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One of the principles of marketing research is to view qualitative and quantitative research as complementary, rather than in competition with

each other. Do you agree to the above statement? State your reasons to support your answer. Yes, I agree quantitative and qualitative research should be used as complementary because it increases insights and perspectives and also allow confirmations or triagulation of findings through different methods. It improves the validity of results. These results increase use of study to constituency to which it was planned to be addressed. Following are some of the benefits which we can derive by using qualitative and quantitative research as complementary rather than in competition: It produce sturdier research design Produce more reliable and valid findings Inefficiencies of individual method are reduced Internal validity threats are recognized and addressed An equilibrium between logics and stories is obtained through triangulation Exploration, understanding, theory construction in qualitative research provide strong basis for broad quantitative measures, scaling etc. Large sample etc in quantitative research can expose inconsistencies and so on, which further inspected by qualitative methods.

Qualititative research, which emphasizes exploration, understanding, contextualizing, introspection, and theory construction, provides a strong base for wider quantitative measures, scaling, and generalization. Quantitative research, which emphasizes large samples, can provide an overview of an area that can reveal patterns, inconsistencies, and so forth, that can be further investigated with qualitative methods.

Advantages of each complement the other resulting in a stronger research design, and more valid and reliable findings.

inadequacy of individual methods are minimized threats to Internal Validity are realized and addressed

Example Quantitative design strives to control for bias so that facts, instances, phenomena can be understood in an objective way. Qualitative approach strives to understand the perspective of participants or a situation by looking at firsthand experience to provide meaningful data.

Triangulation offers a balance between logic and stories. Qualititative research, which emphasizes exploration, understanding, contextualizing, introspection, and theory construction, provides a strong base for wider quantitative measures, scaling, and generalization. Quantitative research, which emphasizes large samples, can provide an overview of an area that can reveal patterns, inconsistencies, and so forth, that can be further investigated with qualitative methods.

Qualitative and quantitative methods in social science research have long been separate spheres with little overlap. However, recent innovations have highlighted the complementarity of qualitative and quantitative approaches. The Accra Food and Nutrition Security Study was designed to incorporate the participation of a variety of constituencies in the research, and to rely on a variety of approaches both qualitative and quantitative, to data collection and analysis. This paper reviews the way in which qualitative and quantitative methods were used in the Accra study. The argument of the paper is that the complementary use of qualitative and quantitative approaches provide a greater range of insights and perspectives and permit triangulation or the confirmation of findings by different methods , which improves the overall validity of results, and makes the study of greater use to the constituency to which it was intended to be addressed. But the search for truly complementary methods presents substantial challenges as well. These include extra costs, both in financial and human terms, ethical dilemmas regarding follow-up, and the need for teamwork and respect for different methodological and epistemological positions.

Simultaneous triangulation: Use of both qualitative and quantitative methods at the same time

e.g., Survey methods and Case study

Sequential triangulation: Results of one method are essential for planning the next method e.g., Exploratory Pilot study precedes Experimental design