Sie sind auf Seite 1von 21

ABU DHABI NATIONAL OIL COMPANY

ABU DHABI NATIONAL OIL COMPANY HEALTH SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT MANUAL OF CODES OF PRACTICE VOLUME

HEALTH SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT MANUAL OF CODES OF PRACTICE

VOLUME 2: ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION

GUIDELINE ON ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS ADNOC-COPV2-04
GUIDELINE ON
ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS
ADNOC-COPV2-04
OF CODES OF PRACTICE VOLUME 2: ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION GUIDELINE ON ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS ADNOC-COPV2-04
HSE MANAGEMENT CODES OF PRACTICE Volume 2: ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION Version 1 September 2005 GUIDELINE ON

HSE MANAGEMENT CODES OF PRACTICE

Volume 2: ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION

Version 1

September 2005

GUIDELINE ON ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS

Document No: ADNOC-COPV2-04

Page 2 of 21

RECORD OF REVISION

Revision No. Date Section / Page Reason
Revision No.
Date
Section / Page
Reason

Copyright

The copyright and all other rights of a like nature in this document are vested in Abu Dhabi National Oil Company (ADNOC), Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates. This document is issued as part of the Manual of HSE Codes of Practice (the “Manual”) and as guidance to ADNOC, ADNOC Group Companies and independent operators engaged in the Abu Dhabi oil & gas industries. Any of these parties may give copies of the entire Manual or selected parts thereof to their contractors implementing HSE standards in order to qualify for award of contracts or for the execution of awarded contracts. Such copies should carry a statement that they are reproduced by permission of ADNOC, and an explanatory note on the manner in which the Manual is to be used.

Disclaimer

No liability whatsoever in contract, tort or otherwise is accepted by ADNOC or any of its Group Companies, their respective shareholders, directors, officers and employees whether or not involved in the preparation of the Manual for any consequences whatsoever resulting directly or indirectly from reliance on or from the use of the Manual or for any error or omission therein even if such error or omission is caused by a failure to exercise reasonable care.

All administrative queries should be directed to the Manual of HSE Codes of Practice Administrator in:

Environment, Health & Safety Division, Supreme Petroleum Council, Abu Dhabi National Oil Company, P.O. Box : 898, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates. Telephone : (9712) 6023782 Fax: (9712) 6668089 Internet site: www.adnoc.com E-mail: hse@adnoc.com

HSE MANAGEMENT CODES OF PRACTICE Volume 2: ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION Version 1 September 2005 GUIDELINE ON

HSE MANAGEMENT CODES OF PRACTICE

Volume 2: ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION

Version 1

September 2005

GUIDELINE ON ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS

Document No: ADNOC-COPV2-04

Page 3

TABLE OF CONTENTS

PAGE

I. PURPOSE

4

II. DEFINITIONS

5

III. EXISTING LAWS

6

1. GENERAL REQUIREMENTS AND PRINCIPLES

7

1.1 Linking EMS to HSEMS Model

8

1.2 Environmental Review

9

1.3 Boundaries of EMS

10

2. ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT SYSTEM (EMS) REQUIREMENTS

11

2.1

Environmental Policy

11

2.2

Planning

11

2.2.1 Environmental Aspects and Evaluation of Associated Environmental Impacts

11

2.2.2 Legal and other requirements

12

2.2.3 Objectives and targets

12

2.2.4 Environmental management programmes

13

2.3

Implementation and Operation

13

2.3.1 Structure and Responsibility

13

2.3.2 Training, awareness and competence

13

2.3.3 Communication

14

2.3.4 Environmental Management System Documentation

14

2.3.5 Document Control

15

2.3.6 Operational Control

15

2.3.7 Emergency Preparedness and Response

15

2.4

Checking and Corrective Action

16

2.4.1 Monitoring and Measurement

16

2.4.2 Non-conformance and Corrective and Preventive Action

17

2.4.3 Records

17

2.4.4 Environmental Management System Audit

17

2.5

Management Review

18

3.

LINKAGES WITH OTHER ADNOC GUIDELINES AND CODES OF PRACTICE

19

REFERENCES

21

HSE MANAGEMENT CODES OF PRACTICE Volume 2: ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION Version 1 September 2005 GUIDELINE ON

HSE MANAGEMENT CODES OF PRACTICE

Volume 2: ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION

Version 1

September 2005

GUIDELINE ON ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS

Document No: ADNOC-COPV2-04

Page 4

I.

PURPOSE

Environmental protection is an explicit element of ADNOC’s Statement of Commitment and a requirement of ADNOC corporate HSE policy. The management of environmental issues is also one of the key objectives of the ADNOC Health Safety and Environmental Management System (HSEMS) [Ref. 1]. In order to develop a systematic approach to environmental management in the ADNOC Group, it is necessary for ADNOC Group Companies to establish the appropriate systems to ensure that environmental policies, objectives and targets are achieved and that procedures for continual environmental improvement are implemented.

The objective of this document is to provide guidance to the Group Companies on how:

a) To review and manage the environmental aspects / impacts of their activities in line with Company policy objectives.

b) To ensure that all activities are carried out in compliance with relevant Abu Dhabi / Federal Laws and Regulations, including ADNOC Group Guidelines (AGG) and ADNOC Codes of Practice (COP).

c) To ensure that a culture of continual improvement in environmental matters is adopted throughout the organisation.

d) To provide the framework for the establishment of an Environmental Management System (EMS) that is based on international best practice.

e) To enable demonstration to third parties (including international shareholders), that an EMS is in place, which is consistent with international standards.

It is envisaged that Group Companies will use the principles as detailed in this Guideline:

To verify that these are covered in those components of their HSEMS that deal with environmental management.

OR,

To establish a formal and separate EMS which is complementary to their existing HSEMS and is fully aligned with it.

This Guideline is based on the requirements of international EMS Standard, ISO-14001 [Ref. 2].

Implementation of an EMS in accordance with this Guideline will assist Group Companies who are seeking independent certification of their EMS to IS0- 14001, should they wish to do so. However, ISO-14001 certification is not an ADNOC requirement and Group Companies must decide for themselves on the business reasons to gain external certification.

[1] ADNOC Group Guideline ‘HSE Management Systems’, January 2002. [2] BS EN ISO 14001 Environmental Management Systems-Specification with Guidance for Use. British Standard Institute, London, 1996

HSE MANAGEMENT CODES OF PRACTICE Volume 2: ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION Version 1 September 2005 GUIDELINE ON

HSE MANAGEMENT CODES OF PRACTICE

Volume 2: ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION

Version 1

September 2005

GUIDELINE ON ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS

Document No: ADNOC-COPV2-04

Page 5

II.

DEFINITIONS

Continual Improvement Process of enhancing the environmental management system to achieve improvements in overall environmental performance in line with the organisation’s environmental policy.

EMS Environmental Management System

Environment Surroundings in which the organisation operates, including air, water, land, natural resources, flora, fauna, humans and their interrelation, including interrelation with non-local surroundings (e.g. global effect of CO2 emissions).

Environmental Aspect Element of the organisation’s activities, products or services that can interact with the environment. A significant environmental aspect is an environmental aspect that has or can have significant environmental impact.

Environmental Impact Any change to the environment, whether unfavourable or beneficial, wholly or partially resulting from the organisation’s activities, products or services.

Environmental Management System The part of the overall management system that includes the organisation’s structure, planning activities, responsibilities, practices, procedures, processes and resources for developing, implementing, achieving, reviewing and maintaining the environmental policy.

Environmental Management System Audit A systematic and documented verification process of objectively obtaining and assessing evidence to determine whether the organisation’s environmental management system conforms to the environmental management system audit criteria set by the organisation, and for communication of the results of this process to management.

Environmental Objective Overall environmental goal, arising from the environmental policy, that an organisation sets itself to achieve, and which is quantifiable where practicable.

Environmental Performance Measurable results of the environmental management system, related to the organisation’s control of its environmental aspects, based on its environmental policy, objectives and targets.

Environmental Policy Statement by the organisation of its intentions and principles in relation to its overall environmental performance that provides a framework for action and for the setting of its environmental objectives and targets.

HSE MANAGEMENT CODES OF PRACTICE Volume 2: ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION Version 1 September 2005 GUIDELINE ON

HSE MANAGEMENT CODES OF PRACTICE

Volume 2: ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION

Version 1

September 2005

GUIDELINE ON ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS

Document No: ADNOC-COPV2-04

Page 6

Environmental Target Detailed performance requirement, quantified where possible, relevant to the organisation, or parts of it, that arises from the environmental objectives and that needs to be set and met in order to achieve those objectives.

HSEMS Health Safety and Environmental Management System

Interested Party Individual or group concerned with or affected by the environmental performance of the organisation.

Organisation In the context of ADNOC Group, organisation means Group Operating Companies and independent producers.

Prevention of Pollution Use of processes, practices, materials or products that avoid, reduce or control pollution, which may include recycling, treatment, process changes, control mechanisms, efficient use of resources and material substitution.

Further detail on definitions is provided in the document ADNOC Manual of Codes of Practice “Guideline on HSE Definitions and Abbreviations [Ref. 3].

III. EXISTING LAWS

Details of current UAE legislation and other relevant environmental regulations of relevance to this Code of Practice are provided in:

Appendix 4 of ADNOC ‘Code of Practice on HSE Administration Systems’, COPV1-01 [Ref. 4].

Appendix 2 of ADNOC ‘Code of Practice on Environmental Impact Assessment’, COPV2-01 [Ref. 5].

[3] ADNOC Manual of Codes of Practice: ‘Guideline on HSE Definitions & Abbreviations’’, ADNOC-COPV1-05. [4] ADNOC Manual of Codes of Practice: ‘Code of Practice on HSE Administration Systems’, ADNOC-COPV1-01. [5] ADNOC Manual of Codes of Practice: ‘Code of Practice on Environmental Impact Assessment’, ADNOC-COPV2-01.

HSE MANAGEMENT CODES OF PRACTICE Volume 2: ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION Version 1 September 2005 GUIDELINE ON

HSE MANAGEMENT CODES OF PRACTICE

Volume 2: ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION

Version 1

September 2005

GUIDELINE ON ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS

Document No: ADNOC-COPV2-04

Page 7

1. GENERAL REQUIREMENTS AND PRINCIPLES

Environmental Protection is one of the principal requirements of ADNOC’s corporate HSE Policy and is reflected in a number of HSEMS Expectations [Ref. 1]. A formal EMS provides order and consistency for organisations to specifically address environmental concerns, through the allocation of resources, assignment of responsibilities and ongoing evaluation of practices, procedures and processes. An EMS is essential to an organisation’s ability to anticipate and meet its environmental objectives and to ensure ongoing compliance with national and international legislation or other requirements. The overall aim of an EMS is to support environmental protection and prevention of pollution, in balance with socio-economic needs.

The basic requirements of an EMS, irrespective of whether this is an integral component of the HSEMS or developed separately, are the commitment to minimisation of pollution, compliance with legislation and continual improvement. The ISO 14001 EMS model [Ref. 2] comprises elements:

Environmental policy.

Planning.

Implementation and operation.

Checking and corrective action.

Management Review.

The implementation of these elements leads to a cycle of continual improvement in environmental performance, as is illustrated in Figure 1.

in environmental performance, as is illustrated in Figure 1. Continual Continual Improvement Improvement Management
Continual Continual Improvement Improvement Management Management Review Review Checking and Checking and
Continual
Continual
Improvement
Improvement
Management
Management
Review
Review
Checking and
Checking and
Corrective Action
Corrective Action
Environmental
Environmental
Policy
Policy
Implementation
Implementation
and Operation
and Operation
Planning
Planning
FIGURE 1: ISO-14001 ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT SYSTEM MODEL

[1] ADNOC Group Guideline ‘HSE Management Systems’, January 2002. [2] BS EN ISO 14001 Environmental Management Systems-Specification with Guidance for Use. British Standard Institute, London, 1996

HSE MANAGEMENT CODES OF PRACTICE Volume 2: ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION Version 1 September 2005 GUIDELINE ON

HSE MANAGEMENT CODES OF PRACTICE

Volume 2: ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION

Version 1

September 2005

GUIDELINE ON ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS

Document No: ADNOC-COPV2-04

Page 8

Companies must develop and implement an effective EMS, in order to ensure the protection of human health and the environment from the potential impacts of its activities, products or services and to assist in maintaining and improving the quality of the environment. The EMS may either be integrated with the Company HSEMS, or may be developed as a stand-alone system.

Implementation of an EMS, separately but linked to and addressing the expectations of the HSEMS, will assist Company Management to demonstrate top-level commitment to and adherence to the following key principles:

the highest

Recognise that environmental management is among corporate priorities.

Establish

external

and

maintain

communication

with

internal

and

interested parties.

Determine the legislative requirements and environmental aspects associated company activities.

Develop management and employee commitment to protect the environment, with clear assignment of accountability and responsibility.

Encourage environmental planning throughout the process/product life cycle.

Establish a process for achieving environmental performance targets.

Provide appropriate and sufficient resources, including training, to achieve performance levels on an ongoing basis.

Evaluate environmental performance against Company environmental policy, objectives and targets, and seek improvements where appropriate.

Establish a management process to audit and review the EMS and to identify opportunities for improvement in the system and resulting environmental performance.

Encourage contractors and suppliers to establish an EMS.

This Guideline considers the main elements of the international EMS Standard, ISO 14001 [Ref. 2], and provides advice on how to effectively initiate, improve or sustain an EMS. The EMS must be seen as complementary to the Company HSEMS and must be integrated with it.

1.1 Linking EMS to HSEMS Model

If an EMS is developed as a stand-alone systems to facilitate ISO 140001 certification, then its will appear logical to develop this as per the 5- element ISO-14001 model (see Figure 1). However, this may present problems when linking the EMS to the company HSEMS, which may have a different structure e.g. the ADNOC HSEMS model has 8 elements [Ref 1]. A comparison between ADNOC HSEMS Elements and ISO-14001 clauses is provided in Appendix 1 of ADNOC Group Guideline ‘HSE Management Systems’ [Ref. 1].

[1] ADNOC Group Guideline HSE Management Systems’, January 2002. [2] BS EN ISO 14001 Environmental Management Systems-Specification with Guidance for Use. British Standard Institute, London, 1996

HSE MANAGEMENT CODES OF PRACTICE Volume 2: ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION Version 1 September 2005 GUIDELINE ON

HSE MANAGEMENT CODES OF PRACTICE

Volume 2: ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION

Version 1

September 2005

GUIDELINE ON ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS

Document No: ADNOC-COPV2-04

Page 9

It is therefore be advisable to consider developing the separate EMS along similar structure as the company HSEMS. This, and other development issues should be discussed and agreed with the external ISO 14001 certifying authority, prior to developing a separate EMS.

1.2 Environmental Review

The starting point for any organisation seeking to implement an EMS is to conduct an initial environmental review of its activities and to systematically identify its environmental aspects. The information obtained during the conduct of the environmental review is then used to identify gaps in existing environmental management procedures. This in turn helps focus on the specific requirements of the EMS and to establish priorities.

The environmental review also provides the benchmark against which future environmental performance can be judged.

The environmental must review all Company activities and identify all significant environmental aspects. The review must be carried out by suitably qualified persons with appropriate experience and must include the following:

Identification of legislative and regulatory requirements.

Identification of environmental aspects of its activities, products or services and assessment of those that are significant.

Evaluate environmental performance with respect to relevant Company criteria, Federal/ Abu Dhabi Regulations, ADNOC Codes of Practice.

Existing environmental management practices and procedures.

respect to

Existing

policies and procedures

for procurement with

environmental matters.

Review of previous environmental incidents.

Stakeholder concerns

Activities

of

other

organisations

that

environmental performance.

could

assist

or

impede

For each environmental aspect identified, the environmental risks must be identified in accordance with Qualitative Risk Potential Matrix detailed in Sub Element 4.2 of the ADNOC HSEMS. The evaluation of significance of each aspect must consider:

The scale of impact.

The severity of impact (potential consequences).

Probability of occurrence (probability of consequence).

Duration of exposure.

A register of significant environmental aspects must be maintained.

This environmental review will form the basis of an EMS, or where an EMS is already in place, will assist in ensuring it is fit for purpose.

HSE MANAGEMENT CODES OF PRACTICE Volume 2: ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION Version 1 September 2005 GUIDELINE ON

HSE MANAGEMENT CODES OF PRACTICE

Volume 2: ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION

Version 1

September 2005

GUIDELINE ON ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS

Document No: ADNOC-COPV2-04

Page 10

1.3 Boundaries of EMS

Environmental management, when documented as an integral component of the HSEMS, must cover all Company activities i.e. including office facilities, laboratories, projects, construction activities, road transport, etc. [Ref. 1].

There may be circumstances for the boundaries of environmental management, when documented in a separate EMS for purposes of ISO- 14001 certification, to exclude certain activities or company locations.

It is advisable to discuss and agree such issues with the external ISO 14001 certifying authority, prior to developing a separate EMS.

[1] ADNOC Group Guideline ‘HSE Management Systems’, January 2002.

HSE MANAGEMENT CODES OF PRACTICE Volume 2: ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION Version 1 September 2005 GUIDELINE ON

HSE MANAGEMENT CODES OF PRACTICE

Volume 2: ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION

Version 1

September 2005

GUIDELINE ON ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS

Document No: ADNOC-COPV2-04

Page 11

2.

ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT SYSTEM (EMS) REQUIREMENTS

2.1

Environmental Policy

Company top management must define an environmental policy that is consistent with ADNOC HSEMS requirements [Ref. 1] and ISO 14001 [Ref 2]. This environmental policy should be integrated with the Company HSE policy. A Company environmental policy must:

a) Be suitable to the nature, scale and environmental impacts of the Company activities, products or services.

b) Include a commitment to continual improvement and prevention of pollution.

c) Include a commitment to comply with relevant environmental legislation and regulations, and with other requirements to which the Company subscribes (including ADNOC Codes of Practice).

d) Provide the framework for setting and reviewing environmental objectives and targets.

e) Be documented, implemented, maintained and communicated to all employees (including contractors), and made available to the public.

2.2

Planning

2.2.1

Environmental Aspects and Evaluation of Associated Environmental Impacts

Environmental policies, objectives and targets must be based on knowledge about the environmental aspects and significant environmental impacts associated with the Company activities. This ensures that the significant environmental impacts associated with these aspects are considered in setting the environmental objectives. Refer to ADNOC Manual of Codes of Practice:

Code of Practice on Environmental Impact Assessment’, ADNOC-COPV2-01

[5].

The identification of the environmental aspects is an ongoing process that determines the past, current and potential impact of the Company activities on the environment.

Procedures must be established and maintained to identify the environmental aspects of Company activities, products and the services that they control and influence. This specifically applies to those, which have, or can have, significant impacts on the environment.

The process of identifying the significant environmental aspects related to the activities at operating units must, where relevant, consider:

[1] ADNOC Group Guideline ‘HSE Management Systems’, January 2002. [2] BS EN ISO 14001 Environmental Management Systems-Specification with Guidance for Use. British Standard Institute, London, 1996 [5] ADNOC Manual of Codes of Practice: ‘Code of Practice on Environmental Impact Assessment’, ADNOC-COPV2-01.

HSE MANAGEMENT CODES OF PRACTICE Volume 2: ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION Version 1 September 2005 GUIDELINE ON

HSE MANAGEMENT CODES OF PRACTICE

Volume 2: ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION

Version 1

September 2005

GUIDELINE ON ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS

Document No: ADNOC-COPV2-04

Page 12

a) Emissions to air.

b) Discharges to water.

c) Waste management.

d) Contamination of land.

e) Use of raw materials and natural resources.

f) Damage to Flora and Fauna.

g) Fuel and energy use.

h) Land, coastal and/or vegetation disturbance.

i) Noise, odour, vibration, radiation and/or visual impacts.

j) Other local environmental and community issues.

The process must include consideration of normal operating conditions, shut- down and start-up conditions as well as accident and emergency conditions.

Especially those aspects related to significant impacts must be considered in setting Company environmental objectives.

2.2.2 Legal and other requirements

Procedures must be established and maintained to identify and have access to the legal and other requirements to which the Company must demonstrate compliance (e.g. ADNOC Codes of Practice, Federal and Abu Dhabi laws and regulations, non-regulatory guidelines, industry standards etc) i.e. those that are applicable to the environmental aspects of the Company activities. All legal and related procedures must be documented in a Register of Legal Compliance. This register must be reviewed at intervals of not more than 12 months and updated as required.

Information on legal and related requirements must be communicated to all those with responsibilities for environmental management and to those whose activities could lead to significant environmental impacts and/or a breach of statutory or other environmental regulations.

2.2.3 Objectives and targets

Documented environmental objectives and targets must be established and maintained at each relevant function and level within the organisation. These objectives must be SMART (Specific, Measurable, Achievable, Realistic and Time-based). When developing and reviewing objectives and targets, the following must be considered:

Legal and other requirements.

Important environmental aspects.

Technological options.

Financial, operational and business requirements.

The views of interested parties.

HSE MANAGEMENT CODES OF PRACTICE Volume 2: ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION Version 1 September 2005 GUIDELINE ON

HSE MANAGEMENT CODES OF PRACTICE

Volume 2: ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION

Version 1

September 2005

GUIDELINE ON ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS

Document No: ADNOC-COPV2-04

Page 13

The objectives and targets must be consistent with the environmental policy, including the commitment to prevention of pollution.

2.2.4

Environmental management programmes

A programme must be established for achieving the environmental objectives and targets. The programme must include:

a) The designation of responsibility for achieving objectives and targets at each relevant function and level of the organisation.

b) The methods and time frame by which they are to be achieved.

The programme must include an environmental review for new activities/projects and programmes must be amended where relevant to ensure that environmental management applies to such projects.

2.3

Implementation and Operation

For effective implementation, the capabilities and support mechanisms must be developed as necessary to achieve the environmental policy, objectives and targets. Implementing environmental management must be based on:

The level of understanding of the environmental aspects and requirements specific to the business conducted.

EMS and HSEMS expectations and benefits.

The availability of resources.

2.3.1

Structure and Responsibility

Roles, responsibility and authorities must be defined, documented and communicated in order to facilitate effective environmental management. Management must provide the resources essential to the implementation and control of the environmental management system. Resources include human resources and specialised skills, technology and financial resources. Company top management must appoint specific management representatives with defined responsibility and authority for implementing the environmental management system and maintaining it, in accordance with this Code of Practice. The Management Representative will also be responsible for reporting on environmental performance to top management and to ADNOC.

2.3.2

Training, awareness and competence

Training needs must be identified and appropriate training must be provided for all personnel, whose work may create a significant impact upon the environment. Procedures must be established and maintained to make the workforce at each relevant function and level aware of:

a) The significance of conformance with the environmental policy and procedures and with the requirements of the EMS.

HSE MANAGEMENT CODES OF PRACTICE Volume 2: ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION Version 1 September 2005 GUIDELINE ON

HSE MANAGEMENT CODES OF PRACTICE

Volume 2: ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION

Version 1

September 2005

GUIDELINE ON ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS

Document No: ADNOC-COPV2-04

Page 14

b) The significant environmental impacts of their work activities and the environmental benefits of improved personal performance.

c) Their roles and responsibilities in achieving conformance with the environmental policy and procedures and with the requirements of the EMS, including emergency preparedness and response requirements.

d) The possible consequences of deviating from particular operating procedures.

Personnel performing the tasks that could cause major environmental impacts must be competent on the basis of appropriate education, training and/or experience.

In addition to identifying training needs of employees, the organisation should

require that contractors working on its behalf are able to demonstrate that their employees have the requisite training, with records available to demonstrate that training has been carried out.

2.3.3 Communication

With regard to the environmental aspects and environmental management system, procedures must be established and maintained for:

a) Internal communication between the various levels and functions of the organisation (e.g., minute of meetings, memos, etc.).

b) Receiving, documenting and responding to relevant communication from external interested parties parties, including complaints records and responses of which trends can indicate environmental performance.

These procedures must also address necessary communications with public authorities regarding emergency planning and other relevant issues.

The procedures must also address communication on environmental aspects and performance with stakeholders e.g. ADNOC, international shareholders, FEA, ERWDA. All formal communications with FEA or ERWDA must be channelled through ADNOC EH&S Division. Decisions on stakeholder communication must be recorded.

2.3.4 Environmental Management System Documentation

A documentation system must be established and maintained, in paper or

electronic form, for the information concerning:

a)

Description of the basic elements of the management system and their interactions.

b)

Directions to associated documentation.

 

This

documentation

system

must

be

integrated

with

Company

HSEMS

documentation.

HSE MANAGEMENT CODES OF PRACTICE Volume 2: ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION Version 1 September 2005 GUIDELINE ON

HSE MANAGEMENT CODES OF PRACTICE

Volume 2: ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION

Version 1

September 2005

GUIDELINE ON ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS

Document No: ADNOC-COPV2-04

Page 15

2.3.5 Document Control

Procedures must be established and maintained for controlling all EMS documents, in accordance with the HSEMS document control procedures. The document control procedures must ensure that:

a) Documents

reviewed and revised at regular

are

easily

located,

intervals.

b) They are approved for adequacy by authorized personnel.

c) The current versions of relevant documents are to be available at all locations where operations essential to the effective functioning of the EMS are performed.

d) Outdated documents are to be immediately removed from all points of issue and points of use, or otherwise guaranteed against unintentional use. Any obsolete documents kept for legal purposes or as references are to be suitably identified.

Documentation must be legible, dated (with dates of revision) and identifiable, kept in an organized manner and retained for a specified period. Procedures and responsibilities must be established and maintained relating to the creation and changing of the various types of document, in accordance with company procedures for management of change.

However, the primary focus must remain on the effective execution of the environmental management system and on environmental performance and not on a complex documentation control system.

2.3.6 Operational Control

Those operations and activities must be identified that are associated with the identified significant environmental aspects, in line with company policy, objectives and targets. These operations and activities, including maintenance, must be planned in order to ensure that they are carried out under specified conditions by:

a) Establishing and maintaining documented procedures to cover situations where absence of such operations and activities could lead to deviations from the environmental policy and the objectives and targets.

b) Specifying operating criteria in the procedures.

c) Establishing and maintaining procedures related to the identifiable significant environmental aspects of goods and services used and communicating relevant procedures and requirements to suppliers and contractors.

2.3.7 Emergency Preparedness and Response

Procedures must be established and maintained to ensure there will be an appropriate response to unexpected or accidental incidents, and for preventing and mitigating the environmental impacts that may be associated with them.

HSE MANAGEMENT CODES OF PRACTICE Volume 2: ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION Version 1 September 2005 GUIDELINE ON

HSE MANAGEMENT CODES OF PRACTICE

Volume 2: ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION

Version 1

September 2005

GUIDELINE ON ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS

Document No: ADNOC-COPV2-04

Page 16

Also, emergency plan must be established for individual worksites and evidence must be available to demonstrate that personnel with a role to execute the site plan are aware of their roles and responsibilities

Emergency response procedures must be reviewed at regular intervals and after accident or emergency situations, to ensure that they remain effective in preventing or minimising environmental impacts resulting from an incident.

Further guidance on emergency response procedures is provided in the ADNOC ‘Code of Practice on Crisis and Emergency Management’ [Ref. 6] and the ADNOC ‘Code of Practice on Control of Major Accident Hazards’ [Ref. 7].

2.4

Checking and Corrective Action

2.4.1

Monitoring and Measurement

Procedures must be established and maintained procedures to measure and monitor actual performance against the environmental objectives and targets. Measurement and monitoring must cover all relevant areas of management systems and related operational controls and processes. The procedures must include the recording of information to track performance and conformance with each of the environmental objectives and targets.

Monitoring/measurement equipment must be calibrated and maintained in accordance with documented procedures. The records of this process must be retained in according to documented procedures.

Procedure must be established and maintained for regularly assessing compliance with relevant environmental legislation and regulations, including ADNOC Codes of Practice e.g.:

ADNOC ‘Code of Practice on Environmental Impact Assessment’ [Ref. 5]

ADNOC ‘Code of Practice on Pollution Prevention and Control’ [Ref. 8]

ADNOC ‘Code of Practice on Waste Management’ [Ref. 9]

ADNOC ‘Code of Practice on Environmental Performance Reporting[Ref. 10])

The monitoring results must be examined and used to determine areas of success and to identify activities requiring corrective action and improvement. Possible sources requiring monitoring include:

[5] ADNOC Manual of Codes of Practice: ‘Code of Practice on Environmental Impact Assessment’, ADNOC-COPV2-01. [6] ADNOC Manual of Codes of Practice: ‘Code of Practice on Crisis and Emergency Management’, ADNOC-COPV5-02.

[7] ADNOC Manual of Codes of Practice: ‘Code of Practice on Control of Major Accident Hazards (COMAH)’, ADNOC-

COPV5-01.

[8] ADNOC Manual of Codes of Practice: ‘Code of Practice on Pollution Prevention and Control’, ADNOC-COPV2-02. [9] ADNOC Manual of Codes of Practice: Code of Practice on Waste Management’, ADNOC-COPV2-05.

[10] ADNOC Manual of Codes of Practice: ‘Code of Practice on Environmental Performance Reporting’, ADNOC-

COPV2-06.

HSE MANAGEMENT CODES OF PRACTICE Volume 2: ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION Version 1 September 2005 GUIDELINE ON

HSE MANAGEMENT CODES OF PRACTICE

Volume 2: ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION

Version 1

September 2005

GUIDELINE ON ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS

Document No: ADNOC-COPV2-04

Page 17

Flaring and venting

Atmospheric emissions (CO 2 , NO 2 , SO 2 , VOCs, CH 4 , O 3 , PM 10 )

Discharges (COD, BOD, pH, TDS, Oil in water, etc )

Energy consumption

Waste production (sludges, drilling mud/cuttings, spent catalysts, etc.)

Soil and groundwater contamination

Environmental noise

2.4.2 Non-conformance and Corrective and Preventive Action

Procedures must be established and maintained for investigating and correcting non-conformances. The procedures must include:

a) Identifying the cause of the non-conformance.

b) Identifying and implementing the necessary corrective action.

c) Implementing or modifying controls necessary to avoid repetition of the non-conformance.

d) Recording

changes in written procedures resulting from the

any

corrective action.

Any corrective or preventive action taken to eliminate the causes of actual and potential non-conformances must be appropriate to the magnitude of problems and proportionate with the environmental impact encountered.

Management must ensure that these corrective and preventive actions have been implemented and that there is systematic follow-up to ensure their effectiveness.

2.4.3 Records

Procedures must be established and maintained for identification, maintenance and disposition of EMS records and for recording the extent to which planned objectives and targets have been met. These records must include training records and the results of audits and reviews.

Environmental records must be legible, identifiable and traceable to the activity involved. They must be stored and kept in such a way that they are easily retrievable and protected against damage, wear and tear or loss.

2.4.4 Environmental Management System Audit

Procedures must be established and maintained for periodic environmental management system audits to be carried out. These audits must be used to establish whether or not the EMS:

HSE MANAGEMENT CODES OF PRACTICE Volume 2: ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION Version 1 September 2005 GUIDELINE ON

HSE MANAGEMENT CODES OF PRACTICE

Volume 2: ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION

Version 1

September 2005

GUIDELINE ON ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS

Document No: ADNOC-COPV2-04

Page 18

Conforms with the requirements of Company EMS procedures, ADNOC HSEMS Guidelines (Ref. 1] and the ADNOC HSE Codes of Practice that relate to environmental management (see Section 2.4.1).

Has been properly implemented and maintained.

The audit programme must be prioritised in accordance with the environmental importance of the audited activities and the results of previous audits. In order to be comprehensive, the audit procedures must cover the audit scope, frequency and methodologies, as well as the responsibilities and requirements for conducting audits and reporting results.

Audits may be performed by company personnel or by external persons. In either case, auditors must be suitably trained and experienced in environmental auditing techniques. Were company personnel are used, audits must only be carried out in areas other than those in which such personnel normally work. The persons conducting the audit must be able to demonstrate being impartial and objective.

EMS audit reports must be submitted in accordance with a defined audit plan and the results submitted to Company Management for review. If requested, a copy of all EMS audit reports must be made available to the governing ADNOC Directorates and/or the regulating EH&S Division (Supreme Petroleum Council).

Audit reports must address:

Conformities and non-conformities

Effectiveness of implementation of the management system in meeting objectives and targets

Implementation and effectiveness of any corrective actions in previous audits

Conclusions and recommendations

Audit results must be recorded and tracked in system to present evidence of actual corrective actions and close outs.

Auditors must be trained and competent to demonstrate capabilities of carrying out audits

2.5 Management Review

Company top management must review and evaluate its EMS at defined intervals in order to maintain continual improvement, performance and effectiveness of the EMS. Management reviews must take place at least every 12 months and must be documented with evidence of action agreed and taken. Management review must address the possible need for changes to policy, objectives and other elements of the EMS, in the light of EMS audit results, changing circumstances and the commitment to continual improvement.

[1] ADNOC Group Guideline ‘HSE Management Systems’, January 2002.

HSE MANAGEMENT CODES OF PRACTICE Volume 2: ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION Version 1 September 2005 GUIDELINE ON

HSE MANAGEMENT CODES OF PRACTICE

Volume 2: ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION

Version 1

September 2005

GUIDELINE ON ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS

Document No: ADNOC-COPV2-04

Page 19

3. LINKAGES WITH OTHER ADNOC GUIDELINES AND CODES OF PRACTICE

This Guideline has functional links to the environmental management controls defined in other ADNOC Group Guidelines and the ADNOC Manual of Codes of Practice. With reference to Figure 2 (next page), these documents are:

ADNOC Group Guideline ‘HSEMS Guideline’ [Ref. 1]

Code of Practice on Environmental Impact Assessment’ [Ref. 5].

Code of Practice on Pollution Prevention and Control’ [Ref. 8].

Code of Practice on Waste Management’ [Ref. 9].

Code of Practice on Environmental Performance Reporting’ [Ref. 10].

Guideline on Environmental Risk Assessment’ [Ref. 11].

Figure 2 also demonstrates the linkages between the individual environmental Codes of Practice / Guidelines which must be considered when developing an overall approach to achieving acceptable environmental performance.

Implementation of the requirements and guidelines as detailed in above documents and this Guideline will assist companies to develop a system of continuous improvement in environmental performance, based on the effective control of significant environmental impacts at all stages of the activity/product/service lifecycle.

[1] ADNOC Group Guideline ‘HSE Management Systems’, January 2002. [5] ADNOC Manual of Codes of Practice: ‘Code of Practice on Environmental Impact Assessment’, ADNOC-COPV2-01. [8] ADNOC Manual of Codes of Practice: ‘Code of Practice on Pollution Prevention and Control’, ADNOC-COPV2-02. [9] ADNOC Manual of Codes of Practice: ‘Code of Practice on Waste Management’, ADNOC-COPV2-05.

[10] ADNOC Manual of Codes of Practice: Code of Practice on Environmental Performance Reporting’, ADNOC-

COPV2-06.

[11] ADNOC Manual of Codes of Practice: ‘Guideline on Environmental Risk Assessment (ERA)’, ADNOC-COPV2-07

HSE MANAGEMENT CODES OF PRACTICE Volume 2: ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION Version 1 September 2005 GUIDELINE ON

HSE MANAGEMENT CODES OF PRACTICE

Volume 2: ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION

Version 1

September 2005

GUIDELINE ON ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS

Document No: ADNOC-COPV2-04

Page 20

ADNOC Group Guideline on HSE Management Systems

ADNOC Group Guideline on HSE Management Systems

Systems ADNOC Group Guideline on HSE Management Systems Guideline on Guideline on Environmental Environmental
Guideline on Guideline on Environmental Environmental Management Management Systems Systems COPV2-04 COPV2-04
Guideline on
Guideline on
Environmental
Environmental
Management
Management
Systems
Systems
COPV2-04
COPV2-04

COP on

COP on

Environmental

Environmental

Impact

Impact

Assessment

Assessment

COPV2-01

COPV2-01

COP on

COP on

Pollution

Pollution

Prevention &

Prevention &

Control

Control

COPV2-02

COPV2-02

COP on

COP on

Waste

Waste

Management

Management

COPV2-05

COPV2-05

Guideline on

Guideline on

Environmental

Environmental

Risk

Risk

Assessment

Assessment

COPV2-07

COPV2-07

COP on

COP on

Environmental

Environmental

Performance

Performance

Reporting

Reporting

COPV2-06

COPV2-06

FIGURE 2:

LINKAGES BETWEEN THE EMS AND SUPPORTING ENVIRONMENTAL DOCUMENTATION.

HSE MANAGEMENT CODES OF PRACTICE Volume 2: ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION Version 1 September 2005 GUIDELINE ON

HSE MANAGEMENT CODES OF PRACTICE

Volume 2: ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION

Version 1

September 2005

GUIDELINE ON ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS

Document No: ADNOC-COPV2-04

Page 21

REFERENCES

1. ADNOC Group Guideline ‘HSE Management Systems’, January 2002.

2. BS EN ISO 14001 Environmental Management Systems-Specification with Guidance for Use. British Standard Institute, London, 1996.

3. ADNOC Manual of Codes of Practice: ‘Guideline on HSE Definitions & Abbreviations’, ADNOC-COPV1-05.

4. ADNOC Manual of Codes of Practice: ‘Code of Practice on HSE Administration Systems’, ADNOC-COPV1-01.

5. ADNOC Manual of Codes of Practice: ‘Code of Practice on Environmental Impact Assessment’, ADNOC-COPV2-01.

6. ADNOC Manual of Codes of Practice: ‘Code of Practice on Crisis and Emergency Management’, ADNOC-COPV5-02.

7. ADNOC Manual of Codes of Practice: ‘Code of Practice on Control of Major Accident Hazards (COMAH)’, ADNOC-COPV5-01.

8. ADNOC Manual of Codes of Practice: ‘Code of Practice on Pollution Prevention and Control’, ADNOC-COPV2-02.

9. ADNOC Manual of Codes of Practice: ‘Code of Practice on Waste Management’, ADNOC-COPV2-05.

10. ADNOC Manual of Codes of Practice: ‘Code of Practice on Environmental Performance Reporting’, ADNOC-COPV2-06.

11. ADNOC Manual of Codes of Practice: ‘Guideline on Environmental Risk Assessment (ERA)’, ADNOC-COPV2-07.