You are on page 1of 22

SCRANTON - A Scranton

commuter tax proposal has


been denied in a 51-page
written decision handed down
by a three-judge panel Dec.
19 in Lackawanna County
Court.
Bill Wicks, Glenburn Twp.
supervisor and one of the
commuter tax opponents, had
expected the tax to be nixed.
Were very pleased,
Wicks said.
The city had sought to im-
plement a 1 percent tax on
the earned incomes of those
who work in Scranton but do
not reside there. The tax was
expected to raise $4 million
the first year and $6.7 million
the second, which would
come out of the earned in-
comes of 22,000 Scranton
workers who resided outside
the city limits.
The citys government vot-
ed to implement the tax over
the summer for 2013. The
tax, however, could not be
imposed without court ap-
proval as mandated by law.
The hearing took place over
three days of testimony Dec.
11, 12 and 14. Opponents of
the tax, called intervenors by
Scranton
commuter
tax denied
BY GERARD NOLAN
Abington Journal Correspondent
See Tax, Page 7
O
n the one -week anniversary
of the shootings at Sandy
Hook Elementary School in
Newtown, Conn., Abington Heights
High School did its part to support
the grieving families and school
community.
A memorial table was set up in
the middle of the cafeteria adorned
with name cards of the victims
along with candles. Students and
staff had the opportunity to write
personalized sympathy messages
during their lunch break. All letters
will be mailed to the Newton Public
School District and distributed to
teachers and families.
Every school wants to do some-
thing, Abington Heights Principal
Pamela Murray said. Its hard to
cope with the magnitude of the loss,
but theres been a great turnout of
students, faculty, and staff. Its been
on the heads and minds of a lot of
the kids. This was a nice way for
our kids to express their condolenc-
es in a meaningful way directly to
the parents and teachers of the vic-
tims.
One student, senior Cassidy Hen-
ry, wanted the families of several of
the fallen students to know that they
would not be forgotten. Henry re-
searched the hobbies of some of the
kids and designed personalized
sympathy cards with illustrations.
I wanted everyone to realize
these kids are not just numbers,
they all have a story, Henry said.
They are the most important part
of the story. I wanted the families to
know that people are thinking about
the children, not just the tragedy
aspect.
Murray wanted to host a program
at the school to remember the vic-
tims of the tragedy. World Lan-
guage Coordinator Marcy Curra
In their own words: A.H. sends condolences
BY ROBERT TOMKAVAGE
rtomkavage@theabingtonjournal.com
ABINGTON JOURNAL/ROBERT TOMKAVAGE
The names of the victims of the Sandy
Hook Elementary School tragedy were
displayed on a table, each with a candle.
See Letters, Page 7
JOURNAL
Clarks Summit, Pa. DECEMBER 26 TO JANUARY 2, 2013 50 www.theabingtonjournal.com
P
l
e
a
s
e
e
n
c
l
o
s
e
t
h
i
s
l
a
b
e
l
w
i
t
h
a
n
y
a
d
d
r
e
s
s
c
h
a
n
g
e
s
,
a
n
d
m
a
i
l
t
o
T
h
e
A
b
i
n
g
t
o
n
J
o
u
r
n
a
l
,
2
1
1
S
.
S
t
a
t
e
S
t
,
,
C
l
a
r
k
s
S
u
m
m
i
t
,
P
A
,
1
8
4
1
1
T
h
e
A
b
i
n
g
t
o
n
J
o
u
r
n
a
l
An edition of The Times Leader
THE ABINGTON
Wilkes-Barre, Pa.
ArtsEtc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10
Calendar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2
Classified. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15
Crosswords . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5
Obituaries. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14
School . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7,8
Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14
INSIDE
Find out more
about Baxter,
shown, and whats
on the wish list of
Griffin Pond
Animal Shelter
pets. See Page 5
Dear Santa, I love catnip.
Makayla
Crisp, left,
and Chase
Rosenkrans
of Montdale
choose
Kermit. Find
out more on
Page 6.
Whos your favorite MUPPET?
F
irst Night Scranton, nowon its
14th year, is a NewYears Eve
event known for its diversity. But
this years theme of Around the World
may bring that reputation to a whole
FIRST NIGHT SCRANTON: 14 YEARS OF DIVERSITY
ABINGTON JOURNAL/ALEX SEELEY
Damian the Magician delights children and adults at a December event in South Abington Township.
Around the world
in ONE NIGHT
First Night chair people, from left: co-
chairman Damian the Magician, honorary
chairman Al Boscov and co-chairman
Doug Smith
RANSOMTWP. - At its
Dec. 17 meeting, the Ransom
Township Planning Commis-
sion voted unanimously to
extend its deadline for review
of the development plans for
RansomRecreational Shoot-
ing Sports, LLCuntil August.
21, 2013.
The extension request was
tabled at the boards previous
meetings Oct. 15 and Nov. 19,
due to an unresolved billing
dispute with RansomRecre-
ational Shooting Sports, LLC.
According to the township,
the business owes money for
engineering services regarding
a rifle range development
planned for 1500 Ransom
Road. For an unspecified rea-
son, however, invoices were
not sent to the developer until
they were several months out-
standing. After receiving
them, RansomRecreational
Shooting Sports, LLCManag-
er AndrewMassimilian ex-
pressed doubt that the full
amount requested was legiti-
mately owed.
The Planning Commission
decided at the Oct. 15 meeting
to hold off on moving forward
with the submitted plans until
the billing dispute was resolv-
ed. Massimilian protested this
decision, stating Section 506
of the Municipal Planning
Code makes it illegal for the
board to delay or deny the
application based on the bill-
Ransom
grants
range
extension
Billing dispute continues
between Ransom Recreational
Shooting Sports, LLC and
township.
BY ELIZABETH BAUMEISTER
lbaumeister@theabingtonjournal.com
See Range, Page 6
S
pending quality time with
children can be as ele-
mentary as doing a craft
together. Some tools of the trade
to have on hand throughout the
year to inspire younger creative
minds, particularly during the
winter months, are paint, con-
struction paper, glitter, glue,
childrens scissors, washable
markers, beads for older chil-
dren and coloring books.
In the kitchen/dining area of
the Hughes home, Clarks Sum-
mit, is a Christmas tree Hannah,
5, and her brother, Harrison, 2,
decorated.
Doing crafts is a great way to
keep them(her children) from
sitting still playing video games.
I was raised very free with art.
My mother provided everything
I needed. And (in our house)
every little thing we can make;
we make, said their mother,
Megan Hughes, who has made
handmade gifts a tradition for
years.
Together, the family crafted
most of the Christmas deco-
rations that adorn their home
this year, as well as numerous
gifts for Hannahs friends and
teachers.
There are a couple of things
we collect, like our (Christmas)
houses, but the ornaments and
the decorations in the front
roomon the large tree are most-
ly handmade ornaments,
ABINGTON JOURNAL/JOAN MEAD-MATSUI
Megan Hughes, 37, Clarks Summit and her daughter Hannah Hughes,
5, crafted most of the Christmas decorations that adorn their home this
year.
Homemade masterpieces
BY JOAN MEAD-MATSUI
Abington Journal Correspondent
See Homemade, Page 7
There are presents I
remember making. I re-
member every one of
them. I think they are
also going to remember
the projects were doing
with them.
Megan Hughes, Clarks Summit
On childhood crafting
A magician and mentalist will
bring his brand of illusions to
Scranton for its First Night Cele-
bration on Dec. 31 for the 12th
straight year.
This year Im going be doing
a sawing -in -half illusion, which
Do you believe
in magic?
BY GERARD NOLAN
Abington Journal Correspondent
See Magic, Page 3
Diverse event
on tap Nov. 31
BY ELIZABETH BAUMEISTER
lbaumeister@theabingtonjournal.com
See Event, Page 3
C M Y K
PAGE 2A www.theabingtonjournal.com The Abington JournalClarks Summit, PA WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 26, 2012
YOUR COMMUNITY
211 S. State St., CLARKS SUMMIT, PA 18411 570-587-1148
NEWS@THEABINGTONJOURNAL.COM
EDITOR KRISTIE GRIER CERUTI
585-1604 / kgrier@theabingtonjournal.com
STAFF WRITERS AND PHOTOGRAPHERS
ELIZABETH BAUMEISTER
585-1606 / lbaumeister@theabingtonjournal.com
ROBERT TOMKAVAGE
585-1600 / rtomkavage@theabingtonjournal.com
RETAIL ADVERTISING ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES
JILL ANDES
970-7188 / jill.andes@timesleader.com
TRIXIE JACKSON
970-7104/ bjacksoni@timesleader.com
CLASSIFIED ADVISOR
LINDA BYRNES
970-7189 / lbyrnes@timesleader.com
COVERAGE AREA: The Abington Journal, a weekly community newspaper
that is part of Impressions Media in Wilkes-Barre, PA, covers the Abingtons
area of Lackawanna and Wyoming counties. This includes but is not limited to
Clarks Summit, Clarks Green, South Abington, Newton, Ransom, Glenburn,
Dalton, La Plume, Factoryville, Waverly, Tunkhannock and the Abington
Heights, Lackawanna Trail and Lakeland school districts.
Our circulation hovers between 2,000 and 3,000 readers. We try to get to as
many events as possible, but staff and space limitations make it impossible to
cover everything. If you have news about your family, town or organization,
please send it to us and well do our best to publish it. Photographs (with
captions) are welcome.
CORRECTIONS, clarifications: The Abington Journal will correct errors of
fact or clarify any misunderstandings created by a story. Call 587-1148. Have a
story idea? Please call. Wed like to hear about it. Letters: The Abington Journal
prints all letters, which have local interest. Send letters to: Editor, The Abington
Journal, 211 S. State St., Clarks Summit, PA 18411. All letters must be signed
and include a phone number where we can reach the author. Editor reserves
the right to edit or reject any item submitted. Deadline is noon, Friday prior to
publication. Want a photo that has appeared? We can provide color prints of
photos taken by our staff. Prices: 8x10 - $25; 5x7 - $12. Call, mail in, or stop by
to order.
CIRCULATION
Orders for subscription received by Friday at noon will begin the following
week. See box at right for subscription prices. Local subscriptions should arrive
Wednesdays. Please inform us of damage or delay. Call 587-1148. The Abing-
ton Journal (USPS 542-460), 211 S. State St., PO Box 277, Clarks Summit, PA
18411. Published weekly by Wilkes Barre Publishing Company, 211S. State St.,
Clarks Summit, PA, 18411. $20 per year, in Lackawanna and Wyoming counties
(PA); $24 elsewhere in PA and additional offices. Periodicals postage paid at
Clarks Summit, PA, 18411, and at additional offices.
ISSN. NO. 1931-8871, VOL. 86, ISSUE NO. 51
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to The Abington Journal, 211 South
State St., Clarks Summit, PA 18411.
COPYRIGHT 2012: Entire contents copyrighted. All rights reserved. No
part of this publication may be reproduced by any means without the express
written consent of the publisher.
ADVERTISING
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING DEADLINE: Mondays at 10 a.m.
DISPLAY ADVERTISING DEADLINE: Thursday at 5 p.m.
CALL 587-1148 (Thursday at noon if proof required.)
We have a variety of rates and programs to suit your advertising needs. The
Abington Journal satisfies most co-op ad programs. Creative services at no
charge. Combination rates with The Dallas Post, Dallas, available. We can pro-
duce your newsletter, flyer or newspaper. Call for quotes on typesetting, pro-
duction and printing.
Complete and mail in this form, or call 587-1148
Name _________________________________________
Mail Address ____________________________________
City _________________________State _____ Zip _____
Phone ________________________________________
RATES 1 Year 2 Years
Lackawanna & Wyoming counties $20 $35
Other PA, NY or NJ $24 $42
All Other States $27 $48
Return completed formwith payment to: The Abington Journal, 211S. State St.,
Clarks Summit, PA 18411
THE ABINGTON
JOURNAL
For the fifth year, Henry F. Smith Jr., M.D., Director of Pulmonary Services at Heinz Rehab
Hospital in Wilkes-Barre and Director of Pulmonary Medicine at Mercy Special Care Hospital
in Nanticoke, produced a calendar benefiting the myriad pediatric services offered at Allied
Services Integrated Health System.
The 9-by-12-inch calendar features 15 eye-catching photos of some of Dr. Smiths favor-
ite exterior locales in Northeast Pennsylvania. It also includes pictures of 12 pediatric pa-
tients served by Allied and Heinz, who achieved significant milestones in their rehabilitation.
To order a calendar, visit AlliedServices.org.
Shown from left: Sisters Ally, Bea and Anne Davis help Dr. Henry F. Smith Jr. promote his
calendar to benefit pediatric patients.
Calendar to benefit pediatric patients
REMINDERS
Myasthenia Gravis Support
Group 2013 Meeting Schedule,
at Allied Services, Charles
Luger Outpatient Center Com-
munity Room , 475 Morgan
Highway, Scranton: Feb. 2,
April 7, June 1, Aug. 3, Oct. 5
and Dec. 7. Info: Vera Krewsun
at 570.687.6009 or Marie
Ronnlof at 877.596.1491.
The Northeastern Pennsylva-
nia Bridge Building Competi-
tion, will be held Feb. 9, 2013
in the Viewmont Mall in Dick-
son City. The objective of the
competition is to provide an
educational learning experience
for secondary students to apply
their understanding of scientific
and engineering principles to
everyday experiences, in this
case bridge structures. Tro-
phies/plaques are awarded to
the first (sponsored by CECO
Associates in memory of Mr.
Angelo Rosati), second, and
third place winners in the com-
petition. Certificates of partici-
pation and commemorative
T-shirts are given to each par-
ticipant in the regional competi-
tion. Trophies are also present-
ed to the schools represented by
the respective First, Second,
and Third Place winning. Stu-
dents and teachers interested in
more information may contact
Donald Kieffer, regional direc-
tor at dhkieffer@gmail.com or
586.0197.
Abington Heights Middle
School Concert Schedule, all
concerts are free and open to
the public and are scheduled for
7:30 p.m. on the following
dates: Eighth Grade Orchestra,
Jan. 24; Seventh Grade Orches-
tra, Jan. 25; Sixth Grade Or-
chestra, Jan. 28 and Fifth Grade
Orchestra, Jan. 29.
HOLIDAY EVENTS
December 27: Holiday
Camp, at the Dietrich Theater
in downtown Tunkhannock,
continuing Dec. 28 from 9:30 -
11 a.m. For ages 5-12. Instruc-
tors: Amy and Steve Colley.
Attendees will the opportunity
to throw pots on a potters
wheel, create sculptures and
design 3D collages out of recy-
cled household items. Admis-
sion: $25. Register/info:
996.1500.
January 6: Festival of Nine
Lessons and Carols, at St. Tho-
mas More Anglican Use Parish
at St. Josephs Church, N. Main
Ave. and Theodore St., Scran-
ton, at 5 p.m. A traditional
Anglican Christmas celebra-
tion, followed by a potluck
supper and 3 Kings Celebra-
tion. All are welcome. Cost:
free; please bring bread, fruit or
dessert to share. Info:
343.0634.
January 11: Malanka,
Northeastern Pennsylvania s
Ukrainian New Year Ninth
Annual Dinner Dance, at St.
Vladimir Parish Center, 728
North Seventh Avenue, Scran-
ton from 6 p.m. to 1 a.m. Eve-
ning will include a Ukrainian
and American dinner buffet
catered by Paul Wanas of Ac-
centuate Caterers, cash bar,
complimentary bubbly toast
and dancing to Ukrainian or-
chestra Fata Morgana.
Door prizes will also be
awarded. Cost: $40. Info/
reservations: 489.1256.
DAILY EVENTS
December 28: Owl Moon
Walk, at Lackawanna State
Park from 7 - 9 p.m. Partici-
pants will meet at the Envi-
ronmental Learning Center
for an introduction to our
Pennsylvania Owls and then
head into the night and try
their luck at owling. Regis-
tration (required):visitPA-
parks.com, click on Events
Calendar then drop down to
Lackawanna State Park under
select facilities to register
online.
January 4: The American
Lung Association Arena Climb
meeting, at Odyssey Fitness in
Wilkes-Barre on at 5:30 p.m.
Atendees will learn about the
American Lung Associations
Arena Climb at the Mohegan
Sun Arena, planned for Sat.
April 6, 2013. Everyone attend-
ing this event will earn a free
day pass to Odyssey Fitness to
start their preparation for the
climb of their life. Info: lungin-
fo.org/arenaclimb Register:
823.2212 or dreifler@lungin-
fo.org.
January 5: Griffin Pond
Animal Shelter Volunteer Meet-
ing, at Lackawanna College,
501 Vine St., Scranton, at 11
a.m.
Winter Wake-Up Open
House, at McCann School of
Business and Technology,
2227 Scranton Carbondale
Hwy, Dickson City, from10
a.m. to 1 p.m. Atendees are
invited to meet with faculty
and staff, tour the campus,
stop in for refreshments and
enjoy hand paraffin treat-
ments and Womens self-
defense demo, as well as
learn about career opportuni-
ties available at McCann.
RSVP: 307.2000.
January 7: BioScience
Forum, at The Common-
wealth Medical College, 525
Pine St., Scranton from1:30
to 3:30 p.m. Sponsored by
Senator John Blake. Features
presentations and a discus-
sion on Development of a
Regional Bioscience Cluster
in Northeas Pennsylvania.
Includes a keynote presenta-
tion by PA Department of
Community and Economic
Development Secretary, Hon.
C. Alan Walker. RSVP:
blake@pasenate.com (In the
subject line, please indicate
Blake Bioscience Forum
and provide your name, orga-
nization, title and telephone
number.)
January 8: NEPA Affiliate
of the Pancreatic Cancer
Action Network Volunteer
Meeting, at Hampton Inn, 22
Montage Mountain Rd.,
Scranton, from 6:30 - 8:30
p.m. Info: 342.18507.
Misericordia University
Open House for Adult Lear-
ners, in Huntzinger and Al-
den Trust Rooms 218-219 of
Sandy and Marlene Insalaco
Hall on the upper campus
from 4 - 7 p.m. Snow date:
Jan. 9 from 4 - 7 p.m. Info:
674.6791 or admissmu@mi-
sericordia.edu.
COMMUNITY
CALENDAR
Make-A-Wish is requesting
daily votes. The foundation is
one of 39 charities participa-
ting in United Airlines 10
Million Charity Miles Give-
away. The more votes Make-
A-Wish receives, the larger
percentage of the 10 million
miles it gets.
To vote, go to http://10mil-
lioncharitymiles.com and look
for the Make-A-Wish Amer-
ica link. Participants may vote
once per day from any In-
ternet-driven devices (comput-
ers, iPods/Pads, smart phones,
etc.), and votes can also be
cast through various browsers
like Explorer, Firefox and
Google Chrome on the same
device.
Make-A-Wish
requests votes
National Running Center on
Davis St. was recently recog-
nized as Best Commercial
Recycler by Clarks Summit
Borough Council. According
to the borough, the downtown
retail business effort and
quantity of recyclables was
impressive.
This commercial recycling
initiative has been underway
in Clarks Summit Borough
since August. Commercial
Recyclables can be dropped
off Monday through Friday
between 7a.m. and 3:15 p.m.
The drop-off dumpster is
marked and on the DPW
grounds on Davis St. Partici-
pants are reminded to cut
boxes (cardboard). Office
paper, glass, soda cans, news-
paper, plastics and catalogs
are all accepted.
The borough extends its
special thanks to the commer-
cial recyclers.
Im proud of their effort,
said Councilwoman and Recy-
cling Committee chairperson
Patty Lawler. Please always,
always take time to fill out the
form next to the dumpster. We
need to know your business is
recycling. You may be just
one month away from winning
two free parking meters for
the month of January.
Jason Corby, owner of the National Running Center, is shown with
Clarks Summit Borough Council President Gerrie Carey.
Clarks Summit business tops
commercial recycling in borough
Gymboree Play and Music, a global leader in programs for
children five and under, is offering an expanded class schedule at
the Waverly Community Center beginning Jan. 14, 2013. Gym-
boree will be offering Art and Music Classes. Art classes will
focus on inspiring the childs imagination and self-expression
with a world of hands on activities including sculpture, drawing,
collage, dramatic play and more.
Music classes will enhance childrens development and love of
music through song, dance, movement games and instruments.
Art and Music classes will be offered with parent participation
and drop-off options. Classes are limited in size and pre-regis-
tration is required. For more information or to register, call
570.208.2908.
Shown: Children participate in a past Gymboree event.
Gymboree classes offered at Comm
Wyoming Seminary Upper
School in Kingston and Lower
School in Forty Fort are of-
fering area elementary, middle
and high school students and
their families an opportunity
to visit either campus during
the Winter Visitation Day on
Martin Luther King Day, Jan.
21.
At the Lower School, 1560
Wyoming Avenue, Forty Fort,
Visitation Day will begin at
8:30 a.m. Visiting students are
invited to experience a typical
day at Lower School by shad-
owing a student in his/her
current grade level and join-
ing with other students for
lunch. Parent tours of Lower
School, which will include a
review of financial aid, will be
available at 8:30 a.m. and at 2
p.m. Reservations at Lower
School are requested Jan. 18.
Call the Lower School Admis-
sion Office at 570.718.6610
for more information and to
make reservations, or register
on line at www.wyomingsem-
inary.org.
The Upper School Vis-
itation Day program will be-
gin at 8:30 a.m. in the Stettler
Learning Resources Center,
North Sprague Avenue, King-
ston. Visiting students will
attend a welcome address and
presentations on preparing for
college and co-curricular op-
portunities, tour the campus,
and join current students for
lunch and a sampling of class-
es. Parents also may tour the
campus and attend discussions
on affordability and the Merit
Scholarship Program. Vis-
itation Day activities will end
at 2:30 p.m. Admission in-
terviews will be given upon
request.
All those interested in at-
tending the Upper School
Winter Visitation Day are
asked to respond by Friday,
Jan. 18. For more information,
or to sign up for the event, call
the Upper School Admission
Office at 570.270.2160, or
register on line at www.wyo-
mingseminary.org.
Information about Wyom-
ing Seminarys 2013 Merit
Exam, to be held Feb. 2 at
both Lower and Upper
Schools, will also be available
during this Visitation Day
event.
Wyoming Seminary
schedules visitation
C M Y K
WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 26, 2012 THE ABINGTON JOURNALCLARKS SUMMIT, PA WWW.THEABINGTONJOURNAL.COM PAGE 3A
newlevel.
With more than16 countries
represented in the musical and
interactive entertainment lineup,
co-organizer Damian the Magi-
cian said the event promises to
be extremely diverse this year.
He added, Something is going
to be there for everyone.
Damian and co-organizer
Doug Smith, of Lexington En-
tertainment, said in selecting the
theme for 2013, the goal was to
introduce an international feel
to the musical and specialty acts.
FromLatin jazz to reggae,
improvisational comedy to
poetry and face painting to
horse -drawn carriage rides,
First Night Scranton 2013 offers
not only an international diversi-
ty, but a variety of activities for
all ages.
Damian described it as, a
city-wide community-oriented
NewYears Eve celebration with
a safe alcohol-free environ-
mentone of the largest New
Years Eve celebrations in the
state.
It will begin with family Bin-
go at The Mall at Steamtown in
the food court from3 to 6 p.m.
and continue throughout the
evening with activities and en-
tertaining acts at venues around
the city.
Newthis year are outdoor
food vendors on Lackawanna
Avenue. Hot dogs, burgers and
other quick food items will be
served downstairs at ElmPark
Church. Other participating
food venues include Caf Trio,
Chocolate Creations and North-
ern Light Espresso Bar.
The event will conclude at the
mall with a fireworks display at
midnight.
First Night Scranton Project
Director Paige Balitski said she
and the other organizers are
always seeking newvolunteers,
and anyone interested in helping
out may contact themthrough
the website.
We need young people to
step up and volunteer, she said.
Damian added, Its worth-
while for themto help out.
Information about volun-
teering, a full schedule of events,
entertainment lineup and other
details can be found online at
www.firstnightscranton.com.
Admission to the entire event
and all performances and activ-
ities at the various venues, is
included with the purchase of a
$10 button, available ahead of
time at all area Gerritys Mar-
kets, The Mall at Steamtown,
Duffys Accessories on Linden
Street in Scranton, and the day
and night of the event at the
mall. A$5 senior discount will
be offered the day of the event
only.
Parking is free, and event
organizers suggest attendees
park in the malls parking ga-
rage, as the evening will begin
and conclude at the mall.
First Night Scranton: 14 years of diversity
ABINGTON JOURNAL/ELIZABETH BAUMEISTER
First Night organizers from left, include: Doug Smith, co-chair; Paige Balitski, project director and Damian
the Magician, co-chair
EVENT
Continued from Page 1
Welcome the New Year at
First Night Scranton with a
good dose of laughter.
Here We Are in Spain, an
improv comedy group, prom-
ises interactive family fun.
The comedy troupe, together
for five years, has performed
at many venues in the Scran-
ton area, including NBCs
The Office Convention, The
Vintage Theater. Starting in
January, they will take the
stage at Afa Art Gallery the
second Saturday of every
month.
Here We Are In Spain has
also presented shows at the
New York City Del Close
Marathon.
Members Britain Perry-
Giblin, Don McGlynn, Pat
Holmes, Pat Martin, Rob
Klubeck and Baxter Pancake
met while taking comedy
classes at the (Chris Barnes)
Comedy DoJo held at the
Masonic Temple.
Everything we do is im-
promptu, said Perry-Giblin,
Clarks Summit.
Laughter and New Years
Eve go hand-in-hand so the tie
to First Night is easy.
The group has performed at
First Night for the last few
years and according to Perry-
Giblin, Every show is differ-
ent, so there is no chance of a
repeat performance, except
for the laughter. We all love
First Night...it is a great event
that offers families the oppor-
tunity to celebrate New Years
Eve together. We take our
cues from interacting with the
audience and using their sug-
gestions to create the comedic
situations we portray.
Here We Are In Spain is
scheduled for three shows on
First Night, with the first two
performed in the lobby at the
Federal Building, 235 N.
Washington Avenue at 7:45
and 9:15 p.m. Their last show
will be outside at the Show-
mobile at Courthouse Square,
200 Block of N. Washington
Ave at 11:30 p.m.
Perry-Giblin said, This
year our last show (of the
night) will be on the main
stage so we will help to ring in
the New Year at midnight.
What could be more fun than
that?
For more information, con-
tact Pat Martin at
570.604.1874, or visit and like
the troupe on Facebook, face-
book.com/pages/Here-We-
Are-in-Spain/11969485
8056533?ref=hl.
PHOTO COURTESY ALEX SEELEY
Some members of Here We Are In Spain Pat Martin, Britain Perry
-Giblin, Pat Holmes and Baxter Pancake, from left.
Laugh into
the New Year
Improv group fun for all
BY JOAN MEAD-MATSUI
Abington Journal Correspondent
Poems written in French.
Phrases in Lakota, Iroquois and
Algonquin languages. These
are highlights to expect from
Lucia Dailey &Friends at the
upcoming First Night Scranton,
as they performoriginal works.
Scheduled to performwith
Dailey are poet and musician,
TomAllen and Rich Howells,
poet and journalist. They are
scheduled to appear at AFA
Gallery, 514 Lackawanna Ave-
nue, 7:45 to 8:15 p.m., 9:15 to
9:45 p.m. and10:45 to11:15
p.m.
Dailey performed at First
Night 2011and said she is hon-
ored to be asked again.
She described the poetry
reading as international, and
in keeping with the First Night
theme Around the World.
In keeping with that theme,
well have a poemI wrote in
French and another that quotes
fromthe Lakota (Sioux), Iroqu-
ois and Algonquin languages,
said Dailey, whose love of
language led her to major in the
study of foreign languages. She
has a BAin Modern Foreign
Languages and an MAin En-
glish, and comes froma family
who loved and valued the arts
and learning.
My mother was a classical
pianist, my father and his father
were poets, she said. Grow-
ing up I listened to long narra-
tive poems recited frommemo-
ry at family gatherings. But the
roots of poetry are much deeper
and poets struggle to translate
mythic imagination, overpow-
ering experiences, deep suf-
fering and love into the lan-
guage of their time.
Her poetic roots grewout of
her childhood, and to date she
has written several volumes,
and has authored two historical
novels, Mine Seed, and an-
other about World War One.
I sometimes write music for
my poems and also enjoy read-
ing with musical accompani-
ment fromsome of the gifted
musicians in our area, like Tom
Allen who will be joining us at
First Night.
Dailey has performed in
very diverse venues fromthe
Dissident Folk Festival with
Pete Seeger, to the governors
mansion in Harrisburg, where
she was asked to appear as
guest poet to read at the state-
wide Poetry Out Loud com-
petition.
She added, Poetry plays on
themes that remain constant in
human experience. The return
of the sun on the winter solstice
naturally leads to the contem-
plation of ends and beginnings
and people have always made
rituals to honor, mark, or cele-
brate them. Many festivals of
light, (re)birth, joy, and re-
demption occur at this time of
year around the world-- from
Hanukkah to Christmas to
Diwali to the Chinese New
Year and our own NewYear
Dailey thanked the dedicated
people, including Doug Smith,
Paige Balitski, Damian the
Magician, volunteers and spon-
sors for all they do and the
hard work they render to make
First Night happen.
For more information, con-
tact First Night Scranton Asso-
ciation, POBox 565, Scranton,
or call 570.955.5380.
WEEKENDER PHOTO/RICH HOWELLS
Lucia Dailey performs at a Drawing Social at the AFA Gallery.
Poetry with international flair
Group to perform original works
at First Night Scranton
BY JOAN MEAD-MATSUI
Abington Journal Correspondent
Ive never done for a first
night, Damian the Magi-
cian said.
The magician, who was
born in Scranton, still en-
joys wowing audiences. He
spoke about his favorite
part of performing.
I guess it would be
twofold: being able to
make an audience react
positively, to thrill them,
and for me to be able to
express myself artistically,
he said.
Damian said he likes the
concept of First Night. He
said the atmosphere is
charged with a kinetic
energy that you can feel in
the air.
What I like about First
Night is that it brings the
community together for a
very special concentrated
evening of celebration of
the arts and a new year,
Damian said. Where else
could you go for the mon-
ey and see that?
Damian sees First Night
as a way for the communi-
ty to come together.
Were all from the com-
munity, he said. And
were doing it for the com-
munity, showing we care
about the community.
The magician said he
performs all over the coun-
try.
Its very exciting, he
said.
Damian will perform at
the Steamtown Malls Cen-
ter Court from 7:30 to 8:15
p.m. and 9:30 to 10:15
p.m.
MAGIC
Continued from Page 1
MUSICAL OFFERINGS:
Continental ItalianSere-
nadesat Center Court, The Mall at
Steamtown from6:30 - 7:15 p.m.,
8:30 - 9:15 p.m. and10:30 - 11:15 p.m.
GeorgeWesleyupstairs at Elm
Park Church from7 - 7:45 p.m., 9 -
9:45 p.m. and11 - 11:45 p.m.
NorthesternPAGuitar Trio
Northern Light Espresso Bar 8:30 9
p.m., 9:30 10 p.m. and10:30 11 p.m.
Joe Stanky and the Cadets
at Leahy Hall from7:30 - 8:15 p.m.
and 9:30 - 10:15 p.m.
Hector RosadoandhisOr-
chestraHacheat ElmPark
Church from8 - 8:45 p.m. and10 -
10:45 p.m.
OdessaKlezmer Bandat
Leahy Hall from6:30 - 7:15 p.m., 8:30
- 9:15 p.m. and10:30 - 11:15 p.m.
Trinidad-Tobago Steel Band
at Ritz Theater from6:30 - 7:15 p.m.,
8:30 - 9:15 p.m. and10:30 - 11:15 p.m.
Tribal Wavesat Ritz Theater
7:30 - 8:15 p.m. and 9:30 - 10:15 p.m.
FAMILY AND INTERACTIVE
ENTERTAINMENT:
BrookvalleyFarmscarriage
ridesat the main entrance of The
Mall at Steamtown from6 -11 p.m.
John OConnell Caricature-
sIn the food court at The Mall at
Steamtown from7 11 p.m.
HereWeareinSpain im-
provisational comedy group at the
Federal Building from7:45 - 8:15 p.m.
and 9:15 - 9:45 p.m. Also on the
Showmobile at 11:30.
Poet LuciaDaileyand
Friendsat AFA Gallery from7:45 -
8:15 p.m., 9:15 - 9:45 p.m. and10:45 -
11:15 p.m.
Michael Jinxat Caf Trio and
Chocolate Creations from6:30 7
p.m., 8 - 8:30 p.m. and 9:30 10 p.m.
MikeSimondownstairs at Elm
Park Church from6:30 - 7:30 p.m., at
The Mall at Steamtown from8 9
p.m. and Firehouse from10:45 - 11:15
p.m.
DamiantheMagicianat
Center Court, The Mall at Steamtown
7:30 - 8:15 p.m. and 9:30 - 10:15 p.m.
Juggler RobSmithat The Mall
at Steamtown from6:30 - 7:15 p.m.,
and at Fire Station from7:45 - 8:15
p.m. and 9:15 - 9:45 p.m.
WildWest Entertainment at
the Federal Building from8:30 9
p.m. and10 - 10:30 p.m.
FionaPowell at AFA Gallery 7 -
7:30 p.m., 8:30 9 p.m. and10 - 10:30
p.m.
DancewithHoops at Cross-
over bridge, The Mall at Steamtown
from7 - 7:30 p.m. and 9 - 9:30 p.m.
JoJotheClownat Boscovs
second floor from6:30 - 10:30 p.m.
LindasFacepaintingat
BonTon, second floor, The Mall at
Steamtown. 6:30 11 p.m.
FrankotheClownat ElmPark
Church from6 - 6:30 p.m. and 7 -
7:30 p.m. and the Ritz Theater from
8:30 9 p.m.
FamilyBingoIn The Mall at
Steamtown Food Court, kicking off
the night from3 6 p.m.
LotusFiredancers at Fire
Station from7 - 7:30 p.m., 8:30 9
p.m. and10 - 10:30 p.m.
First Night FireworksSpec-
tacular will close out the night at
The Mall at Steamtown.
Youll almost feel the breeze as the island sounds of lively Trinidad-
Tobago Steel Band transport you to a Topical paradise at Ritz Theater
from 6:30 - 7:15 p.m., 8:30 - 9:15 p.m. and 10:30 - 11:15 p.m.
Dance with
Hoops will per-
form for First
Night Scranton
2013 on the
Crossover Bridge
at The Mall at
Steamtown from
7 - 7:30 p.m.
and 9 - 9:30
p.m.
C M Y K
PAGE 4A www.theabingtonjournal.com The Abington JournalClarks Summit, PA WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 26, 2012
Ford is Americas best-selling brand
1
and now
its time to celebrate with a great deal.
Text Gibbons to
35555 To View
our Inventory
2013 Ford Focus SE
2013 Ford Edge SE AWD 2013 Ford Explorer 4x4
2013 Ford Fusion S
Stk# 013273
2013 Ford Escape SE FWD 2.0
Stk# 013264
2013 Ford Fiesta SE
Lease for
$
149 24 mos*
Lease for
$
205 24 mos*
Lease for
$
279 24 mos*
Lease for
$
139 24 mos*
MSRP
$
31,745
MSRP
$
32,580
MSRP
$
22,890
* All lease payment plus tax and tags 24 month term with $2000 down. 10,500 miles allowed
per year. All applicable rebates applied. Some or most rebates available upon qualication.
See dealer for details. Expires 1/2/13.
* All lease payment plus tax and tags 24 month term with $2000 down. 10,500 miles allowed
per year. All applicable rebates applied. Some or most rebates available upon qualication.
See dealer for details. Expires 1/2/13.
* All lease payment plus tax and tags 24 month term with $2000 down. 10,500 miles allowed
per year. All applicable rebates applied. Some or most rebates available upon qualication. See
dealer for details. Expires 1/2/13.
* All lease payment plus tax and tags 24 month term with $2000 down. 10,500 miles allowed
per year. All applicable rebates applied. Some or most rebates available upon qualication.
See dealer for details. Expires 1/2/13.
* All lease payment plus tax and tags 24 month term with $2000 down. 10,500 miles allowed
per year. All applicable rebates applied. Some or most rebates available upon qualication.
See dealer for details. Expires 1/2/13.
* All lease payment plus tax and tags 24 month term with $2000 down. 10,500 miles allowed
per year. All applicable rebates applied. Some or most rebates available upon qualication.
See dealer for details. Expires 1/2/13.
* All lease payment plus tax and tags 24 month term with $2000 down. 10,500 miles allowed
per year. All applicable rebates applied. Add in after applied. Some or most rebates available
upon qualication. See dealer for details. Expires 1/2/13.
2.0L, 4cyl., Heated Seats, Automatic.
Stk# 013516
Stk# 013376
Stk# 013380
3 at this Price
30 others
available
Lease for
$
279
99
24 mos* SYNC, Satellite Radio
Lease for
$
245
99
24 mos*
SYNC, Satellite radio,
18 AluminumWheels
PWR Drive Seat, Keyless
Entry, Satellite Radio
Lease for
$
369 24 mos*
Buy for
$
28,949
*
Buy for
$
27,599
*
Buy for
$
16,899
*
Buy for
$
26,952
*
Gibbons Discount - $1,145
Ford Customer Cash - $1,500
Retail Bonus Cash - $500
Competitive Lease
Conquest - $1,000
Gibbons Discount - $1,130
Retail Customer Cash - $1,500
Competitive Lease
Conquest - $1,000
Gibbons Discount - $913
Retail Customer Cash - $1,000
MSRP
$
20,680
Gibbons Discount - $886
Ford Customer Cash - $2,000
Focus Sync and Sound - $395
Competitive Conquest - $500
MSRP
$
38,350
Gibbons Discount - $2,701
Retail Customer Cash - $2,000
Ford Retail Bonus Cash - $1,000
F150 5.0L Retail
Customer Cash - $500
MSRP
$
33,815
Gibbons Discount - $1,974
Retail Customer Cash $2,000
Focus Credit Retail
Bonus Cash -$1500
MSRP
$
30,445
Gibbons Discount - $1,493
Retail Customer Cash - $1,500
Ford Credit Retail
Conquest Cash - $500
MSRP
$
17,185
Gibbons Discount - $313
Ford Customer Cash - $1,000
Focus Sync and Sound -$395
Competitive Conquest -$500
Stk# 013382
HOURS: Mon.-Thur. 8:30 - 8:00 Fri. 8:30 - 5:00 Sat. 8:30 - 4:00
All Prices plus tax and tags. *Other factory rebates available upon qualications. See dealer for details. Ford Competitive Conquest Rebate customer must own a non-Ford vehicle in their name, it does not need to be
traded. See Dealer for details. **0% APR nancing available thru FMCC in lieu of $2,000 rebate. 5.9% APR nancing thru FMCC. All nancing with approved credit. Expires 1/2/13
See Entire Inventory at GibbonsFord.com
950 Main Street, Dickson City, PA. 18519 570-489-4747 1-800-853-4641 Exit 190A Interstate 81 - 1 mile
**** This is a combined offer. Receive your best deal on a package price. See dealer for details ****
Don Hull
Sales Consultant
Darryl Jayne
General Sales Manager
Doug Higgins
Pre-Owned Sales Manager
Stephanie Abraham
Finance Director
Casey Grow
Director of Social Media
Liz Hopkins
Internet Sales
John Orue
Sales Consultant
Keith Kime
Sales Consultant
Joe Dickhut
Sales Consultant
Andy Noone
Sales Consultant
Kurtis Medeiros
Sales Consultant
Since 1949
2 at this Price
15 others
available
2013 Ford F-150
Supercab XLT 4x4
Stk# 013217
2 at this Price
23 others
available
Buy for
$
28,341
*
Buy for
$
31,999
*
Buy for
$
20,977
*
2013 Ford F-250
Series Reg. Cab
Stk # 012621
-
Gibbons
Buy for
$
14,977
*
Air Conditioning, Keyless
Entry, 6-Speed Auto.
6-Speed Auto, SYNC w/ My Ford
Touch, Remote Keyless Entry
Sirius Satellite, Keyless Entry, SYNC
Voice Activated, Power Lift Gate
Air Conditioning,
Trailer Tow Package
C M Y K
WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 26, 2012 THE ABINGTON JOURNALCLARKS SUMMIT, PA PAGE 5A
CROSSWORDS
ANSWERS ON PAGE14
The Griffin Pond
Animal Shelter, 967
Griffin Pond Rd.,
Clarks Summit, is
open for the adop-
tion of pets from
noon to 4:30 p.m.,
daily. Wish list items
are always appre-
ciated, including
kitty litter and cat
food, Timothy hay,
Carefresh or Aspen
bedding for small
animals and any
type of donation.
Adopt a cage at the
Griffin Pond Animal Shelter
for one month and your $20
donation will go toward care
and feeding of the animal in
that cage for the month you
choose. A card will be placed
on the cage identifying the
sponsor for that month.
Send the following Adopt-
a-Cage information,
including name, address,
city, state and zip, phone
number, sponsor month,
choice of dog, cat or small
animal cage and howyou
would like your sponsor
card to appear, along with
$20for each cage to The
Griffin Pond Animal Shelter,
967 Griffin Pond Rd., Clarks
Summit, PA18411. Patrons
may adopt pets using Pay
Pal or credit cards.
My name is ... Baxter
Name: Baxter
Age: Adult
Sex: Male
Breed: Tuxedo cat
About me: I really want a home for the holi-
days, I have been at the shelter for almost a full
year. Im affectionate and very social.
Remember to contact the Griffin Pond Animal
Shelter at 586.3700 if your pet is lost or goes
astray.
Members of the MarywoodUniversityAviators Clubdonated
toys Dec. 14tothe Pediatrics Department at Moses Taylor Hospital.
The clubraisedmore than$250fromanon-campus fundraiser,
whichwas a raffle for a free plane ride.
The purpose of the MarywoodAviators is toprovide pilots and
other aviationenthusiasts withmore knowledge of the industry.
MarywoodUniversityis a private, Catholic college inNortheast
Pennsylvania that offers100undergraduate, graduate anddoctoral
degree programs.
Shown, from left: Jorge Borda, Marywood University student; Michele
Johnston, RN; Captain Joseph McDonald, Marywood University faculty;
Megan Schaefer, RN; Debra Rosenberg, LPN; Brendan LaFrance, Mary-
wood University student and John Rempe, Marywood University stu-
dent.
Marywood Aviators Club
donates Christmas toys
Dear Santa,
We have been very good this year, so
we are asking you to bring us the items
on our Wish List.
1. Blankets, sheets and towels
2. Cleaning supplies, laundry de-
tergent, paper towels and dish soap.
3. Kitty litter, puppy chow, kitten and
dog food
4. Gift cards
5. Loving homes we can call our very
own
SANTA, we know you will be busy
filling your sack with toys for boys and
girls, but please dont forget us.
THANK YOU,
The animals at Griffin Pond
P.S. We left a plate of milk and coo-
kies in the lobby for you.
For the fourth consecutive year, Keys-
tone College, La Plume has been included
on a national list of Military Friendly
Schools, ranking among the top15 percent
of colleges, universities, and trade schools
in the nation that are doing the most to
recruit and retain students with military
experience.
The 2013 list was released by G.I. Jobs
Magazine, published by Victory Media, a
veteran-owned business based in Corao-
polis, Pa. The selection of Military Friend-
ly Schools was compiled through exten-
sive research and a data-driven survey
during which G.I. Jobs polled over 12,000
Veterans Administration-approved colleg-
es and universities nationwide.
Keystone named as a
military-friendly school
C M Y K
PAGE 6A www.theabingtonjournal.com The Abington JournalClarks Summit, PA WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 26, 2012
EXPERTS IN AUTOMOTIVE
RECONDITIONING
CLEAN & WAX SPECIAL
ONLY
$
59
75
BUFF, WAX
& CLEAN SPECIAL
ONLY
$
89
75
SPREAD HOLIDAY CHEER WITH CARS ARE US!
COMPLETE AUTO
RECONDITIONING
ONLY
$
129
75
701 S. State Street
Clarks Summit
TRUCKS AND SUVs EXTRA
586-7177 or
963-9988
DYNAMIC PERFORMANCE COMES TO US NATURALLY
1609 River Road Pittston, PA18640 ph: 570-654-2433 Ix: 570-654-6242
www.milazzoindustries.com inIomilazzoindustries.com
Happy New Year
FROM
7
9
4
4
1
7
ing dispute.
Residents in attendance at
the Dec. 17 meeting ques-
tioned the boards vote to
extend the deadline in light of
the fact that the billing dis-
pute remains unresolved.
Planning Commission
Attorney Donna DeVita ex-
plained the board is simply
granting an extension, not
making any kind of decision
for or against the plans. She
also noted there is a provision
under the Municipal Planning
Code to bring the dispute to
an arbitrator if an agreement
can not be reached.
I think were kind of chas-
ing our tails, she said. He
[Massimilian] is saying he
needs more information from
John [Seamans, twp. engi-
neer] before he responds, and
we have to address that first.
Massimilian was told at
previous meetings to submit a
list of specific charges he is
contesting fromthe bills and
was advised to contact Sea-
mans for details in answer to
questions on certain charges.
According to Massimilian, he
sent two letters to Seamans
since then, to which, at the
time of the meeting, he had
not received a reply.
Seamans said he did re-
ceive the letters, but their
deliveries were delayed, due
to thembeing sent to the
wrong mailing address. He
said when he received them,
he turned the letters over to
the township supervisors for
review, as he works for the
township, not RansomRecre-
ational Shooting Sports,
LLC.
Planning Commission
member Lisa Levan asked
Massimilian about the con-
tent of those letters, and he
said they include general
backup information to his
claims.
Seamans responded, Its
all bogus backup informatio-
nan attempt to delay, delay,
delay.
Massimilian then chal-
lenged him, saying thats only
his opinion and he should be
able to back up his own bills.
I work for the township,
Andy, I dont work for you,
Seamans said. I turned the
documentation over to the
township. They will address
it.
Massimilian was later in-
structed to send future corre-
spondence directly to the
township and nothing was
resolved in regard to the bill-
ing dispute.
In other business, it was
noted that there was nothing
newto discuss in regard to
the Merkel subdivision re-
quest.
No items were discussed
under the Public Comment
section of the agenda.
RANGE
Continued from Page 1
F
amilies attended a
free showing of
A Muppet Christ-
mas Carol Dec. 20 at
the Scranton Cultural
Center, where kids were
asked their favorite
Muppet. Elmo and Ker-
mit the Frog were pop-
ular favoritesa red
and green Christmas
coincidence?
WHO IS YOUR FAVORITE MUPPET?
ABINGTON JOURNAL PHOTOS/JASON RIEDMILLER
Jaedyn Kura of Dunmore, Kermit.
Maya Baresse of Scranton, Elmo. Isabella and Cameron Forgione of
Covington Twp, Kermit.
Braxton Bean and Jayden Carter
of Forest City, Kermit.
Brooke Schlesser, Kermit, Billy
Teaman, Cookie Monster, and
Jayden Lillie, Kermit. From Dun-
more and Scranton.
PRENUPTIAL AGREEMENTS FOR NON-MARRRIED COUPLES
Prenuptial agreements are contracts commonly used by couples entering second
marriages, who view them as useful estate planning tools. As unromantic as it may
seem, prenuptial agreements also anticipate the possibility of divorce and dictate its
terms. While prenups have traditionally been associated with married couples, they
are no longer necessarily so. Unmarried couples have also increasingly been seeking
legal protections through cohabitation agreements, which, like prenups, are designed
to protect each persons assets, address child-custody issues, and determine support
obligations. According to a recent poll by the American Academy of Matrimonial
Lawyers, 39 percent of divorce attorneys have seen an increase in cohabitation agree-
ments between live-in couples over the past fve years.
Every family is different and you need a family law attorney who understands that.
If you have any questions about prenuptial agreements, or any aspect of family law,
please call me. I amAmil M. Minora and I can deal with both routine and unusual
situations in regards to prenuptials, separations, divorces, adoptions, and child cus-
tody agreements. Call (570) 961-1616 to make an appointment today. My address
is 700 Vine St., Scranton. Im here to help.
www.minorakrowiak.com
HINT: A prenuptial or cohabitation agreement should not favor one party over
the other. Instead, they should provide a useful way of setting out each spouses/
partners expectations for the relationship.
Amil M. Minora, Attorney at Law
C M Y K
WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 26, 2012 THE ABINGTON JOURNALCLARKS SUMMIT, PA WWW.THEABINGTONJOURNAL.COM PAGE 7A
The supervisor asked if a tree
could be removed because it
blocks the sight of cars com-
ing from Glenburn Road.
James, along with several
others, surveyed the area and
disagreed that a tree needs to
be removed.
Instead, James installed a
22-foot STOP bar and painted
a double yellow line on the
intersection.
Local recycling centers will
now accept paper and card-
board in one bin. Recycling
centers are accepting electron-
ic devices after a new state
policy refuses electronic de-
vices in landfills. Electronics
are accepted anytime with no
fee.
WAVERLY TWP. The
budget for 2013 as published
was approved by Waverly
Township Supervisors at the
Dec. 10 meeting.
Public Works Director Tho-
mas James will invite a repre-
sentative from PPL to visit the
township building about the
purchase of a generator. The
generator will control power
in the municipal building, but
will not reach the equipment
in the township garage.
A supervisor from Glen-
burn Township. approached
Waverly Township. about a
concern at the intersection of
Oakford and Glenburn roads.
Waverly Twp.
approves budget
BY BRITTNEY PIERCE
Abington Journal Correspondent
A new book by University
of Scranton Psychology Pro-
fessor John C. Norcross,
Ph.D., was selected by The
Wall Street Journal as one of
the years best books.
Changeology: 5 Steps to
Realizing your Goals and
Resolutions was among the
just six best guides to later
life highlighted in the Dec. 7
online issue (in print on Dec.
10).
In the book, Dr. Norcross,
an internationally recognized
expert on behavior change,
shares his science-based pro-
gram for reshaping behavior
and ensuring permanent
change. The Clarks Summit
resident explains why the
process of self change is the
same no matter what behavior
is being altered and provides
the steps and a structured
timeline for lasting results.
Whether youre hoping to
quit smoking or gambling,
commit to exercising more
hours a week, eliminate fast
food and bike to work, or
learn a new skill that will
earn you promotion, follow-
ing the program outlined in
this book can dramatically
increase your chance of suc-
cess, said Dr. Norcross.
This practical program
shows you exactly how to
execute the steps necessary to
change on your own.
Changeology explains: how
to maintain motivation by the
push-pull method; how to
assemble a support team to
help you reach your goal;
how to maintain new behav-
iors; how to control your
environment; and how to
manage slips and resist the
urge to relapse. The book is
accompanied by a free, inter-
active web page
(www.Changeology-
Book.com).
Dr. Mehmet Oz has en-
dorsed the book, saying Dr.
Norcross has revolutionized
the psychology of change and
now offers a remarkable five-
step program for more than
50 common complaints that
plague many of us. You can
learn to change your life to-
day.
Dr. Norcross, a Distin-
guished University Fellow at
Scranton, also serves as an
adjunct professor of psychia-
try at SUNY Upstate Medical
College, and is a board-certi-
fied clinical psychologist in
part-time practice. He has
written more than 300 publi-
cations and edited or co-writ-
ten 22 professional books.
Dr. Norcrosss research on
behavior change and New
Years resolutions has been
featured in hundreds of media
outlets including USAToday,
The New York Times, Time,
The Wall Street Journal,
Newsweek, The Washington
Post, National Public Radio,
the Dr. Oz Radio Show, the
BBC, and network morning
shows.
Changeology, published
by Simon & Schuster, be-
comes available Dec. 25.
Local authors
work among
years best
created the idea to send sym-
phony notes to the district.
Staff members Virginia
Grande and Patty Andrisani
also helped organize the
event.
Its a subtle, but meaning-
ful way to remember the
lives that were lost, Curra
said. The students really
took a lot of time to write
personalized messages.
According to Murray, the
school also observed a mo-
ment of silence for the vic-
tims at 9:30 a.m., almost the
exact time a gunman entered
the Connecticut school last
week and began the shooting
which killed 20 students and
six adults.
LETTERS
Continued from Page 1
ABINGTON JOURNAL/ROBERT TOMKAVAGE
Abington Heights senior Cassidy
Henry took time to research the
interests of several victims and
create personalized sympathy
cards.
COSTA DRUGS
Summit Square, Clarks Summit
Permanent Hours:
Monday - Friday 8 a.m. - 7 p.m.
Saturday 8 a.m. - 4 p.m. Sunday 8 a.m. - 1 p.m.
We guarantee accuracy Computerized
Prescription Filling Patient Prole
We honor all major prescription
plans including CVS, Caremark,
Medco, Aetna, Geisinger and
Express Scripts
587-4717
WORLD CLASS EYE SURGERY
Fellowship Trained
Cornea Specialist
Keratoconus
Dry Eye
Corneal Transplant
Premium Cataract Surgery
Custom Bladeless LASIK
570.347.5608
www.rowedoor.com
7
9
5
4
6
0
Member FDIC. *Annual Percentage Yield (APY) is accurate as of December 10, 2012. Minimum
balance to obtain the APY is $500.00. Minimum of $500.00 to open the account. Penalty may be
imposed for early withdrawal. Deposit to Grand Opening CD must be new money to PS Bank.
Certain restrictions may apply.
Tunkhannock
Grand Opening
Certificate of Deposit
1.09%APY* 15-month CD!
Visit us at 802 Hunter Highway
(next to Walmart)
Hurry - limited time offer!
www.PeoplesBankPA.com | 866-746-1011
said Megan.
The larger tree in the
living roomincludes gar-
land made frompopcorn
and I-Cord knitted garland
made by Megan. This year
five-year-old Hannah cre-
ated Christmas cards and
has been busy making
beaded bracelets for her
friends.
Friendship bracelets are
very big with kids, she
said.
Regarding the countless
hours she has devoted to
craft time with her chil-
dren, Megan explained, It
is quality time. Theres no
television. We dont have
music on. We sit together.
We really like working with
our hands, and I think its
important to have your kids
active outside when its
nice and active inside when
it isnt.
She added, Were very
lackadaisical about the
rules with crafting. Its
difficult for me to get her
(Hannah) to tell me about
her dayso this kind of
structures her to talk to me
about her dayTo me
theres nothing nicer than
handmade gifts.
At Evelyn Walters
house in South Abington
Township, she and her two
children, Jake, 5 and Evie,
7, spent an afternoon with
friends, Kathy Platt and her
son, six-year-old Calvin,
crafting sand art ornaments
using sand and feathers.
They also planned to make
gingerbread men and other
Christmas- inspired pro-
jects. The crowd that gath-
ers on a regular basis often
includes additional friends
and their children.
Walters said, When
youre a mom, you dont
like to be away fromthe
kids so much and its even
more fun to be there and
see your children doing
things together and having
fun, and youre having your
friends around at the same
time.
Working with the kids
is learning time and were
letting thembe creative and
were actively participating
in what theyre doing.
There are presents I re-
member making (as a
child). I remember every
one of them. I think they
(our children) are also
going to remember the
projects were doing with
them.
The families also spend
time together throughout
the year, engaging their
children in outdoor activ-
ities with paint and other
crafts.
Platt added, We do a lot
of things throughout the
yearWe like it because
the mothers get together
and we share ideas and its
nice for the kids to be to-
gether. Its a structured
playIts nice to see them
do things together.
HOMEMADE
Continued from Page 1
A cottonball, twig and glitter
snowman craft designed by
Megan, Hannah and Harrison
Hughes.
Jake Walters, Kathy Platt, Calvin Platt, Evelyn Walters and Evie Walters craft sand art orna-
ments using sand and feathers in South Abington Township.
the court, attempted to dis-
count Scrantons claims that it
needed the tax to be financial-
ly solvent. The city main-
tained that it had exhausted
all other forms of raising
revenue and cutting costs and
needed the tax to balance its
budget.
Clarks Green Council Presi-
dent Keith Williams said he is
pleased with the courts deci-
sion.
There comes a point where
one community shouldnt
have to be so reliant on the
other for tax money and for
revenues, Williams said.
There need to be other plans
that should be developed and
implemented where commu-
ters dont have to bear the
brunt of these expenses.
TAX
Continued from Page 1
C M Y K
PAGE 8A THE ABINGTON JOURNALCLARKS SUMMIT, PA WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 26, 2012
Abington Heights High School
junior Serena DeSeta won first place
in the schools annual Poetry Out
Loud Competition, held Dec. 19 in
the auditorium.
A panel of judges and a small
audience listened to five students
recite two poems each during the
competition, which was followed by
an award ceremony where first, sec-
ond and third prize plaques were
given out. Second prize was awarded
to sophomore Kate Glidewell and
third prize to sophomore Jordan Rip-
pon.
DeSeta recited the poems Ego by
Denise Duhamel and Alone by Ed-
gar Allan Poe. She will move on to
the regional competition at the
WVIA Studio in February.
ABINGTON JOURNAL PHOTOS/ELIZABETH BAUMEISTER
Winners of the Abington Heights High School 2012 Poetry Out Loud Competition Dec. 19, from
left: Kate Glidewell, a sophomore, second place; Serena Deseta, a junior, first place and Jordan
Rippon, a sophomore, third place.
Abington Heights High School junior Serena DeSeta recites a poem during the schools annual
Poetry Out Loud Competition in the auditorium Dec. 19, for which she was awarded first place.
DeSeta wins top prize
BY ELIZABETH BAUMEISTER
lbaumeister@theabingtonjournal.com
Letters of invitation have
been mailed to all public and
private schools in the North-
east quadrant of Pa. by the
Northeastern Pennsylvania
Bridge Building Committee.
Schools are invited to select
three students to represent
their school in a unique edu-
cational experience that re-
quires no registration fee of
the school or student partici-
pant as all expenses are cov-
ered by our sponsors.
Students are encouraged to
check with their teachers and/
or administration to obtain the
particulars. Students, parents,
teachers and administrators
are asked to visit www.ne-
parbdgblg.com for detailed
information and specific in-
formation regarding the com-
petition. The bridge building
competition will be held Feb.
9, 2013 in the Viewmont Mall
in Dickson City (Exit 191A of
Interstate 81). Students and
teachers interested in more
information are encouraged to
contact Donald Kieffer, re-
gional director at Email:
dhkieffer@gmail.com, phone:
570. 586.0197
The objective of the compe-
tition is to provide an educa-
tional learning experience for
secondary students to apply
their understanding of scien-
tific and engineering princi-
ples to everyday experiences,
in this case bridge structures.
The program in turn hopes to
encourage our youth to in-
vestigate career opportunities
in science, technology, mathe-
matics, and engineering. The
first and second place regional
winners are eligible to com-
pete at the International Com-
petition in Chicago, Ill. at a
time and date to be announced
later.
Trophies/plaques are award-
ed to the first, sponsored by
CECO Associates in memory
of Angelo Rosati; second and
third place winners in the
competition. Certificates of
participation and commemo-
rative T-shirts are given to
each participant in the region-
al competition. Trophies are
also presented to the schools
represented by the respective
first, second and third place
winners. Participants are also
eligible for scholarships to
local colleges/universities
when they are available. A
special Architectural EX-
CELLENCE award, in mem-
ory of Tomas Kovall, an
Abington Heights physics
teacher who died after a short
and courageous battle with
cancer, will also be presented
Organizations interested in
assisting the regional competi-
tion should contact Donald
Kieffer at www.neparbdgblg-
.com, or via email at
DHKIEFF-
ER@ALUM.LHUP.EDU;
phone 570. 586.0197; fax,
570. 587.1154 or cell 570.
561.3286.
Bridge
contest
set to
begin
Several students from our
area are in their first semester
as Blue Hens at the University
of Delaware, including:
George Buckbee, Sarah
Fulton, Nicole Kozar, Brian
Mattern, Michael Pacyna, all
of Clarks Summit; John Lobo-
da, Waverly; Matthew Stro-
ney, Dalton and Brian Vietz,
Clarks Green.
COLLEGE NEWS
Six Abington Heights High School students were named 2012 National Merit Commended Students.
They are Evan Eckersley, Taylor Ross, Will Swisher, Amelia Oon, Kaylee Kline and Madeline McNichols
These students have received letters of commendation from the National Merit Scholarship Corpora-
tion in recognition of their outstanding academic promise. Commended Students are named on the basis
of a nationally applied Selection Index score.
AHHS students honored for academic success
Volunteers from Keystone College, La Plume made a trip to
the Abington Manor to spread holiday cheer with the resi-
dents. Some of the volunteers wore costumes during a Christ-
mas Show.
Shown, from left: Pudge Adcroft, Tim Clancy and Derrick A. Davis.
Keystone College
students visit seniors
Members of The American Legion Post 953 of Nicholson have been
a Secret Santa to area children. Shown, from left: Tom Adams (Com-
mander), Dave Gohsler, Ralph Hanyon, Stan Majiaka and Joe Woolsey.
Legion members buy toys
Five new coordinated transportation vans have been added to the
fleet and are on the road, serving the needs of the citizens of Lacka-
wanna County. The vehicles, which cost $52,696 each, were purchased
with Federal Highway Flex Money through COLTS. The 18 passenger
vans have the capacity to hold three wheelchairs.
Shown, from left: John Tomcho, Director of Coordinated Transporta-
tion; County Commissioners Patrick M. OMalley, Corey D. OBrien, Jim
Wansacz and Robert Fiume, COLTS Director.
Lackawanna County
receives new vans
Pennstar Bank presented the United Way of Lackawanna and
Wayne Counties with a check for $5,000 in support of the United
Ways Pre-Kindergarten Scholarship program. This financial com-
mitment is part of the Pennsylvania Department of Community and
Economic Developments Educational Improvement Tax Credit pro-
gram which allows eligible businesses to receive tax credits that
are then directed to approved Pre-K Scholarship Organizations.
Shown above, from left, are: Gary Drapek, president of United
Way of Lackawanna and Wayne Counties and Joseph P Migliorino,
Pennstar Bank Senior Vice President.
Pennstar Bank supports United Way
Pre-K program
The University of Scran-
ton will conduct a financial
aid workshop Jan. 15, from
6:30 to 8:30 p.m. in the
fourth-floor Moskovitz
Theater of the DeNaples
Center.
The workshop, presented
by William Burke director
of financial aid, will include
a review of the Free Appli-
cation for Federal Student
Aid (FAFSA) and academic
scholarship and need-based
assistance programs.
The program will include
information on federal and
state-aid programs, and
student and parent loans.
In the case of inclement
weather, the workshop
will be held Jan. 22, at
the same time and loca-
tion.
Reserve you spot at
www.scranton.edu/finaid-
workshop.
U of S to hold aid workshop
Pennsylvania Ex-
truded Tube Compa-
ny (PEXCO) ob-
served its 20th Chil-
drens Christmas
party December 1 at
Baptist Bible Col-
lege, Clarks Sum-
mit.
The party was
organized by Abing-
ton Heights juniors
Maria Sunick and
Francesca Toth for
their schools com-
munity project.
The event was
open to the employ-
ees children, grand-
children and retired
employees.
BBC hosts
Christmas
party
Students in kindergarten through fourth grade at South Abington
Elementary School recently participated in a food drive to benefit
United Neighborhood Centers of Northeastern Pennsylvanias
(UNC) emergency food and clothing bank, Angels Attic.
Shown, from left: Pam Berg, UNCs Emergency Services Supervisor; Elana
Supanek, Olivia Arcuri, Daniel Knelly, Tara Crum, PTA President; Kohl Linda-
man and Gabe Pietryka.
Students host food drive
C M Y K
WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 26, 2012 THE ABINGTON JOURNALCLARKS SUMMIT, PA WWW.THEABINGTONJOURNAL.COM PAGE 9A
Ca ll 1- 8 00- 2 73- 7130 To Ad vertis e
R eligious S ervice C alendar
O UR LADY O F
THE S NO W S
S t. Ben ed ict
S ATUR DAY
VIGIL M AS S ES
4 p .m . S t. Ben ed ict
5 p .m . Ou rL ad yof
the S n ows
6:30 p .m . Ou rL ad y
ofthe S n ows
S UNDAY
7 a.m . Ou rL ad yof
the S n ows
8 a.m . S t. Ben ed ict
9:30 a.m . Ou rL ad y
ofthe S n ows
11:00 a.m . S t. Ben ed ict
11:15 Ou rL ad y
ofthe S n ows
12:20 S t. Ben ed ict
CO NFES S IO NS
S ATUR DAYS
3:00 p .m . S t. Ben ed ict
6:00 p .m . Ou rL ad y
ofthe S n ows
(570) 586- 1741
Ca tholic Luthera n
TR INITY LUTHER AN CHUR CH
205 W . Grove S treet
Rev. George M athewsP astor
W ors hip S e rvic e s
S atu rd ay7:00 p .m .
Con tem p oraryS u n d ayS ervice 8:15 a.m .
Trad ition al S ervice 9:30 a.m .
www.Trin ityL u theran cs.com
Call ou rP reschool:
586- 5590
Chu rch Office
587- 1088
THE CHUR CH
O F THE EP IP HANY
25 Chu rch Hill,
Glen b u rn Twp ., P A.
(2 M ilesNorth of
ClarksS u m m it)
Com e join u sfor
worship on
S UND AY
8:00am & 10:30am
HOL Y EUCHARIS T
9:00 S u n d ayS chool
& Ad u ltF oru m
W ED NES D AY
9:30AM
HOL Y EUCHARIS T
5 63- 15 64
www.ep ip han y
glen b u rn .org
God sheart& han d sin
the Ab in gton s
FIR S T BAP TIS T CHUR CH
O F ABINGTO N
1216 N. Ab in gton Rd
( corn erofAb in gton & Carb on d ale)
Com e Join UsF or
S ervicesS u n d ay
M orn in g 11:00 a.m .
P astorK en n eth K n ap p
(570) 587- 4492
Ba p tis t
Chris tia n
CountryAllia nce Church
14014 Orchard D rive, ClarksS u m m it
Acros s f rom Red BarnV illage,N ewtonT wp.
P astorD an M organ tin i
(570) 587- 2885
Worship Service: Sunday 10:00AM
Time of Prayer: Sunday 11:15AM
Bible Study: Wednesday 6:00PM
Ep is cop a l Free M ethod is t
W AVER LY
CO M M UNITY
CHUR CH
101 Carb on d ale Rd
S erm on S eries
NearThe En d
M orn in g W orship
11 am
Nu rsery&
Child ren sChu rch
P astorJam esCohen
(570) 587- 2280
waverlycom m u n itychu rch.org
P res b yteria n
FIR S T P R ES BYTER IAN
CHUR CH
300 S chool S t.,
ClarksS u m m it
W orship with u son
S u n d aym orn in gs
9am an d 10:55am
Child care availab le
all m orn in g!
5 8 6-63 06
www. fp c c s . org
Bridget Z. Walsh DMD
Megan Z. Azar DMD
570.585.7111
azarwalshdental.com
Your Community Credit Union
We wish you and your family
a happy holiday & a healthy,
prosperous new year!
www.crossvalleyfcu.org (570) 823-6836
Open to residents of Luzerne, Lackawanna & Wyoming Counties
Check out our group page on facebook. Main Office, 640 Baltimore Drive, WB, PA 18702
NowOpen!
West
Scranton
Branch,
815 Smith Street
Become a
member today!
NowOpen!
West
Scranton
Branch,
815 Smith Street
Become a
member today!
CHERMAK AUTO
CAR & TRUCK SERVICE CENTER
Were Not Just Suzuki and Saab.
Serving Most Major Makes & Models
of Cars and Light Trucks
GM FORD
TOYOTA HONDA
and many more foreign
& domestic brands
SERVICES
State Inspection & Emissions
Detailing & Reconditioning
Oil Changes Electrical
Alignments Tire & Wheel Balancing
Major Mechanical
Remote Starters and Accessories
713 N. STATE STREET CLARKS SUMMIT, PA
570-586-6676 WWW.CHERMAKAUTO.COM
Mon. - Thurs. 8-7 Fri. 8-5 Sat. 8-1
We carry all the top names in tires
A
$
40
00
Value
with any standard or
premium oil change
Valid through 12-31-12
FREE
PRE-WINTER
CHECK OVER
b .
odels
SERVING THE ABINGTONS SINCE 1945
P
leats on an ice blue dress flow with the mo-
tion of a young dancer reveling in the merri-
ment of New Years Eve festivities. Her part-
ner in a matching blue velvet suit observes perfect
dance formation. This turn-of-the-century postcard,
Wishing You A Happy New Year contains all the
joy of the season. Card designed as part of the Ra-
phael Tuck & Sons Post Card Series No. 8057.
NEWYEARS WISH
POSTCARD COURTESY JACK HIDDLESTONE
Featuredartist was beadartist
Joanne Hemmings at Cloe and
Company, 410S. State St.
Participatingart venues in-
cluded: Weezies Corner, 116
Depot St.; AbingtonArt Studio,
208Depot St.; Lawlers Affor-
Clarks Summit SecondFriday
Art Walkorganizedbythe Art
Council of the Abingtons took
place Dec. 14.
dable Elegance, 210Depot St.;
AbingtonFinancial Group, 120
S. State St.; Duffys, 312S. State
St.; Sonias Contemporary
Clothing, 120S. State St.; Pau-
lettes PrettyPurses, 336S. State
St.; Cloe andCompany, 410S.
State St.; EverythingNatural,
426S. State St.; Sole toSoul,
535S. State St.; Mamma Mia
Pizza, 507S. State St.
For details onnext months
event, contact Charles Char-
lesworthat ffnepa@epix.net.
ABINGTON JOURNAL/NATALIE MENNICUCCI
Duffys Cafe also displayed visual arts on display by local artist, Beth Tyrrell, Scranton.
Jasper Paci, Olyphant, plays live
music at Duffys Cafe in Clarks
Summit during Dec. 14 Art Walk
events.
Live music,
illustrations
featured at
Art Walk
C M Y K
PAGE 10A www.theabingtonjournal.com The Abington JournalClarks Summit, PA WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 26, 2012
ArtsEtc...
With the newyear approach-
ing, I always like to take a mo-
ment to reflect upon all that has
happened over the past year as
well as look forward to the com-
ing year. During those reflec-
tions, I usually end up making a
newyears resolution or two.
Nowmind you, these resolu-
tions are not always kept, but
one resolution that I have found
to be easy to honor is to learn
and try newthings.
For instance, last year I made
that resolution and learned how
to make jewelry when I took a
couple of jewelry-making class-
es at the Dietrich. Through those
classes I found out howrelaxing
that hobby was. This year I have
taken a fewmore jewelry mak-
ing classes including Kumihimo
Beading and Brick Stick Ear-
rings and discovered that I really
want to continue expanding my
knowledge on the subject.
For 2013, I amonce again
going to make a resolution to try
and learn newthings. If you plan
on making that a goal too, I
recommend looking to the Die-
trich Theater. We offer a host of
classes and events for all ages to
enjoy. This January and Febru-
ary middle school and high
school students will have the
opportunity to explore all as-
pects of theatre arts in our After
School Theatre Arts Program.
During this program, students
will create their own scripts,
props and costumes; learn about
stage managing, movement,
lighting and sound and will
performtheir production for an
audience on the Dietrich stage.
This eight-week programwill
be held on Wednesdays and
Thursdays, Jan. 2 through Feb.
23 from3:15 to 5:30 p.m. Led
by drama coach Jennifer Jen-
kins, admission is free. You
cant beat that! Right? Call the
Dietrich at 570.996.1500 to
register. Space is limited.
For adults, we will be starting
up two newyoga classes in
January. On Wednesdays, Jan. 2
through Feb. 6 from10 to11:15
a.m., registered yoga teacher
Donna Fetzko will be back to
teach Simply Yoga. This formof
exercise promotes overall
health, strengthens the body,
improves flexibility, increases
energy and can decrease stress.
Classes are suitable for all levels
of experience and will be pre-
sented in the user-friendly Yoga-
Fit style. Participants are en-
couraged to wear comfortable
clothes, bring a mat or towel,
and water. Admission is $60 for
a series of six consecutive class-
es or drop in at $15 per class.
We will also be offering Kun-
dalini Yoga with instructor Bar-
bara Tierney in the newyear.
Classes will be held on Sat-
urdays, Jan. 19, 26, Feb. 2 and 9
from10 to11:30 a.m. In this
series you will experience the
gifts that Kundalini yoga, as
taught by Yogi Bhajan, has to
offer as you explore breath,
MORE THAN
MOVIES
Dietrich Theater
Erica Rogler
See Movies, Page 11
Visual Arts/
Performing
Arts
B&B Art Gallery Exh-
hibit, through the end of
December, at 222 Northern
Blvd, SAbington Twp. Fea-
turing artwork created by
northeastern Pa. artists, in-
cluding featured artist Joe
Kluck and Maureen Van
Nostrand, Rita Eddy, Chris
Lathrop, Jan Winemiller,
Paul Kaulfers, Lesli Van
ZanderbergenandKirkVan
Zanderbergen. Gallery
Hours: Monday-Friday 11
a.m. - 7 p.m., Saturday 11
a.m. - 5 p.m. and Sunday12
- 5 p.m. Kluck will give a
presentation called Chalk
Talk Jan. 6, at 2 p.m. Info:
bnbartgallery.com or
585.2525.
AFA Winter Members
Exhibition, through Dec.
28 at the AFA Gallery, 514
Lackawanna Ave., Scran-
ton.
NewVisions Studio and
Gallery January Exhibit:
Annmarie Ciccarelli and
Alexandra Price, Jan. 4 -
19, opening reception on
First Friday, Jan. 4 from - 9
p.m. Cost: Reception is free
to the public and will in-
clude food and drink and
meet and greet with the art-
ists.
Punk Show, Jan. 5 at
New Visions Studio and
Gallery, 201 Vine St.,
Scranton. Bands include:
Feds, Halfling, Bad An-
swers and Mundo (debut
set). Doors oopen at 7 p.m.
and showstarts at 7:30 p.m.
Weather date: Jan 6 or 8.
Cost: $7. Info: 878.3970 or
NewVisionsStudio.com.
Covenant Public Con-
cert Mignarda, lute-
song duo, Jan. 6 at Cov-
enant Presbyterian Church,
550 Madison Ave., Scran-
ton at 3 p.m. Mignarda: lu-
tenist Ron Andrico and so-
prano Donna Stewart in a
candlelight concert. Cost:
free; food donations for the
Safety Net Food Pantry are
welcomed.
Literary Arts
Writers Group, for ages
18 and up, at the Dietrich
Theater in downtown Tunk-
hannock, Thursdays from 7
to 8:30 p.m., ongoing. All
genres and levels of writing
welcome. Cost: Free. Info:
996.1500.
STACKS Writing
Group, at The Vintage/
Morning Glory Cafe, 326
Spruce St., Scranton, every
Tuesday at 6:30 p.m. Info:
emailstackswriting-
group@gmail.com.
Arts, Crafts
and More
Holiday Camp, at the
Dietrich Theater in down-
town Tunkhannock, Dec.
27 and 28 from 9:30 - 11
a.m. For ages 5-12. Instruc-
tors: Amy and Steve Colley.
Attendees will the opportu-
nity to throw pots on a pot-
ters wheel, create sculp-
tures and design 3D collag-
es out of recycled house-
hold items. Admission:
$25. Register/info:
996.1500.
Last weeks winner:
Peter Erickson
of Clarks Summit
Last weeks answer:
Peter Jackson
M
onica Pacyna, 17, of Clarks
Summit, was named WVIA
Artist of the Week for the
week of Dec. 16 - 22 and starred in a
one-minute television spot
on her work.
Pacyna, an Abington
Heights High School senior,
primarily uses pencil and
colored pencils for her
drawings. Her favorite artist
is American painter and
illustrator Norman Rock-
well.
She hasnt chosen a col-
lege, but she plans to study
architecture, she said. The
young artist wants to focus
on restoring old houses or
building newenvironmen-
tally -friendly structures.
It just makes me feel that
I should work that much
harder now, being recog-
nized, Pacyna said of the award.
Ryan Kresge, 18, of Clarks Sum-
mit, was also named one of WVIA
Artists of the Week for the same
week as Pacyna.
Kresge plays cello in the Abing-
ton Heights High School orchestra.
He said he was grateful to be cho-
sen, especially because there are
many deserving musicians at his
school.
Ive been playing [cello] serious-
ly for the past four years,
he said. I had originally
touched the cello in fifth
grade, but I picked it back
up.
The cellist, who said he
plays a little guitar, said he
isnt quite sure why he
selected the cello as a child.
I dont know. I just real-
ly like playing cello, he
said. Its the stringed in-
strument that most closely
represents the range of the
human voice.
Kresge said his favorite
composer is Austrian com-
poser Gustav Mahler, who
lived in the 19th and 20th
centuries. Kresge said he
played Mahlers Symphony No. 1
over the summer. He described that
concert as an almost spiritual expe-
rience.
The experience of playing that
symphony really opened my eyes to
the wealth of playing classical mu-
sic, he said.
The Abington Heights senior said
will major in environmental studies
in college, but that he wants to con-
tinue playing music.
Id love to find an ensemble to
play in.
The WVIAtelevision spots were
designed to call attention to high
school students who have excelled
in the study of the arts, according
to the television stations website.
ABOVE AND INSET BELOW: Mon-
ica Pacyna, 17, of Clarks Summit,
was named WVIA Artist of the
Week for the week of Dec. 16 -
22 and starred in a one-minute
television spot on her work. Her
work is shown here.
ARTIST
appreciation
Pacyna
Kresge
BY GERARD NOLAN
Abington Journal Correspondent
Contestants can only win once in a 60-day period.
Who plays Jean Valjean in "Les Misrables"?
C M Y K
WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 26, 2012 THE ABINGTON JOURNALCLARKS SUMMIT, PA WWW.THEABINGTONJOURNAL.COM PAGE11A
A yearend purchase at the
Abington Community Library
has been described as a must-
read for parents of youngsters
from elementary through high
school years who are actively
involved in sports programs.
Parenting Young Athletes
was co-authored by two pro-
fessors of psychology who
serve on the faculty at the Uni-
versity of Washington. Dr.
Frank L. Small and Dr. Ronald
E. Smith write from experi-
ence on child development,
sport psychology, and sports
medicine, translating their
knowledge into a practical
how-to guide that assists
parents in ensuring that their
sons and daughters get the
most out of youth sports. They
address such issues as promot-
ing achievement in all areas of
life, choosing the right sports
program, helping children cope
with disappointment and per-
formance anxiety, applying
positive principles of coaching
and character-building, and
recognizing and preventing
bullying and abuse. The book
is in the adult non-fiction col-
lection at the library.
New Novels Available in
Both Print and Audiobook
Versions
Dear Life: Stories, by
Alice Munro. In story after
story, Munro illumines the
moment a life is forever altered
by a chance encounter or an
action not taken, or by a simple
twist of fate that turns a person
out of his or her accustomed
path and into a new way of
being and thinking. Most of
the stories take place in small
Canadian towns around Lake
Huron, where the author grew
up.
The Inn at Rose Harbor, by
Debbie Macomber. Young war
widow, Jo Marie Rose, pur-
chases a local bed-and-break-
fast in Cedar Cove ready to
begin her life anew. The inn
holds more surprises than Jo
Marie can imagine.
The Twelve, by Justin
Cronin. One hundred years in
the future, Amy and others
fight on for humankinds salva-
tion, unaware that the rules
have changed with a vision of
the future infinitely more hor-
rifying than mans extinction.
Summer Breeze, by Nancy
Thayer. The lives of three
women unexpectedly inter-
twine during a summer on
Dragonfly Lake. Each will
experience romance, tempta-
tion and self-discovery: thirty-
year old mother, Morgan
OKeefe, New York career
woman, Natalie Reynolds, and
Bella Barnaby, who quit her
job in Texas to return home to
help out her large, boisterous
family.
The library will close at 5
p.m. Dec. 31. And will be
closed New Years day.
LIBRARY NEWS
BY MARY ANN MCGRATH
The Abington Community Library is
located at 1200 W. Grove St., Clarks
Summit. Visit our website,
www.lclshome.org/abington to regis-
ter online for events or call the
library at (570) 587-3440.
Dont have a library card? Register
for one at http://www.lclshome.org/
libraryinfo/library_card_reg.asp.
Its not too late to enjoy a gift
fromFather Christmas.
Last year, someone with a lot
of time on his hands calculated
that Santa Claus had visited
more than 5 billion children, so I
imaginethejollyoldelf hadonly
nanoseconds to write, text or
tweet his thanks for the milk and
cookies kids put out for him on
Christmas Eve. But once upon a
time, lifemovedat aslower pace,
and the children in one English
family enjoyed an extraordinary
correspondence with Father
Christmas, courtesy of their fa-
ther, J.R.R. Tolkien.
Beginning in 1920, when his
eldest child, John, was three
years old, and continuing for
more than 20 years, until his
youngest, Priscilla, grewtoo old
to hang up her stocking, Tolkien
wrotemarvelouslyinventiveand
elaborately illustrated letters to
his brood in the name of Father
Christmas. Today, you and the
childrenyoulovecansharethese
letters, thanks totherevisedthird
edition of Letters from Father
Christmas,editedbyBailleTol-
kien.
I discovered an earlier edition
of this charming book when my
children were little, and each
night of that December, we read
a letter together. Inspired by the
book, I helpedSanta Claus write
an illustrated letter to my kids.
Theyenjoyedit, but theytoldme
that Santas drawings werent as
good as the ones he sent the Tol-
kien youngsters. Well, hes
much older now, I said, in an ef-
fort to excuse my sub-par art-
work. Father Christmas made
similar excuses to the Tolkien
children, explaining in an early
letter that his penmanship was
shaky because he was 1,927
years old.
His writing may have been
squiggly, but Tolkiens wit was
sharp, andyoull get akickout of
Father Christmass elaborate
tales of life at the North Pole
complete with weather reports.
The greatest source of mirth in
the letters is the North Polar
Bear, who is Father Christmass
somewhat dim-witted, always
hungry, and often trouble-caus-
ing helper. Polar Bears shenani-
gans lead to all manner of com-
ical disasters, but it is his clum-
silypawededitorial commentsin
the letters margins that provide
the most fun for readers. As the
Tolkienboyslearntowrite, Polar
Bears penmanship improves
too, but his spelling remain-
swell, see for yourself in his
note from1929:
We have had hevy snow and
sumof our messengers got buer-
riedandsumlost: that is whi you
have not herd lately, he ex-
plains.
Tolkiens story telling ability
is in fine formin the letters, and
youngreaderswill lovethemany
characters that appear in them.
Polar Bear is joined by his neph-
ews, the Man-in-the-Moon, the
Snow Man (Santas gardener),
and assorted Snow Boys, elves,
helpful red gnomes, and nasty,
toy-stealinggoblins. Later, some
of the letters are penned by Ilbe-
reth, Father Christmass secreta-
ry, an officious fellowfor whom
Polar Bear has littleaffection. As
Tolkien warms to his task, the
letters evolve into tales of Polar
Bears manyaccidents andindis-
cretions, goblin attacks, and ex-
citing adventures in the caves
and tunnels beneath the North
Pole, along with descriptions of
bonfires, fireworks, ice skating
parties, and feasts.
Grown up readers will appre-
ciate the way the letters echo re-
al-life events. Some of the mis-
sives take on a somber note, ac-
knowledging the hard times En-
glish families endured. In 1931,
Father Christmas tells his read-
ers: if youfindthat not many
of the things you asked for have
comeremember that this
Christmas all over the world
there are a terrible number of
poor and starving people.
Ihave had to do some collect-
ing of food and clothes, and toys
too, for the children whose fa-
thers and mothers cannot give
them any, sometimes not even
dinner. In the midst of World
War II, Father Christmas tells
Priscilla that not many children
have written to him. I expect it
is because of this horrible war,
he laments, noting that he and
his friends at theNorthPolehave
been troubled by goblin attacks.
While the letters are marvel-
ous, what makes the book so
special are the illustrations that
accompany them. Often Tolkien
divides his drawings into hori-
zontal panels. In1926, for exam-
ple, the top panel shows flames
froman explosion that occurred
when Polar Bear unleashed two
years worth of Rory Bory Ay-
lis fireworks at once. The mid-
dle panel shows the unrepentant
bear laughing while Father
Christmas chases the runaway
reindeer spooked by the explo-
sion, and the bottom panel de-
picts the year, along with moons
and stars against a black back-
ground. I especially love the im-
ages of the stamps Tolkien drew
on the envelopes. With their rich
reds, oranges, greens and blacks
and striking composition, the
stamps are tiny works of art.
Letters from Father Christ-
mas is, in the end, a touching
example of a gifted fathers de-
votion to his children. In todays
busyworld, it reminds us that, al-
though we may not have Tol-
kiens artisticandliterarytalents,
we still can give children the gift
of our attention and time.
With
Jane Julius
Honchell
SEE JANE READ
Father Christmas
preaches quality time
Jane Julius Honchell, who resides in
Glenburn Twp., is a well-known fea-
tures writer and columnist. She is an
associate professor at Keystone
College, La Plume, where she serves
as Director of Theater. "See Jane
Read" appears monthly in The Abing-
ton Journal.
N
ovelist Eyre
Price, a former
Clarks Summit
resident, found success
when he published his
debut novel, Blues
Highway Blues. Nearly
six months after the
books initial release, the
novels sales have picked
up some steam, owing to
new recognition.
The website Blues 411
published a glowing
review in September.
The review calls the
novel a merry musical
jigsaw puzzle with a
well- crafted set of char-
acters that make the
merry way all the more
merrier...Price has cre-
ated a very rare bird
with Blues Highway
Blues. This month the
website named the novel
the best blues book of
the year.
Amazon.com named
the book to its list of 100
Kindle books for $3.99
or less for December.
Price said both the
award and the Amazon
listing led to an uptick in
sales for the book.
That was a huge
boost, he said. Its kind
of been a nice one-two
punch for the book.
Price, who now lives
in central Illinois, has
received recognition
from another quarter as
well. Writers Digest
interviewed Price for a
story on debut authors
for its January edition,
which is available now.
The author cant rest
on his laurels, though,
because he has a three-
book deal with his pub-
lisher, Thomas & Mer-
cer. But hes not that
kind of writer. Price is a
bit of a literary work-
horse, writing five to six
nights a week. Plying his
craft, he said, is the only
way he knows how to be
successful.
He has already fin-
ished the second book in
the series, Rock Island
Rock, and he plans to
begin work on the third
installment in the series
in Januaryafter he
completes another, un-
related novel.
We just knocked out
the second book of the
three-book series, Price
said. Were ahead of
schedule.
There was not a lot of
sleep for the last couple
of months, he said. We
worked hard to get it out
on that timetable.
Price hopes to achieve
even more success with
his follow-up efforts.
The same characters
from Blues Highway
Blues populate Rock
Island Rock. The super-
natural elements from
the first book begin to
intensify, he said.
Its the same charac-
ters, it picks up two
weeks after the action of
Blues Highway Blues,
he said. The problems
that they had in Blues
Highway Blues, its
hard to outrun those
kind of problems.
The writer talked a
little bit about his expe-
rience of writing the
second installment in the
series with his audi-
ences reaction lurking
in the background of his
mind. Most of the re-
views were positive, but
as with all novels, there
were naysayers.
Its been an education
just seeing how the
books been received,
he said.
I think writing the
book was infinitely har-
der because you knew
straight off that people
were going to read it. It
wasnt a private endeav-
or.
He said some of the
critical voices began to
dog him as he began
work on the second nov-
el. But after a speech he
gave to his son about his
writing assignment for
school, Price realized
that he should take his
own advice.
In writing you cant
be concerned about what
people will think of it,
he told his son.
The lifelong writer
said hes very happy and
feels fortunate to be
writing for a living.
Right now Im mak-
ing money for my writ-
ing, he said. In these
times and in this chang-
ing industry, if you can
do that, its a beautiful
thing.
Novelist Eyre Price, a former Clarks Summit resident,
found success when he published his debut novel, Blues
Highway Blues. Nearly six months after the books initial
release, the novels sales have picked up some steam,
owing to new recognition. He is shown here in St. Louis.
Novel idea
BY GERARD NOLAN
Abington Journal
Correspondent
movement and mantra leading
you into a deep connection with
your own truth. According to
Barbara, Kundalini yoga is
challenging to everyone yet can
be done by everyone. Admis-
sion is $40 for a series of four
classes or drop in at $15 per
class.
If you are more interested in
visual arts, Steve Colley will be
offering a newclass for adults in
January called Recycled Glass
Artwork. Based on what he has
learned fromcreating unique
recycled glass designs, Steve
will share various techniques for
working with glass such as
slumping, casting and mold
making as you create your own
glass masterpieces. Classes will
be held on Mondays, Jan. 7
through 28 from7to 8:30 p.m.
Admission is $65 for a four
class series including supplies.
Students just need to provide
their own safety glasses.
Visit the Dietrichs website
www.dietrichtheater.comor
request a brochure in the mail
for a full listing of Dietrich
classes and events. Fromall of
us at the Dietrich, we wish you
and yours a happy and healthy
2013.
As you can see, the Dietrich is
so much more than the movies!
MOVIES
Continued from Page 10
Students from Marywood University
Music Therapy Program recently perform-
ed at Allied Services in the annual Christ-
mas show and Passion Play with clients of
vocational day services for severely and
profoundly developmentally disabled.
Shown, from left, front: Stephanie Cop-
pola and Casie Esposito; Second row: Lois
Yeust; Sarah Yeust; Joanna Strefeler; Anna
Rennekamp; Cheryl Ellsworth, Music
Therapist, Marywood University; and
Bryce Cline; Back row: Bob Ames, Vice
President, Community Services, and Bill
Conaboy, Esq., President/CEO, Allied Ser-
vices.
Merrywood music at Allied
C M Y K
PAGE 12A www.theabingtonjournal.com The Abington JournalClarks Summit, PA WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 26, 2012
Choose fromfamous names like Sony, Toshiba, Yamaha, Klipsch, Bose, Denon,
Infinity, Optoma, Pinnacle, NHT, or Acoustic Research.
Call for a free in home consultation, or visit our showroom.
1313 Wyoming Ave. Exeter PA 655-8811
1
9
7
8
3
5
Home Theatre Headquarters
Discount Prices Everyday. Service after the sale.
Large selection of national name brands. Complete on site installation
and explanation of operation.
We work one-on-one with your child in your home
or local library.
Our tutors are experienced, Pennsylvania
Certied teachers.
Our instruction is customized to your childs needs.
We offer exible scheduling to make it convenient.
We have a program for every budget.
Year after year, we get outstanding results!
What our customers are saying...
I did SAT prep with Academy Tutoring, and my
score went up 270 points. I got into every school
I applied including Bucknell, Lafayette, Villanova,
Lehigh and Penn State Main Campus. I also qualied
for a $40,000 merit scholarship!
Emily W.
The Tutor was wonderful, and my daughter is so
relaxed now. Shes nally getting it!
Paul S.
With Academy Tutoring, my SAT scores
went up 350 points and I got a $44,000
scholarship to the University of Scranton!!!
Joey M.
Call by
Friday,
January 4th
for our
Winter Special!
Call Academy Tutoring today for a free consultation
(570) 540-9628
www.academytutoring4u.com
We also offer in-home tutoring in all subjects, K-12.
PARENTS, if your child is taking
the SAT or ACT this year, now is
the time to prepare!
SAT and ACT PREP
No Experience Necessary
Everyone Participates
5 Age Divisions
(pre-school to grade 12)
Scholarship Opportunities
LifeTime Sport
PromotesTeam Spirit
Friendly Competition
Coaching
Awards - End Of
Season Party
BowlingYouth League Forming Now
Spring Session Starts Saturday, January 5th
Come Join The Fun!
2008 Scranton Carbondale Highway
Dickson City (470) 489-7526
Idlehourlanes.com
08 00 0 20 22 8 08 SSSS CCC bbbbb ddd l H l b H H h HH h H h
7
9
5
2
0
5
Your homeis whereourheart is.
It is never too soon to reach out for help.
Because serving you is who we are.
We will help you make a plan. Guide you
through the process. Answer all your
questions. Take care of your insurance.
And support you in your home with
loving care that lasts a lifetime.
HospiceSacredHeart.org
|
706.2400
Loving care that lasts a lifetime.
C M Y K
SPORTS
Clarks Summit, Pa. DECEMBER 26 TO JANUARY 1
`
, 2013 50
In Thursdays meet against Holy
Redeemer High School, Mia Non-
nenberg (Scranton) of Scranton Prep
set a school record in the 100 frees-
tyle with a :53.25 time, won two
individual events and participated in
two winning relay teams.
In other words, just another day in
the pool for the standout junior.
After last seasons nationally-recog-
nized efforts, Nonnenberg is ready
for even better results this year.
Nonnenberg burst onto the top of
the local swimming scene last year,
where she set several school records,
including the 200 individual medley
and the 500 freestyle. After the high
school season ended, Nonnenberg
continued competing with Blue Dol-
phin Aquatics, where she qualified
for the USA Swimming 2012 Speedo
Junior National in the 400 IM.
Starting out swimming, I just
wanted to have fun with it, Non-
nenberg said. Im just happy that I
am having this much success, not
only for myself but for the team.
For all the individual accomplish-
ments, Nonnenberg said she gives a
great deal of credit to those who sup-
port her, including her parents, Marty
and Linda, and her brother, Matt,
who also swam in high school.
No matter what, they are always
there, Nonnenberg said. Whether
my meet is good or bad, they are
always there to support me.
She also said she appreciates the
support from her teammates, such as
Niko Lastauskas and Katie Voitik,
who constantly push and encourage
her to reach her best.
I dont think without them I would
be able to stick with it, Nonnenberg
said. This is a sport you cant do
alone. You need somebody to keep
you motivated during practice. Its a
lot of time that you put into it and its
great to have people there that you
know are doing the same thing as
you.
Scranton Prep coach Joe Thier said
Nonnenbergs Diligence and wil-
lingness at practice play a big role
not only in Nonnenbergs own suc-
cess, but the success of the team as a
whole.
She is a great asset for her team-
mates, Thier said. Theres a lot of
reasons why the other kids are being
pulled up and (one of the reasons is)
because of her. They are kind of ral-
lying and feeding off of her, and at
the same time they help her in the
long run as well. Her two training
partners, Katie and Niko, are two
people shes really pulled along, but
at the same time theyve pushed her.
Thier said he has done his best to
challenge Nonnenberg in practice
and hopes it will help her reach her
full potential.
We ask her to go outside her com-
fort zone and be doing things in ad-
vance of her actually doing the things
that she accomplished, Thier said.
Her ultimate goal is the highest
level, which is nationalsShe needs
to keep her sights set on the highest
thing she is capable of doing.
Nonnenberg is also eyeing more
immediate goals she can achieve
before national competition starts up
again. She said she is working toward
placing first at the state competition
in her events after coming close last
year.
Im really looking into getting a
state win, Nonnenberg said. I was
so close last year with my second and
third-place finishes. Thats my main
goal for the season.
It will take even more work for
Nonnenberg to continue her sensa-
tional run, not only at the district and
state levels but nationals as well.
Nonnenberg said she is more than
willing and able to meet these chal-
lenges and reach her goals.
You just need to know that in the
end its all going to pay off, Non-
nenberg said.
ABINGTON JOURNAL/NATALIE MENNICUCCI
Scranton Preps, Mia Nonnenberg, warms up for the Cavaliers swim meet versus the Holy Redeemer Royals held Dec. 20 at The
University of Scranton.
No treading water
for Prep junior
Record-breaking swimmer
credits teammates, family
BY CORY BURRELL
Abington Journal Correspondent
YATESVILLEAbington
Heights nearlyerasedanearly
15-point deficit against anun-
beatenteambefore fallingshort
Saturdayafternoon, Dec. 22, in
a 57-45, non-league girls basket-
ball loss at PittstonArea.
The LadyComets closed
withintwopoints inthe second
quarter andone point inthe third
quarter, but never regainedthe
leadafter scoringthe games
first four points.
That start hurt us, Lady
Comets coachVince Bucciarelli
said. Theyouthustledus inthe
first quarter. I hadtotake the
press off because theygetting
the ball upthe floor.
Caitie Nealonhit a long3-
pointer toopenthe secondquar-
ter anda longer one a minute
later tostart the comebackat-
tempt. The LadyComets, who
fell to4-3goingintothe Lynett
Memorial Tournament, thenthe
start of league play.
Improudof our girls andthe
waytheycame inthe last three
quarters, Bucciarelli said. We
missedsome opportunities. But,
it was a goodexhibitiongame to
get us readyfor the league.
Thats whywe put teams like
this onthe schedule.
Monmouthrecruit Mia Hop-
kins ledPittstonArea toits win
with22points, nine rebounds
andfive assists. Onthe defen-
sive end, she hadgame-high
totals of sixblockedshots and
five steals without committinga
foul until the final minute.
AbingtonHeights committed
nine turnovers while falling
behind, 23-8, after one quarter.
Katherine Rosencrance com-
pleteda streakof10straight
points, thenhadthe last three
points whenthe runextendedto
15-2.
Rosencrance alsoheldHop-
kins scoreless duringthat stretch
toreduce the deficit to25-23.
Hopkins averages 22.5per
game.
WhenRosencrance was
calledfor three fouls in24sec-
onds, she headedtothe bench.
PittstonArea scoredfive
straight points, includingthree
byHopkins, toendthe half with
a 30-23lead.
We hada goodsecondquar-
ter, but thenwe rusheda couple
of shots at the endof the quarter
and, insteadof beingdowntwo,
we were downseven, Buccia-
relli said.
Caitie Nealon, whofinished
witha team-high15points, had
five more points andanassist
duringa10-2runearlyinthe
secondhalf toclose the gapto
34-33.
PittstonArea answeredwith
sevenstraight points andAbing-
tonHeights never got closer
thansixthe rest of the way.
Rosencrance finishedwith12
points. Breanna Toroadded
eight points, 10rebounds and
five blockedshots. Melanie
Coles hadsixpoints andfive
steals.
PittstonArea, whichhadwon
its previous four games byat
least 20points each, improvedto
6-0.
The LadyComets played
another WyomingValleyCon-
ference opponent twodays earli-
er andcame awaywitha 51-27
winover Tunkhannock.
Blair Cacciamani had10of
her11points inthe first half.
Coles hadfive of her10points
inthe first quarter whenAbing-
tonHeights racedtoan18-3
lead.
Lady Comets
battle Pittston in
non-league play
BY TOMROBINSON
For the Abington Journal
ABINGTON JOURNAL/TONY CALLAIO
Blair Cacciamani dribbles around Easton Ashby of Pittston Area as she
drives to the hoop for 2-points.
We have good guards and
post players who can play in-
side and out, she said.
Melissa Grimm led the Lady
Lions with 17 points, 13 re-
bounds and two blocks. Brianna
Smarkusky added 11 points,
eight rebounds and four blocks
for Lackawanna Trail.
Walton praised the Lady Li-
ons tenacity on the court
throughout the game.
Theyre scrappy, theyre
physical, and they go to the
offensive boards, he said.
They gave us fits on our
press. Were a decent pressing
team and a couple times they
went through it like a hot knife
through butter.
Lakeland (4-2) will travel to
Holy Cross High School Jan. 2
for a 7:15 tipoff. Lackawanna
Trail (0-5) will travel to River-
side High School Dec. 26 for
an 8 p.m. tipoff.
FACTORYVILLE- Breann
Clauss-Walton scored 10 of her
game-high 20 points in the
third quarter to spark Lakeland
to a 61-41 victory over Lacka-
wanna Trail in a non-league
game Dec. 18. The junior for-
ward added nine rebounds and
two steals.
The Lady Chiefs forced nine
first quarter turnovers to gain
an 18-9 lead. After the Lady
Lions tied the score at 6 with
2:30 remaining, Lakeland fin-
ished the quarter on a 12-3 run.
Lakeland had five more take-
aways in the second quarter
and led 29-20 at the half.
The pressure is going to be
the key to our season, Lake-
land head coach Pat Walton
said. We started off slow to-
night. Pressure causes points
for us. With turnovers, we get
extra possessions with the ball.
Thats one of the things we
looking to get better at.
Lakelands strong defensive
effort sparked their offense.
The Lady Chiefs scored 18
points in the third quarter. Na-
talie Tuffy, who finished the
game with 17 points, six assists
and five rebounds, hit her first
of three 3-pointers as part of a
9-2 run.
I think the constant pressure
that we present wears on a
team as the game goes on,
Walton said. If we can be pa-
tient on offense, were gonna
get good looks and Breann had
the hot hand tonight.
Senior guard Alissa Steier
contributed eight points and
seven assists for Lakeland.
Freshman Kayla Agentowicz
added six points and seven re-
bounds for the Lady Chiefs.
Clauss-Walton believed the
teams balance on offense leads
to its success.
Lady Chiefs outlast Lady Lions
PHOTOS COURTESY ALICE STUFFLE
Lackawanna Trails Melissa Grimm takes
a foul shot.
Lakeland forward Breann Clauss-Walton
scored a game-high 20 points.
BY ROBERT TOMKAVAGE
rtomkavage@theabingtonjournal.com
C M Y K
PAGE 14A www.theabingtonjournal.com The Abington JournalClarks Summit, PA WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 26, 2012
CROSSWORD ANSWERS FROM PAGE 5
OBITUARY
Dr. Helen
A. Spencer,
86, died Sun-
day, Dec. 16
in Ft. Myers,
Fla., follow-
ing an illness.
A native of Clarks Summit,
Helen was the daughter of the
late Leo and Irene Spencer.
Dr. Spencer was a graduate
of Newton Ransom High
School and East Stroudsburg
University. She worked at
public schools in New Jersey
and Delaware while earning
master and doctorate degrees
in physical education from
New York University. She
taught at Skidmore College
and the University of Cali-
fornia, Santa Barbara before
settling in Connecticut. She
was a professor at the Arnold
College Division, University
of Bridgeport, Conn. and was
the director of athletics. She
was an educator, writer and
advocate of women in sports.
She was an avid golfer and
enjoyed spending time with
family and friends.
Surviving is a sister Jo-
sephine A. Spencer; a brother
William Spencer; several
nieces and nephews
She was preceded in death
by a brother Leo Spencer and
sisters Anne S. Ande and
Mary S. Houck.
The Mass of Christian
Burial will be Dec. 22 at 11
a.m. at the Church of St. Ben-
edict. Friends may call at
10:30 at the church prior to
the mass. Interment will fol-
low at Newton Cemetery.
Funeral arrangements are
entrusted to the Lawrence E.
Young Funeral Home. To
leave an online condolence
visit www.lawrenceeyoungfu-
neralhome.com
Dr. Helen A. Spencer
December 16, 2012
Abington Heights High School annonces
its first quarter Honor Roll for the 2012-2013
school year.
Grade 9
Samuel E. Arnold, Fahad Ashraf, Byonne
Atamna, Gabriel Azevedo, James Barrett,
Riley T. Barrett, Brett S. Barrows, Anna
Baruffaldi, Meghan L. Beahan, Taylor M.
Bender, Holly A. Beppler, Taya Black-Kobryn-
ich, Maanasa Boini, Emily Bonsick, Hannah
Braid, Grant Brand, Kristina M. Bruzzano,
Jennifer Burkey, Alexandra Calvey, Katie M.
Carlin, Sahas C. Chandragiri, Ally E. Christ-
man, Samantha Chrysler, Cameron J. Cleary,
Thomas S. Clifton, Jared M. Cohen, Made-
leine A. Cohen, Brendan Conahan, Nikitha
Dalavai, Carly J. Danoski, Mark DeSeta,
Lauren M. Dempsey, Maura I. Dickinson,
Jillian Doran, Dylan H. Eisenlohr, Dominique
C. Emmett, Murray S. Fallk, Emily Fazio,
Joseph C. Fazio, Alex A. Figueroa, Colin R.
Florey, Cuinn T. Foley, Brandon R. Fritsch,
Joseph D. Fulton, MatthewA. Galaydick,
Alyssa M. Garbin, Philip T. Gattorna, Hannah
Gaul, Kyle Gerrity, Georden Gesford, Lindsay
A. Getz, Abby M. Gilman, Jeramie R. Glynn,
Jacob S. Graziano, Adrianna L. Green,
Kathryn A. Green, Kara A. Greskovic, Andrew
Haggerty, Grace E. Hambrose, Paige E.
Harris, Emma H. Henzes, Carolyn M. Hick-
man, John P. Hildebrand, Tait Hoffmeier,
Jordan Hollander, Brooks Houck, Nicole
Howells, Kevin Hu, MatthewK. Hughes,
Jacob B. Ingalls, Nadeen M. Jafar, Andrew
Jalowiec, Anneliese Jewell, Isabella Jones,
Samuel P. Jubon, Faith Judson, Patrick G.
Kelly, Colin Klingman, Abbey M. Knoepfel,
Courtney Kocsis, Amanda L. Kohut, Jason A.
Kontz, Lauren Kuchinski, Carly N. LaCoe,
David A. Larar, Nadiya A. Latif, Jared S.
Levinson, Marissa G. Lewis, Richard M. Ling,
Katherine Lingle, Jacob A. Linker, Samuel D.
Linker, Sondra G. Lionetti, Jamie L. Lough-
ney, Samuel MacGregor, Anisha Mallik, Jack
J. Malone, Caroline Mattise, John P. McGarry,
MatthewMecca, Hannah Mendo, Olivia
Mendo, Ashley M. Mercado, Dominick J.
Miller, Tyler L. Milo, Rachael V. Muir, Raeva
Mulloth, Rishi Mulloth, Enis Murta, Kyle S.
Napierala, Daniel F. Neary, Peter M. Nolan,
Noah ODonnell, Benjamin Oon, Brandon
Ostrowski, Heather J. Page, Shahil K. Patel,
Olivia Perez, Melissa J. Perfilio, Elisabeth G.
Phillips, Evan C. Phillips, Ana P. Prahalad,
Jared Rasmussen, Manon S. Riley, Matthew
C. Robinson, Lorran Rodrigues, Taylor E.
Rose, Sean Salmon, Susan Scappatura,
Cayden M. Scarantino, Sydney E. Schilpp,
Sloane V. Schubert, Alyssa M. Scoda, Julia M.
Sebastian, Taylor G. Shepard, Logan M.
Shook, Johanna G. Show, Autumn Shumaker,
Sarah Sickler, Maaz Siddiqui, Catherine R.
Simakaski, Noah Sirianni, Nicholas B. Skier-
kowski, Emily M. Smith, Stephen Sokalsky,
Savannah Solan, Zachary S. Spangenberg,
Ellie Sullum, Abigale E. Sutton, Robert M.
Swift, Jason J. Tinsley, Timothy Toro,
Cassandra A. Toth, Claire Traweek, Mariah E.
Tulaney, Sidney Tung, Tyler N. Walter,
Melissa B. Wasserman, Devyn Wylam, Rachel
E. Yannuzzi, Chase C. Yarns, Rhys J. Yarns,
Tiana E. Yarns, Trey D. Yarns, Landon York
and Shiqi Zhou.
Grade10
Tyra Abdalla, Brett S. Andrisani, Joseph
Arcangelo, Elizabeth Bamford, AndrewK.
Barren, MatthewBarrett, Nicholas F. Beck-
ish, Celeste Belknap, Bobbi S. Benson,
Zachary J. Bird, Christopher A. Blacker,
Mallory Brayer, Cameron Buckbee, Nicole A.
Campbell, Mia Caputo, Nora Caputo, Jessica
M. Cerra, Shreyas Chandragiri, Andrew
Chow, Christopher Clark, Amanda L. Col-
ombo, Jasmin L. Colon, Hannah Conahan,
Zachary Coupland, Jeremy Critchley, John
R. Czubek, Madison R. Dinger, Caitlin M.
Dingler, Vanessa A. Duboski, Elizabeth
Durdan, Brad Eckersley, Samuel Errigo,Tho-
mas J. Flowers, Elise K. Frelin, Melanie A.
Fricchione, Alexander P. Fried, Jonathan
Galaydick, Clare Gallagher, Paula Galvao,
Catherine Gee, Olivia E. Gentilezza, Nicholas
Gerardi, WilliamGerrity, AndrewJ. Gibson,
Katie Gilarde, Patrick J. Gilhooley, Sean M.
Gilhooley, Rachel B. Gilmore, Kaitlin Glide-
well, Alex Gockley, Edward G. Goff, Alexa M.
Graham, Sydney Gualtieri, Ian C. Halloran,
Brittany Harris, James T. Harris, Mariah
Hawley, MatthewS. Hayner, John F. Henzes,
Michaelina Holmes, Caroline E. Hopkins,
George Houck, Brent J. Hudak, Terry L.
Hurst, Kristopher Igoe, Emily Jeschke, Griffin
Joyce, Alyssa A. Judson, Jordan A. Kane,
Megan S. Kane, Jonathan Kizer, Tucker
Kizer, Samantha M. Klapatch, MatthewR.
Klucher, Ronald J. Kochmer, Ethan Kreinces,
Tyler M. Ksiazek, Kelly N. Kwolek, Kaitlyn A.
Lacey, Nathan R. Langan, Nathan L. Laub-
ham, Mark Lazar, Calvin Lee, Patrick J.
Lenahan, Sarah Lingle, Amber Loomis,
Michael P. Lynn, Kelly G. McHugh, Kathleen
M. McMahon, Abigail J. McMinn, Alyssa
McMinn, Alanna C. Mecca, Elizabeth A.
Melliand, Michelle Mensah, Sarah A. Mensah,
Dominick L. Mitchell, MatthewMolinaro,
Bianca C. Montes, Samuel J. Morano, Ronald
J. Moschorak, James Negvesky, Jerome M.
Nidoh, Nicole Olver, Michelle J. Pacyna,
MatthewW. Parry, Molly Pash, WilliamB.
Petty, Martha S. Phillips, Alexandra A.
Pisano, Morgan Reiner, Dylan Reynolds,
Jessica K. Rickwood, Jordan M. Rippon,
WilliamRoditski, Jacob Ross, Jessa Sablan,
Eric Salerno, Taylor J. Schirra, Cassandra A.
Schlosser, Jonathan A. Schmidt, AndrewC.
Schoen, Phillip A. Schoen, Erin E. Schumach-
er, Michael R. Sebastian, Daimen Seid, Noah
A. Shapiro, Joseph A. Sileo, Rachel Smertz,
Maria Smith, Corey Sochovka, David J.
Sorokanich, Melissa A. Spencer, Kessyde
Stiles, Carla E. Stillwagon, Jordan M. Stranie-
ri, Leah E. Stuenzi, Michael B. Sullivan,
Hunter L. Suraci, Anthony V. Sylvester, Sean
C. Terrinoni, Elizabeth Thornton, Eden M.
Tinkelman, Francesco Torresani, Leo C. Tully,
Sarah E. Uhranowsky, MariKay VanFleet,
Regina M. Volpe, James M. Voyce, Perrine
Wasser, Chase Wickenheiser, Anna C.
Wildner, Christopher D. Williams, Michael J.
Wynn and Brendan Yesil.
Grade11
Lauren M. Archbald, Grace M. Arnold,
Danielle Barrasse, Brittany S. Barrows,
Sebastian Barry, Sarah Beamish, Cierra
Beck, Sierra D. Berardelli, Erika L. Beyrent,
Noah Bianchi, Kyle Blasi, Kyle Bormann,
Krista A. Brickel, Samuel D. Brock, Sarah
Brouillard, Gabriel Brutico, Mikaela Brutico,
Salvatore M. Bulzoni, Eliza Burdick-Risser,
Abigail C. Burke, Jennifer K. Burke, Blair R.
Cacciamani, Siobhan M. Cahill, John Calcera-
no, Caitlyne R. Calvey, Leila R. Cappellano-
Sarver, Natalie Carleo, Brian Carpenter,
MathewL. Carr, Joseph Carroll, Alexandria Y.
Catania, Brooke Chapple, Kanak M. Chatto-
padhyay, Daniel J. Check, Isabelle C. Clauss,
Lauren Coggins, Chloe Cummings, Jeremy
Cummings, Scott M. Curran, Serena DeSeta,
Katie L. Decker, John Dempsey, Adraina
Dubas, Alexandra L. Epstein, Rebecca Fallk,
Christopher Ferrario, Joseph Fiorillo,
Rebecca A. Fiorillo, Katie-Sue Fischer,
Michael Fitzpatrick, Ryan D. Gilbert, Caleb F.
Green, Samantha Gregorowicz, Annarose
Gromelski, Richard S. Guditus, Mia C. Gurga-
nus, Tara M. Hambrose, MatthewP. Heck-
man, Aidan G. Hodge, Nathan H. Hollander,
Jennifer N. Horne, MatthewR. Huggler, Erin
Jaeger, Camilla M. Jones, Meghan Judge,
Olivia E. Julian, Tyler J. Julian, Quinn D.
Karam, Luke A. Kazmierski, Tarek Khalil,
Samuel D. Kontz, Kristara Kopicki, Nicholas
G. Ksiazek, AndrewP. Kuzma, Zia Lawrence,
Justin P. Levy, Spenser R. Lionetti, Kelsey A.
Loughney, Nina Lyubechansky, Kevin S.
Malone, Alexa R. Matillano, Anthony Matsell,
Richard A. McDermott, Ryan J. McDonald,
WilliamMessler, Kelly Mitchell, Corey Molet-
sky, Abby Monczewski, MatthewR. Montele-
one, Morgan Muller, Brenden J. Murphy,
Jerry Murray, Joseph L. Murray, Audra F.
Nealon, Catherine Nealon, Maura Nealon,
Christabel G. Newman, Claire E. Notarianni,
Elyse A. Notarianni, Paige M. Notarianni, Eric
M. Onofrey, Jennifer L. Page, Julia Pagnani,
Morgan C. Palmiter, Gregory J. Pascale,
Michael Pfister, Abigail M. Pipcho, Adrienne
S. Pitchford, Kyle Pitts, Alivia Plevyak, Kevin
Quinn, Thomas A. Racek, Benjamin Rarrick,
AndrewP. Rebensky, Roy J. Renninger,
Brennah Riley, Katherine R. Roberts, Sean
Rock, Nicholas Rose, Emma Ross, Ashley K.
Rozelle, Scott Salmon, Shane D. Schake, Ian
B. Schobel, Kevin Schumacher, Dylan M.
Sebring, Kathleen Shedlock, Jack Show,
Stephen Shumaker, Urwa Siddiqui, Bradley
M. Smertz, Mason K. Spangler, Daniel L.
Stevens, Noah Strony, Allison E. Stroyan,
Kevin D. Suh, Maria Sunick, Chloe Sweeney,
Ashley Tarabek, Michael Thiel, Kyle K.
Tierney, Breanna Toro, Francesca Toth,
Shirley Tung, Samuel Vale, Tyler VanGorder,
Alyssa R. Vielee, Elizabeth E. Walker, Sarah E.
Walsh, Katharine Wardach, Bridget C. Welsh,
Megan E. Werner, Justin White, Kenneth V.
White, Casey E. Wrobel and Marissa Yannuz-
zi.
Grade12
Allison M. Abdalla, Brandon J. Addeo,
Sean R. Albright, Jake G. Arnold, Doaa H.
Atamna, Marc A. Balzani, Jason S. Bamford,
Emily L. Barrett, Grayson D. Basalyga,
Madeline M. Belknap, Natalie H. Belknap,
Brianna Benson, Heather M. Bloom, Michelle
M. Bohenek, Ellen K. Brown, Jacob A. Brown,
Kelsey J. Brown, Celine A. Brunetti, Joseph
M. Brutico, MatthewT. Bruzzano, Troy M.
Bunnell, Margaret R. Carter, Sierra N. Cas-
well, Paul A. Cheng, Peter J. Cheng, Melianie
A. Coles, Patrick Conahan, Gerald R. Connor,
Sean M. Conway, Sean P. Corcoran, Cali M.
Crapella, Emily P. Davis, Taylor E. Davis,
Alexandra E. DeQueiroz, Samantha Dench,
Colleen M. Devine, Ryan M. Devine, Jennifer
A. Drazba, Evan Eckersley, James C. Egan,
Paige N. Eisenlohr, Kevin C. Elwell, Rachel L.
Ezrin, Kasey M. Feather, Megan E. Fellows,
Christian J. Ferreira, Connor J. Fialko,
AndrewJ. Fiegleman, Gina R. Fiore, Ryan J.
Fiorillo, WilliamP. Fitzgerald, Steven R.
Floyd, Tara Foley, Heidi J. Frantz, John L.
Fruehan, Kristie J. Furiosi, David A. Galayd-
ick, Rebecca A. Gervais, Shomik N. Ghosh,
Maria B. Gibson, Rhiannon M. Gray, Matthew
J. Gronsky, Patrick J. Haggerty, Lindsey A.
Hannigan, Katrina A. Helcoski, Kory P.
Helcoski, Cassidy R. Henry, Jamie C. Henzes,
Kellan E. Hirschler, Max H. Hollander, Geof-
frey M. Hoyt, Peter G. Hubbard, Mary C.
Jakes, Victoria E. Jeschke, Thomas E. Jubon,
Martha K. Kairis, Mohamed Kasim, Ryan J.
Kiernan, Paige L. Kinney, Rebekah K. Kisser,
Brynn L. Kizer, Corryn B. Klien, Kaylee R.
Kline, Kyle R. Kocsis, Jason D. Kohn, Alicia K.
Kohut, Nicholas A. Kremp, Ryan J. Kresge,
Jessica A. Kurey, Holly L. LaCapra, Jo-
sephine R. LaCoe, Claire P. Lakatos, Patrick
J. Lange, Ellen A. Leightcap, AndrewR.
Leister, Richard C. Lenahan, Alicia A. Les-
neski, Ariana S. Lomeo, James E. Lowe,
Nicole K. Madensky, Chloe N. Maloney,
Abigail M. Mappes, Joseph M. Marciano,
Christian J. Mazur, Courtney L. McCreary,
Casey L. McDermott Katherine M. McDonald,
Jessica L. McMinn, Madeline Z. McNichols,
Andres Medina, Anthony T. Mercuri, Chris-
topher A. Michaels, Laura B. Moeller, Laine
M. Murphy, Thomas J. Murray, Emma K.
Musto, Sarah Myers, Celeste Neary, Paige K.
Neidrich, Kelsey M. ODonnell, Jacob OLeary,
Kacey E. Olver, Amelia Oon, Lucas B. Ortiz,
Caleb J. Overholser, Rachel L. Owens, Monica
L. Pacyna, Gina M. Palmiter, Maitri S. Pancho-
ly, Sarah J. Parkinson, Brittany C. Parry,
Dante D. Pasqualichio, Dillan Patel, Ryan J.
Patrick, Zackary J. Peercy, Neil D. Petersen,
MatthewP. Pettinato, Michael G. Pettinato,
Melissa M. Pierre, Amy E. Pisanchyn, Faith O.
Purdy, Alexandra M. Pusateri, Hannah
Radkiewicz, Nathan J. Ratchford, Laura E.
Regula, Demi N. Richardson, Sarah C. Ri-
chardson, Kenneth M. Rink, Jake A. Roba,
Jean M. Robacker, Katherine G. Rosen-
crance, Taylor Ross, Danielle R. Rothka,
Thomas J. Ryder, Daniel C. Schlosser, Tyler
A. Sebastianelli, Kierstyn D. Selig, Morgan A.
Seymour, Steven A. Shields, Kiana L. Sladicki,
Joshua F. Slocum, Sarah A. Sopinski, Cole E.
Srebro, Nicole A. Stefko, Bethany M. Stevens,
Brooke A. Storms, Madison V. Strony, Dante
L. Surace, Zachary D. Sutter, Mary E. Swift,
WilliamG. Swisher, Zackary N. Tamimi, Irene
Torresani, Panagiotis C. Tsaklas, Thomas D.
Twiss, Krysta L. VanDeinse, Bradley M.
Wagner, Eric M. Washo, Stacey C. Watkins,
Meredith E. Westington, Amy S. Wolsiffer and
Zachary L. Yahn.
Honor Roll
The Clarks Summit office
of Home Instead Senior Care
recently presented a donation
to the Sports Management
and Recreation Team
(SMART) at Keystone Col-
lege. Shown, fromleft, are:
Terry Wise, Associate Profes-
sor and SMARTAdvisor;
Jessica Engel, Home Instead
Senior Care Marketing &
Sales Manager; Kenny Heat-
er,Keystone College Senior
and President of SMART.
Home Instead supports
Keystone sports management
Margaret
Ann Williams
Cheponis,
R.N., 83, of
South Abing-
ton Twp., died
Saturday, Dec.
15, at Allied Skilled Nursing
Facility. She was the widow of
Joseph John Cheponis, who
died in 2000. The couple had
been married 50 years.
Born Dec. 6, 1929, in King-
ston, daughter of the late
Francis J. and Loretta Dett-
more-Siegle Williams, she
was a graduate of GAR High
School, Wilkes-Barre, and she
received her nursing degree
from Nesbitt Hospital School
of Nursing, Kingston. She
was a resident of Elmhurst for
many years before moving to
the Virgin Islands in 1979,
returning to South Abington
Twp. in 1991. She was a regis-
tered nurse, having been em-
ployed at Mercy Hospital,
Scranton and St. Marys Villa,
Elmhurst. Margaret also
taught nursing at Scranton
Vocational and Technical
School, where she enjoyed
educating others entering the
field of nursing. She was a
member of Our Lady of the
Snows Parish, Clarks Summit.
Surviving are a daughter,
Ann Marie Mahlmann and
husband, Jack, South Abing-
ton Twp.; a son, Michael Che-
ponis and wife, Terry, Pott-
stown; seven grandchildren;
nieces and nephews.She was
also preceded in death by a
daughter, Loretta Cheponis;
and two brothers, Frank and
Paul J. Williams.
The funeral will be Sat-
urday, Dec. 22, with a memo-
rial Mass at 1:30 p.m. in Our
Lady of the Snows Church,
301 S. State St., Clarks Sum-
mit. Interment, Hickory Grove
Cemetery, at the convenience
of the family.
Margaret Ann Williams Cheponis
December 15, 2012
Lackawanna Trail defeated
Hanover Area in its second
wrestling match of the season
Dec. 20.
PHOTO COURTESY ALICE STUFFLE
Lackawanna Trails Justin Barber picks up a win in the Lions victory.
Lions prevail over
Hawkeyes in match
Jo Ann
Diskin, 58,
of Clarks
Summit,
died Thurs-
day morn-
ing, Dec. 20.
She was the widow of Wil-
liam N. Diskin who died in
2009.
Born in Scranton, she
was the daughter of Mary
Ann Hallick Gilarde and
the late Joseph A. Gilarde.
She was a 1974 graduate of
Dunmore Central Catholic
High School and received a
Bachelors Degree in Ele-
mentary Education from
East Stroudsburg Uni-
versity in 1978. She was a
member of Our Lady of the
Snows Church in Clarks
Summit. Jo Ann was em-
ployed for over 30 years as
a teacher at Friendship
House, where she was
known for her infectious
smile and compassion for
her students.
Jo Anns greatest ac-
complishment in life was
raising three wonderful
boys. They defined her life.
In over 20 years of base-
ball, from farm league
through their college base-
ball careers, JoAnn never
missed a game.......nor did
she ever grasp the rules of
the game. She was their
number one fan and they
were hers. She was known
for her open- door policy,
always welcoming her chil-
drens friends into her
home. Nick and Angel, the
family dogs, will truly miss
her love and care for them.
Her laugh was infectious
and frequent. She lit up
every room she entered. In
a word, she was a blessing.
In addition to her mother,
she is survived by three
sons, Patrick, Joseph and
Michael all at home; a
sister Mary Ann Habeeb;
sisters-in-law Rene Diskin
Shenosky and Frances
Diskin; brothers-in-law
Tim Diskin and Paul She-
nosky; nieces Jennifer Ha-
beeb, Tracy Doherty, Ellen
Lane and Terri Shenosky;
nephews, John and Greg
Habeeb, Patrick Shenosky
and Thomas Doherty.
She was preceded in
death by her brother in law
Patrick J. Diskin.
A Mass of Christian
Burial will be celebrated
by Monsignor James
McGarry Dec. 26 at 10
a.m. in Our Lady of the
Snows Church, 301 S. State
St., Clarks Summit. Those
attending are asked to go
directly to the church.
In lieu of flowers , me-
morials may be made to
the PJM Diskin Education-
al Fund, c/o Penn Security
Bank, 150 N. Washington
Ave., Scranton, PA 18503.
For directions or to send
an online condolence, visit
www.lawrenceeyoungfu-
neralhome.com.
Jo Ann Diskin
December 20, 2012
C M Y K
WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 26, 2012 THE ABINGTON JOURNALCLARKS SUMMIT, PA WWW.THEABINGTONJOURNAL.COM PAGE15A
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied **Lease payments based on 24 month lease 21,000 allowable miles. First months payment, $595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 12/31/12.
CALL NOW 823-8888 CALL NOW 823-8888
1-800-817-FORD 1-800-817-FORD
Overlooking Mohegan Sun Overlooking Mohegan Sun
577 East Main St., Plains 577 East Main St., Plains
Just Minutes from Scranton or W-B Just Minutes from Scranton or W-B
24
Mos.
MPG
MPG
HANDS-FREE
SYNC
17 ALLOY
WHEELS
PERIMETER
ALARM
TONNEAU COVER
AIR CONDITIONING
AUTO. HEADLAMPS
AUTOMATIC
POWER
DOOR LOCKS
1.6 ECOBOOST ENGINE
SIRIUS SATELLITE RADIO
POWER
WINDOWS
NEW2012 FORDFUSION HYBRID
2.5L I4 Engine, Rain Sensor Wipers, Sony Sound
Sys., CD, Alum Wheels, Tilt, PW, PDL, Safety Pkg.,
Side Impact Air Bags, 1st & 2nd Air Curtains,
Anti-Theft Sys., Pwr. Moonroof,
Sirius Satellite Radio,
Keyless Entry w/Keypad,
Message Center,
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied **Lease payments based on 24 month lease
21,000 allowable miles. First months payment, $595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 12/31/12.
M
O
S.
APR
PLUS
NEW FORDEXPLORER
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied **Lease payments based on 24 month lease
21,000 allowable miles. First months payment, $595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 12/31/12.
3.5L Engine,
MyFord Display, CD, Auto.
Climate Control, PL, Pwr.
Mirrors, PW, 17 Steel
Wheels, Keyless Entry,
MyKey,
Cruise Control,
NEW2012 FORDF-150 4X4
3.7L V6 Engine, XL Plus Pkg.,
Cruise Control, MyKey Sys.,
Pwr. Equipment Group,
Pwr. Mirrors, CD, XL
40/20/40 Cloth
Seat, Decor Group
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied **Lease payments based on 24 month lease
21,000 allowable miles. First months payment, $595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 12/31/12.
Auto., Air, CD, Advance Trac w/Electronic
Stability Control, PL, Side Curtains, Sirius
Satellite, PM, Tilt Wheel,
,
Cruise Control,
15 Alum. Wheels,
SYNC, Keyless
Entry with Keypad
NEW FORDFIESTA SE
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied **Lease payments based on 24 month lease 21,000 allowable
miles. First months payment, $595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 12/31/12.
24
Mos.
M
O
S.
APR
PLUS
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied **Lease payments based on 24 month lease 21,000 allowable
miles. First months payment, $595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 12/31/12.
Auto., Anti-Theft Sys., Side Curtain Air
Bags, 16 Steel Wheels, Tilt Wheel,
Instrument Cluster, SYNC,
Message Center, MyKey,
Keyless Entry with
Keypad, CD, Pwr. Side
Mirrors, Fog Lamps
NEW2012 FORDFOCUS SE 4 DR
M
O
S.
APR
24
Mos.
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied **Lease payments based on 24 month lease
21,000 allowable miles. First months payment, $595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 12/31/12.
Pwr. Windows, PDL, Air, Advance
Trac with Roll Stability Control,
CD, Remote Keyless Entry
w/Keypad, MyFord,
Convenience Group,
Auto. Headlamps,
Reverse Sensing Sys.
NEW FORDEDGE
24
Mos.
M
O
S.
APR
PLUS
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied **Lease payments based on 24 month lease
21,000 allowable miles. First months payment, $595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 12/31/12.
24
Mos.
NEW FORDTAURUS SEL AWD
All Wheel Drive, Auto., 3.5L V6, SYNC,
Reverse Sensing Sys., Keyless Entry
w/Keypad, 18Alum. Wheels,
PW, PDL, CD, Anti-Theft
Perimeter Alarm, Sirius
Satellite Radio,
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied **Lease payments based on 24 month lease
21,000 allowable miles. First months payment, $595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 12/31/12.
Auto., Air Conditioning, Power Locks, Power Windows,
Tilt, Side Curtains, Airbags, Remote Keyless Entry,
Anti Theft System, AM/FM/CD,
Rear Defroster
NEW2013 FORDFOCUS
24
Mos.
M
O
S.
APR
PLUS
24
Mos.
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied **Lease payments based on 24 month lease
21,000 allowable miles. First months payment, $595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 12/31/12.
Auto., 17 ALum. Wheels, Tilt, PW, PDL,
Pwr. Seat, Side Impact Air Bags,
1st & 2nd Air Curtains, CD,
Anti-Theft Sys., Sirius
Satellite Radio, Keyless
Entry w/Keypad,
Message Center, SYNC
NEW FORDFUSION SE
24
Mos.
WEDNESDAY DECEMBER 26, 2012 Abington Journal PAGE 16
100 Announcements
200 Auctions
300 Personal Services
400 Automotive
500 Employment
600 Financial
700 Merchandise
800 Pets & Animals
900 Real Estate
1000 Service Directory
MARKETPLACE
To place a Classied ad: Call 1-800-273-7130 Email: classieds@theabingtonjournal.com
theabingtonjournal.com
906 Homes for Sale
412 Autos for Sale
906 Homes for Sale
412 Autos for Sale
906 Homes for Sale
412 Autos for Sale
906 Homes for Sale
412 Autos for Sale
906 Homes for Sale
412 Autos for Sale
542 Logistics/
Transportation
554 Production/
Operations
135 Legals/
Public Notices
542 Logistics/
Transportation
554 Production/
Operations
135 Legals/
Public Notices
542 Logistics/
Transportation
554 Production/
Operations
IN THE COURT OF COMMON PLEAS OF
LACKAWANNA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA,
CIVIL ACTION, LAW, NO. 51217-08
Abington Heights School District
vs. Amy J. Jones
Notice is hereby given that the above was
named as Defendant in a civil action insti-
tuted by plaintiff. This is an action to
recover delinquent real estate taxes for
the year 2007, for the property located at
Rd. To Newton Ctr., Newton Township,
Pennsylvania, Tax Parcel 12201-010-012.
A tax claim in the amount of $1,136.96 was
filed on or about June 26, 2008 for this
claim and a Writ of Scire Facias was filed.
You are hereby notified to plead to the writ
in this case, on or before 20 days from the
date of this publication or a Judgment will
be entered.
If you wish to defend, you must enter a
written appearance personally or by attor-
ney and file your defenses or objections in
writing with the court. You are warned
that if you fail to do so, the case may pro-
ceed without you and a judgment may be
entered without further notice for the relief
requested by the plaintiff. You may lose
property or other rights important to you.
You should take this paper to your lawyer
at once. If you do not have a lawyer or
cannot afford one, go to or telephone the
offices set forth below to find out where
you can get legal help.
Northern Pennsylvania Legal Services,
507 Linden Street, Suite 300,
Scranton, PA 18503-1631,
Telephone (570) 342-0184
Lawyer Referral Service,
Lackawanna Bar Association,
204 Wyoming Avenue, Suite 205,
Scranton, PA 18503-1010,
Telephone (570) 969-9600
Portnoff Law Associates, Ltd.,
P.O. Box 391, Norristown, PA 19404-0391
(866) 211-9466
Clarks Summit / Scranton Ofce
239 Northern Blvd., Clarks Summit
(570) 585-0600 (570) 207-6262
In The
Spotlight
LEWITH & FREEMAN
real estate, inc.
L
F
Real Value. Real Results.
FALL IN LOVE
with this Meadowood Farms home
perched on a corner acre lot with
lots of room for entertaining and
relaxation both inside and out!
MLS#12-4789
Offered at $312,384
Offered by: Kim Skumanick
Lewith & Freeman Real Estate, Inc.
Ofce: (570) 585-0600
Direct Line: (570) 585-0606
$
269
PER MONTH LEASE
36 MONTHS
30,000 TOTAL MILES
NO DOWN PAYMENT
Automatic
All Wheel Drive
32 MPG
Highway
$0 Down Payment
$0 Security Deposit
$269 1st Month Payment
$125 Registration Fees
$394 Total Due at Signing
2013 SUBARU
LEGACY
2.5i
EPA estimated fuel economy for 2013 Legacy 2.5i CVT models. Actual mileage may vary. Financing contingent on lender approval.
Tax not included. Other lease terms available. Call for details.
570-346-4641
1-800-982-4054
www.minookasubaru.com
HOURS: MONDAY THRU THURSDAY 9:00 A.M. TO8:30 P.M.
FRIDAY 9:00 A.M. TO5:00 P.M. SATURDAY 9:00 A.M. TO2:00 P.M. CLOSED SUNDAY
Model DAB-01
Interested Applicants can Apply Online at www.XLCServices.com.
Interviews scheduled Monday thru Friday. Call 800-472-1013 or
walk-ins welcome at Job Fairs.
Hiring Experienced Forklift Operators $12.25 hourly,
after completion of 90 day probation period.
***STRAIGHT DAY SHIFT OR NIGHT SHIFT
(12 hour shifts ave. 42 hours per week)
***75 cent night shift pay differential offered.
***Pay increase based on skill development.
Take charge...LEARNAND EARN!
MUST HAVE 1 YEAR FULL
TIME EXPERIENCE
Skills Required:
High School Diploma/GED
Computer Skills
Valid Drivers License
Criminal Background Check
Pass Pre-Employment Drug
Screen & Physical
*Mehoopany Location
* Benets Available *
Growth Creates Opportunity...Start A New Career!
JOB FAIR!
EVERY
THURSDAY
12-4
AT THE
TUNKHANNOCK
LIBRARY
AUXILIARY OPERATOR
Northeastern Power Company
A 50MW cogeneration plant in McAdoo, PA has an
immediate opening for an Auxiliary Operator.
Auxiliary Operator - Assist in the safe operation and mainte-
nance of a 50MW CFB coal power plant. Responsibilities include
operating auxiliary plant equipment such as fuel processing
equipment, ash conditioning and unloading system, water treat-
ment systems, pumps, compressors. Comprehensive training
provided with future opportunities for advancement possible.
In addition to a competitive salary we offer an excellent benefits
package including medical, dental, 401K plan, paid vacation,
bonus plans and more.
Please apply online at:
www.gdfsuezna.com<http://www.gdfsuezna.com/>
and select Careers and Job Listing.
100
ANNOUNCEMENTS
110 Lost
BEST PRICES
IN THE AREA
CA$H ON THE $POT,
Free Anytime
Pickup
570-301-3602
570-301-3602
CALL US!
TO JUNK
YOUR CAR
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
120 Found
LIKE
NEW
Used Tires
&
Batteries
for $20
& Up
VITOS
&
GINOS
949 Wyoming Ave.
Forty Fort
288-8995
LOST. CHARM
BRACELET, silver,
lots of charms
attached. Call and
describe.
570-829-1972
135 Legals/
Public Notices
ESTATE NOTICE
Estate of Florence
C. Slawitsky, late of
Scranton, Pennsyl-
vania (died Novem-
ber 8, 2012). Per-
sonal Representa-
tive is Thomas P.
Swift. Attorney for
the Estate is:
Nancy M.
Barrasse, Esquire,
639 Jefferson
Avenue, Scranton,
Pennsylvania 18510
135 Legals/
Public Notices
LEGAL NOTICES
The Abington
Journal is a
newspaper of
general circula-
tion and meets
the require-
ments by
Newspaper
Advertising Act
45 Pa.C.S.A.
Section 301.
DEADLINE:
Mondays at 4 pm
for current week
Deadline varies
during holiday
weeks
RATE:
$1.00 line/$12.
per inch
For information or
questions
regarding legal
notices
you may call
Marti Peznowski
570-970-7371
or email to:
mpeznowski@
timesleader.com
or fax to
570-831-7312
or mail to
The Times Leader
15 N. Main Street
Wilkes-Barre, PA
18711
ESTATE NOTICE
RE: Estate of
Edmund W. Bun-
trock, late of Glen-
burn Township, PA
(Died November 11,
2012). Letters tes-
tamentary in the
referenced estate
having been grant-
ed, creditors shall
make demand and
debtors shall make
payment to Steven
Bowman and Susan
Bowman, Execu-
tors, or to their
attorney, Robert P.
Browning, Esquire,
Oliver, Price &
Rhodes, 1212 South
Abington Road, PO
Box 240, Clarks
Summit, PA 18411
Robert P. Browning,
Attorney For the
Estate
Line up a place to live
in classified!
ESTATE NOTICE
RE: ESTATE OF M.
JANE DAKIN, late of
No r t h Ab i n g t o n
Township, Pennsyl-
vania (died Novem-
ber 29, 2012).
Letters Testamen-
tary in the above
estate having been
granted, creditors
shall make demand
and debtors shall
make payment to C.
H. Welles IV Execu-
tor, 11th Floor Bank
Towers, 321 Spruce
Street, Scranton
Pennsylvania 18503.
WELLES &
MCGRATH
Attorneys for the
Estate
135 Legals/
Public Notices
ESTATE NOTICE
ESTATE OF DANIEL
T. FOGARTY, late of
Clarks Summit,
Pennsylvania, (Died
December 3, 2012).
Notice is hereby
given that Letters of
Administration on
the above Estate
have been granted
to Keleen Weaver
and Linda Durso,
Administrators. All
persons indebted to
the said Estate are
required to make
payment and those
having claims to
present the same
without delay to the
Administrators
named herein, or to
Jill M. Spott, Esq-
uire, Sheils Law
Associates, P.C.,
Attorney for Estate,
108 North Abington
Rd, Clarks Summit,
PA 18411.
To place your
ad Call Toll Free
1-800-427-8649
ESTATE NOTICE
ESTATE OF VIR-
GINIA E. FOGARTY,
late of Clarks Sum-
mit, Pennsylvania,
(Died December 3,
2012). Notice is
hereby given that
Letters of Admin-
istration on the
above Estate have
been granted to
Keleen Weaver and
Linda Durso, Admin-
istrators. All per-
sons indebted to the
said Estate are
required to make
payment and those
having claims to
present the same
without delay to the
A d mi n i s t r a t o r s
named herein, or to
Jill M. Spott,
Esquire, Sheils Law
Associates, P.C.,
Attorney for Estate,
108 North Abington
Rd, Clarks Summit,
Pennsylvania 18414
ARTICLES OF
INCORPORATION
NONPROFIT
CORPORATION
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN THAT Articles
of Incorporation of
the Jessup VFW
Post #5544 Home
Association, Inc. a
Pennsylvania Non-
Profit Corporation,
have been filed and
approved by the
Department of
State, Common-
wealth of Penns-
ylvania on Novem-
ber 20, 2012 pur-
suant to the provi-
sions of the Non-
profit Corporation
Law of the Com-
monwealth of Penn-
sylvania Act of
December 21, 1988.
the principal place
of business is
205 Dolph Street,
Jessup, PA 18434.
Russell Canevari,
Incorporator
ESTATE NOTICE
ESTATE OF ESTHER
M. LOMBARDO, late
of Scranton, PA,
who died October 7,
2012. Letters testa-
mentary in the
above estate having
been granted, all
persons having
claims or demands
against the estate
of the descendent
shall make them
known and present
them, and all per-
sons indebted to
said descendent
shall make payment
thereof without
delay to:
Susan Kujawski,
Executrix, or
Gregory A.
Germain Esquire,
639 Jefferson Ave.
Scranton, PA 18510
ESTATE NOTICE
Notice is hereby
given that letters
testamentary have
been granted in the
Estate of Regina
Louise Panulla, late
of Dalton Borough,
Lackawanna Coun-
ty, PA (died Novem-
ber 23, 2012). All
persons indebted to
the said estate are
required to make
payment, and those
having claims or
demands to pres-
ent the same with-
out delay to: Ann
Dingee, Executrix,
428 Simrell Road,
S. Abington Twp.,
PA 18411.
ESTATE NOTICE
ESTATE OF ELIZA-
BETH L. PENDRAK,
late of Spring Brook
Township, PA, who
died October 28,
2012. Letters testa-
mentary in the
above estate having
been granted, all
persons having
claims or demands
against the estate
of the descendent
shall make them
known and present
them, and all per-
sons indebted to
said descendent
shall make payment
thereof without
delay to: Stephen J.
Pendrak, Executor,
or
Gregory A.
Germain Esquire,
639 Jefferson Ave.,
Scranton, PA 18510
135 Legals/
Public Notices
LEGAL NOTICE
The Waverly Town-
ship Board of
Supervisors will
hold their annual
reorganization
meeting on Mon-
day, January 7,
2013 at 7:00pm in
the board room of
the Waverly Town-
ship Municipal
Building, Lake
Henry Drive,
Waverly, Pa. The
Waverly Township
Supervisors meet-
ings for the year
2013 will be held on
the second and last
Mondays of the
month, except for
the month of May
when the meetings
will be the second
Monday and the
last Tuesday. All
meetings will start
at 7:00pm.
The Waverly Town-
ship Board of
Auditors will hold
their annual reorga-
nization meeting on
Tuesday January 8,
2013 at 7:00pm in
the board room of
the Waverly Town-
ship Municipal
Building, Lake
Henry Drive,
Waverly, Pa.
The Waverly Town-
ship Planning
Commission will
hold their annual
reorganization
meeting on Thurs-
day, January 10,
2013 at 7:00pm in
the board room of
the Waverly Town-
ship Municipal
Building, Lake
Henry Drive,
Waverly, Pa.. The
planning commis-
sion meetings for
the year 2013 will
be held on the sec-
ond Thursday of
each month at
7:00pm.
The Waverly His-
toric Architectur-
al Review Board
(HARB) will hold
their annual reorga-
nization meeting on
Wednesday, Janu-
ary 9, 2013 at
7:00pm in the
board room of the
Waverly Township
Municipal Building,
Lake Henry Drive,
Waverly, Pa. . The
meetings of the
HARB for the year
2013 will be held on
the second
Wednesday of each
month at 7:00pm.
William H. White
Waverly Township
Manager
LEGAL NOTICE
CLARKS GREEN
BOROUGH
ESTABLISHMENT
OF MILLAGE AND
SEWER RATES
FOR 2013
At the regular meet-
ing of Clarks Green
Borough Council, to
be held on January
9, 2013, Council will
adopt:
ORDINANCE 1-2013
ESTABLISHING THE
REAL ESTATE TAX
MILLAGE AT FIF-
TEEN (15) MILLS
FOR THE YEAR
2013; and ORDIN-
ANCE 2-2013
AMENDING THE
ANNUAL SEWER-
RENTAL RATE PER
EQUIVALENT DWE-
LLING UNIT SERVED
BY THE BOROUGH
SANITARY SYSTEM
TO $540.00 AND
AMENDING CHAP-
TER 18, PART 2 OF
THE BOROUGH OF
CLARKS GREEN
CODE OF ORDI-
NANCES, and
RE-ENACTING THE
LOCAL WAGE, THE
LOCAL SERVICES,
AND REAL ESTATE
TRANSFER TAX
ORDINANCES.
NOTICE OF
MEETING
SCHEDULE:
Clarks Green Boro-
ugh Council has set
up the following
meeting schedule
for the year 2013.
All meetings take
place at the Boro-
ugh Building, 104 N.
Abington Road,
Clarks Green, PA.
Council Meetings
January 9; February
20;March 20; April
17; May 15; June 19;
July 17, August 21;
September 18; Oct-
ober 16; November
20; December 18.
Council Work
Sessions: First
Wednesday of each
month at 7:00 p.m.
beginning February
6, 2013.
Planning Com-
mission Meet-
ings: Scheduled
upon request or at
call of Chairman.
Zoning Board
Meetings: Hear-
ings scheduled
upon request or at
call of the Chairman.
Shade Tree Com-
mission Meet
ings: Second
Thursday of every
month at 7:00 p.m.
Janice Brown, Bor-
ough Secretary
PAGE 17 Abington Journal WEDNESDAY DECEMBER 26, 2012
WEDNESDAY DECEMBER 26, 2012 Abington Journal PAGE 18
VISIT US & SHOP 24/7 AT WWW.VALLEYCHEVROLET.COM
EXIT 170B OFF 1-81 TO EXIT 1 - BEAR RIGHT ON BUSINESS ROUTE 309 TO SIXTH LIGHT. JUST BELOW WYOMING VALLEY MALL
Chevy Runs Deep
570-821-2778
VALLEY CHEVROLET
601 Kidder Street, Wilkes-Barre, PA
821-2772 1-800-444-7172
www.valleychevrolet.com
*All prices plus tax & tags. Prices include all applicable rebates trade-in bonus cash (if applicable); Business Choice rebate (if applicable); VYU Snowplow bonus cash (if applicable); All Star Edition
(if applicable); Conquest private offers (if applicable on specic vehicles); LOWAPR in lieu of certain rebates to well qualied buyers. See dealer for details. **Lease for $179/mo. plus tax & tags; 36
mos. Lease; 10k miles per year, $3499 (Cash or Trade) plus tax due at Lease signing. **Lease Silverado #13241; $299 per month plus tax & tags, 36 mos. lease, 10,000 miles per year, $2499 due (cash
or trade) at lease signing to well qualied buyers. Must take delivery by 1/2/2013. Artwork for illustration purpose only. Not responsible for typographical errors.
CHECK
OUT OUR
2013 CHEVY
LIFT TRUCK
SPECIALS
0
%
APR
for up to
60MONTHS
Available On
Select Models
TRADES
GLADLY
ACCEPTED!
TOP
DOLLAR
OFFERED
Stk. #13029, 3.6L SIDI 6 Speed Manual Transmission, PW, PDL, Air, Rear Spoiler,
Limited Slip Dierential, 18 Heritage Steel Wheels, Onstar w/ Turn-By-Turn
Navigation, XM Satellite Radio, Bluetooth, AM/FM/CD
2013 CHEVY CAMARO
LS COUPE
2013 CHEVY TAHOE 1500
LS 4X4
Stk. #13014, 5.3L SFI V8 6 Speed
Automatic, PW, PDL, Deep Tinted
Glass, Remote Starter Prep. Pkg.,
Dual Power Heated Mirrors,
Cruise, OnStar w/ Turn-By-Turn
Navigation, XM Satellite Radio,
Luggage Rack, Bluetooth for Phone,
Side Impact Airbags, Stabilitrak,
17 Aluminum Wheels
$
21,999
*
2013 CHEVY MALIBU
LS
MSRP
$23,425
Stk. #13071, ECOTEC 2.5L DOHC 6 Speed Automatic, PW,
PDL, Air, P. Mirrors, Tinted Glass, Stabilitrak, XM Satellite
Radio, Onstar w/ Turn-By-Turn Navigation, Compass Display,
16 Aluminum Wheels, Tilt & Telescopic Steering Column
2013 CHEVY CRUZE
LS
$
16,999
*
Sale Price Starting At
Stk. #KCW01, 1.8L 4 Cyl., 5 Speed Manual
Transmission, Air Conditioning, Tilt Steering, PW,
PDL, Bluetooth for Phone, OnStar w/ Turn-By-Turn
Navigation, XM Satellite Radio, Remote Keyless
Entry, Stabilitrak, Premium Cloth Seating
$
23,499
*
Sale Price Starting At
$
39,999
*
Sale Price Starting At
Sale Price
Starting At
2012 CHEVY TRAVERSE
LS FWD 8 PASSENGER
#12730, 3.6L SIDI V6, 6 Speed Automatic,
Traction Control, Remote Keyless Entry, 3rd Row
60/40 Bench Split Seat, PW, PDL, P. Mirrors,
Bluetooth, Rear Spoiler, Onstar w/ Turn-By-Turn
Navigation, XM Satellite Radio
MSRP
$30,585
0
%
FOR
72 MOS
APR
$
27,599
*
Sale Price Starting At
OR
Lease For
$
179
**
Per Mo.
for 36 mos.
MSRP
$43,885
MSRP
$24,245
2013 CHEVY SILVERADO 1500
CREW CAB LS 4X4
SAVE OVER
$
7,500
0
%
FOR
60 MOS
APR
Stk. #13201, 4.8L V8 Auto.,
Stabilitrak, PW, PDL, Keyless Remote
Door Lock, Air, Dual Pwr. Heated
Mirrors, XM Satellite, Onstar w/
Turn-By-Turn Navigation,
AM/FM/CD, Deep Tinted Glass
MSRP
$36,565
$
28,999
*
Sale Price Starting At
$AVE OVER
$
10,000
2013 CHEVY SILVERADO
1500 EXTENDED CAB 4X4
ALL STAR EDITION
Stk. #13241, Vortec 5.3L V8 6 Speed Automatic,
Locking Rear Dierential, Trailering Pkg.,
Aluminum Wheels, Dual Zone A/C, Bluetooth,
CD w/ USB Port, PW, PDL, EZ-Lift Tailgate,
Onstar, XM Satellite, Cruise & More
ONLY
$
299
**
Per
Mo.
for
36
mos.
LEASE SPECIAL
MSRP
$36,175
PAGE 19 Abington Journal WEDNESDAY DECEMBER 26, 2012
906 Homes for Sale 906 Homes for Sale 906 Homes for Sale 906 Homes for Sale 906 Homes for Sale 906 Homes for Sale 906 Homes for Sale 906 Homes for Sale 906 Homes for Sale 906 Homes for Sale
REALESTATE, INC.
Clarks Summit / Scranton Ofce (570) 585-0600
239 Northern Blvd., Clarks Summit (570) 207-6262
WAVERLY Grand historic home on 5.5 magnifcent
acres. So very much detail throughout, 18 rooms,
8 baths, 4 freplaces, 4 car garage. A treasure!
MLS# 12-4586
BEVERLY 585-0619 $899,000
MAGNIFICENT ESTATE This stone mansion was built
by prestigious architect George Lewis whose work in-
cludes numerous historic places in NE PA. Situated on
21+ acres this 7000 SF home includes 8 stall horse
barn & 75 x 150 indoor riding area. MLS# 12-1540
Virtual Tour: www.3dvirtualvisions.com/westmain/
MARION 585-0602 or CHRISTIAN 585-0614
GLENMAURA Lovely ranch home w/ pretty views,
beautiful landscaped lot, open foor plan & easy
fow kitchen, family room & dining room plus living
room. Enjoy this great ranch on a wonderful lot.
Appt. only! MLS# 12-1165
PEG 714-9247 $395,000
NEW MILFORD Sit on the covered patio and enjoy the
country views or stay inside and admire the custom
wood and stone work. Gorgeous details abound in this
5 bedroom, 4 1/2 bath home from the cherry and gran-
ite gourmet kitchen to the beautiful stamped concrete
foors to the stunning entry rotunda. Luxury and liv-
ability all in one charming country estate. MLS#12-553
Virtual Tour: www.3dvirtualvisions.com/route492/
LORI 585-0627 $1,450,000
FACTORYVILLE Lots of charm, 4 bedrooms,
1.5 baths, wood fooring, freplace, 3.5 acres,
1 car garage. MLS#12-4686
BEVERLY 585-0619 $137,000
GREENRIDGE Beautiful 3 unit located in the
Heart of Green Ridge with fenced yard and 2
car garage. www.christiansaunders.com
MLS#12-3210
CHRISTIAN 585-0614 $134,900
SCRANTON Buy a 3 unit get a 2 unit free and a 2
car garage free. What more can you ask for, 5 units
with separate utilities. Check out the hardwood
foors and woodwork in the large apartments.
www.christiansaunders.com MLS#12-1557
CHRISTIAN 585-0614 $119,900
CLARKS SUMMIT Waiting for your fnishing touch-
es, this brand new home features gourmet kitchen,
regal offce, large family room with freplace and
awesome master suite. MLS# 12-3839
MARION 585-0602 $499,000
CHARMING LAKEFRONT Cottage that can be
used year round . Beautiful oversized lot. Redone
lakefront area w/ composite deck, pretty stone-
work, boat storage & frepit. Everything you need
to enjoy the lake in any season! MLS#12-3559
LORI 585-0627 $219,900
UNDER CONSTRUCTION at Olde Grove Estates.
Ranch units with garage, master suite, public
sewer, North Pocono schools all in a country set-
ting close to the interstates. Special construction
price. MLS#12-550
MARION 585-0602 $219,000
CLARKS SUMMIT Move in condition bi level with
updated kitchen and baths, beautiful hardwood
foors, 2.5 baths, 3 season room, a large level
backyard and more. MLS# 12-4405
EDNA 585-0610 $217,000
MINOOKA Beautiful 3 bedroom home, newly re-
modeled. Finished basement, screened in porch,
fenced yard and corner lot. Dont let this one get
away! MLS# 12-5299
JAIME 585-0609 $219,000
CLARKS SUMMIT Beautiful end unit townhome
w/ main level master bedroom suite. Custom
draperies and all appliances included. Loads of
upgrades & priced to sell quickly. MLS# 12-5039
LORI 585-0627 $215,000
SCRANTON Recently renovated. Beautiful, move-
in condition ranch, upscale kitchen, cherry wood
foors, 2 bedrooms, 2 bath, very interesting!
MLS# 12-4811
BEVERLY 585-0619 $229,000
CLARKS SUMMIT RENTAL Beautiful ranch
with HW foors, large yard, 1 car garage. Totally
handicap accessible, wheel chair accessible.
Nice patio in rear. MLS# 12-5126
ELIZABETH 585-0608 $1,200/MT
TUNKHANNOCK Beautiful riverfront prop-
erty. Private yet minutes from town. Enter-
taining all offers! MLS# 12-2891
JAIME 585-0609 $55,700
FACTORYVILLE Build your dream home, 1+ wooded building
lot! MLS# 12-3928 ELIZABETH 585-0608 $19,000
DUNMORE Convenient location for this building lot. This
could be a perfect lot for multi-family. MLS# 12-3775
DAVE 585-0615 $34,900
CLARKS SUMMIT 7.34 acre parcel in terrric Abington Heights
location. www.christiansaunders.com MLS# 12-5442
CHRISTIAN 585-0614 $129,900.
MOUNT COBB Small 7 lot subdivision in serene setting locat-
ed minutes from interstate offers minimal covenants / restric-
tions, public sewer & utilities. Convenient to Sanolf-Pasteur
& Tobyhanna Depot. Lot 2 ( .97 acres) $49,900 Lot 5 (1.2
acres) $55,900 Lot 3 (1.05 acres) $59,900 Lot 6 (2 acres)
$81,900 Lot 1 (1.98 acres) $88,900 DAVE 585-0615
LOTS & LAND
CLARKS SUMMIT Beautiful 1.43 acre wooded lot in quiet
area. MLS# 12-3913 ELIZABETH 585-0608 $79,900
CLARKS SUMMIT Prime 2 acres lot in beautiful Cherry Ridge
Development. This land offers awesome views and easy ac-
cess to the city. MLS# 12-1851
MARION 585-0602 $119,000
CLARKS SUMMIT Beautiful acreage offers the peace and
tranquility of the country with only a ten minute drive to town.
Plenty of room to build. Seller is looking for offers so dont
hesitate! MLS#11-3684 LORI 585-0627 $129,000
CLARKS SUMMIT Just Reduced! Beautiful 1.38 acres on
Summit Lake offers amazing views and public sewer.
MLS# 12-3243 JAIME 585-0609 $215,000
LOTS & LAND
ABSOLUTE MASTERPIECE! Dream home combines great
living & fabulous entertaining. Spectacular entrance, high
ceilings, marble foors. 1st fr Mst suite, exercise room,
offce, and kitchen are all luxurious yet perfectly suited
for everyday life! www.christiansaunders.com
MLS#12-538 CHRISTIAN 585-0614 $749,900
NORTH ABINGTON TOWNSHIP 11+ acres sur-
round this meticulously kept home featuring in-law
apartment, fully stocked pond, modern kitchen and
baths, freplace and frst foor master suite. Home
Warranty included! MLS# 12-4658
MARION 585-0602 $399,900
GLENMAURA Beautiful home w/ all the amenities.
Wonderful foor plan that affords convenience &
privacy. Located on a cul-de-sac. Fully landscaped
& sits up high off the road. MLS# 12-4796
PEG 714-9247 $449,900
3
U
N
IT
5
U
N
IT
GLENMAURA - Live easy in this fabulous middle
unit with custom granite kitchen, hardwood foors,
open foor plan and more. MLS#11-3774
KIM 585-0606 $299,000
WAVERLY Awesome views surround the 4-5 bed-
room home featuring wood foors, frst foor master
bedroom, fnished lower level, modern baths, eat
in kitchen and 2 car garage. Virtual Tour: http://
www.3dvirtualvisions.com/millerroad MLS# 12-
1090 MARION 585-0602 $250,000
GLENMAURA Luxury at every step! This exceptionally
well-built home has custom amenities throughout.
MLS# 12-3511 TINA 714-9251 $850,000
REDUCED!
REDUCED!
OLD FORGE - Home ownership made easy! Motivated
seller offering a one year home warranty tomake you
feel safe and secure in your new home. Lower price
too? Call to fnd out more if this might be the home for
you! MLS#11-3981 LORI 585-0627 $149,900
REDUCED!
MAIN STREET MOSCOW Commercial offce space
with 2 apartments and 8 parking spots. Prime lo-
cation. MLS# 12-4892
DAVE 585-0615 $129,900
OLD FORGE Modern open-foor plan 4BR, 3 bath
home. with 1st foor MBR Suite. Beautiful HW, FR
w/full-wall stone FP, modern Kit, large 1st foor rec
room; heated sunroom; 2 garages, in-ground pool
plus lower level / on-grade 686SF could be in-law
apartment. MLS# 12-4602
RAE 714-9234 $239,900
REDUCED!
TUNKHANNOCK Country but convenient! Over an
acre surrounds this lovely 3-4BR home with covered
rear deck, pool, pond, garage & much more.
MLS # 12-3190 MARY 714-9274 $174,900
REDUCED!
REDUCED!
WELL MAINTAINED 2 bedroom ranch home in
Old Forge. Low maintenance yard. Move in
condition. MLS# 12-4545
DAVE 585-0615 $92,900
DUNMORE Buy and save! Why rent when you can
own for so much less? You need to see the inside
of this 2 bedroom home to appreciate its charm.
Great rental possibilities for investors too. Call to
schedule an appointment. MLS # 12-3557
LORI 585-0627 $84,000
150 Special Notices
FOSTER PARENT(S)
NEEDED
IMMEDIATELY
for teens or sibling
groups.
Compensation,
training, and 24
hour on-call sup-
port provided.
Please call
FRIENDSHIP
HOUSE (570)
342-8305 x 2058.
Compensation up
to $1200.00 per
month per child.
310 Attorney
Services
FREE Bankruptcy
Consultation
Payment plans.
Carol Baltimore
570-822-1959
SOCIAL SECURITY
DISABILITY
Free Consultation.
Contact Atty. Sherry
Dalessandro
570-823-9006
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
Its a showroom in print!
Classifieds got
the directions!
406 ATVs/Dune
Buggies
TOMAHAWK`11
ATV, 110 CC. Brand
New Tomahawk
Kids Quad. Only
$695 takes it away!
570-817-2952
Wilkes-Barre
409 Autos under
$5000
FORD 95 F150
4x4. 1 Owner.
91K. 4.8 engine,
auto. Runs
great. New
paint, stake
body with
metal floor.
570-675-5046.
Leave message,
will return call.
NOW $4,295
412 Autos for Sale
CHRYSLER 03
PT CRUISER
Dark Red,
Black interior.
Very clean, 100K
miles. Auto, Air,
power steering,
power brakes,
CD/Cassette.
Great Car! $3,200
Call 570-212-1046
FORD 08 FOCUS SE
Silver, black interior.
4 door sedan.
Power windows
and locks, CD. 104k
highway miles.
Runs excellent.
$7200 negotiable.
570-578-9222
TOYOTA 04 CELICA GT
112K miles. Blue,
5 speed. Air,
power
windows/locks,
CD/cassette, Key-
less entry, sun-
roof, new battery.
Car drives and
has current PA
inspection. Slight
rust on corner of
passenger door.
Clutch slips on
hard acceleration.
This is why its
thousands less
than Blue Book
value. $6,500
OBO. Make an
offer! Call
570-592-1629
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
VOLVO 06 S40
Automatic, original
owner. Paid over
$30,000. Fully
equipped too much
to mention. Clean
car fax. Like new
with only 14,000
miles. Just serviced
& inspected by
Volvo. Brand new
tires. $13,900 nego-
tiable. call for details
570-510-8613
415 Autos-Antique
& Classic
CHEVROLET `76
PICKUP
4 Cylinder
Very Good
Condition!
NEW PRICE
$1,500.
570-362-3626
Ask for Lee
CHEVY 30 HOTROD COUPE
$47,000
GREAT DEALS!
MERCEDES 29
Kit Car $5,500
OR TRADE
JUST REDUCED
(570) 655-4884
MAZDA `88 RX-7
CONVERTIBLE
1 owner, garage
kept, 65k original
miles, black with
grey leather interior,
all original & never
seen snow. $7,995.
Call 570-237-5119
MERCEDES-BENZ `73
450SL
Convertible with
removable hard top,
power windows, AM
/FM radio with cas-
sette player, CD
player, automatic, 4
new tires. Cham-
pagne exterior; Ital-
ian red leather inte-
rior inside. Garage
kept, excellent con-
dition. Priced to Sell!
$23,000.
Call 570-825-6272
439 Motorcycles
SUZUKI 01 VS 800
GL INTRUDER
Garage kept, no
rust, lots of
chrome, black with
teal green flake.
Includes storage
jack & 2 helmets.
$3600
570-410-1026
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
YAMAHA 97
ROYALSTAR 1300
12,000 miles. With
windshield. Runs
excellent. Many
extras including
gunfighter seat,
leather bags, extra
pipes. New tires &
battery. Asking
$4,000 firm.
(570) 814-1548
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
INTERNATIONAL `05
4300 BOX TRUCK
18, automatic, lift
gate. GVW 17,000.
Unladen weight
9,100. $15,500.
570-760-3226
570-735-4788
457 Wanted to Buy
Auto
All
Junk
Cars &
Trucks
Wanted
Highest
Prices
Paid In
CA$H
FREE
PICKUP
570-574-1275
Looking for that
special place
called home?
Classified will address
Your needs.
Open the door
with classified!
460
AUTOMOTIVE
SERVICE
DIRECTORY
490 Truck/SUV/
Van Accessories
TRUCK CAP
Ford F-150 2008-
2009 A.R.E Truck
Cap. Black, Fiber-
glass, 5 1/2 ft bed
Has break light,
interior cargo light,
clamps. All carpet
on the inside
Sliding side win-
dows with screen
locking back win-
dow/door. Front
window folds down
for cleaning $400.
Call 855-0550,
leave message
503 Accounting/
Finance
TAX PREPARER
No experience
necessary. Enroll
in a FREE 1-WEEK
TRAINING CLASS.
Focus on providing
quality service to
Liberty Tax cus-
tomers, Day and
evening classes
available. Seasonal
job opportunities.
Pittston & Plains
570-883-7829
Dallas
570-675-2240
Edwardsville &
West Pittston
570-288-4007
Wilkes-Barre &
Hanover Twp.
570-208-1096
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
522 Education/
Training
FORTIS INSTITUTE
FORTY FORT
Exciting Teaching
Opportunity
Immediate position
open for part
time instructor
CDL program.
Must have 3
plus years work
experience in field
and current CDL.
Teaching experi-
ence a plus but
not required.
Fax resume to:
570-287-7936
Or send to:
Director of
Education
Fortis Institute
166 Slocum Street
Forty Fort PA 18704
533 Installation/
Maintenance/
Repair
FORKLIFT MECHANIC
Action Lift, Inc.,
located in Pittston,
PA, is the exclusive
dealership for
Crown and TCM
forklifts for NEPA.
We are seeking a
full time forklift
mechanic to trou-
bleshoot, repair and
diagnose Crown
and other makes of
lift trucks. Good
written and verbal
communication
skills, as well as
customer care skills
are necessary. A
valid drivers license
and the ability to
safely operate lift
trucks are required.
Previous forklift
mechanical experi-
ence or technical
school graduate will
be considered. We
offer an excellent
wage and benefits
package, as well as
401K Retirement
Savings Plan, paid
holidays, paid vaca-
tion and much
more.
Apply by e-mail
mike.phelan@action
liftinc.com or call
570-655-2100 x115.
Find Your Ideal
Employee! Place an
ad and end the
search!
570-829-7130
ask for an employ-
ment specialist
545 Marketing/
Product
MARKETER
Audition to be our
famous Lady
Liberty. Male or
Female. Energy and
Enthusiasm a must!
Earn income being
a Liberty Tax
Marketer.
Pittston & Plains
570-883-7829
Dallas
570-675-2240
Edwardsville &
West Pittston
570-288-4007
Wilkes-Barre &
Hanover Twp
570-417-4814
566 Sales/Retail/
Business
Development
SALES
Experienced Outside
Sales professional
(Commissioned) to
offer our no-cost
financial services.
We are a growing
company with huge
upside potential.
Must have strong
people skills and be
comfortable building
relationships with
senior executives.
Fax Resume to:
(866) 969-0690,
Email to: CMCNorth
east@verizon.net
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
Its a showroom in print!
Classifieds got
the directions!
600
FINANCIAL
610 Business
Opportunities
PERSONAL
TRAINING CENTER
FOR SALE
570-592-2458 for
details
630 Money To Loan
We can erase
your bad credit -
100% GUARAN-
TEED. Attorneys
for the Federal
Trade Commission
say theyve never
seen a legitimate
credit repair opera-
tion. No one can
legally remove
accurate and timely
information from
your credit report.
Its a process that
starts with you and
involves time and a
conscious effort to
pay your debts.
Learn about manag-
ing credit and debt
at ftc. gov/credit. A
message from The
Times Leader and
the FTC.
700
MERCHANDISE
708 Antiques &
Collectibles
YEARBOOKS.
COUGHLIN (25)
1928-1980, GAR,
(22) 1928-2006,
MEYERS, (22) 1957-
1981, WYOMING
VALLEY WEST, (11)
1970-1992. NANTI-
COKE, (2) 1971-
1979, PITTSTON, (11)
1967-1981HANOVER
(6) 1951-1981 MINT.
Prices vary depend-
ing on condition.
$20-$40 each. Call
for further details
and additional
school editions.
570-825-4721
arthurh302@
aol.com
710 Appliances
DRYER: Like new,
kenmore 90 series
electric dryer. white.
auto moisture sens-
ing-4 fabric settings
$250. Kenmore
Ultrawash DISH-
WASHER. beige.
ultrawash sensor &
quiet guard system.
$300. Willing to
negotiate if u buy
both! 570-266-2300
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
742 Furnaces &
Heaters
OIL TANKS (2)
275 gallon indoor oil
tanks. Very good
condition. Convert-
ed to gas. $125.
each. Call
570-760-2793
744 Furniture &
Accessories
CHAIRS, (2)
Genuine
leather, cus-
tom made
recliners.
Taupe color,
like new. $550
each.
570-675-5046
DEN
FURNITURE
Wood/cloth. Reg-
ular size sofa,
chair and
ottoman. Coffee
table, 2 end
tables. Excellent
condition. $325
for all.
570-675-5046
796 Wanted to Buy
Merchandise
CASH PAID
Guns & gun parts,
Civil War items,
military items, US &
German, swords,
daggers & knives.
Old toys and coins.
Fishing equipment.
Private Collector
570-417-9200
800
PETS & ANIMALS
815 Dogs
PAWS
TO CONSIDER....
ENHANCE
YOUR PET
CLASSIFIED
AD ONLINE
Call 829-7130
Place your pet ad
and provide us your
email address
This will create a
seller account
online and login
information will be
emailed to you from
gadzoo.com
The World of Pets
Unleashed
You can then use
your account to
enhance your online
ad. Post up to 6
captioned photos
of your pet
Expand your text to
include more
information, include
your contact
information such
as e-mail, address
phone number and
or website.
Collect cash, not dust!
Clean out your
basement, garage
or attic and call the
Classified depart-
ment today at 570-
829-7130!
MALTESE-
POODLE PUPPIES
/ LHASA-PO
PUPPIES
Very sweet, Non
shedding, Health
Guarantee. Asking
$275 males
$325 females
570-765-1914
900
REAL ESTATE
FOR SALE
906 Homes for Sale
Having trouble
paying your mort-
gage? Falling
behind on your
payments? You
may get mail from
people who promise
to forestall your
foreclosure for a fee
in advance. Report
them to the Federal
Trade Commission,
the nations con-
sumer protection
agency. Call 1-877-
FTC-HELP or click
on ftc.gov. A mes-
sage from The
Times Leader and
the FTC.
DALLAS
3 bedroom, 2 bath,
modern country
kitchen with Corian
counters, family
room with fireplace,
wet bar & walkout
to patio, multi-level
decks. All appli-
ances included.
$217,000.
570-675-0446
evenings.
To place your
ad call...829-7130
LAFLIN
20 OLD MILL RD
For Sale By Owner
Beautiful
Custom Built.
Minutes from I-81
Turnpike & Casino.
Move In Condition!
3 to 4 bedroom
Tri-level, Master
bath, 2 full baths &
1 powder room,
central vacuum
system. Living &
dining rooms, fam-
ily room with fire-
place. Gas heat,
central air, large
basement, deck,
three car garage
& 2nd large lot
included.....
$395,000
570-237-0101
Find Your Ideal
Employee! Place an
ad and end the
search!
570-829-7130
ask for an employ-
ment specialist
Find Your Ideal
Employee! Place an
ad and end the
search!
570-829-7130
ask for an employ-
ment specialist
Say it HERE
in the Classifieds!
570-829-7130
WEDNESDAY DECEMBER 26, 2012 Abington Journal PAGE 20B
The Journal
Call
1-800-273-7130 For Local Pros
LOCAL PROS
WELL DRILLING
WELLS
PUMP REPAIR
FILTERS
PUMPS
WATER SOFTENERS
SULFUR REMOVAL
COMPLETE WATER SYSTEMS
ROUTES 6-11 DALTON, PA 18414
563-1123
TELL YOUR WATER PROBLEMS TO CRESSWELL
Pat Regan Gutter Cleaning
All Winter Long
Te Right Way Cleaned, Flushed and Minor Repairs
CALL BEFORE YOU REPLACE THEM
Call Pat Regan 383-1991 No Answer, Leave Message
Insulation & Home Effciency Specialists
Vinyl Replacement Windows
Free Surveys & Estimates #PA012503
570-586-7946 570-587-5081 - Fax
www.jaynebrothersniulation.com
AIR CONDITIONING
& HEATING
HEATING & AIR CONDITIONING
Service - Installation
AJS Mechanical Services, LLC.
Dalton, PA 570-468-0190
We service all brands!
GUTTER REPAIR
& CLEANING
Insulation/
Home Efcency
Route 107, Lake Sheridn
(10 Miles from Clarks Summit)
9:00-5:00 Mon-Fri 8:00-3:30 Sat
945-5379
Sales & Service
MTD Products, Briggs & Stratton,
Husqvarna, Tecumseh, Poulan, Kohler,
White, Mantis, Oregon, Echo, Muray
Small Engine Service
CLARK S SHARP-ALL
REPAIRS
AUTOMOTIVE
Saiis
Siivici
Ixsraiiariox
Warii Soirixiis x Tiiarxixr
VAN FLEET DRILLING CO., INC.
Puoxi:
;o-o-1;;o
:o:o Maiii Roao
Dairox, PA 181
ERRANDS 2 GO
Residential/Business Cleaning, Home
Helper Services, Personal Errands, etc.
errands2go50@ymail.com
570-357-1291
Karpentry by Keiper
Specializing in windows, doors, paneling,
decks, kitchens, bathrooms, roong, siding, gutters,
ALL PHASES OF CARPENTRY
Licensed General Contractor.
Call 563-2766
(Quality over volume, one job at a time)
CONSTRUCTION
ERRAND SERVICES
EXCAVATING
WATERPROOFING
SUMP PUMPS
Installed & Replaced
Basements Waterproofed
Marciano Waterproong ~ PA 21778
570-961-3161
SEAL COATING
TWIN FORCES
Professional Hot Oil Seal Coating
Not Latex!
Asphalt Repair
& Crack Filling
Licensed & Insured
Since 1947
570-499-8963
LONGLAST BLACKTOP
SEALCOATING
Cracks & Pothole Repairs Line Striping
Free Estimates
570-282-2517
$50.00 off Residential or $100 off Commercial
For All Your
Imported Car Needs
1173 Winola Rd.
Clarks Summit, PA 18411
570-586-9353
www.neimportsinc.com
CAREYS EXCAVATING
Topsoil, &Mulch, Coal Delivery, Fill,
Sand &Stone Foundations &Driveways
DONALD CAREY
246 Snyder Road Scott Twp, PA 18433
570-254-4636 Snow Plowing & Salting
HAIR SALON
PIZAZZ SALON
Now Oering
Lash Extensions
Call 570-586-6645
for Information
Abington Shopping Center
McAndrew Construction
All Types Including:
Kitchen, Baths, Roofs & Additions
Well Even Fix Your Dripping Faucet!
NOJOBTOOSMALL
Licensed & Insured
36 Years Experience
570-499-7170 570-591-3560
WANTED TO BUY
BUYING OLDER DOLLS
ONE DOLL OR WHOLE COLLECTIONS
Vintage Toys Up to the 1980s
Please Call Susan at 570-878-5360
Or Jim at 570-575-2348
SPA SERVICES
FLOOR REFINISHING
FLOOREXCELLENCE
Hardwood Refnishing &Installing
John Mirabelli
103 Park Blvd.
Clarks Summit, PA 18411
570-586-8961 570-840-1455 Cell
Lavender ...Salon and Spa
563-9875
110 N. Turnpike Rd.
P.O. Box 652
Dalton, Pa. 18414
Salon Hours: T +Th 12-8
W+F 10-4 Sat 9-2
lavenderaquaintsalon.webs.com
$10 OFF Any Service With This Ad
JAYNE BROTHERS
House Doctors Since 1954
Lic#9117737045
DAPSIS
REGISTERED PLUMBING & HEATING SPECIALISTS
Serving Abingtons over 25 years Gas & Oil 24 Hour Service
313 Leach Hill Road., Clarks Summit 587-1401
PLUMBING & HEATING
MUSIC LESSONS
Call
1-800-273-7130
For
Local Pros
Clip Ad for Savings
PAGE 21 Abington Journal WEDNESDAY DECEMBER 26, 2012
906 Homes for Sale
NANTICOKE
1472 S. Hanover St.
Well maintained
bi-level. This home
features 2 bed-
rooms, 1 3/4 baths,
recreation room
with propane stove.
Walk out to a 3
season porch. Pro-
fessionally land-
scaped yard. 1 car
garage, storage
shed, new appli-
ances, ceiling fans.
Close to LCCC.
$153,900.
Call 570-735-7594
or 570-477-2410
915 Manufactured
Homes
EAST MOUNTAIN RIDGE
& SAN SOUCI PARKS
PRICES REDUCED!
Financing Available
MobileOneSales.net
Call 570-250-2890
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
KINGSTON
1st Ave. 1 bedroom,
single occupancy,
off-street parking,
no pets, references.
$450 + utilities.
Call 570-655-9229
PITTSTON
152 Elizabeth Street
Spacious 2 bed-
room apartment with
ample closet space.
Off street parking.
All utilities and appli-
ances included. No
pets. $795 + lease &
security. Call
570-510-7325
WEST WYOMING
Eighth Street
Beautiful, 2nd floor,
2 bedroom, 1 bath.
All appliances,
includes washer/
dryer & air condi-
tioning. Non smok-
er, security & refer-
ences, off street
parking, no pets.
$595 + utilities.
954-2972
WILKES-BARRE
Mayflower
Crossing
Apartments
570.822.3968
1, 2, 3 & 4
Bedrooms
- Light & bright
open floor plans
- All major
appliances included
- Pets welcome*
- Close to everything
- 24 hour emergency
maintenance
- Short term
leases available
Call TODAY For
AVAILABILITY!!
www.mayflower
crossing.com
Certain Restrictions
Apply*
944 Commercial
Properties
LOCATION
MATTERS
PRIME OFFICE
SPACE
The Mack
Building
281 PIERCE ST.
Kingston, PA.
Refined office
suites, or
individual flexible
office spaces on
2nd floor
comprised of
approximately
1,300sq. ft.
Central A/C,
glass door
entrance, 6
rooms consisting
of waiting room,
French doors
leading to
conference
room(s), offices,
bathroom,
kitchenette, with
ample storage/
archive space
available, parking
lot area
professionally
maintained.
Multiple signage
opportunities:
Exterior Bronze
wall
plaque,Entrance
glass-doors,
Street frontage
sign, and
billboard
*Available
February 1st.
showing by
appointment only
570-472-1110
NAIL/BEAUTY SALON
Swoyersville. 1100
sq. ft. 2 station nail
& beauty salon, fullY
equipped, like new.
570-831-5715
944 Commercial
Properties
COMMERCIAL RETAIL
PROPERTY FOR RENT:
900 Sq. Ft.
STORE RETAIL
SPACE
Will be vacant
as of
January 1, 2013
200 Spring St.
Wilkes-Barre
Great for a
Barber Shop!
Call Michael at
570-239-7213
DOLPHIN PLAZA
Rte. 315 2,400 Sq.
Ft. professional
office space with
beautiful view of
Valley & Casino.
will divide
office / retail
Call 570-829-1206
STOREFRONT
Glen Lyon. Unique
opportunity at
61-63 East Main St.
High Traffic Area.
570-881-0320
315 PLAZA
1,750 SQ. FT. &
2,400 SQ.FT
OFFICE/RETAIL
2,000 FT.
Fully Furnished
With Cubicles.
570-829-1206
950 Half Doubles
PLYMOUTH
Shawnee Ave.
3 bedrooms, back
yard, basement.
$550/month +
utilities and sewer.
570-357-0712
WILKES-BARRE/SOUTH
3 bedroom, 1.5
baths, small yard,
front porch, off
street parking.
$615/month
security required.
Tenant pays
all utilities.
570-357-0712
953Houses for Rent
BEAR CREEK
Modern 2 bedroom,
kitchen, dining
room, laundry, new
carpeting. Deck,
storage area.
$550/month. No
pets. 570-947-5113
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
Its a showroom in print!
Classifieds got
the directions!
DUPONT
7 room house with
3 bedrooms, 1 full
tile bath. Large
kitchen with beau-
tiful oak cabinets,
new stove,
fridge, carpeting,
flooring, draperies
& windows.
Washer/dryer
hook up on 1st
floor. Single car
detached garage.
Large yard. Gas
heat. Pets OK, no
smoking. $900/
month + utilities &
security. Close to
airport, I-81
& casino.
570-762-8265
HARVEYS LAKE
HOUSE ON LAKE
includes partial use
of boat house.
Spectacular view,
4 bedrooms, all
appliances, ample
parking. $1475/
month plus utilities.
570-822-2992
NANTICOKE
Single Home, 3 bed-
rooms, 2 car
garage, appliances
included. No pets.
$800/month + utili-
ties and security
deposit.
570-417-3220
1000
SERVICE
DIRECTORY
1015 Appliance
Service
ECO-FRIENDLY
APPLIANCE TECH.
25 Years Experi-
ence fixing major
appliances: Wash-
ers, Dryers, Refrig-
erators, Dishwash-
ers, Compactors.
Most brands. Free
phone advice & all
work guaranteed.
No service charge
for visit. 706-6577
1024 Building &
Remodeling
1st. Quality
Construction Co.
Roofing, siding,
gutters, insulation,
decks, additions,
windows, doors,
masonry &
concrete.
Insured & Bonded.
Senior Citizens Discount!
State Lic. # PA057320
570-606-8438
timesleader.com
SAVE
MORE
MONEY
WELL HELP YOU
TO SUBSCRIBE CALL
829-5000
or visit us online at
timesleader.com
In a matter of weeks, you can
shave hundreds of dollars off
your grocery bill just by clipping
The Sunday Times Leader coupons.
Grab your scissors and join the
coupon craze!
Already a subscriber?
Pick up EXTRA COPIES of
The Sunday Times Leader at the
newsstand and multiply your savings!
C M Y K
PAGE 22A www.theabingtonjournal.com The Abington JournalClarks Summit, PA WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 26, 2012
W
e
M
ake
The
Difference!
For the past three years, Toyota Scion of Scranton was recognized with the prestigious Presidents Award for
excellence in each of a series of categories, including Customer Sales Satisfaction and Customer Service Satisfaction.

0% Financing available on select models only. With approved credit only. Not all customers will qualify. See dealer for complete details. All offers end close of business Monday, December 31, 2012 or while supplies last. All offers valid only at Toyota Scion of Scranton. Some restrictions may apply. See dealer for details. Pictures may not represent actual units. Dealer not responsible for
typographical errors. 2012 Impact Advertising 12TSS-EFC-ABJ122612
5 DAYS ONLY!
DECEMBER 26 - DECEMBER 31
P
R
I
C
E
S
B
E
S
T
O
F
T
H
E
Y
E
A
R
!
SALES EVENT!
PRESENTS
HOLIDAY
FFF
TT
FF
OOO
FFF
TT
H
PRESENTS RES TS ESE PRESENTS E NTS ESE
YEAR END
WE DELIVER
INCREDIBLE:
INVENTORY!
SELECTION!
PRICE!
QUALITY!
BUYING EXPERIENCE!
For the past three years, Toyota Scion of Scranton was recognized with the prestigious President TT s Award for AA
excellence in each of a series of categories, including Customer Sales Satisfaction and Customer Service Sat
SAVE!
LAST CHANCE TO
0
%
FINANCING
AVAILABLE
ON OVER 365 VEHICLES!

OVER NEW & CERTIFIED TOYOTAS AVAILABLE!
570
ABSOLUTE BEST PRICES OF THE YEAR
ONALL NEWAND USED

Related Interests