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Monday Dec. 10, 2012 Vol XII, Edition 97
RECKLESS PRESCRIBING
STATE PAGE 6
HOPE AND FEAR WITH
GAY MARRIAGE CASES
NATION PAGE 7
NINERS BACK
TO WINNING
SPORTS PAGE 11
REPORT: PATIENTS AT RISK DUE TO LACK OF OVERSIGHT
By Heather Murtagh
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Focusing on multiple details can
be a challenge for autistic children.
A child may only pay attention to
one detail rather than all of them.
Or, he or she could see the whole of
something without paying attention
to the details. Its a skill autistic
children often work on through
therapy which can be expensive.
It was with this in mind that three
recent Stanford University gradu-
ates decided to make a difference
using technology. As a nal project
for their masters degrees, Go Go
Games was created. Making a tool
for children with autism, the three
women decided, only made sense if
it was actually offered to a wide
audience. Now its available on
iTunes for use on iPads and the
ladies behind the idea are making a
go of turning their project into a
thriving company.
Co-founder Joy Wong Daniels
said more children with autism play
video games during their free time
than traditionally developed chil-
dren. The idea was to give parents a
video game that was inexpensive
but also helped with the challenges
their children are facing.
The idea started with co-founder
Alexis Hiniker, the software guru
of the group, who started
researching autism and discovered
the need for educational technolo-
gy tools grounded in science,
explained Daniels. It was in the
Learning, Design and Technology
program at Stanford that Daniels,
Hiniker and Heidi Williamson met
and began working on making the
idea a reality.
Go Go Games includes three dif-
ferent matching games Build-a-
Train, Wheels & Roads and Out of
This World each with six levels
that increase in difculty. Built to
work with children ages 5 to 9 who
represent a broad range of the
autism spectrum, the game aims to
help children with observation,
scanning, focusing and categoriza-
tion skills. It became available for
sale in October but required lots of
ne-tuning before that.
Work really began in April. With
Go Go Games a fun autism tool
More children with autism play video
games during their free time than tra-
ditionally developed children.
Trio develops app to assist with unique challenges
See GAME, Page 20
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
Now, its the City Councils turn.
With more than 25 hours of public
hearings under its belt, the San
Carlos Planning Commission last
month agreed the environmental
review of the proposed Transit
Village is complete even if several
members didnt care for its conclu-
sions. On Monday night, the City
Council will discuss the recommen-
dation it certify the environmental
impact report and move on to dis-
cussing the actual merits of the
mixed-use plan that would convert
the land around the historic train
depot into several multi-story build-
ings.
The City Council is actually split-
ting the public hearing on the matter
into two. At 5 p.m., the council will
hold a special meeting specically
for eight presentations providing an
Council ready
to scrutinize
Transit Village
By Heather Murtagh
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
It wasnt a well-known church
official that
inspired how
Father Joe
Bradley prepares
when talking to
Serra High
School students.
His inspiration
instead comes
from comic
Robin Williams.
If a speaker doesnt engage teens
quickly, he may as well wrap it up,
Bradley said. If he grabs their atten-
Honesty with humor
define Serra chaplain
A weekly look at the people who
shape our community
Joe Bradley
See BRADLEY, Page 20
San Carlos ofcials weigh environmental
report on proposed railway development
See VILLAGE, Page 20
BILL SILVERFARB/DAILY JOURNAL
Belmont resident Jerry Hein has been searching for Bigfoot for years. He and a group of other locals meet reg-
ularly to discuss the creatures possible whereabouts and what to do if they nd the elusive primitive man.
FRAME 352
By Bill Silverfarb
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
In 1967, a couple of men lmed a
creature unknown to science that
has become affectionately known as
Bigfoot.
Shot by Roger Patterson and
Robert Gimlin along the Klamath
River in the far north reaches of
California, scientists mostly dismiss
the lm as a hoax but those who con-
tend the creature is real say the lm
is the best well-known piece of evi-
dence that shows the hairy human-
like creatures are indeed real.
Frame 352 of the lm shows what
appears to be a female Sasquatch
staring directly at the camera.
Coupled with footprint castings of
an abnormally large creature found
in Northern California nearly 17
The Bigfoot experience
See BIGFOOT, Page 19
Lawrence of Arabia, David Leans
epic film starring Peter OToole as
British military ofcer T.E. Lawrence,
had its royal gala premiere in London,
with Queen Elizabeth II and her hus-
band, Prince Philip, in attendance.
FOR THE RECORD 2 Monday Dec. 10, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
The San Mateo Daily Journal
800 S. Claremont St., Suite 210, San Mateo, CA 94402
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Actress Nia
Peeples is 51.
This Day in History
Thought for the Day
1962
To have news value is to have
a tin can tied to ones tail.
T.E. Lawrence (1888-1935).
Actress Susan Dey
is 60.
TV chef Bobby
Flay is 48.
In other news ...
Birthdays
REUTERS
Seattle gay-rights advocate and journalist Dan Savage (L), and Terry Miller sort through roses on the steps of City Hall after
getting married at Seattle City Hall in Seattle,Wash. Sunday.Washington made history last month as one of three U.S. states
where marriage rights were extended to same-sex couples by popular vote, joining Maryland and Maine in passing ballot
initiatives recognizing gay nuptials. SEE RELATED STORY PAGE 7.
Monday: Sunny. Highs in the lower 60s.
Northeast winds 10 to 20 mph.
Monday night: Mostly clear. Lows in the
upper 40s. Northeast winds 5 to 15 mph.
Tuesday: Sunny. Highs in the mid 50s.
Northeast winds 5 to 10 mph...Becoming
northwest in the afternoon.
Tuesday night: Partly cloudy in the
evening then becoming mostly cloudy. A chance of rain. Lows
in the mid 40s. Southwest winds 5 to 10 mph. Chance of rain
30 percent.
Wednesday: Showers likely. Highs in the mid 50s.
Wednesday night: Mostly cloudy. A chance of showers. Lows
in the lower 40s.
Thursday: Partly cloudy. A slight chance of showers. Highs in
the mid 50s.
Local Weather Forecast
Lotto
The Daily Derby race winners are No. 07 Eureka
in rst place; No. 12 Lucky Charms in second
place; and No.04 Big Ben in third place.The race
time was clocked at 1:46.54.
(Answers tomorrow)
CROAK VENOM DREDGE KITTEN
Saturdays
Jumbles:
Answer: The zombie boxers manager told him to
KNOCK EM DEAD
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
WAREF
BEEOS
NEMYOK
TURGET
2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
All Rights Reserved.
F
in
d

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Ans:
5 3 6
7 43 44 51 56 4
Mega number
Dec. 7 Mega Millions
4 5 15 28 38
Fantasy Five
Daily three midday
6 0 3 1
Daily Four
8 7 9
Daily three evening
On this date:
In 1520, Martin Luther publicly burned the papal edict
demanding that he recant, or face excommunication.
In 1787, Thomas H. Gallaudet, a pioneer of educating the deaf,
was born in Philadelphia.
In 1817, Mississippi was admitted as the 20th state.
In 1861, the Confederacy admitted Kentucky as it recognized
a pro-Southern shadow state government that was acting with-
out the authority of the pro-Union government in Frankfort.
In 1906, President Theodore Roosevelt became the rst
American to be awarded the Nobel Peace Prize, for helping
mediate an end to the Russo-Japanese War.
In 1931, Jane Addams became the rst American woman to be
awarded the Nobel Peace Prize; the co-recipient was Nicholas
Murray Butler.
In 1948, the U.N. General Assembly adopted its Universal
Declaration on Human Rights.
In 1950, Ralph J. Bunche was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize,
the rst black American to receive the award.
In 1964, Martin Luther King Jr. received his Nobel Peace
Prize.
In 1967, singer Otis Redding, 26, and six others were killed
when their plane crashed into Wisconsins Lake Monona.
In 1972, baseballs American League adopted the designated
hitter rule on an experimental basis for three years.
In 1987, President Ronald Reagan and Soviet leader Mikhail
S. Gorbachev concluded three days of summit talks in
Washington.
Ten years ago: President George W. Bush selected William H.
Donaldson, an investment banker with ties to Wall Street and
the Bush family, as chairman of the besieged Securities and
Exchange Commission.
Former Agriculture Secretary Clayton Yeutter (YEYE-tur) is
82. Actress Fionnula Flanagan is 71. Pop singer Chad Stuart
(Chad and Jeremy) is 71. Actress-singer Gloria Loring is 66.
Rhythm-and-blues singer Ralph Tavares is 64. Country singer
Johnny Rodriguez is 61. Former Illinois Gov. Rod Blagojevich is
56. Jazz musician Paul Hardcastle is 55. Actor-director Kenneth
Branagh (BRAH-nah) is 52. Rock singer-musician J Mascis is
47. Country singer Kevin Sharp is 42. Rock musician Scot (cq)
Alexander (Dishwalla) is 41. Actress-comedian Arden Myrin is
39. Rock musician Meg White (The White Stripes) is 38.
Violinist Sarah Chang is 32. Actress Raven-Symone is 27.
Rolling Stones hit NY
for 50th anniversary gig
NEW YORK It sure didnt feel like
a farewell.
The Rolling Stones average age 68,
if youre counting were in rollicking
form as they rocked the Barclays Center
in Brooklyn for 2 1/2 hours Saturday
night, their rst U.S. show on a mini-tour
marking a mind-boggling 50 years as a
rock band.
And though every time the Stones
tour, the inevitable questions
arise as to whether its The
Last Time, to quote one of
their songs, there was no
sign that anything is end-
ing.
People say, why do you
keep doing this? mused
Mick Jagger, the bands
impossibly energetic front-
man, before launching into
Brown Sugar. Why do you
keep touring, coming back? The
answer is, youre the reason were doing
this. Thank you for buying our records
and coming to our shows for the last 50
years.
Jagger was in top form, with all of his
usual swagger strutting, jogging, skip-
ping and pumping his arms like a man
half his age. And though he briey
donned a amboyant feathered black cape
for Sympathy for the Devil and later,
some red-sequined tails, he was mostly
content to prowl the stage in a tight black
T-shirt and trousers.
The four grizzled rock icons Jagger,
Keith Richards, Ronnie Wood and of
course drummer Charlie Watts, were
joined Saturday by singer Mary J. Blige,
who sang a searing Gimme Shelter with
Jagger, and the Texas blues guitarist Gary
Parker Jr.
The band played a generous 23 songs,
including two new ones, but mostly old
favorites. The rousing encore included
Jumping Jack Flash, of course, but the
nal song was Satisfaction. And
though the song speaks of not
getting any, the consensus of
the packed 18,000-seat
arena was that it was a
hugely satisfying
evening indeed.
If you like the
Stones, this was as good
a show as you could have
had, said one fan, Robert
Nehring, 58, of Westeld,
N.J.
The Brooklyn show followed two
rapturously received shows in London late
last month. The band also will play two
shows in Newark, N.J., on Dec. 13 and 15.
Before that, they will join a veritable
whos who of British rock royalty and
U.S. superstars at the blockbuster 12-12-
12 Sandy benet concert at Madison
Square Garden. Also scheduled to per-
form: Paul McCartney, the Who, Eric
Clapton, Bruce Springsteen & The E
Street Band, Alicia Keys, Kanye West,
Eddie Vedder, Billy Joel, Roger Waters
and Chris Martin.
In a urry of anniversary activity, the
band also released a hits compilation last
month with two new songs, Doom and
Gloom and One More Shot, and HBO
premiered a new documentary on their
formative years, Crossre Hurricane.
The Stones formed in London in 1962
to play Chicago blues, led at the time by
the late Brian Jones and pianist Ian
Stewart, along with Jagger and Richards,
whod met on a train platform a year ear-
lier. Bassist Bill Wyman and Watts were
quick additions.
Wyman, who left the band in 1992, was
a guest at the London shows last month,
as was Mick Taylor, the celebrated former
Stones guitarist who left in 1974 to be
replaced by Wood, the newest Stone and
the youngster at 65.
The inevitable questions have been
swirling about the next step for the
Stones: another huge global tour, on the
scale of their last one, A Bigger Bang,
which earned more than $550 million
between 2005 and 2007? Something a bit
smaller? Or is this mini-tour, in the words
of their new song, really One Last Shot?
The Stones wont say. But in an inter-
view last month, they made clear they felt
the 50th anniversary was something to be
marked.
I thought it would be kind of churlish
not to do something, Jagger told the
Associated Press. Otherwise, the BBC
would have done a rather dull lm about
the Rolling Stones.
17 24 30 33 45 22
Mega number
Dec. 8 Super Lotto Plus
E
ver since Nicolas Otto built the rst
effective gas motor, internal combus-
tion, four stroke engine in 1876, man
has been improving on this design. More than
100,000 patents have created the modern
automobile after the engines were adapted to
the horse carriages in the 1800s (thus called
horseless carriages). Carl Benz of Germany
designed and built the rst practical automo-
bile in 1885 and, in the United States, Charles
and Frank Duryea, bicycle makers, put the
rst auto on the streets of Springeld, Mass.
in 1893.
It was, however, Ransom E. Olds who start-
ed the Olds Motor Vehicle Company in 1893
and, in 1902, started the rst successful auto
production line in the United States. Their
auto became the rage of the times and even a
song, In my merry Oldsmobile, touted the
thrill of a ride in an auto. Henry Ford began
producing the ever popular Model T Ford
automobile in 1908 after introducing a plane-
tary transmission and a pedal-based control
system. This went into his improved assembly
line and, by 1927, 15 million to these Model
Ts were on American roads. This was fol-
lowed by the Model A Ford which added four
million more autos to American roads. By
2006, more than 135 million passenger cars
were registered in the United States.
All of these autos needed roads to travel on,
but rst a bureau had to be created to develop
these roads. In 1895, the State Bureau of
Highways was created by the Legislature and
the 65-mile Lake Tahoe Wagon Road, a pio-
neer toll road, was acquired. This was the
beginning of a long development of the high-
ways and byways in the state of California. At
the same time the State Bureau of Highways
was created, the governor was empowered to
appoint three members of the Bureau of
Highways. During 1895 and 1896, after pur-
chasing a buckboard wagon and teams of
horses, these three men traveled throughout
the state and made their report to the governor
that spelled out the extent of the highway sys-
tem needed to tie this great, diversied state
together. One of their recommendations was
to develop a road system starting from San
Francisco, develop roads to the south, through
San Mateo County, etc. In 1897, the Bureau of
Highways was dissolved and a Department of
Highways was created. In 1910, after prelimi-
nary work had been completed to provide nec-
essary legislation to purchase land for roads,
an election by the public provided funds of
$18 million for the beginning of a paved state
highway system. The first Highway
Paved roads on the Peninsula
3
Monday Dec. 10, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
Police reports
Come on kid!
A person was seen begging a child for
money on the 1100 block of Capuchino
Avenue in Burlingame before 2:57 p.m.
on Thursday, Nov. 29.
MILLBRAE
DUI. An unknown person was detained for
driving under the influence on Camino
Millennia and Rollins Road before 1:16 a.m.
on Monday, Dec. 3.
Petty theft. Two women were arrested for
stealing on the unit block of Rollins Road
before 6:31 p.m. on Sunday, Dec. 2.
Hit and run. A hit and run occurred on the
800 block of Hillcrest Boulevard before mid-
night on Sunday, Dec. 2.
SAN BRUNO
Vandalism. BB gun holes were found in a
black Honda Accord parked on the 1200 block
of San Mateo Avenue before 12:45 p.m. on
Monday, Dec. 3.
Hit and run. A 2006 Honda Civic was side
swiped on the 800 block of Hensley Avenue
before 10:36 a.m. on Monday, Dec. 3. The
owner of the vehicle believes the damage had
been done the previous weekend.
Fraud. An unknown subject reportedly made
and cashed a counterfeit check in the amount
of $60 on the 1600 block of Donner Avenue
before 10:16 a.m. on Monday, Dec. 3.
Hit and run. Someone reported their black
Mazda Protege was hit on El Camino Real
and San Diego Avenue before 8:58 a.m. on
Monday, Dec. 3.
Petty theft. A purse was stolen from a depart-
ment store on the 1100 block of El Camino
Real before 2:30 p.m. on Monday, Dec. 3.
PHOTO COURTESY OF THE SAN MATEO COUNTY HISTORY MUSEUM
On Aug. 7,1912, the rst shovel-full of dirt dug up by the Highway Commission signals to the
steam-engine operator (in the background) to begin the paving of El Camino Real.
See HISTORY, Page 19
4
Monday Dec. 10, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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Career Technical Education
Elderly man struck by
vehicle and seriously
injured on Grand Avenue
A 74-year-old man was struck by a car
on the 900 block of Grand Avenue in
South San Francisco Friday evening and
seriously injured, police said.
The victim was crossing Grand
Avenue around 6:30 p.m. when he was
struck by a northbound car, police said.
The man suffered a serious head injury
and was taken to a trauma center for
treatment.
His name is not being released at this
time.
The driver of the vehicle stopped at
the scene and is fully cooperating with
investigators. The cause of the crash
remains under investigation.
Anyone who witnessed the collision
should call South San Francisco police
at (650) 877-8900.
Four arrested in connection
with burglary at cultural center
Four suspects were arrested in connec-
tion with a burglary at a cultural arts cen-
ter at Oddstad Park Thursday, police
said.
Police responded to 1050 Crespi Dr. at
9:33 a.m. on report of a burglary that had
occurred in the building which houses
the Pacica Spindrift Players, a nonprof-
it group that creates theater for the
Pacica community.
Ofcers arrested two suspects at the
scene and further police investigation
led to the arrest of two additional sus-
pects later in the day.
Police located Pacifica resident
Jasmine Vardigans, 20, at the scene. She
was arrested and booked into the county
jail for burglary, possession of stolen
property and conspiracy.
Police also located Joshua Shargel, 21,
of Pacica, at the scene. He was arrested
and booked into the county jail for bur-
glary and conspiracy, police said.
Pacica police detectives identied
two additional suspects, Sarah Courtney,
19, and Russel Basques, 20, both of
Pacica.
Courtney was arrested for burglary,
possession of stolen property, and con-
spiracy. She was booked into county jail,
police said.
Basques was arrested for burglary and
conspiracy. He was also booked into
county jail, police said.
Police recovered numerous items,
including equipment used by the
Pacica Spindrift Players.
The investigation remains under inves-
tigation.
Local briefs
SPENCER HILL
San Mateo residents Carlos and Maria Palacios at Steves
Christmas trees on El Camino Real in Burlingame Saturday.
TREE SHOPPING
By Juliet Williams
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SACRAMENTO California
Assembly leaders say they have no plans
to change their longstanding practice of
adding and changing thousands of votes
after their votes are cast on the
Legislature oor, despite criticism from
good government groups that say it
allows lawmakers to obscure their real
positions and curry favor with lobbyists.
An Associated Press analysis found that
lawmakers in the 80-member Assembly
changed their votes more than 5,000 times
during the 2012 legislative session.
Nearly half of the newly sworn in
Assembly members are new to the job,
and all were elected after signicant
changes to the electoral process, includ-
ing independently drawn districts and a
top-two primary. Those reforms changed
the campaigns and hopefully will lead to
different behavior once lawmakers are in
Sacramento, said Jim Mayer, executive
director of California Forward, a govern-
ment reform group.
The optics matter, when lawmakers
participate in things such as adding and
switching their votes, Mayer said.
These kinds of rules may matter more
now than they did last year, because the
voters can hold this Legislature account-
able better now than they could their
predecessors.
At least one new member,
Assemblyman Adam Gray, D-Merced,
said he intends to limit vote-switching to
rare instances.
Its not something I intend to engage
in outside of some extraordinary circum-
stance, outside of when a mistake was
made or a wrong button was pushed, he
said. As a practice I think you ought to
vote whatever your conscience is and
whatever the correct decision is for your
constituents.
He said he supports allowing lawmak-
ers to add their votes to legislation after
the fact, though, because lawmakers face
competing demands and sometimes have
to leave the oor.
Assembly Speaker John Perez, D-Los
Angeles, defended vote additions and
switches on similar grounds.
Folks have committees that some-
times they have to prepare for concur-
rently with a oor activity, Perez, D-
Los Angeles, told reporters as lawmak-
ers were sworn in last week. Some
committees meet immediately after
oor. Sometimes a member has to go
and meet off the oor with staff to pre-
pare for a meeting with a chair.
Sometimes the call of nature comes
when one is on the floor of the
Legislature. And they go and avail of
themselves of facilities and come back.
And they will miss a vote.
The additions and switches cannot
affect the overall outcome of the bill
whether it passed or failed. The state
Senate allows vote changes only for the
two party leaders.
The Senate doesnt have this prob-
lem, said Philip Ung, a spokesman for
the good government group California
Common Cause. Senators go to the
bathroom. Senators step out of the room,
but theyre still able to vote on things in
a more public way than the Assembly
does, with a voice vote and not switch it.
You dont see any senators having an
issue with that.
Common Cause had hoped to include
legislation on vote additions and
changes as part of a package on trans-
parency, but weve yet to nd anyone
whos willing to take on the challenge of
taking an Assembly members power
away, Ung said.
The AP contacted all 38 freshman mem-
bers of the state Assembly. Staff in many
of their ofces said the lawmakers did not
know about the practice of vote-switching,
and most declined to comment on it.
New lawmakers will join
in adding, changing votes
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
PORTERVILLE A man shot three people to death and
wounded another on a California Indian reservation, and was
wounded himself several hours later in an exchange of gunre
with sheriffs deputies as he tried to ee in a vehicle before hie
died later from his injuries, authorities said Sunday.
The suspect, 31-year-old Hector Celaya, also shot and
wounded his two daughters, ages 5 and 8, who were with him
in the vehicle when he was apprehended about 2 a.m., of-
cials said. It was unclear exactly when the girls were shot.
A motive for the attacks also wasnt immediately known.
Authorities apprehended Ceyala about six hours after
Tulare County sheriffs deputies were called, at about 8 p.m.
Saturday, to a trailer on the Tule Indian Reservation. Inside,
they found the body of a man and a woman; the body of
another man was nearby.
Deputies also discovered a wounded male juvenile, whose
condition and age were not known.
Deputies found Celaya by tracking his cellphone, and
pulled him over in a rural area outside the tiny community of
Lindsay around 2 a.m., about 20 miles from the reservation.
Celaya red his weapon, prompting deputies to return re,
sheriffs Sgt. Chris Douglass said.
She did not say how many shots were red, but said Celaya
red his gun multiple times. Celaya was wounded during
the exchange of gunre, and was being treated for life-threat-
ening injuries before he died, Douglass said.
Celaya also shot his daughters, though when he did so
remained under investigation, Douglass said.
Three dead in Indian
reservation shooting
6
Monday Dec. 10, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LOS ANGELES California
patients are at risk from reckless
prescribing by doctors because of a
lack of oversight at the state
Medical Board, an investigation has
found.
The board seldom tries to suspend
the prescribing privileges of physi-
cians under investigation, and even
when it sanctions doctors for abus-
ing their powers, in most cases it
allows them to continue practicing
and writing prescriptions, according
to the Los Angeles Times
(http://lat.ms/SWhvgp ).
At least 30 patients in Southern
California have died of drug over-
doses or related causes over a six
year span while their doctors were
under investigation. The board ulti-
mately sanctioned all but one of
those 12 doctors, and some were
criminally charged.
One physician, Dr. Carlos
Estiandan, wrote more prescriptions
than the entire staffs of some hospi-
tals and earned more than $1 mil-
lion a year, the newspaper said.
Court records show Estiandan
prescribed powerful painkillers to
addicts who had no medical need
for them, conducted phony exami-
nations and appeared to be a suppli-
er for drug dealers.
By the time the medical board
stripped Estiandan of his prescrip-
tion pad, more than four years after
it began investigating, eight of his
patients had died of overdoses or
related causes, according to coro-
ners records.
The Estiandan case was not an
isolated example of the boards fail-
ure to protect patients from reckless
prescribing, the Times said. In 80
percent of the 190 cases of improp-
er prescribing led by the board
since 2005, the offending physician
was given a reprimand or placed on
probation. In most of those cases,
the doctor was allowed to continue
writing prescriptions with few or no
restrictions.
Eight doctors disciplined for
excessive prescribing later had
patients die of overdoses or related
causes. Prescriptions those doctors
wrote caused or were linked to 19
deaths.
In response to the Times nd-
ings, officials have asked the
Legislature to require county coro-
ners to report all prescription drug
deaths to the board.
Previously investigators looking
into reports of poor treatment usual-
ly did not search county coroners
les to determine whether as in
Estiandans case a doctors
patients are dying of drug overdos-
es.
Dr. Rick Chavez, a pain manage-
ment physician in Redondo Beach,
serves as an expert for the board in
cases of reckless prescribing. He
told the Times overprescribing is a
pervasive problem, and oversight is
inadequate.
We have doctors out there doing
things that no one is monitoring, he
said. Its scary.
The medical boards president,
Sharon Levine, a pediatrician who
is an executive at Kaiser
Permanente, declined to be inter-
viewed by the newspaper, saying it
would be inappropriate because
disciplinary cases are ultimately
decided by the board. Executive
Director Linda Whitney declined to
comment, and staff members said
they are barred by policy from
speaking with reporters.
Responding by email to written
questions, board ofcials asserted
that their highest priority and pri-
mary mission is consumer protec-
tion.
Report: reckless prescribing common in state
NATION 7
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By Mark Sherman
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON Gay mar-
riage supporters see 41 reasons to
fret over the Supreme Courts deci-
sion to take up the case of
Californias ban on same-sex
unions.
While nine states allow same-sex
partners to marry, or will soon, 41
states do not. Of those, 30 have
written gay marriage bans into their
state constitutions.
That fact is worrisome to those
who rmly believe there is a consti-
tutional right to marry, regardless of
sexual orientation, but who also
know that the Supreme Court does
not often get too far ahead of the
country on hot-button social issues.
Mindful of history, I cant help
but be concerned, said Mary
Bonauto, director of the Civil
Rights Project at Gay and Lesbian
Advocates and Defenders and a
leader in the state-by-state push for
marriage equality.
Bonauto was speaking before the
court decided on Friday to take up
cases on Californias constitutional
ban on gay marriage and a federal
law that denies to gay Americans
who are legally married the favor-
able tax treatment and a range of
health and pension benets other-
wise available to married couples.
In 2008, California voters
approved the ban, Proposition 8,
after the state Supreme Court ruled
that gay Californians could marry.
Since then, a federal appeals court
struck down the constitutional pro-
vision, but did not authorize the
resumption of same-sex marriages
pending appeal.
Bonauto identied three earlier
seminal rulings that once and for all
outlawed state-backed discrimina-
tion, and observed that in each case
the number of states that still had
the discrimination on the books was
far smaller.
Thirteen states still had laws
against sodomy when the court said
in 2003 that states have no right to
intrude on the private, personal con-
duct of people, regardless of sexual
orientation.
Interracial marriage still was ille-
gal in 16 states in 1967 before the
high court outlawed race-based
state marriage bans.
In 1954, when the court issued its
landmark decision in Brown v.
Board of Education, 17 states had
formally segregated school systems.
Cornell University law professor
Michael Dorf said those cases illus-
trate a widespread misperception
about the justices.
There is a commonly held but
inaccurate view that the Supreme
Court does is to impose its views on
the country. It very rarely does that.
Much more frequently, it will take a
view that is either a majority in
some place or a majority of elite
opinion, and speed up acceptance,
said Dorf, who was a Supreme
Court law clerk to Justice Anthony
Kennedy.
The forces that mounted the legal
challenge to Proposition 8 have said
all along that the right to marry is so
fundamental that it should not
depend on success at the ballot box
or the votes of state legislatures.
Washington lawyer Theodore
Olson, representing gay
Californians who wish to marry,
said he will argue that there is a
fundamental constitutional right to
marry for all citizens.
But are there five justices, a
majority of the court, willing to
endorse that argument?
The fear among gay marriage
proponents is that the court will
refuse to declare that states can no
longer dene marriage as the union
of a man and a woman, because to
do so might provoke a backlash in
public opinion and undermine
acceptance of its authority.
Hope and fear in gay marriage cases
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON President Barack
Obama and House Speaker John Boehner met
Sunday at the White House to discuss the
ongoing negotiations over the impending s-
cal cliff, the rst meeting between just the
two leaders since Election Day.
Spokesmen for both Obama and Boehner
said they agreed to not release details of the
conversation, but emphasized that the lines of
communication remain open.
The meeting comes as the White House and
Congress try to break an impasse over nding
a way to stop a combination of automatic tax
increases and spending cuts scheduled to kick
in at the beginning of next year.
Obama met in November with Boehner, as
well as Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid
and House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi.
The president spoke by telephone with Reid
and in person with Pelosi on Friday.
Obama has been pushing higher tax rates on
the wealthiest Americans as one way to
reduce the decit a position Boehner and
other House Republicans have been steadfast-
ly against. Republicans are demanding steep-
er cuts in costly government entitlement pro-
grams like Medicare and Social Security.
One GOP senator said Sunday that Senate
Republicans would probably agree to higher
tax rates on the wealthiest
Americans if it meant get-
ting a chance to overhaul
entitlement programs.
The comments by Bob
Corker of Tennessee a
scal conservative who has
been gaining stature in the
Senate as a pragmatic deal
broker puts new pres-
sure on Boehner and other
Republican leaders to rethink their long-held
assertion that even the very rich shouldnt see
their rates go up next year. GOP leaders have
argued that the revenue gained by hiking the
top two tax rates would be trivial to the decit,
and that any tax hike hurts job creation.
But Corker said insisting on that red line
especially since Obama won re-election after
campaigning on raising tax rates on the
wealthy might not be wise.
There is a growing group of folks looking
at this and realizing that we dont have a lot of
cards as it relates to the tax issue before year
end, Corker told Fox News Sunday.
If Republicans agree to Obamas plan to
increase rates on the top 2 percent of
Americans, Corker added, the focus then
shifts to entitlements and maybe it puts us in
a place where we actually can do something
that really saves the nation.
Obama, Boehner meet
to discuss the fiscal cliff
Romneys 47 percent
quote is best of 2012
NEW HAVEN, Former Republican
presidential candidate Mitt Romneys com-
ments about 47 percent of the population
dependent on the government and binders
full of women topped this years best quotes,
according to a Yale University librarian.
Fred Shapiro, associate librarian at Yale
Law School, released his seventh annual list
of the most notable quotations of the year.
Debate remarks and gaffes actually
seemed to play an important role in the ups
and downs of the election campaign and may
even have affected the ultimate outcome of
the election, Shapiro said.
Romney, who lost the November election
to President Barack Obama, made the 47
percent comment at a private fundraiser in
May that was secretly recorded and posted
online in September by Mother Jones maga-
zine.
There are 47 percent of the people who
will vote for the president no matter what ...
who are dependent upon government, who
believe that they are victims. ... These are peo-
ple who pay no income tax. ... and so my job
is not to worry about those people. Ill never
convince them that they should take personal
responsibility and care for their lives,
Romney said.
Romney spoke about reviewing binders
full of women as governor when he sought to
diversify his Massachusetts administration.
It contributed to an image of him as being
somewhat out of touch and maybe particular-
ly out of touch with issues related to women,
Shapiro said.
Barack Obama
Nation brief
WORLD 8
Monday Dec. 10, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Sarah El Deeb
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
CAIRO (AP) Egypts opposi-
tion said Sunday it will keep up
protests against a referendum on a
disputed draft constitution but
stopped short of advocating either a
boycott or a no vote less than a
week before the ballot.
The opposition was still pushing
for Islamist President Mohammed
Morsi to cancel the Dec. 15 referen-
dum, saying they reject the process
entirely and refuse to call it legiti-
mate.
The referendum over a disputed
draft constitution has deeply polar-
ized Egypt and sparked some of the
bloodiest clashes between Morsi
supporters and opponents since he
came to power in June.
In a sign of how jittery the gov-
ernment about holding the referen-
dum, Morsi has ordered the military
to maintain security and protect
state institutions until the results of
the referendum are announced.
The new presidential decree, pub-
lished in the ofcial gazette, would
be effective starting Monday. The
military is asked to coordinate with
the police on maintaining security
and would also be entitled to arrest
civilians.
Morsi insists on holding the refer-
endum on schedule. Instead, as a
concession to his opponents, he
rescinded decrees he issued last
month granting him almost unre-
stricted powers, giving himself and
the panel that drafted the constitu-
tion immunity from judicial over-
sight.
The decrees sparked the protests.
Opponents said they were issued
initially to protect the disputed con-
stitution from numerous court chal-
lenges.
Rushing the approval of the con-
stitution in a late night session in the
panel further inamed those who
claim Morsi and his Islamist allies,
including the Muslim Brotherhood,
are monopolizing power and trying
to force their agenda into practice.
The opposition sent hundreds of
thousands of protesters into the
streets, in unprecedented mass ral-
lies for the largely secular groups
since they led the popular uprising
last year that toppled President
Hosni Mubarak.
Egypt opposition urges more protests
REUTERS
An anti-Morsi protester chants slogans on a newly built barrier in front of
soldiers guarding outside the Egyptian presidential palace in Cairo Sunday.
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
BEIRUT Syrias civil war
spilled over into neighboring
Lebanon once again on Sunday,
with gun battles in the northern city
of Tripoli between supporters and
opponents of President Bashar
Assads regime that left four dead.
Nine Syrian judges and prosecu-
tors also defected to the opposition.
It was the latest setback for the
regime, which appears increasingly
embattled with rebels making gains
in northern Syria and near
Damascus, the capital.
The defecting judges posted a
joint statement online urging others
to join them and break ranks with
Assads regime. There have been
several high-level defections over
the past year, including Assads for-
mer prime minister.
In Geneva, the United Nations
Special Representative for Syria and
the Arab League, Lakdhar Brahimi,
met with Russian Deputy Foreign
Minister Mikhail Bogdanov and
U.S. Deputy Secretary of State
William Burns to discuss the crisis
in Syria. They said in a joint state-
ment that the situation in Syria was
bad and getting worse, adding that
a political process to end the conict
was still necessary and still possi-
ble.
Russia and the United States
have argued bitterly over how to
address the conflict, which began
with peaceful protests against
Assad in March 2011 and escalated
into a civil war that has killed an
estimated 40,000 people. Activists
said another 45 were killed on
Sunday.
Syrias civil war spills into Lebanon
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
JOHANNESBURG Inside a
Catholic church that once served as a
major rallying point for anti-
apartheid activists, the image of a
gray-suited Nelson Mandela appears
in stained-glass window that also
features angels and the cross.
Worshippers here prayed Sunday
for the hospitalized 94-year-old for-
mer president, who remains almost a
secular saint and a father gure to
many in South Africa, a nation that
has Africas top economy.
Mandelas admission to the hospi-
tal this weekend for unspecified
medical tests sparked screaming
newspapers headlines and ripples of
fear in the public that the frail leader
is fading further away.
And as his African National
Congress political party stands
ready to pick its leader who likely
will be the nations next president,
some believe governing party politi-
cians have abandoned Mandelas
integrity and magnanimity in a
seemingly unending string of cor-
ruption scandals.
South Africa at crossroads as Mandela hospitalized
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
MONTERREY, Mexico The
wreckage of a small plane believed
to be carrying Mexican-American
singing superstar Jenni Rivera was
found in northern Mexico on
Sunday and there are no apparent
survivors, authorities said.
Transportation and
Communications Minister Gerardo
Ruiz Esparza said that everything
points toward it being the U.S.-reg-
istered Learjet 25 carrying Rivera
and six other people from
Monterrey en route to Toluca,
Mexico. The plane had gone miss-
ing after takeoff early Sunday.
There is nothing recognizable,
neither material nor human in the
wreckage, Ruiz Esparza told the
Televisa network.
Authorities had not conrmed that
Rivera was among the dead.
Jorge Domene,
spokesman for
Nuevo Leons
government, said
the plane left
Monterrey about
3:30 a.m. after
Rivera gave a
concert there and
aviation authori-
ties lost contact
with the craft about 10 minutes later.
It had been scheduled to arrive in
Toluca, outside Mexico City, about
an hour later.
Also aboard the plane were her
publicist, lawyer, makeup artist and
the ight crew. The 43-year-old who
was born and raised in Long Beach,
California, is one of the biggest stars
of the Mexican regional style known
as grupero music, which is inu-
enced by the norteno, cumbia and
ranchera styles.
Airplane believed to be
singers found in Mexico
Jenni Rivera
OPINION 9
Monday Dec. 10, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Assad using chemical weapons?
Editor,
Now weve heard that Bashir Assad
may be planning chemical weapon
attacks on his own citizens, after
already killing 40,000 of them in the
traditional way. Lets remember that in
the 1980s, Iraqi leader Saddam Hussein
also killed thousands of his own citi-
zens with chemical weapons. If this is
how Arab leaders deal with their own
people, imagine what may be in store
for the Jewish people in Israel, sur-
rounded by Hamas, Hezbollah and an
Iranian terrorist regime that vows to
wipe them off the planet?
Scott Abramson
San Mateo
Keep dreamin
Editor,
How will the Republican Party ever
look more favorable in the eyes of
Latino voters when many of us are 100
percent against illegal immigration and
the idea of amnesty?
Are we to moderate our opposition to
a group of people who have broken
U.S. laws and are in this country ille-
gally? Do conservatives give up their
desire for the adherence to the rule of
law to gain a certain ethnic voting
bloc? No, those tricks are for the
Democratic Party. Giving voters every-
thing they want whether or not it is
legal is a good way to win an election
but a bad way to run our country. The
majority of Hispanics here illegally are
usually poor and uneducated and who
burden public resources through free
public education, free health care and
free government assistance. Cheap
labor might be good for the employer,
but it is very costly to the state.
If Latino voters really felt patriotic
toward America, they would vote for
what is best for our country. At this
point, giving amnesty to those in this
country illegally would only result in
giving the Democratic Party 11 million
new voters. When it comes to amnesty,
I would rather lose an election than
give up my principles as a citizen of
this country.
Family, self-reliance and freedom to
celebrate their religion is what truly
binds the Republican Party with the
Hispanic community. Love of country
and not race will change the hearts and
minds of California Hispanic voters to
our side. One day, they will put their
country rst and set their ethnicity
aside like the rest of us have learned to
do.
Christopher P. Conway
San Mateo
Letters to the editor
Guest perspective
By Charlie Bronitsky
W
ith Thanksgiving in the rear
view mirror, we are looking
at the holiday season and a
brand-new year before us. The end-of-
year holidays have great signicance to
most Americans. We celebrate various
major religious events and we enjoy the
holiday spirit. We decorate our
homes, we buy gifts for family and
friends and we gather together to cele-
brate with our loved ones. I know that
most of us here in Foster CIty will have
a wonderful holiday season.
There are some however, here in
Foster City and in neighboring cities
and counties, who are still struggling.
Did you know, for example, that 15
percent of Americans currently live at
or below the poverty line? Did you
know that about one in seven people
need food stamps to subsidize the fact
that their income cannot put enough
food on their table to feed their families
every day? Did you know that mini-
mum wage would have to be more than
$12 per hour for a person working full
time at minimum wage to above the
poverty level? I am not talking here
about people on welfare, I am talking
about families who work but still can-
not afford to keep a roof over their head
and food in their stomach. I am talking
about this because the holiday season is
a great time to reach out and help.
In San Mateo, the Samaritan House
runs a program that every day feeds
families who, although they work, still
cannot afford to feed themselves. The
holiday season would be a great time to
help feed these folks. You can make a
cash donation, a food donation or teach
your children about
helping during the
holiday season by
volunteering as a
family to help serve
food.
Have some slight-
ly used clothes in
your closet that you
no longer wear? For
women, Career Closet runs a program
that collects professional womens
clothing so women looking for work
can have work attire to wear to inter-
views. They are always accepting dona-
tions, and now would be a great time to
clean out your closet. For men, Project
90, which provides substance abuse
programs, collects clothing for men, so
they too can have something to wear
when they are looking for jobs. For
kids, Samaritan House runs a Kids
Closet and collects clothing for kids to
wear to school.
Everybody has some clothes in their
closet they no longer wear. Think about
dontating those clothes this holiday sea-
son. Make it a fun event with your fam-
ily, sort of like a treasure hunt through
everyones closet to pick out the clothes
to give away and then make it a family
trip to the donation site. What a great
way this would be to learn as a family
that giving is much more rewarding
than receiving.
Next time you are in a the gorcery
store, pick up $10 of extra food and
bring it to the Second Harvest Food
Bank. They feed families right here in
San Mateo County. How about the day
you are planning to head to the toy
store to buy presents for your kids,
grandkids, nieces or nephews. Why not
pick up an extra toy for $10 or $15 and
bring it to the Foster City re station
and donate it so every kid in our county
gets a holiday present?
Give to your church, mosque, syna-
gogue or wherever you worship. Give
to a local school. These schools need to
reach out every year because the funds
they get from our state are not enough
to provide the level of education they
offer to our children. Spend some time
at the senior center or at a senior living
facility. Bring the kids and your pets.
Give someone the gift of your time and
your willingness to listen. Do whatever
you think will help, but please take a
moment out during this holiday season
to do something, to make some differ-
ence in the life of someone who is a bit
less fortunate than you.
I love the holiday season. People are
friendlier, there is lots of family time
and the little things seem to matter
more. I hope to share my joy of the hol-
iday season with as many people as I
can and I hope you will too. Lets show
the world that Foster City is great not
just because it is so safe, has such great
schools, parks, and other amenities.
Lets show them it is great because we
do great things. Do something great
this holiday season.
Happy holidays to you all.
Charlie Bronitsky is a member of the
Foster City Council. He can be reached
at cbronitsky@fostercity.org or 286-
3504.
The holiday season a time for giving
Heritage
trees versus
the driveway
T
hree coast oak trees all of them designated as
heritage trees will soon face the guillotine. The
new owners of a home in San Mateos
Glazenwood neighborhood received a permit to cut down
the trees. The oaks were uprooting the driveway leading to
the garage in back which floods during rainy season.
Outraged neighbors appealed the citys decision to allow
removal of the heritage trees, to no avail. One of the
neighbors pointed out that that the entire backyard is
paved over and the garage is at the low point of the prop-
erty, so water doesnt drain to the street. And the trees are
not responsible for water problems in the garage.
Neighbors hoped a way
could be found to rebuild
the existing 50 foot long
driveway which would leave
the trees intact. But profes-
sionals called in by the city
for an objective analysis
could not find a solution.
Concerned neighbors on
Rosewood appealed the
staffs decision to the Parks
and Recreation
Commission. The three
members present validated
staffs decision to allow a
permit for tree removal.
Neighbors then appealed to
the City Council for help, but again, in a unanimous deci-
sion, councilmembers agreed the trees had to go. If you
drive by the house, at 937 Laurel Ave., you will notice
four coast oaks in the front yard. Three already look
unhealthy and have drooping foliage ( not leaves). Maybe
they know their fate.
According to the citys arborist, Dennis Pawl, there was
no reasonable alternative. Any work to smooth out the
bumps in the driveway would mean harmful root removal
which would result in the death of the trees. Any possible
solution to circumvent the trees would be expensive,
unreasonably expensive. However, before the trees are
removed, the owner must secure building permits for the
driveway and garage.
***
When the new owners bought the house on Laurel
Avenue in San Mateo last year they were not told about
the water problem in the garage. They didnt discover it
until the first heavy rain. Then they sued the previous
owner for not disclosing the problem. Did the owner also
realize they had heritage trees on their property before
they bought the house?
***
Its not only a problem in the Glazenwood area.
Throughout the city and neighboring towns, there are large
forest size trees in an increasingly urbanized environment.
San Mateo adopted a heritage tree ordinance in 1968 to
preserve the great trees in the city Heritage trees are liv-
ing landmarks and are an important part of San Mateos
urban forest. Heritage trees include bay, buckeye, oak,
cedar and redwood or any other tree with a trunk diameter
of 16 inches or more, measured at 48 inches above natu-
ral grade. The ordinance requires a permit to remove a her-
itage tree, to prune more than one quarter of the crown or
existing foliage, and to remove more than a third of the
root system. In addition, there is a tree preservation ordi-
nance to protect existing trees during construction.
Neighborhoods are proud of their trees. In some areas,
they define the neighborhood and make it a special place
in which to live. The challenge is how to protect the trees,
the big ones, when they are planted too close together or
too close to a driveway or house. If we remove too many
of them, we will be losing the feature which makes our
neighborhoods beautiful and livable. The Glazenwood
neighborhood is itself a historic place with its attractive
small homes on small lots, with some of the most artistic
bungalow architecture to be found between San Jose and
San Mateo. It is a unique community with entrances
marked by stately stucco pillars.
San Mateo has a historic preservation ordinance which
requires a permit to demolish a home which is designated
historic. Similar to the heritage tree ordinance, demolition
is only allowed for health and safety reasons. Someone
buying a designated historic home must also maintain the
historic features of the house on the outside. San Mateo
and other cities need to strengthen their heritage tree ordi-
nances so that new and current owners know they have a
responsibility to maintain large historic trees.
Sue Lempert is the former mayor of San Mateo. Her column
runs every Monday. She can be reached at sue@smdai-
lyjournal.com.
Follow us on Twitter and Facebook:
facebook.com/smdailyjournal
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BUSINESS 10
Monday Dec. 10, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Daniel Wagner
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON Companies are
rushing special payments to sharehold-
ers to take advantage of lower dividend
tax rates before they go up Jan. 1. But
investors should beware: Not all special
payments are created equal.
Some companies are borrowing a lot
of money to make the payments. At oth-
ers, the payments amount to corporate
self-help, rewarding large shareholders
who also sit on the board.
In addition to those companies,
dozens have decided to move dividends
that were scheduled for January into
December a no-brainer when you
consider the tax advantage, says Howard
Silverblatt, senior index analyst at S&P
Dow Jones Indexes.
Pay me in January or pay me in
December: It makes no difference to the
company, Silverblatt says. As a share-
holder, if you pay me in January, youd
better have a good explanation for that.
Thats because a January payment
may nearly triple the tax rate that the
highest earners must pay on dividends
to 43.4 percent from 15 percent, the
rate in place since 2003.
If decade-old tax cuts are allowed to
expire at the end of this year, dividends
will be taxed like ordinary income, and
the top rate for ordinary income will rise
to 39.6 percent from 35 percent.
High earners will pay an additional 3.8
percent to offset the cost of President
Barack Obamas health care overhaul.
Obama and Republicans in Congress
are ghting over whether the top rate for
ordinary income should increase.
Republicans would prefer that the divi-
dend tax remain at 15 percent but have
not taken a hard line on it publicly.
Between Nov. 1 and Dec. 5, 349 com-
panies moved up their dividends or paid
special dividends, according to
Silverblatt. That is higher than the 314
irregular dividends paid last year in all
of November and December. Silverblatt
expects the pace of early dividends to
pick up if Washington keeps dawdling.
Many companies go beyond moving
up ordinary payments.
They are declaring special, one-time
dividends to take advantage of the lower
tax rate while it lasts. Those special div-
idends can dramatically alter a compa-
nys nances.
Normally, when a board declares a
special dividend, its a sign of nancial
strength, experts say. That condence
can attract investors and boost the com-
panys stock price.
But these are not normal times. With
so many companies declaring special
dividends, professional traders have a
warning for everyday investors.
If they really thought this was the
right plan, they would have done it
already, says Peter Tchir, who runs the
hedge fund TF Market Advisors. He
believes that some companies are not
considering the long-term costs of their
decisions.
People should scour these companies
and see if theyre doing some damage to
themselves on the credit side, he says.
Many of the special dividends, it turns
out, are not drawn from the proverbial
mountain of cash that companies have
been sitting on since the onset of the
Great Recession.
Costco last month declared a special
dividend of $7 per share, or about $3 bil-
lion. To pay for it, the company bor-
rowed $3.5 billion. That caused Fitch, a
rating agency, to downgrade Costco,
though its rating remains relatively high.
Costco declined to comment.
Brown-Forman Corp., which makes
Jack Daniels and other liquors, will pay
for its $4 per share special dividend with
a combination of cash and debt, execu-
tives said on a conference call with
financial analysts. That amounts to
$853.2 million.
Investors should beware
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LANSING, Mich. With defeat in
the Michigan Legislature virtually cer-
tain, Democrats and organized labor
intend to make enactment of right-to-
work laws as uncomfortable as possible
for Gov. Rick Snyder and his Republican
allies while laying the groundwork to
seek payback at the polls.
Shellshocked opponents of the laws
spent the weekend mapping strategy for
protests and acts of civil disobedience,
while acknowledging the cold reality
that Republican majorities in the House
and Senate cannot be stopped or even
delayed for long by parliamentary
maneuvers. Leaders vowed to resist to
the end, and then set their sights on win-
ning control of the Legislature and
defeating Snyder when he seeks re-elec-
tion in 2014.
Theyve awakened a sleeping giant,
United Auto Workers President Bob
King told The Associated Press on
Saturday at a Detroit-area union hall,
where about 200 activists were attending
a planning session. Not just union
members. A lot of regular citizens, non-
union households, realize this is a nega-
tive thing.
Right-to-work laws prohibit requiring
employees to join a union or pay fees
similar to union dues as a condition of
employment. Supporters say its about
freedom of association for workers and a
better business climate. Critics contend
the real intent is to bleed unions of
money and bargaining power.
Hundreds of chanting, whistle-blow-
ing demonstrators thronged the state
Capitol last week as bills were intro-
duced and approved hours later, without
the usual committee hearings allowing
for public comment. Even more protest-
ers are expected Tuesday, when the two
chambers may reconcile wording differ-
ences and send nal versions to Snyder,
who now pledges to sign them after say-
ing repeatedly since his 2010 election
the issue wasnt on my agenda.
Unions vow political payback for right-to-work law
By Rod McGuirk
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
GUNNEDAH, Australia Tony Clifts family has plowed
the rich black soil of Australias Liverpool Plains for six gener-
ations. The thought of selling never crossed his mind until a
Chinese company came to town.
Shenhua Watermark Coal offered to buy farms at unheard-of
prices. The decision wasnt easy, Clift says. His pioneer ances-
tors settled the land in 1832. But farming is a business nowa-
days, and selling his 6,500 acres made business sense.
If someone offers you a whole heap of money, youve got to
take it, says the 50-year-old father of two, sitting at the kitchen
table of the palatial hilltop home he built with the windfall. A
sea of yellow stretches out below, canola elds planted on less
fertile land he bought 25 miles to the north.
Soaring coal prices fueled by Chinas economic growth have
made mining parts of the Australian landscape far more lucra-
tive than farming it. Its one example of how Chinas emer-
gence as a global trading power may transform countries in
ways never contemplated and not yet fully understood.
The Associated Press analyzed Chinas trade with other
countries as a percentage of their gross domestic product, using
an International Monetary Fund database. It found that, on
average, trade with China had climbed to 12.4 percent of GDP
by 2011. By comparison, the peak reached with the U.S. in the
past 30 years was 10 percent in 2001.
In Australia, where trade with China hit 7.7 percent of GDP
last year, exports of coal and iron ore have helped Australia
fend off recession for 21 years and deliver the largest trade sur-
pluses in 140 years of record-keeping.
Chinas rapid rise has given Australia its strongest terms of
trade since a global wool boom in the 1950s, says economist
Peter Robertson at the University of Western Australia. That
boom was fairly short-lived, he wrote in an email response to
questions. This ones length is unknown. It may turn out much
bigger depending on Chinas future growth.
Chinas cash changes
Australias landscape
Just how special are special dividends?
<< Figure skatings best back on ice , page 13
Indiana wins NCAA mens soccer title, page 13
Monday, Dec. 10, 2012
NFL SUNDAY: RGIII INJURED BUT SKINS STILL WIN; COWBOYS BEAT BENGALS >> PAGE 15
REUTERS
San Francisco 49ers running back Frank Gore runs past Miami Dolphins linebacker Karlos Dansby to the 1-yard-
line to set up a touchdown during the fourth quarter of their NFL football game in San Francisco Sunday.
L
AS VEGAS The idea of
Manny Pacquiao being
knocked out cold was
shocking enough. The sight of him
face down on the canvas, unrespon-
sive even as bedlam broke out all
around him, was positively frighten-
ing.
Mitt Romney saw it up close from
his ringside seat just a few feet
away. So did Pacquiaos wife, who
broke down in tears and tried to get
in the ring to aid her downed hus-
band.
Juan Manuel Marquez didnt even
bother to look. He was already busy
celebrating the knockout of a life-
time.
This was boxing at its brutal best,
a toe-to-toe slugfest Saturday night
that was destined from the opening
bell to be decided by sts instead of
judges. Both fighters had been
down, and
both fighters
were hurting
w h e n
M a r q u e z
threw a right
hand off the
ropes with a
second left in
the sixth
round that
could be felt
all the way in
the rafters of
the MGM
Grand arena.
It will go down among the great
ghts of their era. But it was barely
over when the cry arose for the two
ever-so-willing warriors to do it
again.
When it comes to Pacquiao and
Marquez, four ghts may not be
enough.
If you give us a chance, well
ght again, Pacquiao said. I was
just starting to feel condent and
then I got careless.
Indeed, the case could be made
that Pacquiao was on the verge of a
big win himself when Marquez
landed the punch that sent him
falling face rst on the canvas. He
had come back from a third round
knockdown to drop Marquez in the
fth and was landing big left hands
that broke and bloodied the
Mexicans nose.
After three ghts that all went the
distance both ghters had vowed to
be more aggressive in their fourth
meeting. Pacquiao ended up paying
the price for it when he tried to
close the sixth round with a urry, a
Big knockout may set up Pacquiao-Marquez again
REUTERS
Juan Manuel Marquez of Mexico is directed to a neutral corner after knock-
ing out Manny Pacquiao of the Philippines,during the sixth round of their
welterweight ght in Las Vegas Saturday.
TIM
DAHLBERG
See BOXING, Page 14
Niners level Dolphins
By Janie McCauley
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO Frank
Gore purchased a gray hooded
sweatshirt months ago specically
for this day, featuring an upside
down teal dolphin in distress.
Miamis mascot, on its head with
a rst-aid symbol and an X over
each eye to boot.
I said, Weve got to turn him
upside down, he said.
A Miami man through and
through, Gore sure did his part.
Gore ran for a 1-yard touchdown
and reached 1,000 yards rushing for
the sixth time in his career, and even
took the fake on Colin Kaepernicks
late 50-yard scoring run in the San
Francisco 49ers 27-13 victory
against the Dolphins on Sunday.
Gore, Kaepernick and Michael
Crabtree pulled off just the kind of
grind-it-out win coach Jim
Harbaugh wants to see during the
December stretch run.
Gore nished with 63 yards rush-
ing, caught two passes and also
matched his mentor, Roger Craig,
and late Hall of Famer Joe Perry for
the franchise record in rushing
touchdowns with 50. And, no, Gore
didnt grow up a Dolphins fan in his
native South Florida.
Its a blessing. Everybody says
when you turn 29 and 30, you cant
do it anymore. When I got to 29, I
told myself, Im going to overcome
that, Gore said. Ive still got the
See NINERS, Page 14
UNLV
sneaks
by Cal
By Michael Wagaman
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
BERKELEY Quintrell Thomas
grabbed Anthony Marshalls airball
under the basket and scored on a
short hook shot with 1.2 seconds
remaining to lift No. 21 UNLV to a
76-75 win over California on
Sunday.
The Runnin Rebels led for most
of the second half but trailed 75-74
following two free throws by Cals
Justin Cobbs with 11.9 seconds left.
Marshall then rushed a long jumper
that Thomas alertly grabbed and
ipped in. Thomas was fouled on
the play but missed the free throw.
Justin Hawkins then blocked a 3-
point attempt by Cobbs from mid-
court as the buzzer sounded.
Anthony Bennett had career-highs
of 25 points and 13 rebounds while
leading UNLV (7-1) to its sixth
straight win. Bryce Dejean-Jones
also had a career-best 22 points.
Allen Crabbe scored 18 for
California.
The Rebels werent sharp offen-
sively early and trailed most of the
rst half. They made up for it by
dominating the boards despite los-
ing leading rebounder Mike Moser
to injury less than ve minutes into
the game.
Moser crashed to the oor during
a scramble for a loose ball and lay
on his stomach for several moments
as trainers rushed to him. Coach
Dave Rice also made his way over
before Moser who missed
UNLVs previous game against
Portland with a hip injury was
slowly helped to his feet and escort-
ed into the locker room. He clutched
the shirt of an assistant coach for
support as he walked off.
It didnt seem to slow the Rebels.
They had three players in double
gures by halftime, limited Cal to
one offensive rebound, and
outscored the Bears 22-6 in the paint
in the rst half.
By Jim Litke
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The games go on.
For the second straight weekend,
tragedy rocked the regularly sched-
uled world of the NFL. It left fami-
lies, friends, teammates and coach-
ing staffs grieving over yet another
senseless loss of life. It also left the
league facing questions not only
about efforts to safeguard players on
the field but whether its doing
enough to help them stay out of
harms way once they step outside
the white lines.
In the early-morning hours
Saturday in Irving, Texas, 24-year-
old Dallas Cowboys nose tackle
Josh Brent got behind the wheel of
his Mercedes alongside teammate
Jerry Brown and sped off, the prel-
ude to a one-car accident that would
leave Brown dead at 25 and Brent
sitting in jail facing a felony charge
of intoxicated manslaughter.
All this happened little more than
three years after Brent was sen-
tenced to probation and 60 days in
jail in a plea agreement following
his drunken driving arrest while
playing football at the University of
Illinois, where he and Brown were
teammates as well.
That it happened just a week after
Kansas City linebacker Jovan
Belcher shot his girlfriend to death,
then drove to the Chiefs training
facility and took his own life with
the same gun, raised questions
about the leagues responsibility to
the young men it empowers and
enriches in some cases, almost
overnight.
I dont know that anybody has
the answer, to be honest. Theyre
human beings, kids in most of the
cases like this, and theyre going to
make mistakes, said Dan Reeves,
who played seven years for the
New tragedy rocks NFLs regularly scheduled world
See NFL, Page 14
12
Monday Dec. 10, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
HOOVER, Ala. Nikita Kotlov
scored off a header pass from Eriq
Zavaleta midway through the sec-
ond half to give Indiana a 1-0 victo-
ry over Georgetown on Sunday to
win the NCAA mens soccer cham-
pionship.
It is the eighth championship for
the Hoosiers (16-5-3), their first
since 2004.
Indiana midelder Patrick Doody
lofted a crossing pass to the right of
the goal that brought Georgetown
goalkeeper Tomas Gomez out from
the net.
Zavaleta got to the ball before
either Gomez or Hoyas defender
Jimmy Nealis and sent a header to
Kotlov, who kicked it into the open
net with 27 minutes left.
The ball kind of drifted in the air
for quite a while, Zavaleta said of
Kotlovs pass. The keeper was
pretty hesitant and kind of got in no
mans land. I saw Nikita running
into the box, and I just wanted to get
the ball down to let him make a
play.
Indiana outshot Georgetown 16-7,
including eight shots on goal. But
Gomez stopped the Hoosiers with
six saves before giving up the game-
winner.
Its hard on Tomas. Hell take a
lot of responsibility for that,
Georgetown coach Brian Wiese
said.
Indiana wins NCAA mens soccer title
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
DORTMUND, Germany
Olympic champion Kim Yu-na com-
pleted her triumphant return to g-
ure skating competition Sunday by
winning the NRW Trophy with the
seasons best total score.
Kim overcame one fall in an oth-
erwise assured free skate to end her
19-month sabbatical with 201.61
points, including the 72.27 awarded
for the seasons best short program
Saturday.
The 22-year-old South Korean
was competing in the second-tier
competition to secure a place at next
years world championships.
Im happy that I could reach my
goal today, said Kim, who needed
just 28 points from the short pro-
gram and 48 from the free skate to
qualify for London, Ontario.
At the beginning of the program
my spins were
going well, but I
made one mis-
take, she said.
Afterward, I
felt shaky but I
persevered to the
end. I was actu-
ally surprised at
the score I
received. That
was unexpected. I think I did my
best, the best I could, even though I
dont feel Ive shown all I can do.
But overall Im satised with the
result today.
Russias Xenia Makarova was
second with 159.01 points, followed
by Swedens Viktoria Helgesson at
158.93.
Mao Asada of Japan reached the
seasons previous best of 196.80
when she won the Grand Prix Final
in Sochi, Russia on Saturday.
Kim Yu-na makes
triumphant return
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
BARCELONA, Spain Lionel
Messi broke German great Gerd
Muellers 40-year-old record for
most goals in a year by scoring for
the 86th time in 2012 on Sunday.
The Argentina forward scored
twice to lead Barcelona to a 2-1 win
at Real Betis in the Spanish league
match.
His rst was an individual effort
in the 16th minute to tie Muellers
mark, and he eclipsed the 1972
milestone with a familiar left-footed
nish nine minutes later.
As I have said many times, the
record is nice but the important thing
is the victory that keeps us on the
patch we want to continue on,
Messi said. As I always say, my
objectives are on a team level: to win
the league, the Champions League
and the Copa del Rey again.
Messi has scored 74 goals for
Barcelona and 12 times for
Argentina this year, and he has three
more games in which he can add to
his tally before the end of the year.
Mueller scored 85 for Bayern
Munich and West Germany.
Messi passed Brazil great Peles
single-season milestone of 75 goals.
Messi breaks 40-year record with 86th goal of 2012
Kim Yu-na
SPORTS 14
Monday Dec. 10, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
explosiveness. When I see something, I go get
it.
Anthony Dixon also had a 1-yard scoring
run, while Kaepernick came through with a
the touchdown run and also passed for 185
yards in his fourth straight start since being
promoted over Alex Smith.
Gore drew Miamis defense his way on that
game-clinching play.
Everybody came to me and Mr. Everything
did his thing, Gore said of Kaepernick.
NFL sacks leader Aldon Smith added two
more to his total for 19 1/2 , passing Fred
Deans franchise-best single-season mark of
17 1/2 set in 1983. Smith also moved within
three sacks of Michael Strahans seasonal
NFL record set in 2001 with the New York
Giants.
Couple more, baby! Gore hollered to
Smith in the locker room.
Crabtree had nine catches for 93 yards and
rookie LaMichael James ran for 30 yards in a
solid NFL debut for the 49ers (9-3-1), who
kept hold on the No. 2 seed in the NFC behind
Atlanta.
Anthony Fasano made a diving 3-yard
touchdown catch for Miami (5-8) midway
through the fourth quarter on a pass from
Ryan Tannehill. Fasanos right knee landed in
the end zone as he fell out of bounds under
pressure from safety Donte Whitner.
Miami went for it on fourth-and-10 from the
35 with 4:16 remaining and Tannehill over-
threw Marlon Moore on the left sideline.
In the fourth quarter, we had some oppor-
tunities to put some more points on the board.
We didnt. We were too generous, Dolphins
coach Joe Philbin said. Its just a lack of
playmaking at critical times. Thats it.
The sold-out crowd at Candlestick Park was
treated to a spectacular, clear Bay Area day.
The football didnt quite live up to it until both
teams performed down the stretch.
Harbaughs NFC West-leading Niners hard-
ly looked like a power for most of the after-
noon against overmatched Miami the team
Harbaugh considered coaching before accept-
ing a $25 million, ve-year contract with San
Francisco in January 2011.
These games are really hard, Harbaugh
said. Youve got to stay patient. We also took
our shots.
Continued from page 11
NINERS
big mistake against a counterpuncher who
drew him into his sights.
I knew Manny could knock me out at any
time, Marquez said. I threw the perfect
punch.
Pacquiao, who hadnt been stopped in a ght
since 1999 in Thailand when he was a 112-
pounder, took several minutes to come around
on the canvas before being led to his ring stool.
He blew his nose and stared vacantly ahead as
the pro-Marquez crowd of 16,348 screamed in
excitement.
He was taken to the hospital for a precau-
tionary brain scan, then went to his hotel suite,
where he ate with wife Jinkee and his
entourage and watched a replay of the ght to
see what went wrong.
Spoiler alert, Pacquiao said as the ght
played on the TV. I dont think you are going
to like how this ends.
His countrymen in the Philippines certainly
didnt. The country came to a standstill as it
usually does when its hero ghts, and for the
second ght in a row they were bitterly disap-
pointed.
In the southern region where the boxer and
congressman lives, some survivors of a power-
ful typhoon that killed more than 600 people
this week watched on a big TV screen in a gym
that serves as an emergency shelter in the town
of New Bataan.
People were really dismayed, town
spokesman Marlon Esperanza said. It was
like they were hit by another typhoon.
What Marquez hit Pacquiao with might have
seemed almost as powerful. Pacquiao had
dropped Marquez four times in their rst three
ghts, but Marquez had never put him down
before he landed a big right hand in the third
round for his rst knockdown. The power was
sure to raise questions about the new bulked-
up physique Marquez has at the age of 39,
which he said came from hard work under a
strength conditioner who once provided
steroids to Marion Jones and other track stars.
Still, it was a career-dening moment for
Marquez, who believes he was robbed by the
judges in his rst three ghts with Pacquiao.
The two fought to a draw eight years ago at
125 pounds and Pacquiao was awarded close
decisions in the other two ghts.
It was clear there would be no need for the
judges on this night, which might have been
good for Marquez since he was losing by one
point on all three scorecards when he landed
his big punch.
The only question was which ghter would
end the night on the canvas.
It turned out to be Pacquiao, who lost a con-
troversial decision in his last ght to Timothy
Bradley and who many in boxing believe is
showing the wear of 17 years in the ring. For
any other ghter the knockout loss might be
the end, but Pacquiao showed no sign after-
ward that he was willing to call it quits on his
remarkable career and return to his other job as
a congressman in the Philippines.
Trainer Freddie Roach said the decision
wont be an easy one.
I said if he is back in the gym and I see
signs of him declining Ill tell him to retire, but
if I dont see that I wont tell him to retire,
Roach said. Id love to get a rematch, but is
that the best move right away? Should we try
him out in a softer ght rst? There is a lot of
things we have to think about. Its very com-
plicated, and its not going to be overnight.
One thing the stunning loss did do was scut-
tle, perhaps forever, what would have been the
richest ght in boxing history. With Pacquiao
now damaged goods, any ght against Floyd
Mayweather Jr. would be fought for a lot less
money and generate a lot less interest than if it
had happened with Pacquiao still on his win-
ning streak and still in his prime.
Pacquiaos career may not be over. If post-
ght comments from both ghters and pro-
moter Bob Arum were any indication, he and
Marquez will more than likely ght for a fth
time. Theres too much money to be had and
the ghter in Pacquiao will surely want a
chance at redemption.
That will be a hot topic of discussion in the
months ahead. For now, though, one thing is
for sure.
On this night, one huge right hand from
Marquez changed everything.
Continued from page 11
BOXING
Cowboys before launching an NFL coaching
career that included four stops over four
decades.
As a coach, youve got more than 50 play-
ers, if you count practice squad guys, that
youre trying to keep an eye on. And both the
league and the team invest an awful lot of time
and money trying to educate them about the
opportunities and pitfalls that are set out in
front of them. ...
But no matter what you do, some are going
to believe the bad stuff will never happen to
them. And teams spend so much time togeth-
er, they become like families. Its easy to get
lulled into thinking you know which ones
need a pat on the back and which ones a kick
in the behind. Yet this shows we dont always
learn the real strengths and weaknesses of
some until its too late. Everybody deals with
that knowledge in their own way.
But if youre going to play, Reeves said
nally. I dont know any other way to honor
that person than to play as hard as you can.
The emotional scene that roiled Kansas City
in the wake of Belchers murder-suicide a
week earlier shifted to Cincinnati, where the
Cowboys arrived Saturday night to complete
preparations before Sundays kickoff against
the Bengals.
The team cut short its regular two-hour
meeting and made sure counselors were on
hand to speak to players afterward. But when
owner Jerry Jones spoke with a Fox inter-
viewer outside the locker room shortly before
the game, his eyes were rimmed red and he
spoke haltingly about Brown.
Continued from page 11
NFL
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LANDOVER, Md. With Robert Grifn
III sidelined with a sprained right knee, the
Washington Redskins rallied behind backup
Kirk Cousins to tie the game in the nal
minute of regulation, then Kai Forbath kicked
a 34-yard eld goal in overtime Sunday for a
31-28 victory over the Baltimore Ravens.
Grifn was hurt at the end of a 13-yard
scramble while attempting to lead the game-
tying drive with the Redskins trailing 28-20.
He left for one play, returned for four, then
was no longer able to continue.
Cousins stepped in and hit Pierre Garcon
for an 11-yard touchdown pass, then ran in the
2-point conversion with 29 seconds to play.
The Redskins have won four straight to
improve to 7-6. The Ravens lost back-to-back
games for the rst time since 2009 and fell to
9-4.
COWBOYS 20, BENGALS 19
CINCINNATI The grieving Cowboys
rallied for a signicant win on Dan Baileys
40-yard eld goal as time ran out.
Dallas overcame a nine-point decit in the
closing minutes behind Tony Romo, who held
his hand over his heart during a moment of
silence to honor teammate Jerry Brown before
the kickoff.
Brown died in an auto accident early
Saturday. Defensive lineman Josh Brent, who
was driving, remained in jail in Irving, Texas,
charged with intoxication manslaughter.
The Cowboys (7-6) learned about Browns
death on their ight to Cincinnati on Saturday.
Coach Jason Garrett told his team that the best
way to honor him was to play well in a game
with playoff implications for both teams.
A late comeback was just enough to beat
the Bengals (7-6).
Romo threw a 27-yard touchdown pass to
Dez Bryant, then led the drive to Baileys
kick.
GIANTS 52, SAINTS 27
EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J. Rookie
David Wilson returned a kickoff 97 yards for
one touchdown, ran for two more scores and
piled up 327 all-purpose yards and Eli
Manning threw four touchdown passes to lead
the Giants.
The win allowed New York (8-5) to main-
tain its one-game lead in the NFC East over
Washington and Dallas. The loss all but ended
the playoff hopes of Drew Brees and the
Saints (5-8), who turned the ball over four
times in losing their third straight.
Manning had TD passes of 6 yards to
Martellus Bennett, 5 yards to Domenik
Hixon, 25 yards to Hakeem Nicks and 10
yards to Victor Cruz. Wilson scored on runs of
6 and 52 yards and nished with 100 yards on
13 carries on the biggest day of his career.
SEAHAWKS 58, CARDINALS 0
SEATTLE Marshawn Lynch had three
touchdown runs and Seattle set a franchise
record for points. The Seahawks forced eight
turnovers. Richard Sherman and Bobby
Wagner each had two interceptions.
Seattle (8-5) kept rm grasp on the nal
NFC wild-card spot and kept alive slim
chances of catching San Francisco in the NFC
West race. The Seahawks also picked up their
rst division victory and assured coach Pete
Carroll of his rst eight-win season in three
years with them.
The 58-0 victory was the biggest shutout in
Seattles history. Leon Washingtons 3-yard
TD run with 2:32 left set a franchise record
for points.
Arizona (4-9) was shut out for the rst time
since 2003 against Seattle. The effortless per-
formance will only raise questions about Ken
Whisenhunts future as coach. Arizona lost its
ninth straight overall.
PANTHERS 30, FALCONS 20
CHARLOTTE, N.C. Cam Newton
threw for 287 yards and two touchdowns and
scored on a 72-yard run.
Newton piled up a career-high 116 yards on
the ground as the Panthers racked up 475 total
yards to avenge an early-season loss with a
dominating performance against the NFC
South champion Falcons.
Carolina (4-9) came in with little to play for
except to gain a measure of revenge on
Falcons quarterback Matt Ryan, whom they
felt disrespected them after Atlantas 30-28
come-from-behind win earlier this season at
the Georgia Dome.
Ryan threw for 342 yards and two scores
and had a costly fourth-quar-
ter interception.
The Panthers opened a 23-0
lead en route to snapping a
five-game losing streak
against the Falcons.
VIKINGS 21, BEARS 14
MINNEAPOLIS Adrian
Peterson rushed for 154 yards
and two touchdowns and
Harrison Smith returned an
interception for a score.
Peterson topped 100 yards before the rst
quarter was over, helping the Vikings (7-6)
overcome another lackluster day from quar-
terback Christian Ponder to get a win that will
keep their faint playoff hopes alive.
Jay Cutler threw for 260 yards, one touch-
down and two interceptions and couldnt n-
ish the game for the Bears (8-5), who have
lost four of their last ve. He took a wicked hit
to the head from Everson Griffen in the fourth
quarter, remained in the game for the rest of
that drive, but was replaced by Jason
Campbell with 3 minutes to play.
BROWNS 30, CHIEFS 7
CLEVELAND Rookie Travis
Benjamins electrifying 93-yard punt return
touchdown gave Cleveland momentum and
the Browns won their third straight game.
Benjamins game-changing runback helped
the Browns (5-8) continue their resurgence
under second-year coach Pat Shurmur, whose
future in Cleveland remains uncertain. The
Browns have one more win than last season,
SPORTS 15
Monday Dec. 10, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Redskins rally behind backup QB; Boys win
See GAMES, Page 16
16
Monday Dec. 10, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
SPORTS
12/9
@Patriots
8:20p.m.
NBC
12/16
@Seattle
1:25p.m.
FOX
12/23
12/6
vs.Chiefs
1:25p.m.
CBS
12/16
@Panthers
1p.m.
CBS
12/23
vs. Arizona
1:25p.m.
FOX
12/30
@Chargers
1p.m.
CBS
12/30
@Orlando
5p.m.
CSN-BAY
12/14
@Atlanta
4p.m.
CSN-BAY
12/15
vs.New
Orleans
7:30p.m.
CSN-BAY
12/18 12/7 12/8
@Charlotte
4p.m.
CSN-BAY
12/10
@Miami
4:30p.m.
CSN-BAY
12/12
AMERICAN CONFERENCE
East
W L T Pct PF PA
y-New England 9 3 0 .750 430 260
N.Y. Jets 6 7 0 .462 245 306
Buffalo 5 8 0 .385 289 352
Miami 5 8 0 .385 240 276
South
W L T Pct PF PA
x-Houston 11 1 0 .917 351 221
Indianapolis 9 4 0 .692 292 329
Tennessee 4 9 0 .308 271 386
Jacksonville 2 11 0 .154 216 359
North
W L T Pct PF PA
Baltimore 9 4 0 .692 331 273
Pittsburgh 7 6 0 .538 278 264
Cincinnati 7 6 0 .538 321 280
Cleveland 5 8 0 .385 259 272
West
W L T Pct PF PA
y-Denver 10 3 0 .769 375 257
San Diego 5 8 0 .385 292 281
Oakland 3 10 0 .231 248 402
Kansas City 2 11 0 .154 195 352
NATIONAL CONFERENCE
East
W L T Pct PF PA
N.Y. Giants 8 5 0 .615 373 270
Washington 7 6 0 .538 343 329
Dallas 7 6 0 .538 300 314
Philadelphia 4 9 0 .308 240 341
South
W L T Pct PF PA
y-Atlanta 11 2 0 .846 337 259
Tampa Bay 6 7 0 .462 354 308
New Orleans 5 8 0 .385 348 379
Carolina 4 9 0 .308 265 312
North
W L T Pct PF PA
Green Bay 9 4 0 .692 323 279
Chicago 8 5 0 .615 308 219
Minnesota 7 6 0 .538 283 286
Detroit 4 9 0 .308 320 342
West
W L T Pct PF PA
San Francisco 9 3 1 .731 316 184
Seattle 8 5 0 .615 300 202
St. Louis 6 6 1 .500 236 279
Arizona 4 9 0 .308 186 292
ThursdaysGame
Denver 26, Oakland 13
SundaysGames
Minnesota 21, Chicago 14
Washington 31, Baltimore 28, OT
Cleveland 30, Kansas City 7
San Diego 34, Pittsburgh 24
Indianapolis 27,Tennessee 23
N.Y. Jets 17, Jacksonville 10
Carolina 30, Atlanta 20
Philadelphia 23,Tampa Bay 21
St. Louis 15, Buffalo 12
Dallas 20, Cincinnati 19
San Francisco 27, Miami 13
Seattle 58, Arizona 0
N.Y. Giants 52, New Orleans 27
Green Bay 27, Detroit 20
NFL STANDINGS
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct GB
New York 15 5 .750
Brooklyn 11 8 .579 3 1/2
Philadelphia 11 9 .550 4
Boston 11 9 .550 4
Toronto 4 17 .190 11 1/2
Southeast Division
W L Pct GB
Miami 13 5 .722
Atlanta 12 5 .706 1/2
Orlando 8 12 .400 6
Charlotte 7 12 .368 6 1/2
Washington 2 15 .118 10 1/2
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Chicago 11 8 .579
Milwaukee 10 9 .526 1
Indiana 10 11 .476 2
Detroit 7 15 .318 5 1/2
Cleveland 4 17 .190 8
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct GB
San Antonio 17 4 .810
Memphis 14 4 .778 1 1/2
Dallas 10 10 .500 6 1/2
Houston 9 10 .474 7
New Orleans 5 14 .263 11
Northwest Division
W L Pct GB
Oklahoma City 17 4 .810
Utah 11 10 .524 6
Minnesota 9 9 .500 6 1/2
Denver 10 11 .476 7
Portland 8 12 .400 8 1/2
PacicDivision
W L Pct GB
L.A. Clippers 14 6 .700
Golden State 13 7 .650 1
L.A. Lakers 9 11 .450 5
Sacramento 7 12 .368 6 1/2
Phoenix 7 15 .318 8
SundaysGames
L.A. Clippers 102,Toronto 83
Milwaukee 97, Brooklyn 88
Oklahoma City 104, Indiana 93
New York 112, Denver 106
Orlando 98, Phoenix 90
Utah at L.A. Lakers, late
MondaysGames
Golden State at Charlotte, 4 p.m.
Detroit at Philadelphia, 4 p.m.
Atlanta at Miami, 4:30 p.m.
San Antonio at Houston, 5 p.m.
Sacramento at Dallas, 5:30 p.m.
Toronto at Portland, 7 p.m.
TuesdaysGames
L.A. Lakers at Cleveland, 4 p.m.
New York at Brooklyn, 4 p.m.
Denver at Detroit, 4:30 p.m.
Washington at New Orleans, 5 p.m.
L.A. Clippers at Chicago, 6:30 p.m.
NBA STANDINGS
BASEBALL
AmericanLeague
SEATTLEMARINERS Designated LHP Mauricio
Robles for assignment.
TEXASRANGERS Traded INF Michael Young to
Philadelphia for RHP Josh Lindblom and RHP
Lisalverto Bonilla. BASKETBALL
National Basketball Association
NBAFinedClevelandcoachByronScott $25,000
for public criticism of ofciating after a Dec.7 game
at Minnesota.FinedBostonF-CChrisWilcox$25,000
for making an obscene gesture directed toward
fans during a Dec. 7 game at Philadelphia.
CHARLOTTEBOBCATS Waived G Cory Higgins.
Called up F Jeff Adrien from Rio Grande Valley
(NBADL).
PORTLAND TRAIL BLAZERS Recalled G Will
Barton and F Victor Claver from Idaho (NBADL).
TRANSACTIONS
and their longest winning streak
since 2009.
Trent Richardson had a pair of 1-
yard TD runs for Cleveland.
Jamaal Charles ran for 165 yards,
breaking off an 80-yard TD run on
the games rst play for Kansas
City. It was the rst road game for
the Chiefs (2-11) following line-
backer Jovan Belchers suicide.
CHARGERS 34, STEELERS 24
PITTSBURGH Philip Rivers
threw three touchdown passes, two
to Danario Alexander, and San
Diego won for the rst time in 15
regular-season visits to Pittsburgh.
The Chargers (5-8), who snapped
a four-game losing streak, dominat-
ed from the outset. They never let
Steelers quarterback Ben
Roethlisberger get comfortable in
his rst game in nearly a month.
Roethlisberger completed 22 of
42 passes for 285 yards and three
second-half touchdowns. But he
also threw an interception and had a
botched screen pass turn into an
easy San Diego score as Pittsburgh
(7-6) hardly played like a team
readying for a postseason run.
COLTS 27, TITANS 23
INDIANAPOLIS Andrew
Luck led Indianapolis back from a
13-point second-half deficit and
Adam Vinatieri made two fourth-
quarter eld goals.
Luck has now engineered six
fourth-quarter comebacks for Indy
(9-4). Delone Carter cut the decit
to 20-14 with a 1-yard TD run on
Indys opening possession of the
second half. And after Pat McAfees
52-yard punt went out of bounds at
the Titans 1-yard line, Cassius
Vaughn jumped in front of Nate
Washington, picked off Jake
Lockers pass and scored on a 3-yard
interception return to make it 21-20.
JETS 17, JAGUARS 10
JACKSONVILLE, Fla. Shonn
Greene and Bilal Powell ran for short
touchdowns and the New York Jets
kept their postseason hopes alive.
The Jets (6-7) were shut out at
halftime for the second consecutive
week, but they didnt need to change
quarterbacks to spark the offense
this time.
EAGLES 23, BUCCANEERS 21
TAMPA, Fla. Nick Foles
threw a pair of touchdown passes in
the nal four minutes, including a 1-
yarder to Jeremy Maclin with no
time remaining.
The rally allowed the Eagles to
end an eight-game losing streak
their longest in 42 years.
Foles completed 32 of 51 passes
for 381 yards in his fourth start in
place of the injured Michael Vick.
RAMS 15, BILLS 12
ORCHARD PARK, N.Y. Sam
Bradford threw a 13-yard touch-
down pass to Brandon Gibson with
48 seconds left.
Bradford was 5 of 8 for 68 yards to
cap a 14-play, 84-yard drive. St.
Louis (6-6-1) continued its late-sea-
son resurgence by winning its third
straight for the rst time since closing
the 2006 season with three victories.
PACKERS 27, LIONS 20
GREEN BAY, Wis. The Green
Bay Packers are a victory away
from clinching the NFC North title
after beating the Detroit Lions 27-
20 on Sunday night.
DaJuan Harris rushed for a score
in his first NFL game, Aaron
Rodgers added the longest TD run
of his career, and Mike Daniels
returned a fumble 43 yards as the
Packers (9-4) opened a one-game
lead over Chicago.
Continued from page 15
GAMES
DATEBOOK 17
Monday Dec. 10, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
$
$
W
ith just 14 shopping days until
Christmas, some of you need
options and need them now!
Here are three gift-giving ideas you might
not have considered; all three are simple,
affordable and benefit homeless animals.
First, the gift of a homeless animal. Since
choosing an animal is such a fun, personal
and subjective process, dont take that special
experience away from your loved one.
Instead, gift wrap a box of dog treats, a cat
collar, bone or bowl and include a card say-
ing you would love to take them to our new
center to meet the pet of their dreams. If the
special person in your life loves sparkly items
in tiny boxes, use one for a dog or cat tag. In
your note, you can also promise to treat them
to breakfast or brunch the day of your adop-
tion visit. Option number two: an Honor Gift.
When we receive a gift in honor of a person,
we send the honored party a notication card
or certicate. Call 650-340-7022 ext. 327 to
make your honor gift via credit card. Want to
kiss up to your boss without overdoing it? Do
you have a special friend, teacher, coach,
dog-walker, pet-sitter, co-worker, garbage
collector, or Daily journal columnist? That
one person in your life who has everything
and needs nothing? An Honor Gift makes a
fantastic, thoughtful holiday gift. The recipi-
ent wont know the gift amount, but will
know you thought of them in a special way
that also helps homeless animals. Lastly,
option number three: our Green Christmas
option, perfect for that environmentally-
friendly person in your life who recycles,
composts, reuses and spouts off about sus-
tainable solutions. Take a trip to our Pick of
the Litter resale shop in Burlingame for
stocking stuffers or their main gift. The Pick
is a virtual treasure trove with an incredible
assortment of ever-changing gently used (or,
occasionally, never used) items.
Scott oversees PHS/SPCAs Adoption,
Behavior and Training, Education, Outreach,
Field Services, Cruelty Investigation,
Volunteer and Media/PR program areas and
staff from the new Tom and Annette Lantos
Center for Compassion.
By David Germain
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LOS ANGELES James Bond is in a
box-ofce photo nish with Santa Claus and
the Easter Bunny over what looks to be the
last slow weekend of the holidays.
According to studio estimates Sunday,
Sonys Bond tale Skyfall took in $11 mil-
lion to move back to No. 1 in its fth week-
end.
That put it narrowly ahead of Paramounts
Rise of the Guardians, the animated adventure
of Santa, the Easter Bunny and other mytholog-
ical heroes that pulled in $10.5 million.
The two movies inched ahead of Summit
Entertainments The Twilight Saga: Breaking
Dawn Part 2, which had been tops for
three-straight weekends. The Twilight nale
earned $9.2 million, slipping into a tight race
for No. 3 with Disneys Lincoln, which was
close behind with $9.1 million.
The top movies were bunched up so closely
that rankings could change once nal week-
end revenues are released Monday.
The weekends only new wide release,
Gerard Butlers romantic comedy Playing
for Keeps, opped with just $6 million, com-
ing in at No. 6.
Skyfall raised its domestic total to $261.6
million and added $20.3 million overseas to
bring its international income to $656.6 mil-
lion. At $918 million worldwide, Skyfall
has the best cash haul ever for the Bond fran-
chise and surpassed Spider-Man 3 at $890
million to become Sonys top-grossing hit.
The Twilight nale also is a franchise
record-breaker, surpassing the $710 million
worldwide haul of last years Breaking
Dawn Part 1. The nales domestic total
now stands at $268.7 million.
Rise of the Guardians led the internation-
al box ofce with $26 million, followed by
20th Century Foxs Life of Pi at $23.8 mil-
lion.
It was another traditionally quiet post-
Thanksgiving weekend, with big November
releases continuing to dominate in the lull
before a pre-Christmas onslaught of movies.
The box ofce is expected to soar next
weekend with the arrival of part one of The
Hobbit, Peter Jacksons The Lord of the
Rings prelude. After that comes a steady
rush of action, comedy and drama through
years end, including Tom Cruises Jack
Reacher, Quentin Tarantino and Jamie
Foxxs Django Unchained, Seth Rogens
The Guilt Trip and Hugh Jackman and
Russell Crowes Les Miserables.
The last couple of weeks of the year are
some of the strongest every year, said Paul
Dergarabedian, an analyst for box-office
tracker Hollywood.com. We are on the cusp
of some really huge box ofce. Theres a lot
of money still left in the year despite this slow
period right now.
Skyfall,Guardians duel for box-office win
1.Skyfall,$11 million ($20.3 million).
2.Rise of the Guardians,$10.5 million
($26 million international).
3.The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn
Part 2,$9.2 million
($23.5 million international).
4.Lincoln,$9.1 million.
5.Life of Pi,$8.3 million
($23.8 million international).
6.Playing for Keeps,$6 million
($2.5 million international).
7.Wreck-It Ralph,$4.9 million
($5.8 million international).
8.Red Dawn,$4.3 million.
9.Flight,$3.1 million.
10.Killing Them Softly,$2.7 million
($1.4 million international).
Top 10 movies
18
Monday Dec. 10, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Air Force
Reserve
Airman 1st
Class Cheyne
P. Baumgart
graduated from
basic military
training at
Lackland Air
Force Base, San Antonio, Texas.
Baumgart is the son of Jacquie
Garrish of San Mateo. He is a
2005 graduate of Aragon High
School in San Mateo.
Birth announcements:
Jared and Heather Tenud, of
Sunnyvale, gave birth to a baby
boy at Sequoia Hospital in
Redwood City Nov. 28, 2012.
Jun Yang and Wen Zhang, of
Foster City, gave birth to a baby
girl at Sequoia Hospital in
Redwood City Nov. 28, 2012.
Viacheslav Chernoy and Lena
Leikin, of Redwood City, gave
birth to a baby boy at Sequoia
Hospital in Redwood City Nov.
29, 2012.
Marvin Frankel and Audrey
Linn Lozares, of San Carlos,
gave birth to a baby girl at
Sequoia Hospital in Redwood
City Nov. 30, 2012.
Matthew Hulse and Judy
Hwang, of San Mateo, gave birth
to a baby boy at Sequoia
Hospital in Redwood City Nov.
30, 2012.
Ashour Kastiro and Haneen
Salih, of Belmont, gave birth to a
baby girl at Sequoia Hospital in
Redwood City Nov. 30, 2012.
Gregory and Andree
Charonis, of Redwood City,
gave birth to a baby boy at
Sequoia Hospital in Redwood
City Dec. 1, 2012.
Paresh Upadhyay of Nidhi
Chawda, of San Francisco, gave
birth to a baby girl at Sequoia
Hospital in Redwood City Dec.
1, 2012.
Miguel and Elizabeth Vieira,
of Redwood City, gave birth to a
baby girl at Sequoia Hospital in
Redwood City Dec. 3, 2012.
Teodor and Simone Bally, of
Mountain View, gave birth to a
baby boy at Sequoia Hospital in
Redwood City Dec. 4, 2012.
Andrew and Yurah Yen, of
Redwood City, gave birth to a
baby girl at Sequoia Hospital in
Redwood City Dec. 4, 2012.
TOM JUNG
2012 US Poet Laureate Natasha Trethewey spoke at Sky-
line College in San Bruno Nov. 30.Trethewey, who is also
winner of the 2007 Pulitzer Prize for Poetry,is the director
of the Creative Writing Program at Emory University in
Atlanta, Georgia.
POET LAUREATE
BILL SILVERFARB/DAILY JOURNAL
A group of Girl Scouts put together donated items for
the holidays for children in need at the County Cen-
ter in Redwood City Saturday.The event was hosted
by the Countys Human Services Agency and Su-
pervisor Adrienne Tissier was also on hand.
HOLIDAY HELP
Barbara Evers, board member of Peninsula Family Service
and Sr. VP, Boston Private Bank & Trust, accepted a com-
mendation during the Peninsula Family Service launch of
its Ways to Work program. Peninsula Family Services helps
families increase their nancial capabilities, independence
and self sufciency. Pictured (far right): Mike Donohoe, Pol-
icy Aide from San Jose Supervisor Dave Corteses ofce
presenting to Barbara Evers and Rob Lajoie, Financial Em-
powerment Program Director, Peninsula Family Service.
WAYS TO WORK
LOCAL 19
Monday Dec. 10, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
eoffreys Diamonds and Goldsmith was founded
in 1984 and has served the the Peninsula for
28 years. This year, we entered our second
generation with new ownership under Nikko Kandhari,
who has helped manage Geoffreys for a number of
years. Nikko and his team are passionate about fine
jewelry and extraordinary customer service. This
passion is the central philosophy of how we conduct
our business. the central precept of this passion is our
strong commitment to excellence in all aspects of our
business.
Our team includes certified GIA Gemologists, a
Jeweler, a diverse and deeply knowledgeable staff
and one fashionable Chihuahua named Robin.
We are authorized dealers of the top bridal
designers brands, including Art Carved, Coast, Diana,
Henri Daussi, Jeff Cooper, Kirk Kara, Martin Flyer,
Simone G. and Vatche.
We are members of GIA Gemological Institute of
America, AGS American Gem Society, Jewelers of
America, California Jeweler, JVC Jewelers Vigilance
Committee and the Better Business Bureau. Please
check out our Yelp page to see how our customers
rate us and our Facebook page to see what our
friends say.
We stand behind our products to provide the
ultimate in customer satisfaction We look forward to
the opportunity to serve you!
Located in San Carlos @ 626 Walnut Street Suite 212
www.gaoffraysd|amonds.com 50-591-0301
Commission was convened in 1911.
The sum was considered completely inade-
quate by the engineers and, in 1915, a second
bond issue of $15 million was passed. Many
more bonds were passed later to continue the
work of the Bureau of Highways.
In early 1900, this main route down the
Peninsula was given the name of El Camino
Real, the Royal Road. It was an unpaved, dirt
road that became a quagmire in the winter when
it rained. Repair was constant but it seemed that
as soon as a bridge or road was repaired, anoth-
er one needed immediate work. Trees were
planted to break the wind along this path and
give shelter from the sun that could beat merci-
lessly upon the travelers. Some of these trees
can still be seen along the road in the city of
Burlingame.
In 1912, Contract #1 was issued for the
paving of El Camino Real from Orange Avenue
in South San Francisco to San Mateo. In front
of the ever-popular and well-patronized Uncle
Toms Cabin roadhouse, the state began the
project of paving El Camino Real. A huge cele-
bration was called for to announce the begin-
ning of a system that would allow better and
more rapid transit up and down the Peninsula.
Speeches were made, food consumed and, the
next day, the project began. Gunnysacks full of
cement and bags full of sand were laid beside
the road waiting for the men with their mixers
to turn the concrete into a rm road that would
accommodate the rapidly increasing number of
automobiles that were becoming popular.
In 1915, James Martin of San Francisco
solicited the cooperation of the San Mateo
Development Association to hold a successful
parade down El Camino Real on April 23. The
Grand Parlor of the Native Sons of the Golden
West annual convention in San Francisco want-
ed to sponsor this grand parade that would
include more than 1,000 Native Sons in 250
automobiles on a drive down the Peninsula that
would start at Mason Street. They toured
around the Presidio, to the Cliff House, Golden
Gate Park, and then the group headed south to
Uncle Toms Cabin in San Bruno for lunch.
After lunch, the group would tour to Crystal
Springs and various points in San Mateo
County.
Continued from page 3
HISTORY
years before the lm was shot, believers con-
tend there is plenty of proof the creatures are
real since there have been Bigfoot sightings
in practically every state in the country and
Canada, too.
Belmont resident Jerry Hein rst saw the
Gimlin-Patterson lm in 1971 and became
convinced the creature was real.
Forty years later, Hein and a group of local
theorists meet monthly to discuss the phe-
nomenon and have even gone out on search
expeditions together.
Together, the group makes up the Bay Area
Bigfoot Research Organization, which is
afliated with the Animal Planet television
series Finding Bigfoot.
Hein knows the cast of characters in the
television series and they are all serious about
nding Bigfoot.
The goal is to prove they are real without
killing or capturing them, Hein, 59, told the
Daily Journal.
And there are thousands of such creatures,
he said.
Although they are not known to inhabit
San Mateo County, Hein said there may have
been a sighting in La Honda once. They cer-
tainly have been sighted in the Santa Cruz
Mountains but most have been seen in
Northern California and the eastern parts of
Washington and Oregon, he said.
While the Gimlin-Patterson lm stoked
Heins curiosity into the creature, his person-
al visits with Gimlin, now 82, have convinced
him that the lm is not a hoax.
Film, ancient Native American cave paint-
ings of the creature and footprint castings
aside, Hein knows the creatures are real
because he has seen a Bigfoot rsthand.
I stood 20 feet from an 8-footer, he said.
It was a rainy night near the Willow Creek
Bigfoot Bookstore along the Klamath River
when Hein was headed toward Yreka and saw
two deer running frantically from the rivers
edge trying to obviously get away from
something, he said.
He was driving his Sasquatch Research
Team truck, equipped with spotlights and
camera when he turned his head and saw a
male Bigfoot standing next to a berry tree
with its head down.
Hein hurriedly ipped the truck around to
try and get a better look at it and to snap a
picture but it was gone.
He pulled out his measuring tape to see
how tall the berry tree was, however, and
determined the Bigfoot he saw was at least 8
feet tall.
Heins ultimate goal, although silly sound-
ing, is to get a picture of himself with a moth-
er, father and child Bigfoot all together.
He is not interested in turning the creatures
into a circus show for people to gawk at.
When he and other searchers go out on
expeditions, the group simply sets up camp
and waits for the creatures to come to them.
We dont go looking for them. We let
them come to us. They are interested in what
we do, Hein said.
The group even sings Bigfoot-themed
songs meant to attract the primitive humans.
Pleasanton resident Tom Yamarone is also
part of the Bay Area Bigfoot Research
Organization and has been interested in the
creature since the late 1990s.
Yamarone calls the search for Bigfoot
amateur CSI stuff.
When the group assembles locally, they
learn how to cast footprints and learn other
skills needed when they are out searching for
the creature.
Yamarone is hoping the local group grows
and that more people take interest in the crea-
ture. He even puts together a newsletter for
the group, which has about 15 committed
members.
In September, the group went camping in
the Stanislaus National Forest outside of
Long Barn to search for the creature. On the
ride up, along Highway 108, there is a store
in Strawberry with a large Bigfoot statue out
front, evidence you are approaching
Sasquatch territory.
But no Bigfoot was found on that trip.
Through the year, Yamarone said, most in
the group do their own research on the sub-
ject. The gatherings allow for members to
share their experiences related to the primi-
tive creature. This Sunday, the group will dis-
cuss the possibility that DNA evidence exists
after someone claimed to have shot a Bigfoot
dead and forwarded samples to a Texas vet-
erinarian named Melba Ketchum. Ketchum,
after a ve-year study, claimed recently that
she had more than 100 DNA samples she
believes comes from the elusive creature. She
gave an in-depth interview two weeks ago
with the Hufngton Post on her ndings but
the scientic community has yet to endorse
her ndings.
Nevertheless, Hein knows they are real
because he saw one with his own eyes.
The local Bay Area Bigfoot Research
Organization was started by Hein, Yamarone
and San Francisco resident Joyce Kearney,
who attends conferences all over the country
related to the Bigfoot experience.
The Bay Area Bigfoot Research
Organization meets once a month at Round
Table Pizza, 61 43rd Ave., San Mateo. For
more information call (650) 504-1782.
Continued from page 1
BIGFOOT
Jerry Crew with a cast of a footprint from a
creature in Northern California in 1957.
PHOTO COURTESY OF TOM YAMARONE
Local Bigfoot theorists practice making foot-
print casts in case they ever come close to
the elsusive creature.
Truckee man arrested after
shots red at home during ght
A Truckee man was arrested Sunday after allegedly ring
shots at a Menlo Park home, according to police.
The shots were red around 1:30 a.m. at a home on the 1300
block of Windermere Avenue, according to Menlo Park police.
After residents provided a description of the suspect, police
located him driving away from the scene, Sgt. Tim Brackett
said.
Geoffrey Smith, 24, was stopped and arrested on suspicion of
attempted murder after a handgun was found in his vehicle,
Brackett said.
The victims told police that Smith, a Truckee resident, is
known to them and that they had been having an argument
before he red shots at them.
No one was injured in the incident.
Anyone with information on this incident is asked to call
Menlo Park police at (650) 330-6300.
Local brief
MONDAY, DEC. 10
Lecture: HappyFeet-HealthyFeet.10
a.m. to 11 a.m. City of San Mateo Senior
Center,2645 Alameda de las Pulgas,San
Mateo. Free. Learn how to strengthen
your toes and prevent foot discomfort.
Ryan Keller, of LivHome, will discuss the
importance of foot health and exercise
which can lead to improved circulation
andexibility.For moreinformationand
to register call 522-7490.
BurlingameMusicClubFreeMusical
Program. 1 p.m. Burlingame Womans
Club, 241 Park Road, Burlingame. Come
enjoy a performance from young
classical musicians.For moreinformation
visit burlingamemusicclub.net.
Piano and Harmony Department
Concert. 7 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. CSM Music
Building 02, Room 110, Choral Room,
1700 W. Hillsdale Blvd., San Mateo. A
musical evening lled with piano
performances that include classical and
other styles, as well as eclectic and
entertaining mix of original
compositions. All music is performed
and/or composed by students from
CSMs piano, harmony and music
students. Open to public. Donations
welcome. Free. For more information
email jacksonj@smccd.edu.
TUESDAY, DEC. 11
WorkingDifferently:Beyondthe9to
5.10 a.m.to noon.Redwood City Public
Library,1044MiddleeldRoad,Redwood
City. Free. For more information visit
phase2careers.org.
Natural Solutions to
Headaches/Natural Approaches to
Prevent and Treat Low Back Pain.
10:15 a.m. to 11:15 a.m. Burlingame
RecreationCenter,850BurlingameAve.,
Burlingame.KatieEisman,gerontologist
and MA,will give a lecture as part of the
Free Health and Wellness Lecture Series
for Active Adults and Seniors. For ages
55 and older.Free.For more information
call 558-7300.
Author Marty Brounstein Book
SigningEvents. Noon.Foster City Parks
and Recreation Department, 650 Shell
Blvd., Foster City. Brounstein will sign
copies of his book, Two Among the
Righteous Few: A Story of Courage in
the Holocaust. Free. For more
information call 888-361-9473.
Kids ClubHolidayPajamaParty.5:30
p.m. Serramonte Shopping Center,
Harvest Food Court, Serramonte and
Gellert Boulevard,off Highway280,Daly
City. Free. For more information go to
serramontecenter.com.
Eleventh Annual Burlingame
Chanukah Celebration. 6 p.m. Park
Road, 240 Park Road, Burlingame.There
will be a re juggler, latkes, music, and a
menorah lighting. Free admission. For
more information email
info@chabadnp.com.
DocumentaryFilmScreenings: Shorts
byFirst Year MFAStudents. 7:30 p.m.
Annenberg Auditorium, Stanford
University,450 Serra Mall,Stanford.Free.
For more information call 723-3404 or
go to art.stanford.edu.
Sixth Annual presentation of the
Beautiful Belmont Awards Program.
7:30 p.m.City Council Chambers,1 Twin
Pines Lane, Belmont. This recognition
program is designed to acknowledge
individuals,businesses,and community
groups who have enhanced the City's
community by making signicant
exterior improvementstotheir Belmont
properties.Opentothepublic.For more
information call 595-7433.
A Chanticleer Christmas. 8 p.m.
Stanford Memorial Church, 450 Serra
Mall, Stanford. Prices start at $10. For
moreinformationcall 723-3811or goto
arts.stanford.edu.
WEDNESDAY, DEC. 12
CommunityHealthScreening. 9 a.m.
to 11 a.m.,Senior Focus,1720 El Camino
Real, Suite 10, Burlingame (across from
Mills-Peninsula). Complete cholesterol
prole, blood glucose, nurse
consultation. Fast 12 hours for blood
cholesterol screening (water and meds
onlybut delaydiabetesmedicationuntil
after screening). Take blood pressure
medication, if prescribed. $25 age 62+.
$30 age under 62.Pre-register.For more
information call 696-3660.
Author Marty Brounstein Book
SigningEvents. Noon.Foster City Parks
and Recreation Department, 650 Shell
Blvd., Foster City. Brounstein will be
availabletosigncopiesof hisbook,Two
Among the Righteous Few: A Story of
CourageintheHolocaust.Free.For more
information call 888-361-9473.
Deadline for San Mateo County
Newcomers Club Payments. In order
to attend the event on Tuesday,Dec.18,
noon, checks must be sent in today in
order to attend. Crystal Springs Golf
Course, 6650 Golf Course Drive,
Burlingame. Checks must be $25 per
person. For more information call 286-
0688.
Peninsula Community Connections:
LGBTGroup. Noon to 1 p.m. Peninsula
Family Service, 24 Second Ave. San
Mateo.Supportive discussion group for
LGBT adults over 55 in the San Mateo
County. Meetings are held the second
Wednesday of every month. Free. For
more information call 403-4300, ext.
4325.
Sock It toMe Storytime and Craft. 4
p.m.SanMateoPublicLibrary,55W.Third
Ave., San Mateo. Join us for sock stories
and a sock puppet craft. Wear your
favorite fun socks and bring a new pair
to donate to Samaritan House.For ages
4 to 8. Free. For more information call
522-7838.
Leonardo Art/Science Evening
Rendezvous (LASERseries). 6:45 p.m.
Room 305, Building 200, Stanford
University,450 Serra Mall,Stanford.Free.
For more information call 725-2650 or
go to stanford.edu.
MillbraeLibraryHolidayFamilySing-
A-LongwithFolkSingerJimStevens.
7 p.m. Millbrae Library, 1 Library Ave.,
Millbrae.There will be refreshments and
the event is for all ages. Free. For more
information call 697-7607.
Holiday Songs and Stories. 7 p.m.
Belmont Library, 1110 Alameda de las
Pulgas, Belmont. Free. For more
information go to smcl.org.
MillbraeLibraryHolidayFamilySing-
a-Long.7 p.m.Millbrae Library,1 Library
Ave.,MillbraeLibrary.JimStevens,singer,
will host.Therewill berefreshments.Free.
For more information call 697-7607 or
go to plsinfo.org.
Tip of the Top perform the blues. 7
p.m.to11p.m.ClubFox,2209Broadway,
Redwood City. Doors open at 6:30 p.m.
$5 cover. For more information go to
www.clubfoxrwc.com.
Soloists of New Century Chamber
Orchestra. 8 p.m to 10 p.m. Center for
Performing Arts, Menlo-Atherton High
School,555 Middleeld Road,Atherton.
Ticketsrangefrom$29-$59.Topurchase
go to www.cityboxofce.com.For more
information go to www.ncco.org.
THURSDAY, DEC. 13
Open House. 7 p.m. Summit, 890
Broadway, Redwood City. Summit
Preparatory Charter High School and
Everest Public High School,both public,
tuition-free, charter high schools in
Redwood City, would like to invite
parents and students to learn more
about their schools and the admission
process. For more information visit
www.summitprep.net or everestphs.org.
Holiday Square Dance Exhibition. 7
p.m. San Carlos Library, 610 Elm St., San
Carlos. Free. For more information call
591-0341.
NDNU presents AChristmas Carol:
The Musical Gala Performance. 7:30
p.m. NDNU Theater, 1500 Ralston Ave.,
Belmont. Reception to follow show.
Those who plan on attending are
encouraged to bring a non-perishable
fooditemor newtoytobedistributedto
members of the Peninsula community.
Free. For more information go to
christmascarolthegift.org
Philharmonia Baroque Orchestra
presents ABach Christmas. 8 p.m. to
10 p.m.The Center for Performing Arts,
Menlo-Atherton High School, 555
Middleeld Road,Atherton.Tickets start
at $25. For more information and for
tickets call (415) 392-4400 or go to
http://www.philharmonia.org/dec2012.
FRIDAY, DEC. 14
Anne Lamott Speaker. 6:30 p.m.
Congregational Church of San Mateo,
225 Tilton Avenue,San Mateo.New York
Times bestselling author, Anne Lamott,
will be talking about her new book,
signing books, and receiving the
Visionary Voices Award.$25.Register for
event at ccsm-ucc.eventbrite.com. For
more information call 343-3694.
RoyCloudSchoolPresents:Gilbertand
SullivansThePiratesofPenzance.7:30
p.m. McKinley School Auditorium, 400
Duane Street, Redwood City. $15 for
reserved individual seating. $10 for
general admission. $30 for a family four
pack.Formoreinformationandfortickets
go to
www.roycloudpiratesofpenzance.eventb
rite.com.
NDNU presents AChristmas Carol:
The Musical Gala Performance. 7:30
p.m. NDNU Theater, 1500 Ralston Ave.,
Belmont. Reception to follow show.
Those who plan on attending are
encouraged to bring a non-perishable
fooditemor newtoytobedistributedto
members of the Peninsula community.
Free. For more information go to
christmascarolthegift.org
St.CatherineofSienaSchoolsDrama
ClubpresentsAChristmasStory.7:30
p.m. St. Catherine Auditorium, 1300
Bayswater Ave., Burlingame. $25 for VIP
seating, $10 for general admission and
$8 for students/children. For more
information and for tickets go to
www.stcos.com.
Annual MessiahSingandPlayAlong.
8 p.m. Stanford Memorial Church, 450
Serra Mall, Stanford. Prices range from
free to $10. For more information call
723-3811 or go to arts.stanford.edu.
SATURDAY, DEC. 15
SanMateoFireFighters Association
Toysfor Tots Program. 9 a.m. to noon.
Fire Station 23, 31 27th Ave., San Mateo.
San Mateo reghters and friends will
wrappresentsthat will begivenbyaSan
Mateo reghter Santa to school
childrenatTurnbull School inSanMateo.
Free. For more information go to
toysfortots.org or smffa.net.
LOCAL 20
Monday Dec. 10, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
For more events visit
smdailyjournal.com, click Calendar.
Calendar
overview of the project and specics on
parking, noise, toxins and SamTrans role.
At 7 p.m., the council will hold its regular
meeting and tackle other agenda items
like possible garbage rate increases before
returning to the Transit Village for public
speakers and discussion.
The council must also decide if it will
impose a list of 13 improvement measures
recommended by the Planning
Commission to further mitigate potential
problems like noise and lighting. The
council could accept all, none or impose
its own.
As currently proposed by Foster City-
based developer Legacy Partners, the
Transit Village plan would convert a
10.53-acre strip of land within the existing
Caltrain station and running parallel to the
railroad corridor. Legacys proposal envi-
sions eight four-story buildings with 281
housing units among a mix of 407,298
square feet of residential, 23,797 square
feet of ofces and 14,326 square feet of
retail space. The project would also
include 667 parking spaces and a new
SamTrans Transit Center on 4.29 acres.
The plan has drawn ire from residents
of the Greater East San Carlos neighbor-
hood, several who crowded the Planning
Commission meetings in red shirts to
argue the environmental impact report
was incomplete or contained wrong infor-
mation. The Planning Commission ulti-
mately voted unanimously in favor of rec-
ommending the EIR to the council after
clarifying members felt the consultants
conclusions on impacts like noise were
wrong.
The proposed improvement measures
include requests that the developer pre-
pare a landscape design plan for the
vacant railroad corridor property, con-
tribute funding toward a residential park-
ing permit program and more thoroughly
study noise before and after construction.
City staff concluded earlier that the pro-
jects potential to reect train noise cant
be considered a signicant impact
because the noise already exists and is
caused by transportation rather than the
buildings themselves.
A lingering worry for neighbors is high-
speed rail possible leading to eminent
domain of Old County Road and their
property to accommodate extra rails.
SamTrans, the agency that owns the land
proposed for development into the Transit
Village, has said that is unlikely and that
any work, from high-speed rail to Caltrain
electrication, should be possible within
the current connes.
The San Carlos City Council meets 5
p.m. and 7 p.m. Monday, Dec. 10 at City
Hall, 600 Elm St., San Carlos.
Continued from page 1
VILLAGE
the school project deadline looming,
everything needed to be completed by
August.
At the onset, we wanted to take a
known therapy and embed it in a video
game, said Daniels.
Arbor Bay, in San Carlos, was one of
the two local schools at which the game
was piloted. About a half dozen of the
students helped give feedback as the
women made changes to their games,
said Director Susan Rose. Childrens
feedback was used to change the audio
and visual effects within the game. Also,
the kids really wanted a space aspect so
were happy to see the nal product
which included such a fantasy world.
It was delightful to watch the kids, to
watch the kids as they got it, as the
magic occurred, she said.
Since its release, the app has been
downloaded in multiple countries and
they can gauge how often its used once
purchased. About 20 percent of people
are using it daily and 50 percent use it
during a week, Williamson said.
Now they are focused on leveraging
their idea into a company, which will
require partnerships and possibly angel
investors for which they are looking.
Also, next month, there will be a small
study about the behavior outcomes of
children using the game, said
Williamson.
Go Go Games is available for pur-
chase for $1.99 through iTunes. To learn
more about the company visit go-go-
games.com.
Continued from page 1
GAME
tion, however, a person can riff forever.
Bradley may also have another trait similar
to the well-known Bay Area-comic
telling the truth. Bradley, a 57-year-old
San Mateo native, doesnt sugar coat
things when talking to students.
He openly shares his struggles with
addiction, challenges he faced when his
heart was failing, and even the changes in
his approach to ministry in recent years.
An honest approach to such topics isnt
necessarily what one might associate with
the church. But being honest with himself
is how Bradley was able to deal with and
overcome lifes struggles, which he chron-
icles in a recently released book entitled
The Four Gifts.
Prior to becoming an author who
enjoyed working with local youth, Bradley
was a student at Serra himself. A 1973
alum, Bradley considered joining the sem-
inary but, at the encouragement of his fam-
ily, tried out a few other life options rst.
He went to the College of San Mateo after
graduate then worked for a number of
years with a San Francisco-based airline
loading bags. Anyone who lost luggage
during that time could probably blame
Bradley, he said.
At 22, Bradleys life changed when his
father died of heart disease.
My response to loss and the hurt that
goes with it was to ee, Bradley said.
A mix of alcohol and cocaine took over.
Bradley recalled stealing items, like alco-
hol from planes, to help feed the habit.
Its no secret. When you go down that
path, you pay the price, he said.
Bradleys price came at the cost of a
friends life. He was one of four guys who
spent a day at pubs then got high before
everyone drove away. Bradley went to
work. While at work, Bradley learned that
his friend was killed in a car accident on El
Camino Real. It was a jolt that eventually
got Bradley onto a different path in life.
Bradley was ordained in 1991. Hes had
a couple of assignments in San Francisco
but has spent most of his 21 years in min-
istry on the Peninsula. One blessing for
Bradley, through his work with the church,
has been being reunited with teachers and
sisters who had helped shape him.
Despite the new path, and awareness for
a family history with heart problems,
Bradley didnt make his own health a pri-
ority. Instead, Bradley waited until he col-
lapsed in 2004 to really take the situation
seriously. And the situation was serious
Bradley needed a heart transplant. It was a
struggle for him.
For me to live means someone else has
to die. You cant pray for someone to die,
he said.
It was, of course, a life-changing situa-
tion. Bradley was a priest who always had
an answer. When he would go to meet with
others, he had a game plan when walking
in and was normally nished in about an
hour. Dealing with illness personally made
Bradley realize there isnt always an
answer. It changed his approach to min-
istry. Now he listens more and for longer.
Bradley lived on the 10th oor of the
UCSF hospital for the better part of a year.
It was just after his 50th birthday that
Bradley got his transplant.
Now Bradley often will visit the same
level and chat with patients who are wait-
ing. It was during one of these visits that
Bradley passed room 1024, where he had
spent his time waiting. He asked the man
how he was doing, which wasnt very
good.
I said, I know what youre going
through, Bradley recalled, which the
man didnt believe. Until Bradley
explained that he too had spent time wait-
ing for a heart in this very room.
These experiences have been gifts to
Bradley who experiences a depth of grati-
tude daily.
The Four Gifts is published through
Behler Publications and retails for $14.95.
Continued from page 1
BRADLEY
MONDAY, DECEMBER 10, 2012
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -- You could be far
more fortunate than usual in things of a fnancial
nature. Chance could play an important role in
putting you in the right spot at the right time.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -- There is nothing
wishy-washy about you. Youll have no trouble
backing up your words with action whenever a
situation calls for it.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -- More than one goal
you set will be achievable. On top of that, the zest
and relish with which you pursue your objectives will
bring you a great deal of enjoyment and satisfaction.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) -- With your current gift
of gab, which is both logical and imaginative, youll
be extremely compelling when persuading others to
go along with your ideas or methods. Dont let your
followers down.
ARIES (March 21-April 19) -- Even though you might
end up spending more time working on someone
elses endeavor than you will your own, you
nonetheless stand to gain much.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20) -- A competitive
endeavor involving a team effort will arouse your
will to win. You could end up being the crucial
component that leads to victory.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20) -- You should be able
to fnd a second, ultimately lucrative, source of
earnings if you put your mind to doing so. Start
looking now.
CANCER (June 21-July 22) -- If you focus your
efforts and energies on a defnite goal, be it social or
commercial, the results should be most gratifying.
Your example will inspire imitators.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) -- Concerns for the needs
of loved ones will motivate you to be much more
enterprising than usual. Youll want to be able to give
them what they arent able to acquire on their own.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -- Its one of those days
when you might need a variety of activities to satisfy
your restless spirit. Fortunately, regardless of how
much you take on, youll do it all well.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -- Involvements that have
the potential for turning a proft should be acted
upon as promptly as possible. You arent likely to
make much money hemming and hawing.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -- Whether or not you
achieve success will be predicated upon your ability
to stay focused on your objective. Once you have a
clear target, keep your mind focused on only it.
COPYRIGHT 2012 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
COMICS/GAMES
12-10-12
wEEkENDS PUZZLE SOLVED
PREVIOUS
SUDOkU
ANSwERS
Want More Fun
and Games?
Jumble Page 2 La Times Crossword Puzzle Classifeds
Tundra & Over the Hedge Comics Classifeds
kids Across/Parents Down Puzzle Family Resource Guide


Each row and each column must contain the
numbers 1 through 6 without repeating.

The numbers within the heavily outlined boxes,
called cages, must combine using the given operation
(in any order) to produce the target numbers in the
top-left corners.

Freebies: Fill in single-box cages with the number in
the top-left corner.
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ACROSS
1 Sundial numeral
4 Agreement
8 Archaic
11 Geological periods
13 Heron kin
14 Iron Man Gehrig
15 Night, to Yves
16 Mexican cruise port
18 Toward the rudder
20 Grandstand yells
21 Egg -- yung
22 Family member
24 Like summer clouds
27 Brewers buys
30 Feng --
31 Transvaal settler
32 Weed
34 Male turkey
35 -- -- for ones money
36 Replenish
37 Went toward
39 Ocean fiers
40 This -- -- stickup!
41 Youth org.
42 Whey opposite
45 Live in
49 Flowering shrub
53 Muscle pain
54 -- -- shoestring
55 Lapdog
56 Gill opening
57 Schoolboy
58 Bulrush
59 Frazier foe
DOwN
1 TV warrior princess
2 Promises to pay
3 No future -- --
4 Stevie Wonders
instrument
5 Kindergarten trio
6 Government org.
7 Kitchen meas.
8 Clay pot
9 Nessies hideout
10 Couples
12 Martina rival
17 Coffee dispensers
19 Orbison or Acuff
22 Glimpsed
23 Trireme mover
24 L.A. hrs.
25 Yikes! (hyph.)
26 Seethe
27 -- be surprised!
28 Skinny
29 Flatfsh
31 La -- Tar Pits
33 Raised railways
35 Pitches
36 Melee
38 Verdi heroine
39 PC key
41 At loose ends
42 Nippy
43 Longest arm bone
44 Peruse
46 Bruins
47 Comedian -- Silvers
48 Sasquatch cousin
50 Morning Edition
broadcaster
51 Joey or Kiki
52 Barely make do
DILBERT CROSSwORD PUZZLE
fUTURE SHOCk
PEARLS BEfORE SwINE
GET fUZZY
Monday Dec. 10, 2012 21
THE DAILY JOURNAL
22
Monday Dec. 10, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
DELIVERY DRIVER
ALL ROUTES
Wanted: Independent Contractor to provide deliv-
ery of the Daily Journal six days per week, Mon-
day thru Saturday, early morning. Experience
with newspaper delivery required.
Must have valid license and appropriate insurance
coverage to provide this service in order to be eli-
gible. Papers are available for pickup in San Ma-
teo at 3:00 a.m. or San Francisco earlier.
Please apply in person Monday-Friday only, 10am
to 4pm at The Daily Journal, 800 S. Claremont St
#210, San Mateo.
GOT JOBS?
The best career seekers
read the Daily Journal.
We will help you recruit qualified, talented
individuals to join your company or organization.
The Daily Journals readership covers a wide
range of qualifications for all types of positions.
For the best value and the best results,
recruit from the Daily Journal...
Contact us for a free consultation
Call (650) 344-5200 or
Email: ads@smdailyjournal.com
104 Training
TERMS & CONDITIONS
The San Mateo Daily Journal Classi-
fieds will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion, and its lia-
bility shall be limited to the price of one
insertion. No allowance will be made for
errors not materially affecting the value
of the ad. All error claims must be sub-
mitted within 30 days. For full advertis-
ing conditions, please ask for a Rate
Card.
110 Employment
HOME CARE AIDES
Multiple shifts to meet your needs. Great
pay & benefits, Sign-on bonus, 1yr exp
required.
Matched Caregivers (650)839-2273,
(408)280-7039 or (888)340-2273
RESTAURANT -
Cooks, Cashiers, Avanti Pizza. Menlo
Park. (650)854-1222.
TAXI DRIVER wanted. Pay cash every-
day. (650)766-9878
110 Employment
NEWSPAPER INTERNS
JOURNALISM
The Daily Journal is looking for in-
terns to do entry level reporting, re-
search, updates of our ongoing fea-
tures and interviews. Photo interns al-
so welcome.
We expect a commitment of four to
eight hours a week for at least four
months. The internship is unpaid, but
intelligent, aggressive and talented in-
terns have progressed in time into
paid correspondents and full-time re-
porters.
College students or recent graduates
are encouraged to apply. Newspaper
experience is preferred but not neces-
sarily required.
Please send a cover letter describing
your interest in newspapers, a resume
and three recent clips. Before you ap-
ply, you should familiarize yourself
with our publication. Our Web site:
www.smdailyjournal.com.
Send your information via e-mail to
news@smdailyjournal.com or by reg-
ular mail to 800 S. Claremont St #210,
San Mateo CA 94402.
SALES/MARKETING
INTERNSHIPS
The San Mateo Daily Journal is looking
for ambitious interns who are eager to
jump into the business arena with both
feet and hands. Learn the ins and outs
of the newspaper and media industries.
This position will provide valuable
experience for your bright future.
Email resume
info@smdailyjournal.com
120 Child Care Services
AGAPE VILLAGES
Foster Family Agency
Become a Foster Parent!
We Need Loving Homes for
Disadvantaged Children
Entrusted to Our Care.
Monthly Compensation Provided.
Call 1-800-566-2225
Lic #397001741
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #253524
The following person is doing business
as: Aeromedical Transport, 3603 Cole-
grove St. Apt 1, SAN MATEO, CA 94403
is hereby registered by the following
owner: Manuel M. Dayag, same address.
The business is conducted by an Individ-
ual. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on .
/s/ Manuel M. Dayag /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 12/07/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
12/10/12, 12/17/12, 12/24/12, 12/31/12).
210 Lost & Found
FOUND- LITTLE tan male chihuahua,
Found on Davit Street in Redwood
Shores Tuesday, August 28th. Please
call (650)533-9942
LOST - Small Love Bird, birght green
with orange breast. Adeline Dr. & Bernal
Ave., Burlingame. Escaped Labor Day
weekend. REWARD! (650)343-6922
LOST CHIHUAHUA/TERRIER mix in
SSF, tan color, 12 lbs., scar on stomach
from being spade, $300. REWARD!
(650)303-2550
LOST: SMALL diamond cross, silver
necklace with VERY sentimental
meaning. Lost in San Mateo 2/6/12
(650)578-0323.
RING FOUND Tue. Oct 23 2012 in Mill-
brae call (650)464-9359
294 Baby Stuff
BABY CAR SEAT AND CARRIER $20
(650)458-8280
NURSERY SET - 6 piece nursery set -
$25., (650)341-1861
295 Art
WALL ART, from Pier 1, indoor/outdoor,
$15. Very nice! (650)290-1960
296 Appliances
COIN-OP GAS DRYER - $100.,
(650)948-4895
HAIR DRYER, Salon Master, $10.
(650)854-4109
HUNTER OSCILLATING FAN, excellent
condition. 3 speed. $35. (650)854-4109
WATER HEATER $75, (650)333-4400
296 Appliances
MIROMATIC PRESSURE cooker flash
canner 4qt. $25. 415 333-8540
RADIATOR HEATER, oil filled, electric,
1500 watts $25. (650)504-3621
REFRIGERATOR - Whirlpool, side-by-
side, free, needs compressor, (650)726-
1641
ROTISSERIE GE, US Made, IN-door or
out door, Holds large turkey 24 wide,
Like new, $80, OBO (650)344-8549
SHOP VACUUM rigid brand 3.5 horse
power 9 gal wet/dry $40. (650)591-2393
SLICING MACHINE Stainless steel,
electric, almost new, excellent condition,
$50 (650)341-1628
SMALL SLOW cooker. Used once, $12
(650)368-3037
SUNBEAM TOASTER -Automatic, ex-
cellent condition, $30., (415)346-6038
TABLE TOP refrigerator 1.8 cubic feet
brown in color, $45, call (650)591-3313
VACUUM CLEANER excellent condition
$45. (650)878-9542
297 Bicycles
BIKE RACK Roof mounted, holds up to
4 bikes, $65 (650)594-1494
298 Collectibles
15 HARDCOVERS WWII - new condi-
tion, $80.obo, (650)345-5502
1937 LOS ANGELES SID GRAUMANS
Chinese Theatre, August program, fea-
turing Gloria Stuart, George Sanders,
Paul Muni, Louise Rainer, $20. (650)341-
8342
1940 VINTAGE telephone guaranty
bench Salem hardrock maple excellent
condition $75 (650)755-9833
1969 LIFE MAGAZINE Off to the
Moon, featuring Armstrong, Aldrin, and
Collins, article by Charles Lindburgh,
$25., San Mateo, (650)341-8342
1982 PRINT 'A Tune Off The Top Of My
Head' 82/125 $80 (650) 204-0587
2 FIGURINES - 1 dancing couple, 1
clown face. both $15. (650)364-0902
62 USED European Postage Stamps.
Many issued in the early 1900s. All dif-
ferent and detached from envelopes.
$5.00 SOLD!
67 OLD Used U.S. Postage Stamps.
Many issued before World War II. All
different. $4.00, (650)787-8600
298 Collectibles
ANTIQUE ALCOHOL ADVERTISING
STATUE - black & white whiskey, $75.
OBO, SOLD!
ARMY SHIRT, long sleeves, with pock-
ets. XL $15 each (408)249-3858
BAY MEADOWS bag - $30.each,
(650)345-1111
BEAUTIFUL RUSTIE doll Winter Bliss w/
stole & muffs, 23, $90. OBO, (650)754-
3597
CASINO CHIP Collection Original Chips
from various casinos $99 obo
(650)315-3240
COLOR PHOTO WW 2 curtis P-40 air-
craft framed 24" by 20" excellent condi-
tion $70 OBO (650)345-5502
COLORIZED TERRITORIAL Quarters
uncirculated with Holder $15/all,
(408)249-3858
HARD ROCK Cafe collectable guitar pin
collection $50 all (650)589-8348
JOE MONTANA signed authentic retire-
ment book, $39., (650)692-3260
MARK MCGUIRE hats, cards, beanie
babies, all for $98., (650)520-8558
MICHAEL JORDAN POSTER - 1994,
World Cup, $10., (650)365-3987
NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE unop-
ened 20 boxes of famous hockey stars in
action, sealed boxes, $5.00 per box,
great gift, (650)578-9208
ORIGINAL SMURF FIGURES - 1979-
1981, 18+ mushroom hut, 1 1/2 x 3 1/2,
all $40., (650)518-0813
POSTER - New Kids On The Block
1980s, $12., call Maria, (650)873-8167
SPORTS CARDS - 3200 lots of stars
and rookies, $40. all, (650)365-3987
SYRACUSE UNIVERSITY Alums! Want
a "Bill Orange" SU flag for Game Day
displays? $3., 650-375-8044
VINTAGE 1970S Grecian Made Size 6-7
Dresses $35 each, Royal Pink 1980s
Ruffled Dress size 7ish $30, 1880s Re-
production White Lace Gown $150 Size
6-7 Petite, (650)873-8167
VINTAGE HOLLIE HOBBIE LUNCH-
BOX with Thermos, 1980s, $25., Call
Maria 650-873-8167
VINTAGE TEEN BEAT MAGAZINES
(20) 1980s $2 each, Call Maria 650-873-
8167
299 Computers
HP PRINTER Deskjet 970c color printer.
Excellent condition. Software & accesso-
ries included. $30. 650-574-3865
300 Toys
FISHER PRICE Musical Chair. 3 activi-
ties learning sound, attached side table,
and lights up, $25., (650)349-6059
302 Antiques
1912 COFFEE Percolator Urn. perfect
condition includes electric cord $85.
(415)565-6719
1920 MAYTAG wringer washer - electric,
gray color, $100., (650)851-0878
ANTIQUE BEVEL MIRROR - framed,
14 x 21, carved top, $45.,
(650)341-7890
ANTIQUE ITALIAN lamp 18 high, $70
(650)387-4002
ANTIQUE WASHING machine, some
rust on legs, rust free drum and ringer.
$45/obo, (650)574-4439
BREADBOX, METAL with shelf and cut-
ting board, $30 (650)365-3987
FISHING POLES (4)- Antiques, $80.
obo, (650)589-8348
J&J HOPKINSON 1890-1900's walnut
piano with daffodil inlay on the front. Ivo-
ries in great condition. Can be played as
is, but will benefit from a good tuning.
$600.00 includes stool. Email
frisz@comcast.net for photos
SANDWICH GRILL vintage Westing
house excellent condition, $30,
(650)365-3987
303 Electronics
3 SHELF SPEAKERS - 8 OM, $15.
each, (650)364-0902
46 MITSUBISHI Projector TV, great
condition. $400. (650)261-1541.
BIG SONY TV 37" - Excellent Condition
Worth $2300 will Sacrifice for only $95.,
(650)878-9542
FLIP CAMCORDER $50. (650)583-2767
HOME THEATRE SYSTEM - 3 speak-
ers, woofer, DVD player, USB connec-
tion, $80., (714)818-8782
LEFT-HAND ERGONOMIC keyboard
with 'A-shape' key layout Num pad, $20
(650)204-0587
LSI SCSI Ultra320 Controller + (2) 10k
RPM 36GB SCSI II hard drives $40
(650)204-0587
MOTOROLA DROID X2 8gb memory
clean verizon wireless ready for activa-
tion, good condition comes with charger
screen protector, $100 (213)219-8713
PR SONY SHELF SPEAKERS - 7 x 7
x 9, New, never used, $25. pair,
(650)375-8044
SONY HDTV hdmi monitor 23"
flatscreen model # klv-s23a10 loud built
in speakers $100 call (213)219-8713
304 Furniture
1940S MAPLE dressing table with Mir-
ror & Stool. Needs loving and refinishing
to be beautiful again. Best Offer.
Burlingame (650)697-1160
2 END Tables solid maple '60's era
$40/both. (650)670-7545
2 SOLID wood Antique mirrors 511/2" tall
by 221/2" wide $50 for both
(650)561-3149
3 DRESSERS, BEDROOM SET- excel-
lent condition, $95 (650)589-8348
AFGAN PRAYER rug beautiful original
very ornate $100 (650)348-6428
ALASKAN SEEN painting 40" high 53"
wide includes matching frame $99 firm
(650)592-2648
ARMOIRE CABINET - $90., Call
(415)375-1617
BASE CABINET TV - double doors,
34W, 22D, 16H, modern, glass, $25.,
(650)574-2533
BASE CABINET, TV, mahogany,
double doors; 24"D, 24"H x 36"W, on
wheels. $55 Call (650)342-7933
CHAIR MODERN light wood made in Ita-
ly $99 (415)334-1980
COCKTAIL BAR, Mint condition, black
leather, 2 shelves, 52" long /40"wide
/18"wide, rollers, $99.00 (650)578-9208
COMPUTER DESK from Ikea, $40
(650)348-5169
COUCH-FREE. OLD world pattern, soft
fabric. Some cat scratch damage-not too
noticeable. 650-303-6002
DINETTE TABLE walnut with chrome
legs. 36x58 with one leaf 11 1/2. $50,
San Mateo (650)341-5347
DINING ROOM SET - table, four chairs,
lighted hutch, $500. all, (650)296-3189
DISPLAY CABINET - mint condition,
brown, 47 in. long/15 in wide/ great for
storage, display, knickknacks, TV, $20.,
(650)578-9208
23 Monday Dec. 10, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Tundra Tundra Tundra
Over the Hedge Over the Hedge Over the Hedge
LEGAL NOTICES
Fictitious Business Name Statements, Trustee
Sale Notice, Alcohol Beverage License, Name
Change, Probate, Notice of Adoption, Divorce
Summons, Notice of Public Sales, and More.
Published in the Daily Journal for San Mateo County.
Fax your request to: 650-344-5290
Email them to: ads@smdailyjournal.com
304 Furniture
DISPLAY CASE wood & glass 31 x 19
inches $30. SOLD!
DRESSER SET - 3 pieces, wood, $50.,
(650)589-8348
DRUM TABLE - brown, perfect condi-
tion, nice design, with storage, $45.,
(650)345-1111
END TABLES (2) - One for $5. hand
carved, other table is antique white mar-
ble top with drawer $40., (650)308-6381
END TABLES (2)- Cherry finish, still in
box, need to assemble, 26L x 21W x
21H, $100. for both, (650)592-2648
FOLDING PICNIC table - 8 x 30, 7 fold-
ing, padded chairs, $80. (650)364-0902
FUTON BED, full size, oak. Excellent
condition. No Mattress, $50,
(650)348-5169
FUTON DELUXE plus other items all for
$90 650 341-2397 (U haul away)
GRANDMA ROCKING chair beautiful
white with gold trim $100 (650)755-9833
HAND MADE portable jewelry display
case wood and see through lid $45. 25 x
20 x 4 inches. (650)592-2648.
LOUNGE CHAIRS - 2 new, with cover &
plastic carring case & headrest, $35.
each, (650)592-7483
MODULAR DESK/BOOKCASE/STOR-
AGE unit - Cherry veneer, white lami-
nate, $75., (650)888-0039
OAK ROUND CLAW FOOTED TABLE
Six Matching Oak chairs and Leaf. $350,
Cash Only, (650)851-1045
OFFICE LAMP, small. Black & white with
pen holder and paper holder. Brand new,
in the box. $10 (650)867-2720
PAPASAN CHAIRS (2) -with cushions
$45. each set, (650)347-8061
PEDESTAL DINETTE 36 Square Table
- $65., (650)347-8061
RATTAN PAPASAN Chair with Brown
cushion excellent shape $45
(650)592-2648
RECLINER CHAIR very comfortable vi-
nyl medium brown $70, (650)368-3037
ROCKING CHAIR - Beautiful light wood
rocking chair, very good condition, $65.,
OBO, (650)952-3063
ROCKING CHAIR - excellent condition,
oak, with pads, $85.obo, (650)369-9762
ROCKING CHAIR - Traditional, full size
Rocking chair. Excellent condition $100.,
(650)504-3621
SMALL STORAGE/ HUTCH - Stained
green, pretty. $40, (650)290-1960
STEREO CABINET walnut w/3 black
shelves 16x 22x42. $30, 650-341-5347
STORAGE TABLE light brown lots of
storage good cond. $45. (650)867-2720
TEA CHEST , Bombay, burgundy, glass
top, perfect cond. $35 (650)345-1111
TRUNDLE BED - Single with wheels,
$40., (650)347-8061
VANITY ETHAN Allen maple w/drawer
and liftup mirror like new $95
(650)349-2195
304 Furniture
VINTAGE UPHOLSTERED wooden
chairs, $25 each or both for $40. nice
set. (650)583-8069
VINTAGE WINGBACK CHAIR $75,
(650)583-8069
306 Housewares
"PRINCESS HOUSE decorator urn
"Vase" cream with blue flower 13 inch H
$25., (650)868-0436
28" by 15" by 1/4" thick glass shelves,
cost $35 each sell at $15 ea. Five availa-
ble, Call (650)345-5502
6 BOXES of Victorian lights ceiling & wall
$90., (650)340-9644
8 PLACE setting 40 piece Stoneware
Heartland pattern never used microwave
and oven proof $50 (650)755-9833
BATTERY CHARGER, holds 4 AA/AAA,
Panasonic, $5, (650)595-3933
BEDSPREAD - queen size maroon &
pink bedspread - Fairly new, $50. obo,
(650)834-2583
CANDLEHOLDER - Gold, angel on it,
tall, purchased from Brueners, originally
$100., selling for $30.,(650)867-2720
CHRISTMAS CRYSTAL PLATTER - un-
opened. Christmas tree shape with or-
naments, Italian, in original box, clear
color, $12., (650)578-9208
DINING ROOM Victorian Chandelier
seven light, $90., (650)340-9644
DRIVE MEDICAL design locking elevat-
ed toilet seat. New. $45. (650)343-4461
FEATHER/DOWN PILLOW: Standard
size, Fully stuffed; new, allergy-free tick-
ing, Mint condition, $25., (650)375-8044
GEVALIA COFFEEMAKER -10-cup,
many features, Exel, $9., (650)595-3933
KLASSY CHROME KITCHEN CANIS-
TERS: Set of four. (2--4"x 4"w x 4"h);
(2--4"x 4" x 9"h.). Stackable, sharp.
$20.00 (650)375-8044
PERSIAN TEA set for 8. Including
spoon, candy dish, and tray. Gold Plated.
$100. (650) 867-2720
PUSH LAWN mower $25 (650)580-3316
SOLID TEAK floor model 16 wine rack
with turntable $60. (650)592-7483
TOWLE SALAD BOWL/SPOONS - mint
condition, 12-inch round, 2 spoons,
mother of pearl , elegant, durable. $25.,
(650)578-9208
306 Housewares
VINTAGE LAZY susan collectable excel-
lent condition $25 (650)755-9833
307 Jewelry & Clothing
BRACELET - Ladies authentic Murano
glass from Italy, vibrant colors, like new,
$100., (650)991-2353 Daly City
GALLON SIZE bag of costume jewelry -
various sizes, colors, $100. for bag,
(650)589-2893
LADIES GOLD Lame' elbow length-
gloves sz 7.5 $15 New. (650)868-0436
WATCHES (21) - original packaging,
stainless steel, need batteries, $60. all,
(650)365-3987
308 Tools
CIRCULAR SAW, Craftsman-brand, 10,
4 long x 20 wide. Comes w/ stand - $70.
(650)678-1018
CRAFTMAN RADIAL SAW, with cabinet
stand, $200 Cash Only, (650)851-1045
CRAFTSMAN 3/4 horse power 3,450
RPM $60 (650)347-5373
CRAFTSMAN ARC-WELDER - 30-250
amp, and accessories, $275., (650)341-
0282
CRAFTSMAN HEAVY DUTY JIGSAW -
extra blades, $35., (650)521-3542
DAYTON ELECTRIC 1 1/2 horse power
1,725 RPM $60 (650)347-5373
FMC TIRE changer Machine, $650
(650)333-4400
GENERATOR 13,000 WATTS Brand
New 20hp Honda $2800 (650)333-4400
LAWN MOWER reel type push with
height adjustments. Just sharpened $45
650-591-2144 San Carlos
TABLE SAW 10", very good condition
$85. (650) 787-8219
309 Office Equipment
DESK - 7 drawer wood desk, 5X2X2.5'
$25., (650)726-9658
ELECTRIC TYPEWRITER Smith Corona
$60. (650)878-9542
310 Misc. For Sale
1 PAIR of matching outdoor planting pots
$20., (650)871-7200
14 PLAYBOY magazines all for $80
(650)592-4529
310 Misc. For Sale
300 HOME LIBRARY BOOKS - $3. or
$5. each obo, World & US History and
American Novel Classic, must see to ap-
preciate, (650)345-5502
4 IN 1 STERO UNIT. CD player broken.
$20., (650)834-4926
40 ADULT VHS Tapes - $100.,
(650)361-1148
6 BASKETS assorted sizes and different
shapes very good condition $13 for all
(650)347-5104
7 UNDERBED STORAGE BINS - Vinyl
with metal frame, 42 X 18 X 6, zipper
closure, $5. ea., (650)364-0902
ADJUSTABLE WALKER - 2 front
wheels, new, $50., (650)345-5446
ADULT VIDEOS - (3) DVDs classics fea-
turing older women, $20. each or, 3 for
$50 (650)212-7020
AFGHAN PRAYER RUG - very ornate,
2 1/2' by 5,' $99., (650)348-6428
Alkaline GRAVITY WATER SYSTEM - ,
PH Balance water, with anti-oxident
properties, good for home or office,
brand new, $100., (650)619-9203.
ALUMINUM WINDOWS - (10)double
pane, different sizes, $10. each,
(415)819-3835
ARTIFICIAL FICUS Tree 6 ft. life like, full
branches. in basket $55. (650)269-3712
ARTS & CRAFTS variety, $50
(650)368-3037
ASSORTED CHRISTMAS TREE orna-
ments, bulbs, lights, $99.obo,
(650)315-5902
BABY BJORN potty & toilet trainer, in
perfect cond., $15 each (650)595-3933
310 Misc. For Sale
BARBIE BEACH vacation & Barbie prin-
cess bride computer games $15 each,
(650)367-8949
BEADS - Glass beads for jewelry mak-
ing, $75. all, (650)676-0732
BLUETOOTH WITH CHARGER - like
new, $20., (415)410-5937
BOOK "LIFETIME" WW1 $12.,
(408)249-3858
BOOK NATIONAL Geographic Nation-
al Air Museums, $15 (408)249-3858
CAMEL BACK antique trunk, wooden
liner $100 (650)580-3316
CARRY ON suitcase, wheels, many
compartments, exel,Only $20,
(650)595-3933
COMFORTER - King size, like new, $30
SSF, (650)871-7200
DOOM (3) computer games $15/each 2
total, (650)367-8949
DVD'S TV programs 24 4 seasons $20
ea. (650)952-3466
ELECTRONIC TYPEWRITER good con-
dition $50., (650)878-9542
EMERIL LAGASSE BOOK unopened,
hard cover, Every Days a Party, Louisia-
na Celebration, ideas , recipes, great gift
$10., (650)578-9208
EXOTIC EROTIC Ball SF & Mardi gras 2
dvd's $25 ea. (415)971-7555
FOLDING LEG table 6' by 21/2' $25
(415)346-6038
GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858
GEORGE Magazines, 30, all intact
$50/all OBO. (650)574-3229, Foster City
HARDCOVER MYSTERY BOOKS -
Current authors, $2. each (10),
(650)364-7777
HARLEY DAVIDSON black phone, per-
fect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720
ICE CHEST $15 (650)347-8061
INFLATED 4'6" in diameter swimming
pool float $12 (415)346-6038
JAMES PATTERSON books 2 Hard
backs at $3 ea. (650)341-1861
JAMES PATTERSON books 5 paper
backs at $1 ea. (650)341-1861
JAPANESE SAKE SET - unused in box,
sake carafe with 2 porcelain sipping,
great gift, $10., (650)578-9208
JONATHAN KELLERMAN - Hardback
books, (5) $3. each, (650)341-1861
KITCHEN FAUCET / single handle with
sprayer (never used) $19, (650)494-1687
Palo Alto
MENU FROM Steam Ship Lurline Aug.
20 1967 $10 SOLD!
MIRROR, ETHAN ALLEN - 57-in. high x
21-in. wide, maple frame and floor base,
like new, $95., (650)349-2195
NELSON DE MILLE -Hardback books 5
@ $3 each, (650)341-1861
NEW CEDAR shake shingles, enough
for a Medium size dog house. $20,
(650)341-8342 San Mateo
NEW LIVING Yoga Tape for Beginners
$8. 650-578-8306
OBLONG SECURITY mirror 24" by 15"
$75 (650)341-7079
OLD WOODEN Gun case $75 OBO,
(650)345-7352
OUTDOOR SCREEN - New 4 Panel
Outdoor Screen, Retail $130 With Metal
Supports, $80/obo. (650)873-8167
PICTORIAL WORLD History Books
$80/all (650)345-5502
PLAYBOY MAGAZINE COLLECTION -
over 120 magazines, $60.obo, (650)589-
8348
PROFESSIONAL BEAUTY STYLING
STATION - Complete with mirrors, draw-
ers, and styling chair, $99. obo,
(650)315-3240
PUNCH BOWL SET- 10 cup plus one
extra nice white color Motif, $25.,
(650)873-8167
310 Misc. For Sale
RUG - 8x10, oriental design, red/gold,
like new, $95., San Mateo, SOLD!
SF GREETING CARDS -(300 with enve-
lopes), factory sealed, $10. (650)365-
3987
SHOW CONTAINERS for show, with pin
frog, 10-25 containers, $25 all, (650)871-
7200
SHOWER DOOR custom made 48 x 69
$70 (650)692-3260
SMALL SIZE Kennel good for small size
dog or cat 23" long 14" wide and 141/2"
high $25 FIRM (650)871-7200
SONY EREADER - Model #PRS-500, 6,
$60., (650)294-9652
SPECIAL EDITION 3 DVD Set of The
Freeze. English Subtitles, new $10.
(650)871-7200
STEP 2 sandbox Large with cover $25
(650)343-4329
TIRE CHAINS - brand new, in box, never
used, multiple tire sizes, SOLD!
TOILET SINK - like new with all of the
accessories ready to be installed, $55.
obo, (650)369-9762
TRAVEL GARMENT BAG - High quali-
ty, 50"length, zipper close, all-weather,
wrap-around hangar, SOLD!
VAN ROOF RACK 3 piece. clamp-on,
$75 (650)948-4895
VASE WITH flowers 2 piece good for the
Holidays, $25., (650) 867-2720
VIDEO CENTER 38 inches H 21 inches
W still in box $45., (408)249-3858
VOLVO STATION Wagon car cover $50
650 888-9624
WALKER - brand new, $20., SSF,
(415)410-5937
WALKER - never used, $85.,
(415)239-9063
WALL LIGHT FIXTURE - 2 lamp with
frosted fluted shades, gold metal, never
used, $15., Burl, (650)347-5104
WANTED: USED. Tall, garage-type
storage cabinet with locking option,
(650)375-8044
WEATHER STATION, temp., barometer
and humidity, only $10 (650)595-3933
311 Musical Instruments
2 ORGANS, antique tramp, $100 each.
(650)376-3762
3 ACCORDIONS $110/ea. 1 Small
Accordion $82. (650)376-3762.
GULBRANSEN BABY GRAND PIANO -
Appraised @$5450., want $3500 obo,
(650)343-4461
HAMMOND B-3 Organ and 122 Leslie
Speaker. Excellent condition. $8,500. pri-
vate owner, (650)349-1172
HOHNER CUE stick guitar HW 300 G
Handcrafted $75 650 771-8513
KEYBOARD CASIO - with stand, adapt-
er, instructions, like new, SanMateo,
$70., (650)579-1431
PIANO ORGAN, good condition. $110.
(650)376-3762
YAMAHA KEYBOARD with stand $75,
(650)631-8902
ZITHER - CASE: Antique/rare/excellent
cond; Maroon/black, gold stenciling. Ex-
tras. Original label "Marx Pianophone
Handmade Instrument", Boston. $100.
(650)375-8044
312 Pets & Animals
REPTILE CAGE - Medium size, SOLD!
SERIOUS HUNTERS ONLY -yellow
labs, TOP pedigree line, extreme hunters
as well as loving house dogs available
11/19/12 see at at
www.meganmccarty.com/duckdogs,
(650)593-4594
SMALL DOG wire cage; pink, two doors
with divider $50. (650) 743-9534.
24
Monday Dec. 10, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ACROSS
1 Jellystone Park
bear
5 Mazda roadster
10 Pre-K basics
14 Mary Kay
competitor
15 Crop up
16 Female WWII gp.
17 __ ring
18 Cub-turned-radio
co-host Ron
19 Thornfield Hall
governess
20 *Im counting on
you!
23 Foil giant
25 Chi.-based flier
26 Rebellious Turner
27 *Nervous Nellie
31 Wind-borne silt
deposit
33 Set (down)
34 Suffix with hero
35 Last inning, usually
36 *By all means!
39 Miserly
41 __ little teapot ...
42 Rank above cpl.
45 Unhappy
spectator
46 *Bars business
booster, in theory
49 Saturn, for one
50 SoCal ball club,
on scoreboards
52 Teeny-tiny
53 Singer of the feel-
good a cappella
#1 hit whose title
begins the
answers to
starred clues
58 Madison Avenue
award
59 Congo creature
with notable
stripes
60 Look (like)
63 Vocal quartet
member
64 Send payment
65 Sporty car roof
66 Piece of work
67 Like a Siberian
Huskys ears
68 W-2 IDs
DOWN
1 Thanksgiving
veggie
2 Lacto-__
vegetarian
3 One way to
relieve pent-up
emotion
4 Like some pools
5 Majority
6 Suffix with myth
7 OXY target
8 Shame on you!
9 Bakery lure
10 Spellbound
11 Civil War weapon
12 School fundraiser
13 Hunting dogs pick
them up
21 Ayes opposite
22 Novelist Bret
Easton __
23 Shoemakers
holemaker
24 Hawaiis
Mauna __
28 Chicken
29 Whichever
30 Aqua __: platinum
dissolver
32 Great Lakes prov.
35 Spring tide
counterpart
36 Quilting party
37 Ahead of
schedule
38 Plate cleaner, at
times
39 Top-selling
Toyota
40 Tolkiens Shire
dwellers
42 Petrarchan works
43 Good Will
Hunting director
Van Sant
44 Test, as ones
patience
45 Lynx family
member
46 Unauthorized
user?
47 __ out!
48 Stickups
51 Dean Martins
Thats __
54 Reserve
55 Starlets goal
56 Homers Iliad,
for one
57 Hud director
Martin
61 Forever and a
day
62 AWOLs avoid
them
By Amy Johnson
(c)2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
12/10/12
12/10/12
ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:
Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
xwordeditor@aol.com
315 Wanted to Buy
GO GREEN!
We Buy GOLD
You Get The
$ Green $
Millbrae Jewelers
Est. 1957
400 Broadway - Millbrae
650-697-2685
316 Clothes
2. WOMEN'S Pink & White Motocycle
Helmet KBC $50 (415)375-1617
A BAG of Summer ties $15 OBO
(650)245-3661
BLACK Leather pants Mrs. size made in
France size 40 $99. (650)558-1975
BLACK LEATHER tap shoes 9M great
condition $99. (650)558-1975
BLOUSES SWEATERS and tops. Many
different styles & colors, med. to lrg., ex-
cellent condition $5 ea., have 20,
(650)592-2648
DESIGNER SHOES, Size 9 1/2 & 10,
many styles and colors, (650)580-3316
EUROPEAN STYLE nubek leather la-
dies winter coat - tan colored with green
lapel & hoodie, $100., (650)888-0129
HARDING PARK mens golf dress shirts
(new) asking $25 (650)871-7200
LADIES BOOTS, thigh high, fold down
brown, leather, and beige suede leather
pair, tassels on back excellent, Condition
$40 ea. (650)592-2648
LADIES COAT Medium, dark lavender
$25 (650)368-3037
LADIES FAUX FUR COAT - Satin lining,
size M/L, $100. obo, (650)525-1990
LADIES FUR Jacket (fake) size 12 good
condition $30 (650)692-3260
LADIES JACKET size 3x 70% wool 30%
nylon never worn $50. (650)592-2648
316 Clothes
LEATHER COAT - 3/4 length, black,
never worn, $85., (650)345-7352
LEATHER COAT medium size (snake
skin design) $25 SOLD!
LEATHER JACKET, mans XL, black, 5
pockets, storm flap, $39 (650)595-3933
LEATHER JACKETS (5) - used but not
abused. Like New, $100 each.
(650)670-2888
MEN'S SPORT JACKET. Classic 3-but-
ton. Navy blue, brass buttons, all wool.
Excellent condition. Size 40R $20.00
(650)375-8044
MENS FLANNEL PAJAMAS - unop-
ened package, XL, High Sierra, long
sleeves and legs, dark green plaid, great
gift, $12., SOLD!
MENS JEANS (8) Brand names verious
sizes 32,33,34 waist 30,32 length $99 for
all (650)347-5104
MENS WRANGLER jeans waist 31
length 36 five pairs $20 each plus bonus
Leonard (650)504-3621
NEW BROWN LEATHER JACKET- XL
$25., 650-364-0902
NIKE PULLOVER mens heavy jacket
Navy Blue & Red (tag on) Reg. price
$200 selling for $59 (650)692-3260
SAN FRANCISCO GIANTS JACKETS
(2) - 1 is made by (Starter) LG/XLG ex-
cellent condition $99. for both,
SOLD!
SNOW BOOTS, MEN'S size 12. Brand
New, Thermolite brand,(with zippers),
black, $18. (510) 527-6602
TUXEDOS, FORMAL, 3, Black, White,
Maroon Silk brocade, Like new. Size 36,
$100 All OBO (650)344-8549
317 Building Materials
(1) 2" FAUX WOOD WINDOW BLIND,
with 50" and 71" height, still in box, $50
obo (650)345-5502
(2) 50 lb. bags Ultra Flex/RS, new, rapid
setting tile mortar with polymer, $30.
each, (808)271-3183
317 Building Materials
DRAIN PIPE - flexible, 3 & 4, approx.
20 of 3, 40 ft. of 4, $25.all, (650)851-
0878
FLOOR BASEBOARDS - Professionally
walnut finished, 6 room house, longest
13- 3/8 x 1 3/8, SOLD!
PVC - 1, 100 feet, 20 ft. lengths, $25.,
(650)851-0878
318 Sports Equipment
"EVERLAST FOR HER" Machine to
help lose weight $40., (650)368-3037
BACKPACK - Large for overnight camp-
ing, excellent condition, $65., (650)212-
7020
BASKETBALL RIM, net & backboard
$35/all 650-345-7132 Leave message.
CALLAWAY GOLF Clubs Hawkeye
Irons, Graphite Shafts, # 4 thru P/W
Excellent Condition $79 SOLD!
DARTBOARD - New, regulation 18 di-
meter, Halex brand w/mounting hard-
ware, 6 brass darts, $16., (650)681-7358
DL1000 BOAT Winch Rope & More,
$50., (650)726-9658
EXERCISE MAT used once, lavender
$12, (650)368-3037
GIRLS BIKE, Princess 16 wheels with
helmet, $50 San Mateo (650)341-5347
GOLF BALLS Many brands 150 total,
$30 Or best offer, (650)341-5347
GOLF CLUB Cleveland Launcher Gold,
22 degrees good condition $19
(650)365-1797
GOLF CLUBS -2 woods, 9 irons, a put-
ter, and a bag with pull cart, $50.,
(650)952-0620
PING CRAZ-E Putter w/ cover. 35in.
Like New $75 call(650)208-5758
THULE BIKE RACK - Fits rectangular
load bars. Holds bike upright. $100.
(650)594-1494
TREADMILL PROFORM 75 EKG incline
an Staionery Bike, both $400. Or sepa-
rate: $150 for the bike, SOLD!
318 Sports Equipment
YOGA VIDEOS (2) - Never used, one
with Patrisha Walden, one by Rebok with
booklet. Both $6 SOLD!
322 Garage Sales
GARAGE SALES
ESTATE SALES
Make money, make room!
List your upcoming garage
sale, moving sale, estate
sale, yard sale, rummage
sale, clearance sale, or
whatever sale you have...
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500 readers
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
340 Camera & Photo Equip.
SONY CYBERSHOT DSC-T-50 - 7.2 MP
digital camera (black) with case, $175.,
(650)208-5598
YASAHICA 108 model 35mm SLR Cam-
era with flash and 2 zoom lenses $99
(415)971-7555
379 Open Houses
OPEN HOUSE
LISTINGS
List your Open House
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500
potential home buyers &
renters a day,
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
380 Real Estate Services
HOMES & PROPERTIES
The San Mateo Daily Journals
weekly Real Estate Section.
Look for it
every Friday and Weekend
to find information on fine homes
and properties throughout
the local area.
440 Apartments
BELMONT - prime, quiet location, view,
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom, New carpets,
new granite counters, dishwasher, balco-
ny, covered carports, storage, pool, no
pets. (650) 591-4046
470 Rooms
HIP HOUSING
Non-Profit Home Sharing Program
San Mateo County
(650)348-6660
Rooms For Rent
Travel Inn, San Carlos
$49-59 daily + tax
$294-$322 weekly + tax
Clean Quiet Convenient
Cable TV, WiFi & Private Bathroom
Microwave and Refrigerator & A/C
950 El Camino Real San Carlos
(650) 593-3136
Mention Daily Journal
620 Automobiles
2000 CHEVY camaro standard transmis-
sion $2000 call dave at (650)344-9462
93 FLEETWOOD Chrome wheels Grey
leather interior 237k miles Sedan $ 1,800
or Trade, Good Condition (650)481-5296
Dont lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journals
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
CHEVY HHR 08 - Grey, spunky car
loaded, even seat warmers, $9,500.
(408)807-6529.
MERCEDES 06 C230 - 6 cylinder, navy
blue, 60K miles, 2 year warranty,
$18,000, (650)455-7461
625 Classic Cars
DATSUN 72 - 240Z with Chevy 350, au-
tomatic, custom, $3,600 or trade.
(415) 412-7030
635 Vans
NISSAN 01 Quest - GLE, leather seats,
sun roof, TV/DVR equipment. Looks
new, $15,500. (650)219-6008
640 Motorcycles/Scooters
BMW 03 F650 GS, $3899 OBO. Call
650-995-0003
HARLEY DAVIDSON 01 - Softail Blue
and Cream, low mileage, extras, $7,400.,
Call Greg @ (650)574-2012
HARLEY DAVIDSON 83 Shovelhead
special construction, 1340 ccs,
Awesome! $5,950/obo
Rob (415)602-4535.
645 Boats
BANSHEE SAILBOAT - 13 ft. with ex-
tras, $750., (650)343-6563
650 RVs
73 Chevy Model 30 Van, Runs
good, Rebuilt Transmission, Fiber-
glass Bubble Top $1,795. Owner
financing.
Call for appointments. (650)364-1374.
CHEVROLET RV 91 Model 30 Van,
Good Condition $9,500., (650)591-1707
or (650)644-5179
670 Auto Service
MB GARAGE, INC.
Repair Restore Sales
Mercedes-Benz Specialists
2165 Palm Ave.
San Mateo
(650)349-2744
ON TRACK
AUTOMOTIVE
Complete Auto Repair
foreign & domestic
www.ontrackautomotive.com
1129 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)343-4594
670 Auto Service
SAN CARLOS AUTO
SERVICE & TUNE UP
A Full Service Auto Repair
Facility
760 El Camino Real
San Carlos
(650)593-8085
670 Auto Parts
'91 TOYOTA COROLLA RADIATOR.
Original equipment. Excellent cond. Cop-
per fins. $60. San Bruno, (415)999-4947
1974 OWNERS MANUAL - Mercedes
280, 230 - like new condition, $20., San
Bruno, (650)588-1946
5 HUBCAPS for 1966 Alfa Romeo $50.,
(650)580-3316
CHEVY ASTRO rear door, $95.,
(650)333-4400
MAZDA 3 2010 CAR COVER - Cover-
kraft multibond inside & outside cover,
like new, $50., (650)678-3557
MERCEDES TOOL KIT - 1974, 10
piece, original, like new condition, SOLD!
SHOP MANUALS 2 1955 Pontiac
manual, 4 1984 Ford/Lincoln manuals, &
1 gray marine diesel manual $40 or B/O
(650)583-5208
TRUCK RADIATOR - fits older Ford,
never used, $100., (650)504-3621
672 Auto Stereos
MONNEY
CAR AUDIO
We Sell, Install and
Repair All Brands of
Car Stereos
iPod & iPhone Wired
to Any Car for Music
Quieter Car Ride
Sound Proof Your Car
31 Years Experience
2001 Middlefield Road
Redwood City
(650)299-9991
680 Autos Wanted
Dont lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journals
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 82,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
DONATE YOUR CAR
Tax Deduction, We do the Paperwork,
Free Pickup, Running or Not - in most
cases. Help yourself and the Polly Klaas
Foundation. Call (800)380-5257.
Wanted 62-75 Chevrolets
Novas, running or not
Parts collection etc.
So clean out that garage
Give me a call
Joe 650 342-2483
25 Monday Dec. 10, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ADVERTISE
YOUR SERVICE
in the
HOME & GARDEN SECTION
Offer your services to 76,500 readers a day, from
Palo Alto to South San Francisco
and all points between!
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
Cabinetry
Contractors
Cleaning
Roses
HOUSE CLEANING
Affordable
Move In & Move Out
Discount
First Time Cleaning
Commercial & Residential
FREE ESTIMATES
(650) 847-1990
www.roseshousecleaning.com
BBB Lic. & Bonded
Ask about
our Holiday
Special
Concrete
Construction
Construction
650 868 - 8492
PATRICK BRADY PATRICK BRADY
GENERAL CONTRACTOR
ADDITIONS WALL REMOVAL
BATHS KITCHENS AND MORE!
PATBRADY1957@SBCGLOBAL.NET
License # 479385
Frame
Structural
Foundation
Roots & ALL
I make your
life better!
LARGE OR SMALL
I do them all!
Decks & Fences
NORTH FENCE
& DECK CO.
Lic #733213
Specializing in:
Redwood Fences
Decks
Retaining Walls
650-756 0694
W W W .
N O R T H F E N C E C O
. C O M
MARSH FENCE
& DECK CO.
State License #377047
Licensed Insured Bonded
Fences - Gates - Decks
Stairs - Retaining Walls
10-year guarantee
Quality work w/reasonable prices
Call for free estimate
(650)571-1500
Electricians
ALL ELECTRICAL
SERVICE
650-322-9288
for all your electrical needs
ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP
ELECTRICIAN
For all your
electrical needs
Residential, Commercial,
Troubleshooting,
Wiring & Repairing
Call Ben at (650)685-6617
Lic # 427952
Gutters
O.K.S RAINGUTTER
New Rain Gutters
Down Spouts
Gutter Cleaning & Screening,
Roof & Gutter Repairs
Friendly Service
10% Senior Discount
CA Lic# 794353/Bonded
(650)556-9780
Handy Help
CONTRERAS
HANDYMAN
Fences Decks Patios
Power Washes Concrete
Work Maintenance
Clean Ups Arbors
Free Estimates!
Call us Today!
(650)350-9968
(650)389-3053
contreras1270@yahoo.com
Handy Help
DISCOUNT HANDYMAN
& PLUMBING
Carpentry Plumbing Drain
Cleaning Kitchens Bathrooms
Dry Rot Decks
Priced for You! Call John
(650)296-0568
Free Estimates
Lic.#834170
FLORES HANDYMAN
Serving you is a privilege.
Painting-Interior & Exterior Roof Re-
pair Base Boards New Fence
Hardwood Floors Plumbing Tile
Mirrors Chain Link Fence Windows
Bus Lic# 41942
Call today for free estimate.
(650)274-6133
LOPEZ HANDYMAN
Bath & Kitchen
Remodels
Specializing in granite,
tile & flooring.
(650)219-4050
SENIOR HANDYMAN
Specializing in Any Size Projects
Painting Electrical
Carpentry Dry Rot
Carpet Installation
40 Yrs. Experience
Retired Licensed Contractor
(650)201-6854
Hardwood Floors
KO-AM
HARDWOOD FLOORING
Hardwood & Laminate
Installation & Repair
Refinish
High Quality @ Low Prices
Call 24/7 for Free Estimate
800-300-3218
408-979-9665
Lic. #794899
Hauling
CHEAP
HAULING!
Light moving!
Haul Debris!
650-583-6700
INDEPENDENT HAULERS
$50 & Up HAUL
Since 1988
Free Estimates
Licensed/Insured
A+ BBB rating
(650)341-7482
26
Monday Dec. 10, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Hauling
HVAC
HRAC HEATING
& APPLIANCES
Refrigeration - Water Heaters
REPAIR ,REPLACEMENT
& SERVICE
Residential & Commercial
FREE ESTIMATES WITH REPAIR
SAME DAY SERVICE
(650)589-3153
(408)249-2838
www.hracappliancerepair.com
Lic.#A46046
Landscaping
Moving
Bay Area
Relocation Services
Specializing in:
Homes, Apts., Storages
Professional, friendly, careful.
Peninsulas Personal Mover
Commercial/Residential
Fully Lic. & Bonded CAL -T190632
Call Armando (650) 630-0424
Painting
BEST RATES
PRO PAINTING
Residential/Commercial
Interior/Exterior, Pressure Washing
Professional/Courteous/Punctual
FREE ESTIMATES
Sean (415)707-9127
seanmcvey@mcveypaint.com
CSL# 752943
Painting
CRAIGS PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Quality Work w/
Reasonable Rates
Free Estimates
(650)553-9653
Lic# 857741
JON LA MOTTE
PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Pressure Washing
Free Estimates
(650)368-8861
Lic #514269
MTP
Painting/Waterproofing
Drywall Repair/Tape/Texture
Power Washing-Decks, Fences
No Job Too Big or Small
Lic.# 896174
Call Mike the Painter
(650)271-1320
Plumbing
Remodeling
CORNERSTONE HOME DESIGN
Complete Kitchen & Bath Resource
Showroom: Countertops Cabinets
Plumbing Fixtures Fine Tile
Open M-F 8:30-5:30 SAT 10-4
168 Marco Way
South San Francisco, 94080
(650)866-3222
www.cornerstoneHD.com
CA License #94260
Home Improvement
CINNABAR HOME
Making Peninsula homes
more beautiful since 1996
* Home furnishings & accessories
* Drapery & window treatments:
blinds & shades
* Free in-home consultation
853 Industrial Rd. Ste E San Carlos
Wed Sat 12:00- 5:30pm, or by appt.
650-388-8836
www.cinnabarhome.com
Tile
JZ TILE
Installation and Design
Portfolio and References,
Great Prices
Free Estimates
Lic. 670794
Call John Zerille
(650)245-8212
Window Coverings
RUDOLPHS INTERIORS
Satisfying customers with world-
class service and products since
1952. Let us help you create the
home of your dreams. Please
phone for an appointment.
(650)227-4882
Window Fashions
247 California Dr
Burlingame 650-348-1268
990 Industrial Rd Ste 106
San Carlos 650-508-8518
www.rebarts.com
BLINDS, SHADES, SHUTTERS, DRAPERIES
Free estimates Free installation
Window Washing
Notices
NOTICE TO READERS:
California law requires that contractors
taking jobs that total $500 or more (labor
or materials) be licensed by the Contrac-
tors State License Board. State law also
requires that contractors include their li-
cense number in their advertising. You
can check the status of your licensed
contractor at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800-
321-CSLB. Unlicensed contractors taking
jobs that total less than $500 must state
in their advertisements that they are not
licensed by the Contractors State Li-
cense Board.
Attorneys
* BANKRUPTCY *
Huge credit card debt?
Job loss? Foreclosure?
Medical bills?
YOU HAVE OPTIONS
Call for a free consultation
(650)363-2600
This law firm is a debt relief agency
Law Office of Jason Honaker
BANKRUPTCY
Chapter 7 &13
Call us for a consultation
650-259-9200
www.honakerlegal.com
Beauty
KAYS
HEALTH & BEAUTY
Facials, Waxing, Fitness
Body Fat Reduction
Pure Organic Facial $48.
1 Hillcrest Blvd, Millbrae
(650)697-6868
Dental Services
DR. SAMIR
NANJAPA DDS
Family Dentistry &
Smile Restoration
UCSF Dentistry Faculty
Cantonese, Mandarin &
Hindi Spoken
650-477-6920
320 N. San Mateo Dr. Ste 2
San Mateo
Dental Services
MILLBRAE SMILE CENTER
Valerie de Leon, DDS
Implant, Cosmetic and
Family Dentistry
Spanish and Tagalog Spoken
(650)697-9000
15 El Camino Real,
MILLBRAE, CA
Food
BROADWAY GRILL
Express Lunch
Special $8.00
1400 Broadway
Burlingame
(650)343-9733
www.bwgrill.com
GOT BEER?
We Do!
Steelhead Brewing Co.
333 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)344-6050
www.steelheadbrewery.com
JACKS
RESTAURANT
Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner
1050 Admiral Ct., #A
San Bruno
(650)589-2222
JacksRestaurants.com
NEALS COFFEE
SHOP
Breakfast Lunch Dinner
Senior Meals, Kids Menu
www.nealscoffeeshop.com
1845 El Camino Real
Burlingame
(650)692-4281
Food
NEW ENGLAND
LOBSTER CO.
Market & Eatery
Now Open in Burlingame
824 Cowan Road
newenglandlobster.net
LIve Lobster ,Lobster Tail,
Lobster meat & Dungeness Crab
SUNDAY CHAMPAGNE
BRUNCH
Crowne Plaza
1221 Chess Dr., Hwy. 92 at
Foster City Blvd. Exit
Foster City
(650)570-5700
THE AMERICAN BULL
BAR & GRILL
19 large screen HD TVs
Full Bar & Restaurant
www.theamericanbull.com
1819 El Camino, in
Burlingame Plaza
(650)652-4908
Financial
RELATIONSHIP BANKING
Partnership. Service. Trust.
UNITED AMERICAN BANK
Half Moon Bay, Redwood City,
Sunnyvale
unitedamericanbank.com
San Mateo
(650)579-1500
Fitness
DOJO USA
World Training Center
Martial Arts & Tae Bo Training
www.dojousa.net
731 Kains Ave, San Bruno
(650)589-9148
Furniture
Bedroom Express
Where Dreams Begin
2833 El Camino Real
San Mateo - (650)458-8881
184 El Camino Real
So. S. Francisco -(650)583-2221
www.bedroomexpress.com
Health & Medical
BACK, LEG PAIN OR
NUMBNESS?
Non-Surgical
Spinal Decompression
Dr. Thomas Ferrigno D.C.
650-231-4754
177 Bovet Rd. #150 San Mateo
BayAreaBackPain.com
General Dentistry
for Adults & Children
DR. JENNIFER LEE, DDS
DR. ANNA P. LIVIZ, DDS
324 N. San Mateo Drive, #2
San Mateo 94401
(650)343-5555
JANET R. STEELE, LMFT
MFC31794
Counseling for relationship
difficulties; chronic illness/
disabilities; trauma/PTSD
Individuals, couples, families,
teens and veterans welcome!
(650)380-4459
Health & Medical
Le Juin Day Spa & Clinic
Special Combination Pricing:
Facials, Microdermabrasion,
Waxing , Body Scrubs, Acu-
puncture , Foot & Body Massage
155 E. 5th Avenue
Downtown San Mateo
www.LeJuinDaySpa.com
(650) 347-6668
SLEEP APNEA
We can treat it
without CPAP!
Call for a free
sleep apnea screening
650-583-5880
Millbrae Dental
STRESSED OUT?
IN PAIN?
I CAN HELP YOU
Sessions start from $20
Call 650-235-6761
Will Chen ACUPUNCTURE
12220 6th Ave, Belmont
www. willchenacupuncture.com
Home Care
CALIFORNIA HOARDING
REMEDIATION
Free Estimates
Whole House & Office
Cleanup Too!
Serving SF Bay Area
(650)762-8183
Call Karen Now!
Insurance
AANTHEM BLUE
CROSS
www.ericbarrettinsurance.com
Eric L. Barrett,
CLU, RHU, REBC, CLTC, LUTCF
President
Barrett Insurance Services
(650)513-5690
CA. Insurance License #0737226
INSURANCE BY AN ITALIAN
Have a Policy you cant
Refuse!
DOMINICE INSURANCE
AGENCY
Contractor & Truckers
Commercial Business Specialist
Personal Auto - AARP rep.
401K & IRA, Rollovers & Life
(650)871-6511
Joe Dominice
Since 1964
CA Lic.# 0276301
Jewelers
KUPFER
JEWELRY
We Buy
Coins, Jewelry,
Watches, Platinum,
& Diamonds.
Expert fine watch
& jewelry repair.
Deal with experts.
1211 Burlingame Ave.
Burlingame
www.kupferjewelry.com
(650) 347-7007
27 Monday Dec. 10, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Legal Services
LEGAL
DOCUMENTS PLUS
Non-Attorney document
preparation: Divorce,
Pre-Nup, Adoption, Living Trust,
Conservatorship, Probate,
Notary Public. Response to
Lawsuits: Credit Card
Issues,Breach of Contract
Jeri Blatt, LDA #11
Registered & Bonded
(650)574-2087
legaldocumentsplus.com
"I am not an attorney. I can only
provide self help services at your
specific direction."
Loans
REVERSE MORTGAGE
Are you age 62+ & own your
home?
Call for a free, easy to read
brochure or quote
650-453-3244
Carol Bertocchini, CPA
Marketing
GROW
YOUR SMALL BUSINESS
Get free help from
The Growth Coach
Go to
www.buildandbalance.com
Sign up for the free newsletter
Massage Therapy
ASIAN MASSAGE
$48 per Hour
New Customers Only
For First 20 Visits
Open 7 days, 10 am -10 pm
633 Veterans Blvd., #C
Redwood City
(650)556-9888
ENJOY THE BEST
ASIAN MASSAGE
$40 for 1/2 hour
Angel Spa
667 El Camino Real,
Redwood City
(650)363-8806
7 days a week, 9:30am-9:30pm
Massage Therapy
GRAND OPENING
$45 ONE HOUR
HEALING MASSAGE
2305-A Carlos Street
Moss Beach
(On Hwy 1 next to Post office)
(650)563-9771
GRAND OPENING!
CRYSTAL WAVE SPA
Body & Foot Massage
Facial Treatment
1205 Capuchino Ave.
Burlingame
(650)558-1199
SUNFLOWER MASSAGE
Grand Opening!
$10. Off 1-Hour Session!
1482 Laurel St.
San Carlos
(Behind Trader Joes)
Open 7 Days/Week, 10am-10pm
(650)508-8758
TRANQUIL
MASSAGE
951 Old County Road
Suite 1
Belmont
650-654-2829
Massage Therapy
YOU HAVE IT-
WELL BUY IT
We buy and pawn:
Gold Jewelry
Art Watches
Musical Instrument
Paintings Diamonds
Silverware Electronics
Antique Furniture
Computers TVs Cars
Open 7 days
Buy *Sell*Loan
590 Veterans Blvd.
Redwood City
(650)368-6855
Needlework
LUV2
STITCH.COM
Needlepoint!
Fiesta Shopping Center
747 Bermuda Dr., San Mateo
(650)571-9999
Real Estate Loans
REAL ESTATE LOANS
We Fund Bank Turndowns!
Direct Private Lender
Homes Multi-family
Mixed-Use Commercial
WE BUY TRUST DEED NOTES
FICO Credit Score Not a Factor
PURCHASE, REFINANCE,
CASH OUT
Investors welcome
Loan servicing since 1979
650-348-7191
Wachter Investments, Inc.
Real Estate Broker #746683
Nationwide Mortgage
Licensing System ID #348268
CA Dept. of Real Estate
Real Estate Services
ODOWD ESTATES
Representing Buyers
& Sellers
Commission Negotiable
odowdestates.com
(650)794-9858
Seniors
LASTING IMPRESSIONS
ARE OUR FIRST PRIORITY
Cypress Lawn
1370 El Camino Real
Colma
(650)755-0580
www.cypresslawn.com
Seniors
AFFORDABLE
24-hour Assisted Living
Care located in
Burlingame
Mills Estate Villa
&
Burlingame Villa
- Short Term Stays
- Dementia & Alzheimers
Care
- Hospice Care
(650)692-0600
Lic.#4105088251/
415600633
ERRANDS WITH
CARE
Housecleaning,
Cooking,
Appointments, Errands
Call anytime
(650) 271-2505
STERLING COURT
ACTIVE
INDEPENDENT &
ASSISTED LIVING
Tours 10AM-4PM
2 BR,1BR & Studio
Luxury Rental
650-344-8200
850 N. El Camino Real San Mateo
sterlingcourt.com
28
Monday Dec. 10, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL