #13132, ALL STAR EDITION, 5.3L V8, AT, AC, Poweer Options, Remote Start,
FABTEC 6 Lift Kit, 4 Wheel To Wheel Stainless Steel Nerf Bars, Stripe Paint w/Fender Flares,
Leather, OnStar, XM, Locking Rear Dierential, Rear Park Assist, Much More!
2013 CHEVY SILVERADO 1500 CREW CAB
SOUTHERN COMFORT EDITION
$
45,999
*
Sale Price Starting At Only
0
%
FOR
72 MOS
APR
MSRP $26,665
0
%
FOR
60 MOS
APR
SAVE OVER
$
6,500
1.9
%
FOR
60 MOS
APR
Stk. #13129, Vortec 5.3 SFI
V8, PW, PDL, P. Drivers
Seat, Dual Pwr. Heated
Mirrors, Remote Start,
3rd Row Seat, F/R Air
Stabilitrak, OnStar w/
Turn-By-Turn Navigation,
XM Satellite Radio,
Trailering Equipped
MSRP $56,732
VALLEY CHEVROLET IS
AN OFFICIAL DROP-OFF
LOCATION FOR
HURRY!
Price Good
Until 11/30
Spark Offer
Ends 11/30/12
WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 28, 2012 Abington Journal PAGE 22
906 Homes for Sale
542 Logistics/
Transportation
906 Homes for Sale
542 Logistics/
Transportation
906 Homes for Sale
542 Logistics/
Transportation
906 Homes for Sale 906 Homes for Sale 906 Homes for Sale 906 Homes for Sale 906 Homes for Sale 906 Homes for Sale 906 Homes for Sale
REALESTATE, INC.
Clarks Summit / Scranton Ofce (570) 585-0600
239 Northern Blvd., Clarks Summit (570) 207-6262
FALL IN LOVE with this Meadowood Farms
home perched on a corner acre lot with lots
of room for entertaining and relaxation both
inside and out! MLS#12-4789
KIM 585-0606 $312,384
WAVERLY Grand historic home on 5.5 magnifcent
acres. So very much detail throughout, 18 rooms,
8 baths, 4 freplaces, 4 car garage. A treasure!
MLS# 12-4586
BEVERLY 585-0619 $899,000
EQUESTRIAN ESTATE Over 33 acres, 7 stall
custom horse barn with 4 paddocks, riding
arena, and 4-5 bedroom, 4 bath home with 4
freplaces. MLS# 12-3470
KIM 585-0606 $849,724
MAGNIFICENT ESTATE This stone mansion was built
by prestigious architect George Lewis whose work in-
cludes numerous historic places in NE PA. Situated on
21+ acres this 7000 SF home includes 8 stall horse
barn & 75 x 150 indoor riding area. MLS# 12-1540
Virtual Tour: www.3dvirtualvisions.com/westmain/
MARION 585-0602 or CHRISTIAN 585-0614
GLENMAURA Lovely ranch home w/ pretty views,
beautiful landscaped lot, open foor plan & easy
fow kitchen, family room & dining room plus living
room. Enjoy this great ranch on a wonderful lot.
Appt. only! MLS# 12-1165
PEG 714-9247 $395,000
NEW MILFORD Sit on the covered patio and enjoy the
country views or stay inside and admire the custom
wood and stone work. Gorgeous details abound in this
5 bedroom, 4 1/2 bath home from the cherry and gran-
ite gourmet kitchen to the beautiful stamped concrete
foors to the stunning entry rotunda. Luxury and liv-
ability all in one charming country estate. MLS#12-553
Virtual Tour: www.3dvirtualvisions.com/route492/
LORI 585-0627 $1,450,000
WELL MAINTAINED 2 bedroom ranch home in
Old Forge. Low maintenance yard. Move in
condition. MLS# 12-4545
DAVE 585-0615 $92,900
DUNMORE Buy and save! Why rent when you can
own for so much less? You need to see the inside
of this 2 bedroom home to appreciate its charm.
Great rental possibilities for investors too. Call to
schedule an appointment. MLS # 12-3557
LORI 585-0627 $84,000
GREENRIDGE Easy Ownership! 2 unit with all sep-
arate utilities and detached garage. Located in the
citys Green Ridge Section MLS#12-3205
www.christiansaunders.com
CHRISTIAN 585-0614 $121,700
GREENRIDGE Beautiful 3 unit located in the
Heart of Green Ridge with fenced yard and 2
car garage. www.christiansaunders.com
MLS#12-3210
CHRISTIAN 585-0614 $134,900
FOREST CITY Great investment opportunity with
this remodeled 3 unit with separate utilities and
off street parking. All plumbing, heating, interior
and exterior updated in 2008. Close to gas lands!
www.christiansaunders.com MLS#12-3409
CHRISTIAN 585-0614 $139,900
CLARKS SUMMIT Waiting for your fnishing touch-
es, this brand new home features gourmet kitchen,
regal offce, large family room with freplace and
awesome master suite. MLS# 12-3839
MARION 585-0602 $499,000
CHARMING LAKEFRONT Cottage that can be
used year round . Beautiful oversized lot. Redone
lakefront area w/ composite deck, pretty stone-
work, boat storage & frepit. Everything you need
to enjoy the lake in any season! MLS#12-3559
LORI 585-0627 $219,900
OLD FORGE Modern open-foor plan 4BR, 3 bath
home. with 1st foor MBR Suite. Beautiful HW, FR
w/full-wall stone FP, modern Kit, large 1st foor rec
room; heated sunroom; 2 garages, in-ground pool
plus lower level / on-grade 686SF could be in-law
apartment. MLS# 12-4602
RAE 714-9234 $249,900
CLARKS SUMMIT Move in condition bi level with
updated kitchen and baths, beautiful hardwood
foors, 2.5 baths, 3 season room, a large level
backyard and more. MLS# 12-4405
EDNA 585-0610 $217,000
CLARKS SUMMIT Beautiful end unit townhome
w/ main level master bedroom suite. Custom
draperies and all appliances included. Loads of
upgrades & priced to sell quickly. MLS# 12-5039
LORI 585-0627 $215,000
SCRANTON Recently renovated. Beautiful, move-
in condition ranch, upscale kitchen, cherry wood
foors, 2 bedrooms, 2 bath, very interesting!
MLS# 12-4811
BEVERLY 585-0619 $229,000
SCRANTON CONDO 1 bedroom, centrally lo-
cated to downtown shops & restaurants.
www.christiansaunders.com
CHRISTIAN 585-0614 $69,900
CLARKS SUMMIT RENTAL Beautiful ranch
with HW foors, large yard, 1 car garage. Totally
handicap accessible, wheel chair accessible.
Nice patio in rear. MLS# 12-5126
ELIZABETH 585-0608 $1,200/MT
SOUTH SCRANTON Save your money! Own
for way less than youd pay in rent. Property
has been used as offce space but a few little
tweaks could make it a cute, 2 bedroom home.
MLS# 12-3624 LORI 585-0627 $42,500
FACTORYVILLE Build your dream home, 1+ wooded building
lot! MLS# 12-3928 ELIZABETH 585-0608 $19,000
DUNMORE Convenient location for this building lot. This
could be a perfect lot for multi-family. MLS# 12-3775
DAVE 585-0615 $34,900
ROARING BROOK TWP Dont miss out on this beautiful piece
of land, large, private and wooded in a quickly growing de-
velopment. Come take a look & you will be ready to start
building the dream home you always wanted! MLS#12-2982
JAIME 585-0609 $39,900.
HUNTINGTON WOODS Offers Lots 5 & 25 in one of the new-
est areas located in Dalton, just minutes from Route 11 in
Clarks Summit, complete with paved roads and utilities ready
to install! MLS#12-2928 & 12-2929 RENEE 585-0626
LAND
CLARKS SUMMIT Beautiful 1.43 acre wooded lot in quiet
area. MLS# 12-3913 ELIZABETH 585-0608 $79,900
CLARKS SUMMIT Prime 2 acres lot in beautiful Cherry Ridge
Development. This land offers awesome views and easy ac-
cess to the city. MLS# 12-1851
MARION 585-0602 $119,000
CLARKS SUMMIT Beautiful acreage offers the peace and
tranquility of the country with only a ten minute drive to town.
Plenty of room to build. Seller is looking for offers so dont
hesitate! MLS#11-3684 LORI 585-0627 $129,000
CLARKS SUMMIT Beautiful 1.38 acres on Summit Lake of-
fers amazing views and public sewer. MLS# 12-3243
JAIME 585-0609 $229,900
LAND
SCRANTON Apartment 3B located in Scrantons
Premier Condominium offers wall to wall carpeting,
den could be optional 2nd bedroom. Nice unit with
24 hour security and convenient location. www.
christiansaunders.com MLS# 12-1939
CHRISTIAN 585-0614 $109,900
ABSOLUTE MASTERPIECE! Dream home combines great
living & fabulous entertaining. Spectacular entrance, high
ceilings, marble foors. 1st fr Mst suite, exercise room,
offce, and kitchen are all luxurious yet perfectly suited
for everyday life! www.christiansaunders.com MLS#12-
538 CHRISTIAN 585-0614 $749,900
NORTH ABINGTON TOWNSHIP 11+ acres sur-
round this meticulously kept home featuring in-law
apartment, fully stocked pond, modern kitchen and
baths, freplace and frst foor master suite. Home
Warranty included! MLS# 12-4658
MARION 585-0602 $399,900
GLENMAURA Beautiful home w/ all the amenities.
Wonderful foor plan that affords convenience &
privacy. Located on a cul-de-sac. Fully landscaped
& sits up high off the road. MLS# 12-4796
PEG 714-9247 $449,900
CLARKS SUMMIT Terrifc Townhome! Newer
hardwood fooring, 2 bedrooms, 1.5 baths,
whirlpool, 2 car garage, beautiful lake views!
MLS# 12-4576
BEVERLY 585-0619 $179,000
2
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IT
3
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3
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GLENMAURA - Live easy in this fabulous middle
unit with custom granite kitchen, hardwood foors,
open foor plan and more. MLS#11-3774
KIM 585-0606 $304,900
WAVERLY Awesome views surround the 4-5 bed-
room home featuring wood foors, frst foor master
bedroom, fnished lower level, modern baths, eat
in kitchen and 2 car garage. Virtual Tour: http://
www.3dvirtualvisions.com/millerroad MLS# 12-
1090 MARION 585-0602 $275,000
REDUCED!
SCRANTON Like new! Well maintained 3 bedroom
1.5 bath townhome in great location. Very effcient
middle unit with gas freplace and private 8 x 10
deck. www.christiansaunders.com MLS#12-609
CHRISTIAN 585-0614 $159,900
N
EW
!
JOB FAIR!
EVERY
THURSDAY
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Interested Applicants can Apply Online at www.XLCServices.com.
Interviews scheduled Monday thru Friday. Call 800-472-1013 or
walk-ins welcome at Job Fairs.
Hiring Experienced Forklift Operators $12.25 hourly,
after completion of 90 day probation period.
***STRAIGHT DAY SHIFT OR NIGHT SHIFT
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AT THE
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LIBRARY
Clarks Summit / Scranton Ofce
239 Northern Blvd., Clarks Summit
(570) 585-0600 (570) 207-6262
In The
Spotlight
LEWITH & FREEMAN
real estate, inc.
L
F
Real Value. Real Results.
CLARKS GREEN
Surrounded by nearly 2 acres this custom
brick home offers new granite countertops,
tile foor, central air and roof, also features
lg family room w/ gorgeous stone freplace
& wet bar, cherry kitchen, large master
suite & relaxing 15 x 10 screened-in porch!
MLS# 12-2122
Offered at $450,000
Offered by: Marion Gatto
Lewith & Freeman Real Estate, Inc.
Ofce: (570) 585-0600
Direct Line: (570) 585-0602
1024 Building &
Remodeling
SNOW
PLOWING
RESIDENTIAL/
COMMERCIAL
SIDEWALKS
Insured & Bonded
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State Lic. # PA057320
570-606-8438
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PAGE 23 Abington Journal WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 28, 2012
Te Greater Scranton Board of REALTORS

, Inc.
Visit timesleader.com & Click Homes to see the most up to date list of Open Houses
SUNDAY, DECEMBER 2
ND
, 2012
1101 S. Webster Ave., Scranton
Prudential Preferred Properties
Dir: South on Pittston Ave to Left onto E Elm Street
to Intersection of S Webster and E Elm, Sign.
MLS#12-4742
12-1PM $87,500
906 Ash St., Scranton
Prudential Preferred Properties
3209 Pittston Ave., Scranton
Prudential Preferred Properties
Dir: From downtown Scranton, N on Washington
Ave, to right onto Ash St, 3 blocks on right.
MLS#12-5214
Dir: From I81, Davis St exit, towards Pittston Ave,
left into gas station before light at Pittston Ave. Go
straight onto Kearney Ct alley, parking for 3+ cars
and 1 parking pad in front. MLS#12-3216
12-1PM 1-3PM $89,000 $115,000
1007 Lewis Ln., Waverly Twp.
Realty Network Group
Dir: North Abington Road, Turn right onto Old Orchard Road, Turn right
onto Lewis lane. 1007 Lewis Lane is on the left. MLS#12-4972
1-3PM $595,000
1710 Elizabeth St., Scranton
Prudential Preferred Properties
Dir: From West Side, north on Main Ave, left onto Euclid Ave, sharp left
onto N Sumner Ave, 2nd right onto Elizabeth St, few blocks house on
right. MLS#12-4745
1:30-2:30PM $132,500
Open House Directory
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WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 28, 2012 Abington Journal PAGE 24
The Journal
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313 Leach Hill Road., Clarks Summit 587-1401
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Sales & Service
MTD Products, Briggs & Stratton,
Husqvarna, Tecumseh, Poulan, Kohler,
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HEATING & AIR CONDITIONING
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We service all brands!
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Dairox, PA 181
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Helper Services, Personal Errands, etc.
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Specializing in windows, doors, paneling,
decks, kitchens, bathrooms, roong, siding, gutters,
ALL PHASES OF CARPENTRY
Licensed General Contractor.
Call 563-2766
(Quality over volume, one job at a time)
CONSTRUCTION
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EXCAVATING
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ll type o masonry
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MUSIC LESSONS
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TWIN FORCES
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& Crack Filling
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570-499-8963
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For All Your
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Clarks Summit, PA 18411
570-586-9353
www.neimportsinc.com
CAREYS EXCAVATING
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Sand &Stone Foundations &Driveways
DONALD CAREY
246 Snyder Road Scott Twp, PA 18433
570-254-4636 Snow Plowing & Salting
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PIZAZZ SALON
Now Oering
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Call 570-586-6645
for Information
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Kitchen, Baths, Roofs & Additions
Well Even Fix Your Dripping Faucet!
NOJOBTOOSMALL
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570-499-7170 570-591-3560
WANTED TO BUY
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Vintage Toys Up to the 1980s
Please Call Susan at 570-878-5360
Or Jim at 570-575-2348
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103 Park Blvd.
Clarks Summit, PA 18411
570-586-8961 570-840-1455 Cell
Lavender ...Salon and Spa
563-9875
110 N. Turnpike Rd.
P.O. Box 652
Dalton, Pa. 18414
Salon Hours: T +Th 12-8
W+F 10-4 Sat 9-2
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House Doctors Since 1954
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570-877-9074