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Group 1 Literature Reflects Culture: The Example of Pre-Columbian Native Americans Pre-1600s Be sure to follow the format below.

That way, all groups study guides will look the same and it will be easy for you and your peers to study. Be as detailed as possible! Important Titles/Dates: You might want to put titles, authors (where applicable), and dates under bullet points in chronological order: The Origin Legend of the Navajo Tribe; The Iroquois Constitution; Remarks Concerning the Savages of North America by Benjamin Franklin Important Concepts / Thesis Sentences: Look back at your notes on Native American Literatures & Cultures blend of Nature, Law, and Religion (mostly from our Prezi on the Pre-Columbian Native Americans), and your reading guides for each text above. What was important to know about this literature and how it reflects this culture? You might want to provide quotations from the texts that exemplify this blend of nature, law, and religion. You might want to organize these either by concept (for or against an idea, etc.) or in chronological order. Be sure each concept/thesis has a specific author next to it. Important Definitions: Origin Legend; Hieroglyphics; Myths, Folklores, & Legends

Group 2 Colonial Literature & The Age of Enlightenment (Scarlet Letter & Reader Readings) 1600s-1750s Be sure to follow the format below. That way, all groups study guides will look the same and it will be easy for you and your peers to study. Be as detailed as possible! Important Authors/Titles/Dates: You might want to put authors, titles, and dates under bullet points in chronological order: Hawthorne (when written? When is the setting?), Edwards, Small Important Concepts / Thesis Sentences: Look back at your notes on Puritans/alienation/individuality, our Prezi on the Puritans, and reading guides. What was important to know about this time period? About writers stances on important issues? You might want to organize these either by concept (for or against an idea, etc.) or in chronological order. Be sure each concept/thesis has a specific author next to it. Important Characters in Scarlet Letter: List major characters & short bios (Hester, Dimmesdale, Chillingworth) and MAYBE a super brief summary of what happens. Important Quotations: Are there particular lines we discussed or annotated in class? Notes that you have about certain words or concepts? Find 3-4 that exemplify the biggest concepts of these writings, and give brief explanations.

Group 4 American Window + Definitions: 1600-1750s The Crucible & The Scarlet Letter o Go back to the American Window for the Puritans. o On your Google Doc, specify which corner is which: Power, Power Through Others, Searching for Power, Powerless. o Then, either fill in the corners with characters from The Scarlet Letter and The Crucible, or make a list of characters that specifies which character belongs in which corner. o Give a brief explanation of why each character belongs in each corner: is it the color of his/her skin? Is it the characters actions? Gender? Lifestyle? o Define the following: theocracy, Protestant work ethic, predestination, conversion

Group 3 Colonial & Puritan Literature (The Crucible) 1600s-1750s Be sure to follow the format below. That way, all groups study guides will look the same and it will be easy for you and your peers to study. Be as detailed as possible! Important Authors/Titles/Dates: Miller (when written? When is the setting?) Important Concepts / Thesis Sentences: Look back at your unit goals sheets, notes on McCarthyism, and reading guides. What was important to know about this time period and this play? About Millers stance on important issues? Be sure to distinguish between important concepts of McCarthyism and important themes in The Crucible. Define McCarthyism, Red Scare, HUAC Important Characters in The Crucible: List major characters & short bios (Proctors, Abigail, Reverend Parris, Reverend Hale) and MAYBE a super brief summary of what happens. Important Quotations: Are there particular lines we discussed or annotated in class? Notes that you have about certain words or concepts? Find 3-4 that exemplify the biggest ideas of The Crucible, and give brief explanations.

Group 5 Romantics, Transcendentalism, Anti-Transcendentalism 1800s-1850s Be sure to follow the format below. That way, all groups study guides will look the same and it will be easy for you and your peers to study. Be as detailed as possible! Important Authors / Titles / Dates: You might want to put authors, titles, and dates under bullet points in chronological order: Emerson, Thoreau, Whitman, MLKs Letter from a Birmingham Jail Important Definitions: Romanticism, Transcendentalism, Anti-Transcendentalism, Over Soul Important Concepts / Thesis Sentences: Look back at your unit goals sheets, notes, and reading guides. What was important to know about these writers ideas? About their stances on important issues? You might want to organize these either by concept (for or against an idea, etc.) or in chronological order. Be sure each concept/thesis has a specific author next to it. For Whitmans Poetry: Why is his writing considered American? Why is it considered Transcendentalist? Be sure to define free verse. Important Quotations: Are there particular lines we discussed or annotated in class? Notes that you have about certain words or concepts? Find 4-5 that exemplify these writers thesis sentences.

Group 7 American Window: 1800s-1850s Transcendentalism & Huck Finn o Go back to the American Window for Transcendentalism & Huck Finn. o On your Google Doc, specify which corner is which: Power, Power Through Others, Searching for Power, Powerless. o Then, either fill in the corners with Transcendentalists, Frederick Douglass, MLK, and characters from Huck Finn, or make a list of Transcendentalists & characters that specifies which character belongs in which corner. o Give a brief explanation of why each character belongs in each corner: is it the color of his/her skin? Is it the characters actions? Gender? Lifestyle? Your group is in charge of Important Definitions, too: Regionalism, Realism, Local Color, dialect, Eye Dialect, sivilized, satire, comic mask, irony, inversion

Group 6 Realism / Regionalism: Huck Finn 1830s-1880s Be sure to follow the format below. That way, all groups study guides will look the same and it will be easy for you and your peers to study. Be as detailed as possible! Important Authors/Titles/Dates: Twain (When was the story published? When is the story set?) Important Concepts / Thesis Sentences: Look back at your notes from our Huckleberry Finn Prezi and reading guides. What was important to know about this time period and this story? About Twains stance on important issues? Be sure to talk about transcendentalist heroeswho qualifies as one and why? Important Characters in The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn: List major characters & short bios (Huck, Jim, King & Duke, Tom, Phelps, Grangerfords & Shepherdsons, Sherburn) and MAYBE a super brief summary of what happens. Important Quotations: Are there particular lines we discussed or annotated in class? Notes that you have about certain words or concepts? Find 3-4 that exemplify the biggest ideas of Huck Finn, and give brief explanations. Remind people to study the story line of Huck Finns moral journey.

Group 8 The American Dream and Immigration Politics 1960s - Present Be sure to follow the format below. That way, all groups study guides will look the same and it will be easy for you and your peers to study. Be as detailed as possible! Important Authors / Titles / Dates: You might want to put authors, titles, and dates under bullet points in chronological order: Rich, Hamill, Henthoff, Smiley, Tan, Cisneros Important Concepts / Thesis Sentences: Look back at your notes and reading guides. What was important to know about these writers ideas? About their stances on important issues? You might want to organize these either by concept (for or against an idea, etc.) or in chronological order. Be sure each concept/thesis has a specific author next to it. Important Quotations: Are there particular lines we discussed or annotated in class? Notes that you have about certain words or concepts? Find 3-4 that exemplify these writers thesis sentences.

Group 9 Rhetorical Devices & SOAPSTone Give the definition for each element of SOAPSTone, and a purpose for finding SOAPSTone in Non-fiction texts. Pick a text to show an example of SOAPSTone: I suggest Pete Hamill, Smiley, or Henthoff Give a definition and an example from MLKs Letter from a Birmingham Jail for each of the following: Allusion, anecdote, parallelism, rhetorical question, appeal to logos, appeal to pathos, appeal to ethos

Group 10 Realism / Regionalism: Frederick Douglasss My Bondage & My Freedom (1845) & The Stanford Prison Experiment (1971) Be sure to follow the format below. That way, all groups study guides will look the same and it will be easy for you and your peers to study. Be as detailed as possible! Important Authors/Titles/Dates: Douglass (When was the story published? When is the story set?); Philip Zimbardo (What is he known for? Who is he?) Zimbardos Ted Talk: The Psychology of Evil http://www.ted.com/talks/philip_zimbardo_on_the_psychology_of_evil.html ) Important Concepts / Thesis Sentences: Look back at your notes and reading guides from Frederick Douglasss My Bondage and My Freedom. What was important to know about this time period and this story? What was Douglasss main thesiswhat happens when people end up in power over, or in submission to, others? You might want to draw & label the social triangle to exemplify this relationship. Look back at your notes on the Stanford Prison Experiment. What was it? What did it prove? In Zimbardos Ted Talk, what leads to evil, and why would the Transcendentalists (Emerson, Thoreau, Whitman) agree with this? What do we need to do to avoid evil, and why would the Transcendentalists agree? Be sure to talk about transcendentalist heroeswho qualifies as one and why? Clarify the connections between Douglasss thesis and Zimbardos experiment. Define: The Lucifer Effect, Transcendentalist Hero

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Class: Study Outline for Fall Final

FALL FINAL REVIEW

Novels/Plays: Know important characters, plot points, and themes. Also know literary movement/approximate dates with which novel/play is associated. 1. Select Chapters of The Scarlet Letter by Nathaniel Hawthorne 2. The Crucible by Arthur Miller 3. The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain Essays, Poems, & Short Stories (Mostly from Reader): Know important quotes, thesis sentences, SOAPSTone (especially Purpose). Also know literary movement with which work is associated.
o o o o o o o o o o o o o o Prospective Immigrants Please Note by Adrienne Rich To be Remembered in the Immigration Debates: They Are Us by Pete Hamill Fish Cheeks by Amy Tan Straw Into Gold by Sandra Cisneros Some Verses Upon the Burning of Our House, July 18th, 1666 by Anne Bradstreet Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God by Jonathan Edwards Hellfire by Michael Small Self-Reliance by Ralph Waldo Emerson Civil Disobedience by Henry David Thoreau Letter from a Birmingham Jail by Martin Luther King, Jr. I Hear America Singing and Song of Myself (both from Leaves of Grass) by Walt Whitman My Bondage and My Freedom by Frederick Douglass Expelling Huck Finn by Nat Henthoff Say it Aint So, Huck by Jane Smiley

American Windows: Be able to label corners of the window. Be able to place characters/authors in correct corners. 1. The Crucible & The Scarlet Letter: 1600s-1750s 2. Transcendentalists & Huck Finn: 1800s-1850s Rhetorical Devices: Know the definition, and be able to identify an example of each from MLKs Letter From a Birmingham Jail. o Parallelism o Rhetorical question o Appeal to ethos o Anecdote o Appeal to pathos o Allusion o Appeal to logos o SOAPSTone Vocabulary Terms: Know definitions.
o o o o o o o o o o o o o Theocracy Satire Regionalism Anti-transcendentalism Transcendentaslism Realism Oversoul Sivilization Eye Dialect House of UnAmerican Activities Committee Origin Legend Hieroglyphics Myth, Folklore, Legend o o o o o o o o o o o o o Dialect Irony Inversion Comic Mask Predestination Conversion Protestant Work Ethic Local Color McCarthyism Red Scare Free Verse Lucifer Effect Transcendentalist Hero