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CHAPTER FOUR DATA PRESENTATION AND ANALYSIS 4.

1 INTRODUCTION

This chapter presents the data presentation and interpretation of results of research carried out in selected senior secondary schools in three Education District III, IV and VI of Lagos State. The data collected were analysed based on the hypotheses with the Teacher-Made Achievement Test and standardized questionnaires. The Teacher-Made Achievement Test and standardized questionnaires were administered to 300 respondents consecutively. The analysis was carried out using Statistical Packages for Social Science (SPSS). Descriptive statistics of frequency count, percentage, Pearson Product Moment Correlation and independent t-test statistics were used to analyse the data to verify the hypotheses raised for the study. 4.2 Demographic Profile of Respondents

The target population was the Senior Secondary Schools Two and parents. The data collected on demographic characteristics of the respondents were analysed and the results obtained are The results from the analysis indicated that 138 of the 300 respondents (46%) were males while the remaining 162 (54%) were females. This numbers satisfied the proportional representation for each of the schools in the two districts used for the research. There were a total of 43 males and 57 females from District II, 48 males and 52 females from District III and 47 males and 53 females from district IV. The average age of the total respondents was 15.5 years. The descriptive statistics captured the composition of the respondent based on some vital demographic information of their status. The gender, district and research group composition by Educational districts of the respondents and the respective

distributions of the information were analyzed and presented in the tables and charts below. Table 4.1: Distribution of Respondent by gender of Students of the Public Secondary Schools in District II. SEX MALE FEMALE TOTAL FREQUENCY 43
57

100

PERCENT 43.0 57.0 100.0

Table 4.1 shows that the most respondent are likewise females with 57.0% while the males are 43.0%. This is further depicted with the chart below. Chart 1: Chart showing respondent by gender of Students of the Public Secondary Schools in District II.

Table 4.2: Distribution of Respondent by gender of Students of the Public Secondary Schools in District III SEX MALE FEMALE TOTAL FREQUENCY 48 52 100 PERCENT 48.0 52.0 100.0

Table 4.2 shows that the most respondent are likewise females with 52.0% while the males are 48.0%. This is further depicted with the chart below. Chart 2: Chart showing respondent by gender of Students of the Public Secondary Schools in District III.

Table 4.3: Distribution of Respondent by gender of Students of the Public Secondary Schools in District IV SEX MALE FEMALE TOTAL FREQUENCY 47 53 100 PERCENT 47.0 53.0 100.0

Table 4.3 shows that the most respondents are also females with 53.0% while the males are 47.0%. This is further depicted with the chart below.

Chart 3:

Chart showing respondent by gender of Students of the Public Secondary Schools in District IV

Table 4.4: Distribution of All Respondent in Districts II, III and IV by Gender. Sex District II Male 43 Female 57 Total 100 District III 48 52 100 District IV 47 53 100 Sub-Total 138 162 300 Percentage (%) 46.0 54.0 100.0

Table 4.4 shows that the male respondents for Districts II, III and IV are 43, 48 and 47 respectively with an average percentage of 46.0% while the females are 57, 52 and 53 for the three districts respectively with an average percentage of 54.0%. These are shown below Chart 4: Chart showing total distribution by gender

Chart 5: Chart showing respondents distribution Districts II, III and IV by Gender.

4.3

Hypotheses Testing

Hypothesis 1 There is no significant relationship between parental involvements and students performance in Yoruba at secondary school level. In order to ascertain if a significant relationship exists between parental involvements and students performance in Yoruba at secondary school level, a Pearson Product Moment Correlation statistics was adopted, using the raw scores generated from the Teacher-Made Achievement Test and standardized questionnaires. Table 4.5: Difference in parental involvements and students performance in Yoruba at secondary school level. Variables N Parental involvements 300 Students Performance 300 Df 298 r-cal 0.384 r-tab 0.195 P 0.05 Inference Significant

Interpretation of Data Table 4.5 above shows the correlation coefficient r-value, of the two variables as (0.384). The calculated r-value is significant since it is greater the critical r-value of (0.195), given 298 degrees of freedom at 0.05 level of significance. Consequently, the null hypothesis Ho which states that there is no significant relationship between parental involvements and students performance in Yoruba at secondary school level is thus rejected. Hence, there is a significant relationship between parental involvements and students performance in Yoruba at secondary school level. Hypothesis 2 There is no significant difference between home factors and students performance in Yoruba among Lagos State secondary school students. In order to ascertain if a significant difference exists between home factors and students performance in Yoruba among Lagos State secondary school students, an independent t-test statistics was adopted, using the raw scores generated from the Teacher-Made Achievement Test and standardized questionnaires. Table 4.6: Difference in home factors and students performance in Yoruba among Lagos State secondary school students. Std. Dev Std. Error Mean

Difference Home factors Students performance

N 300 300

Mean 76.16 24.67

df

t-cal

t-tab

Inference

15.422 0.890 298 15.601 0.901 40.655 1.645 0.05 Significant

Interpretation of Data Table 4.6 above shows that the mean perception and mean score, standard deviation, standard error, the t-calculated and t-tabulated from the probability level (0.05) has recorded. The t-cal (40.655) is greater than the t-tab (1.645), which implies that there is no significance difference between home factors and students performance in Yoruba among Lagos State secondary school students is thus rejected. Hence, there is a significant difference between home factors and students performance in Yoruba among Lagos State secondary school students. Hypothesis 3 There is no significant gender difference between the effects of parental involvement on Lagos State students performance in Yoruba. In order to ascertain if a significant gender difference exist between the effects of parental involvement on Lagos State students performance in Yoruba, an independent t-test statistics was adopted, using the raw scores generated from the Teacher-Made Achievement Test and standardized questionnaires. Table 4.7: Difference in gender difference between the effects of parental involvement on Lagos State students performance in Yoruba. Parents Involvem Sex N 138 162 Mean 69.52 70.46 Std. dev 11.986 11.626 ent Performa M nce Performa F nce Interpretation of Data Std. Error Mean 1.020 298 0.913 0.684 1.645 0.05 Not Significant df t-cal t-tab P Inference

Table 4.7 above shows that the mean score, standard deviation, standard error, the t-calculated and t-tabulated from the probability level (0.05) has recorded. It is obvious that the mean performance of the male (69.52) is less than the female performance (70.46). Also, the t-cal (0.648) is less than the t-tab (1.645), which implies that there is no significance gender difference between the effects of parental involvement on Lagos State students performance in Yoruba. Hence, the hypothesis is thus retained. Hypothesis 4 There is no significant relationship between students achievement in Yoruba and students moral behaviour. In order to ascertain if a significant relationship exist between students achievement in Yoruba and students moral behaviour, a Pearson Product Moment Correlation statistics was adopted, using the raw scores generated from the Teacher-Made Achievement Test and standardized questionnaires. Table 4.8: Difference in students achievement and moral behaviour in Yoruba at secondary school level. Variables Students N Df 298 r-cal 0.345 r-tab 0.195 P 0.05 Inference Significant

Performance 300 Moral Behaviour 300

Interpretation of Data

Table 4.8 above shows the correlation coefficient r-value, of the two variables as (0.345). The calculated r-value is significant since it is greater the critical r-value of (0.195), given 298 degrees of freedom at 0.05 level of significance. Consequently, the null hypothesis Ho which states that there is no significant relationship between students achievement in Yoruba and students moral behavior is thus rejected. Hence, there is a significant relationship between students achievement in Yoruba and students moral behaviour.