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Contemporary Architecture in Pakistan,

Selective work of Mr. Ejaz Ahed


Semester Assignment
Teacher: M unazza Akthar

Report
Wajiha Zahid
2010-March-02

30rd June , 2012

Department of Architecture University of Engineering and Technology, Lahore

30rd June , 2012 Page: 2

Course: Contemporary Architecture in Pakistan Teacher: Munazza Akthar Department of Architecture University of Engineering and Technology, Lahore Wajiha Zahid 2010-March-02

Program: Masters in Architecture

Report

Table of Cont ents


1. 2. 3. Introduction ______________________________________________________________ 1 Background _______________________________________________________________ 1 Professional Opinion _______________________________________________________ 3
3.1 3.2 3.3 Standard of Architectural Education __________________________________________________ 3 Western Influence_____________________________________________________________________ 4 Current Architectural Trends _________________________________________________________ 5

4. 5.

Ejaz ahed _________________________________________________________________ 5 Sanofi Aventis Karachi ______________________________________________________ 8


5.1 Introduction ______________________________________________________________________________ 8 5.2 Challenges ________________________________________________________________________________ 9 5.3 Design ___________________________________________________________________________________ 10 5.3.1 Ground Floor ________________________________________________________________________ 11 5.3.2 First Floor ___________________________________________________________________________ 16 5.3.3 Second floor _________________________________________________________________________ 17 5.3.4 THIRD floor__________________________________________________________________________ 19 5.3.5 Form and elevation __________________________________________________________________ 20

References __________________________________________________________________ 22

30rd June , 2012 Page: 3

Course: Contemporary Architecture in Pakistan Teacher: Munazza Akthar Department of Architecture University of Engineering and Technology, Lahore Wajiha Zahid 2010-March-02

Program: Masters in Architecture

Report

List of Figures

Figure I Master Plan Of The Site- Source: www.ahedasso ciates.com ______________________________________8 Figure II Section Of The Building Source: Www.Ahedassociates.co m _____________________________________9 Figure III Front Elevation Source: W ww.Ahedassociates.Co m ___________________________________________9 Figure IV Elevation Of Building Befo re Renovation- Source: Approa ches In A rchitecture Of Pakistan (1980 To 2007) By Munazzah Akthar ________________________________________________________________________ 10 Figure V View of the Renovated Building- Source: www.ahedasso ciates.com ____________________________ 11 Figure VI Ground Floor Plan- Source: Co mpany Website ______________________________________________ 11 Figure VII Aluminum Clad Front Colu mns- Source: www.ahedassocia tes.com_____________________________ 12 Figure VIII Entrance Lobby- Source: Approaches In Architectu re Of Pakistan (1980 To 2007) By Munazzah Akthar _________________________________________________________________________________________________ 12 Figure IX Void in Reception Lobby Going Up To 2 Floors Source: www.Ahedassocia tes.Com _______________ 13 Figure X Pool over Looking Reception Area- source: www.ahedassocia tes.com ___________________________ 13 Figure XI View of Lobby - source: www.ahedassociates.co m ___________________________________________ 14 Figure XII Piano Key Floor Pattern Of Lobby - source: www.ahedassociates.com __________________________ 14 Figure XIII Egg Shaped Multi-Purpose Hall - source: www.ahedassociates.co m ___________________________ 15 Figure XIV Curvilinear Corridor And Work Stations - source: www.ahedasso ciates.co m ____________________ 15 Figure XV Supplementary Space Created On Upper Floo rs By Adding Additional Columns __________________ 16 Figure XVI Meeting Hall With Frosted Glass Wall- Source: Www.Skyscrapercity.Com/Sho wthread.Php?T=871030 ________________________________________________ 17 Figure XVII Workstations And Storage Cabinets Source: Www.Skyscrapercity.Com/Sho wthread.Php?T=871030 _________________________________________________________________________________________________ 17 Figure XVIII Staff Lounge- Source: W ww.Skyscrapercity.Com/Showth read.Php?T=871030 _________________ 18 Figure XIX Covered Terrace- Source: Www.Urbanpk.Com ______________________________________________ 18 Figure XX Plan Of Third Floo r Source W ww.Ahedassocia tes.Com ______________________________________ 19 Figure XXI Directo rs Office- Source W ww.Ahedassocia tes.Com_________________________________________ 19 Figure XXII Board Room Source : Www.Ahedasso ciates.Com _________________________________________ 20 Figure XXIII Board Roo m Source : W ww.Ahedassociates.Co m _________________________________________ 20 Figure Xxiv landscaping Of The Building _____________________________________________________________ 21

30rd June , 2012 Page: 1

Course: Contemporary Architecture in Pakistan Teacher: Munazza Akthar Department of Architecture University of Engineering and Technology, Lahore Wajiha Zahid 2010-March-02

Program: Masters in Architecture

Report

1. INTRODUC TION
The present report is being submitted as a class assignment in the course of Contemporary Architecture of Pakistan, which is part of the masters program in the discipline of architecture. This document presents the research about the contemporary architecture of Pakistan and discusses in detail the building of Sanofi Aventis Karachi designed by architect Ejaz Ahed.

2. BACKGROUND
Architecture is not only a profession but a state of mind, the science of combining logic, mathematics and aesthetics together to form a structure which is functional as well as pleasant to the eye. The dictionary of architecture and building construction by Nikolas Davies and Erkki Jokiniemi defines architecture as The art and science of producing built form, the product and study of this. In this age of information technology and globalization, architecture all around the globe is in different stages along its road of development and evolving. For creating impressive architecture, professionals with a sense of originality and knowledge of design as well as mathematics are required, along with demanding clients, tasteful users as well as keen critics Architecture will not simply be the expression of accepted functional or moral standards, rather action whether forbidden or not, will become an integral part of architecture. As a result, conventional plans will no longer suffice and new types of architectural notations will be devised- Bernard Tschumi In 1857, when the local soldiers of the troops of the East India Companys government rebelled at a massive scale, control of the territory of India was directly taken over by the British government. East India Company took over India mainly from the Mughals and Sikhs. The architecture which flourished under the British rule was termed as colonial and contained features of both English tradition and local architectural style. Their aim, however, was to house their organizations, and their people and whatever was necessary to control an empire as big as India. Apart from self-serving military cantonments and civil lines, they also left the basic problems well alone. It was no intention of the British to educate Indians in the art and science of architecture. Consequently Indian minds, during the British reign, were completely out of touch with the progressive thinking taking place in the rest 1 of the world. India and Pakistan are the two countries which gained independence from the British at the same time in 1947. Although greatly different in their size, the two countries are comparable in terms of economy, history, culture and traditions, etc. The architecture that developed after independence seems to have been greatly influenced by the British. It was rather a blind following of what was socially considered modern just
1

Mapping India, an insiders guide to Indian architecture, design and fashion, commissioned by Dutch Design Fashion Architecture, June 2010

30rd June , 2012 Page: 2

Course: Contemporary Architecture in Pakistan Teacher: Munazza Akthar Department of Architecture University of Engineering and Technology, Lahore Wajiha Zahid 2010-March-02

Program: Masters in Architecture

Report

because it has not been seen in the sub-continent before. Since then the commonality that can be observed between the two countries is blind faith in western architectural styles and a struggle to fine ones own architectural identity. Kirtee shah, a practicing Indian architect, criticizes this trend saying, Isnt it true that the practicing architects understand little and care even less for the external environmental factors, such as climate, energy, water, etc., while designing buildings? Arent they victims of external mostly westerninfluences and practitioners of unsuited, inappropriate stylization? Isnt a curtain wall and full glass faade in a blazing sun and an over-work ing air2 conditioning system to cool it, an insult to the local climate and the energy crisis? At the time of independence, there were only a handful of local Architec ts who were trained under the western idioms. The architects trained in the Western tradition naturally derived their inspiration from the Modern Movement, the Bauhaus school, Le Corbusier and Frank Lloyd Wright. Most of the architects trained before 1947 had been to the J.J.School of Art in Bombay; several had received further education abroad, usually in England. In the early 1950's this small band of officially recognized architects came together to form the Institute of Architects Pakistan (IAP) in 1957. It had 11 members, including 2 foreigners working in Pakistan: M.A. Ahed, Tajuddin Bhamani, Minoa Mistry, Pir Mohammed, R.S. Rustumjee, H.H. Khan, M.A. Mirza, Abdul Hussain Thariani, Zahiruddin Khawaja, Bloomfield and Peter Powell. Among the first generation of local architects, Pakistan found a very talented and capable architect in Mehdi Ali Mirza. Until the establishment of the PWD School of Architecture in Karachi, the only available training in architecture within Pakistan had been at the Mayo School of Art in Lahore. It was not until 1958, when the Mayo School of Art was upgraded to the National College of Art (NCA), that the first regular courses in architecture became available within the country, and it was only in the mid-1960's that the first batch of locally educated architects began to practice. Jonathan Glancy explains, As Modern architecture, in the 1950s, was functional and moral solution to the problem of how to build. The truth was somewhat different. Architecture like the planet it stands on, has always been changing. When Modern architecture matured to the degree of extent it basically exploded into a kaleidoscope of new forms and styles: Postmodernism, High-tech, Organic, Classical revival and Deconstructivism. That the local context in architecture merits specific design approach is well established. It is instructive to read Bay and Ong, (2006), beautifully making out a case for respecting local conditions, while attempting to adopt modern architecture. From its early days, modern masters like Le Corbusier and Oscar Niemeyer understood that Modernism in architecture ought not to be transplanted globally without some recognition of its changed context. Alvar Alto, in championing modernism in the Scandinavian countries also emphasized the understanding the region, climate and social context. In the US, Frank Lloyd Wright devised the term Usonian architecture to emphasise the grounding of his architecture on locality. The arts and crafts movement in the UK too sough their grounding in local tradition and to preserve their culture.

2 Architects and Architectural Practice: Some imperatives by Kirtee Shah, ADA,

January 2008

30rd June , 2012 Page: 3

Course: Contemporary Architecture in Pakistan Teacher: Munazza Akthar Department of Architecture University of Engineering and Technology, Lahore Wajiha Zahid 2010-March-02

Program: Masters in Architecture

Report

The author goes on to say that much of what is justified as International Style is unadulterated transplant from temperate countries, particularly the US. The authors argue that airconditioning is often accepted as a panacea for most modern buildings and retaining naturally ventilated vernacular style may be easier for residential architecture as contrasted to other occupancies. According to Bay and Ong, (2006), the size and location of openings, windows and roof apertures are essential technical instruments of climate response but carry equal significance in declaring the nature of specific regional, cultural response to the physical environment.

3. PROFESSIONAL OP INION
Following is an outline of the professional opinion obtained through published sources:

3.1 STANDARD OF ARCHITECTURAL EDUCATION


That the standard of education in architectural schools of Pakistan has eroded over the years has been the complaint of many architects. Rashid Raheed complains that the architectural students of today, don't make the effort to learn on their own. Pervaiz Vandal finds room for improvement in the quality of architectural education being offered today. He particular emphasises the need for the teachers to be active practitioners. I feel a genuine teacher of Architecture cannot teach without actively practicing it. The reason being, that a teacher who practices can speak with great er authenticity than a teacher who does not. Shukat Nawaj Raja feels that while the architectural students are brighter in many subjects, they may still remain ill tutored in Math, Geography, English and General knowledge. Hafiz Habib notes the unsatisfactory academic situation of our architectural schools and comments at length on this issue: Most of the prof essionals produced out of these institutions do not posses the in depth understanding of the cultural herit age, socio-physical and psychological desire of society. They do not have the accumulated design vocabulary from the historic examples. Their arc hitectural response therefore does not surpass the mimicry of the past and prevailing trends of pop culture. Lik e the modern painters, they too lack the comprehensive mastery of their professional sk ills.

30rd June , 2012 Page: 4

Course: Contemporary Architecture in Pakistan Teacher: Munazza Akthar Department of Architecture University of Engineering and Technology, Lahore Wajiha Zahid 2010-March-02

Program: Masters in Architecture

Report

3.2 WESTERN INFLUENCE


That there is an established trend of poor mimicry of western influence in architecture of Pakistan, has been pointed out by many professionals. Hafiz Habib makes a very strong observation in this regard:

Our streets are littered with senseless, thoughtless, out of the place buildings whic h
are mostly the outcome of the senseless copying of the western solutions, such buildings are being produced mostly by the architects who are considered as mark et leaders and so called trend setters A blind reproduction exercise is going on and you can not spare any single architect no matter how famous he or she is. There exists no sense of direction. No attempt is made for self recognition and identification. We are all busy producing timeless, memory less, faceless buildings. This state of affairs has virtually leaded to an identity crisis of vast proportion. I am looking more and more towards the simpler technology and longer lasted buildings of our region - buildings that last for centuries; buildings that were logical and simpler, built by craftsmen who knew their trade., says Rashid Rasheed, a practicing architect. He complains of the official patronage granted to foreign architects like Louis Khan and Edward Durell Stone, which, according to him totally confused our architects, who started using western architectural vocabulary at the cost of our own heritage. Peraiz Vandal forcefully argues against indiscriminate copying of western ideas and says: What we need to understand here is that the k nowledge generated abroad was a natural response to their problems. Therefore, it is very logical that the solution that work s for them will not always work for us, for the simple reason that we have different culture, climate, topography, lifestyle, economics and thus, all together different issues from them. In order to come up with a relevant and appropriate solution we need to understand the problem at hand and devise a solution accordingly instead of creating shortcuts and merely copying the solutions proposed by the developed countries. In order to improve, the whole attitude needs to change. Despite cries of globalization, cross-cultural insemination of ideas, easy transfer and access to information, accessibility to new techniques and materials etc, a region with its singular accents of climate, culture etc must continue to inspire local flavor and appropriate and promote a personalized distinct aesthetics., argues Shaukat Nawaz Raja. Ayesha Noorani says: We have been look ing to the West for guidance without evaluating what is right for us. The colonial mentalit y has pervaded our ps yche to such an extent that we have stopped think ing for ours elves She goes on: Modern architecture does not have values, it is all about ostentation, and living it up and assertion, and materialism and consumerism. We have as a nation stopped think ing for ourselves. We merrily ape the West, and adopt their trends regardless of whet her it is suitable for us or not.

30rd June , 2012 Page: 5

Course: Contemporary Architecture in Pakistan Teacher: Munazza Akthar Department of Architecture University of Engineering and Technology, Lahore Wajiha Zahid 2010-March-02

Program: Masters in Architecture

Report

3.3 CURRENT ARCHITEC TURAL TRENDS


That the quality of contemporary urban architecture is way below expected standard, has been argued by some of the leading figures. Kamil Khan Mumtaz sharply criticises the current architectural trends: Thus the demand for modernit y in arc hitecture is serviced by purveyors of trendy images rather than by professionals who are concerned with arc hitecture as a process. He finds the current trends irresponsible, irrelevant, inappropriate, divisive, and corrupting: Irres ponsible because it is frequently wasteful of scarce material and energy resources and foreign exchange - witness the use of imported materials, the reliance on mechanical means of cooling, and the use of large glass surface in a hot climate etc. Irrelevant because it contributes nothing to the current discourse of architecture in its own melieu. Inappropriate because it pays no heed to the imperatives of climate and comfort. Divisive because it sharpens the cont rasts and reinforc es the schisms in societies already plagued by acute disparities. Corrupting because it reflects identities which are false and represents goals which are unattainable. Architect Pervaiz Vandal argues against excessive concentration on terms like modernism and proposes that we should be concentrating on producing appropriate, genuine, honest, and contemporary design; Architecture of the present which is not a slave to such fast moving trends. Arguing against being driven by technology and industry, Zain-ul-Abedin suggests that one should design happy places which are flexible to adjust to the changes required by time and technology, places which make the users comfortable and at home. He goes on to say: At time of initiating any design work I look at the big picture before following the approach of whole to parts. I also like to design with technology and not to design for technology. Hafiz Habib cautions against adopting change for its own sake, under soc ial pressures and says: Since society puts undue emphasis on innovation and originalit y, we some times can not liberate ourselves from the shack les of such demands. Get carried away and find ourselves unintentionally indulged in creating novelty for the sak e of novelt y, change for the sak e of change and concentrate on the visual gymnastics of forms for the sak e of attracting attention. In such cases the user encounters the design and the "idea" goes in obscurity. Some architects identified the client-imposed decisions which force them to produce the kind of architecture which, in their professional opinion, is poor.

4. EJAZ AHED
Architect Ejaz Ahed studied architecture at Illinois Institute of Technology in Chicago. His father Mr. Ahed was a renowned architect himself and was among the few early practicing architects of Pakistan. Ejaz Ahed, left his practice in Chicago with Skidmore Owings and Merrill and

30rd June , 2012 Page: 6

Course: Contemporary Architecture in Pakistan Teacher: Munazza Akthar Department of Architecture University of Engineering and Technology, Lahore Wajiha Zahid 2010-March-02

Program: Masters in Architecture

Report

returned to Pakistan to work with his father. At 27, he started to manage the company started by his father and to the present day Ahed Associates has accomplished many projects all over the country. Talking about how his education and training effected his perception of design he says, I had a very German training as an architect, from people right after the war. The whole philosophy of thinking in such a period is different building shelter becomes the first priority; 3 decorating it is a second priority.

Speaking about the styles of architecture he Never believe in developing a style of architecture. Architecture is an ever changing 4 phenomenon and reflects the state of civilization at the time Ahed explains his views about the field of architecture in the following words,

Architecture is a very self-satisfying field it`s like creating, isn`t it? You create something. And, really, there`s no bigger joy than to have something come from the mind, translate into pictures, and then become reality. It`s almost a godlik e quality. The thrill never goes away. When asked about his design philosophy he elaborated his ideas as, My design philosophy is functional architecture. Whatever design evolves as a result of it mak es its way in the city and nature by itself. I do not work on any symbolism. Every solution comes from what the elements of the need of the project are. I use all the available means and techniques to look for solutions of design problems He has worked on many important projects; a few are listed below,

CDA headquarter building, Islamabad Pakistan

UBL head-office building, Karachi Pakistan PIC Towers Karachi Pakistan

3 http://archives.dawn.com/archives/44984 4

ARCHI TIMES November 2008

30rd June , 2012 Page: 7

Course: Contemporary Architecture in Pakistan Teacher: Munazza Akthar Department of Architecture University of Engineering and Technology, Lahore Wajiha Zahid 2010-March-02

Program: Masters in Architecture

Report

Sanofi Aventis Headquarter building Karachi Pakistan

Getz pharma (Pvt) Limited Karachi Pakistan

Brookes Pharmaceutical Laboratories Limited Karachi Pakistan

Habib Bank limited Islamabad Pakistan AKES Professional Development Center Gilgit Pakistan

NWFP Agriculture university Peshawar Pakistan Agha Khan Sports and Rehabilitaion Center , Karachi Pakistan

Russian consulate Karachi Pakistan

This document will discuss Mr. Ejaz Aheds work on Sanofi Aventis Building Karachi.

30rd June , 2012 Page: 8

Course: Contemporary Architecture in Pakistan Teacher: Munazza Akthar Department of Architecture University of Engineering and Technology, Lahore Wajiha Zahid 2010-March-02

Program: Masters in Architecture

Report

5. SANOFI A VENTIS KARACHI


5.1 INTRODUCTI ON
Ahed associates had their first mega up gradation project when the firm took over the renovation of P arke Davis-P fizer Office building in K arac hi. Later Ahed associates did a similar rehabilitation project of Brookes Pharmaceutical A dministration building, again in Karachi. The results were so impressive that both the companies named Ahed Associates as a modern creative architectural firm. Owing to this ex perience the firm landed the renovation project of Sanofi A ventis Head office building in Karachi. Sanofi A ventis Pakistan, a multinational pharmaceutical company approached arc hitect Ejaz Ahed with the idea of redoing the interiors of their administrative building. They had a very limited budget and the goal was to do a face lift of the original building, which had been constructed in the 80s. But t he architect found the elevation of the existing building rather distasteful and suggested redoing the elevation also. In his own words, I told them that the exterior is lousy so it should also be done. as it was a straight long building like 5 barracks, with straight long corridors . Thus the architect was asked to present a proposal for up gradation of elevation. The development of whole project form elevation to master plan was in reverse order- i.e. 3d visualizations were developed first and then work ed backwards to the working plans of the building. The site was documented through hundreds of photographs from every possible angle. The architect developed a complete master plan of the 1.75 acre site that included t he building elevation and external developments as well as construction of a training hall, and a garden. This project was completed in two phases, as the company staff remained operational during most of the reconstruction period.

Fi gur e I Mas t er Plan O f Th e Si t e - So u rc e: w w w. ah ed as s oc i at es. c o m

Approaches in Architecture of Pakistan (1980 to 2007) by Munazzah Akthar

30rd June , 2012 Page: 9

Course: Contemporary Architecture in Pakistan Teacher: Munazza Akthar Department of Architecture University of Engineering and Technology, Lahore Wajiha Zahid 2010-March-02

Program: Masters in Architecture

Report

F i gu r e I I Sec ti o n O f Th e Bu i ldi n g So ur c e: Ww w .A h ed as so ci at es . co m

F i gu r e I I I F ro n t Elev at io n So ur c e: Ww w .A h ed as so ci at es . C o m

5.2 CHALLENGES
The existing structure was found inadequate both functionally and aesthetically. The building had a straight lined, unattractive structure painted in blue, cream and grey color scheme with curt ained windows. The rectangular plan was cut off from its surroundings. It had a centr al entrance and the two wings were separated by the vertical circulation. There was no reception area at the ground floor and both the interior and exterior were dull and boring. The ent ranc e to the building was inconspicuous, and the 3 floors above had the same double-loaded corridors.

30rd June , 2012 Page: 10

Course: Contemporary Architecture in Pakistan Teacher: Munazza Akthar Department of Architecture University of Engineering and Technology, Lahore Wajiha Zahid 2010-March-02

Program: Masters in Architecture

Report

F i gu r e I V Elev ati o n Of B ui ld i n g B efo r e R en ov ati o n - So u rc e: A pp r o ach es In A r c hi t ec tu r e O f Pak i s t an (1 9 8 0 To 2 0 0 7 ) By Mu n az z ah A k th ar

There was a concrete screen wall on the south side of the building intended to reduc e the intensity of t he sun but also blocking view t o the garden. Most of the site was being us ed as a junkyard. It had to be redesigned from scratch .6

5.3 DESIGN
The architect changed the whole monotonous and boring environment of the building into a user friendly, welcoming and happening one. Mr Ejaz Ahed worked towards creating a layered plan, incorporating both the exterior as well as interior at the same time. The front wall along with all the interior walls blocking the daylight from the north side was torn down and has been convert ed int o a glass wall to take in maximum daylight of north. The new front elevation of the building was initially thought out to be in straight lines but later it was changed t o a c urvilinear design inc orporating t he original c onflicting column grid on the first, second and third floor levels. A new layer of column grid was added to increase floor space and to break up the monotonous faade. The entire landscape was trans formed into a lush green site with many interesting elements. This works in two ways: first, the landscape visually reinforces the building in this context and second, this creat es visual interest from inside of the building. The concept of water as a tranquil and calming element is us ed quite extensively in the 7 scheme.

6Metamorphosing Green by sumera bilgrami , ARCHI TIMES - ISSN No. 2073-9001 7

Metamorphosing Green by sumera bilgrami , ARCHI TIMES - ISSN No. 2073-9001

30rd June , 2012 Page: 11

Course: Contemporary Architecture in Pakistan Teacher: Munazza Akthar Department of Architecture University of Engineering and Technology, Lahore Wajiha Zahid 2010-March-02

Program: Masters in Architecture

Report

F i gu r e V Vi ew o f t h e R eno v at ed B ui ldi n g - So ur c e: w w w. ah ed as s oc i at es. c o m

5.3.1 GROUND FLOOR

The ground floor has been entirely trans formed from inside out, main features being as flows.

Figure VI Ground Floor P lan- So urce: Co mpany Website

An arcade of circular columns has been added at the front to increas e the floor area as well as to provide support to the curved portion on upper levels. These columns now form the new entrance to the building and are clad in composite panels of aluminum.

30rd June , 2012 Page: 12

Course: Contemporary Architecture in Pakistan Teacher: Munazza Akthar Department of Architecture University of Engineering and Technology, Lahore Wajiha Zahid 2010-March-02

Program: Masters in Architecture

Report

F i gu r e VII A lu mi n u m C lad Fr o nt C o lu mn s - So u rc e: w w w . ah ed ass o ci at es .c o m

Through the ent ranc e door one emerges in a lobby housing stairwell and elevator shaft. The previous staircase was narrow but the new one has been given more generous propositions. The floor has been done in a piano key fashion.

F i gu r e VII I En tr an c e L ob b y- So ur c e: A pp r o ach es I n Ar c hi t ec t ur e Of Paki s t an (1 9 8 0 To 2 0 0 7 ) By Mu n az z ah A k th ar

A void of irregular shape has been punctured in the roof of lobby through two stories. It gives the spac e a feeling of grandeur. The pool in front gives a fresh feel.

30rd June , 2012 Page: 13

Course: Contemporary Architecture in Pakistan Teacher: Munazza Akthar Department of Architecture University of Engineering and Technology, Lahore Wajiha Zahid 2010-March-02

Program: Masters in Architecture

Report

F i gu r e I X Voi d i n R ec ep ti o n L o bb y Go i n g U p To 2 F lo o rs So u rc e: w w w .A h ed as so ci at es . Co m

Fi gu r e X Po o l ov er L oo ki n g R ec ep t io n A r ea - s o ur c e: w w w . ah ed ass o ci at es .c o m

The wall behind the reception desk is dressed with block -printing blocks set in an 8 eye-catching pattern and painted a dramatic shade of black.

Metamorphosing Green by sumera bilgrami , A+I 19th issue

30rd June , 2012 Page: 14

Course: Contemporary Architecture in Pakistan Teacher: Munazza Akthar Department of Architecture University of Engineering and Technology, Lahore Wajiha Zahid 2010-March-02

Program: Masters in Architecture

Report

F i gu r e XI Vi ew of Lo b by - s o ur c e: w w w. ah ed as s o ci at es. c o m

The block on the right side of the lobby has a meeting room, Medical division, coffee room, HVA C room and a fax / Xerox room. The security of the building has been given prime importance and each division is accessible only by swiping company I.D cards. The left wing has been provided with views of the garden, fountain and pond through a glazed passage. This side of the building comprises of a medical lounge, a fitness center for employees, and a glass booth behind a sleek marble wall to provide tickets to the frequently flying staff members. On the other side of this glossy wall, are wooden benches set along the glazed wall overlooking the water pond and garden. The floor here is in porcelain arranged in a piano key fashion. The passage leads to a communal lobby adjoining the training center [part of the new addition], which doubles as a multi 9 purpose hall.

F i gu r e XI I Pi an o K ey F loo r Patt er n Of L o b by - so u r c e: ww w . ah ed as so ci at es . co m

An elliptical structure on the left side of the building which seems to be emerging 10 from the water body, is a multi-purpose hall added mainly because of the need

http://sbilgrami.tumblr.com/

10Approaches in Architecture of Pakistan (1980 to 2007) by Munazzah Akthar

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Course: Contemporary Architecture in Pakistan Teacher: Munazza Akthar Department of Architecture University of Engineering and Technology, Lahore Wajiha Zahid 2010-March-02

Program: Masters in Architecture

Report

of space for frequent training sessions held for company staff. It has an open plan with centre stage being the focal point. There are columns pres ent along the periphery of the hall. All the hi-tech mechanical systems are incorporated within. The interior is sophisticated with light furniture and intelligently placed energy efficient lamps for lighting.

F i gu r e XI I I Egg Sh ap ed Mu lt i - Pur p os e Hall - so u r c e: ww w . ah ed as so ci at es . co m

Through open planning and low height curvilinear partition, the straight long and boring corridors have been complet ely transformed. They now incorporate old straight lined columns forming a passage between workstations.

F i gu r e XI V C u rvi lin ear C or ri d or A n d Wor k St at io n s - s ou r c e: w ww . ah ed as so ci at es . co m

The flooring materials used are marble and porcelain tiles.

30rd June , 2012 Page: 16

Course: Contemporary Architecture in Pakistan Teacher: Munazza Akthar Department of Architecture University of Engineering and Technology, Lahore Wajiha Zahid 2010-March-02

Program: Masters in Architecture

Report

5.3.2 FIRST FLOOR


The area remains the same on the first floor as on ground floor. A central service core divides the building into two halves. Left half of the first floor has Respiratory and Classic division, Anti-effective division and a coffee corner. Human Resource division, Commercial Effective division, Staff Lounge and a double height multi-purpose hall are housed in the right wing of the floor. The additional floor area created by introducing a row of columns on the ground floor accommodates staff replaced from the ground floor.

F i gu r e XV Su pp lemen t ar y Sp ac e C r eat ed O n U pp er F lo o rs B y A d di n g A d di ti o n al C o lu mn s

The visitor comes up from the elevator into an inviting lobby looking down into the reception area through the irregular-shaped void. Here the Lobby treatment was upgraded from dull painted surfac e to glossy porcelain tiles, which reflect light and make the lobby appear more spacious. Two meeting halls with frosted glass walls are placed across the lobby , looking down to reception through the void, approached by the elevator. The glass walls ensures privacy as well as are well lit by abundant daylight,

30rd June , 2012 Page: 17

Course: Contemporary Architecture in Pakistan Teacher: Munazza Akthar Department of Architecture University of Engineering and Technology, Lahore Wajiha Zahid 2010-March-02

Program: Masters in Architecture

Report

F i gu r e XVI Meet i n g Hall Wi t h Fr o s t ed G las s Wall - So u r c e: Ww w . Sk y sc r ap erc i ty .C o m/Sh o w t h r ead. Ph p ? T= 87 1 0 3 0

The twisting corridor wit h low height partitions takes the visitor towards a staff lounge, creat ed where the curvat ure of the supplementary floor space merges into the building. This space over- looks a beautiful garden on the east side of the building. This enjoyable lounge space theme is recurrent on all floors. Space bet ween the existing columns has been utilized as storage facility by creating low height storage cabinets. Work stations have been separated by low height partition cabinets

F i gu r e XVII Wor k st at io n s A n d Sto r age C abi n et s So ur c e: Ww w . Sk y sc r ap erc i ty .C o m/Sh o w t h r ead. Ph p ? T= 87 1 0 3 0

5.3.3 SECOND FLOOR


The footprint of second floor is the same as of the first floor. The departments of Finance, Accounts and Distribution are located on the second floor. The irregular shaped void is terminated at this level and gives a view of the reception area on the ground floor.

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Course: Contemporary Architecture in Pakistan Teacher: Munazza Akthar Department of Architecture University of Engineering and Technology, Lahore Wajiha Zahid 2010-March-02

Program: Masters in Architecture

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Across the void are two meeting halls as on the floor below. Curvilinear corridor with low height partition walls and false ceiling concludes at a staff lounge on the right decorated with triangular shaped orange colored tables, creating a welcoming environment.

F i gu r e XVII I St af f L o u n ge- Sou r c e: Ww w. Sk ys c r ap erc it y. C o m/Sh o w t hr ead . Ph p ? T=8 7 1 0 3 0

The lounge is provided with a view of the covered terrace with round columns. This terrace is connected to the roof of the egg shaped training hall, and has been declared as a smoking area.

F i gu r e XI X Co v er ed Ter r ac e- Sou r c e: Ww w. U rb an p k .C o m

According to the architect the intentionally rec urrent concept of coffee corners and open breathing spaces enc ourages staff interactions and creates a healthy 11 working environment.

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Course: Contemporary Architecture in Pakistan Teacher: Munazza Akthar Department of Architecture University of Engineering and Technology, Lahore Wajiha Zahid 2010-March-02

Program: Masters in Architecture

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5.3.4 THIRD FLOOR

Third floor is the executive floor housing offices for directors of the company and has a different arrangement than the floors below.

F i gu r e XX Plan O f Th ir d F lo or So ur c e Ww w .A h ed as so ci at es . Co m

Apart from the directors' offic es, this floor is equipped with a large boardroom, a teleconferenc e room and the IT division.. A waiting lounge is placed across the lobby and adjacent to the reception for the Managing Directors office. The office for the MD is luxurious space accommodating a meeting table and a small sitting area. The flooring is of polished timber giving the spac e a lush look. All the furniture has been imported and the walls are covered with panels of fabric in earthy tones.

F i gu r e XXI Di r ect o r s O ff ic e- So ur c e Ww w .A h ed as so ci at es . C o m

The rooms other directors' have a similar layout with full height glazed walls. The winding passage leads to an open foyer which is an inviting space for group discussions.

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Course: Contemporary Architecture in Pakistan Teacher: Munazza Akthar Department of Architecture University of Engineering and Technology, Lahore Wajiha Zahid 2010-March-02

Program: Masters in Architecture

Report

Next to the terrace is a circular boardroom, the form of which sticks out of the 12 building facade like a spaceship. The triangular conference table composed of wood, stainless steel and granit e has individual sofas placed along the periphery.

Figure XXII Bo ard Room Source : W ww.Ah edassociat es.Com

F i gu r e XXI I I Bo ar d R oo m Sou r c e : Ww w . Ah ed as s oc i at es. C o m

5.3.5 FORM AND ELEVATION


Overall design of the building shows the extent of work and research put into it. From the dull straight lined building it has been trans formed into a contemporary structure which has an interesting form and intelligent use of modern materials as metal and glass. The building has been designed keeping in mind the budget restraint, the local weather and the modern era at the same time. Full advantage of the orientation of the building has

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Course: Contemporary Architecture in Pakistan Teacher: Munazza Akthar Department of Architecture University of Engineering and Technology, Lahore Wajiha Zahid 2010-March-02

Program: Masters in Architecture

Report

been taken by making the north wall glazed to take in daylight. Also t he glazing has been kept in accordance to the thermal comfort to cut down cooling cost. The south side is transformed with deep-set windows to (a) facilitate the view to the garden and (b) reduce the impact of the sun. The west elevation also presents an 13 interesting play of shapes, materials and textures. Landscape of the building has also been giving adequate importance and the surrounding has been transformed into lush green gardens with fountains, wooden benches, ponds and rockery.

F i gu r e XXI V lan d s c api n g Of Th e B u i ldi n g

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Metamorphosing Green by sumera bilgrami , A+I 19th issue

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Course: Contemporary Architecture in Pakistan Teacher: Munazza Akthar Department of Architecture University of Engineering and Technology, Lahore Wajiha Zahid 2010-March-02

Program: Masters in Architecture

Report

6. REFERENCES
1. Metamorphosing Green by Sumera Bilgrami ,Architecture + Interior magazine 19 issue 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8.
th

Architects on Architecture, Interview with Rashid Rasheed, Archi Times, February 2010 Architects on Architecture, Interview with Shaukat Nawaz Raja, Archi Times, March 2008 Architects on Architecture, Interview with Ayesha Noorani, Archi Times, February 2008 Architects on Architecture, Interview with Pervaiz Vandal, Archi Times, December 2009 Architects on Architecture, Interview with Hafiz Habib, Archi Times, October 2008 Architects on Architecture, Interview with Zain-ul-Abedin, Archi Times, November 2008 Bay, Joo-Hwa and Boon-Lay Ong, Tropical Sustainable Architecture: Social and

Environmental Dimensions, Bay, Elsevier, Amsterdam, 2006 9. Davies, Nikolas and Jokiniemi, Erkki, Dictionary Of Architecture And Building Construction 10. http://archives.dawn.com/archives/44984 11. http://sbilgrami.tumblr.com/ 12. www.ahedassociates.com 13. http://www. facebook.com/pages/Ahed-Associates 14. http://www.saglobalaffairs.com/back-issues/757-interview-with-ejaz-ahed.html 15. www.youtube.com