Sie sind auf Seite 1von 77

NOKIA NMS/2000

FOR MANAGING CELLULAR NETWORKS

FAULT MANAGEMENT BASIC OPERATING PRINCIPLES AND PROCEDURES

User's Guide

NOKIA NMS/2000 FOR MANAGING CELLULAR NETWORKS FAULT MANAGEMENT BASIC OPERATING PRINCIPLES AND PROCEDURES User's Guide

Document number/Issue

NTC TAN 0704/1.1 en

Copyright © Nokia Telecommunications Oy

1

The information in this document is subject to change without notice and describes only the

The information in this document is subject to change without notice and describes only the product defined in the introduction of this documentation. This document is intended for the use of Nokia Telecommunications' customers only for the purposes of the agreement under which the document is submitted, and no part of it may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or means without the prior written permission of Nokia Telecommunications. The document has been prepared to be used by professional and properly trained personnel, and the customer assumes full responsibility when using it. Nokia Telecommunications welcomes customer comments as part of the process of continuous development and improvement of the documentation.

The information or statements given in this document concerning the suitability, capacity, or performance of the mentioned hardware or software products cannot be considered binding but shall be defined in the agreement made between Nokia Telecommunications and the customer. However, Nokia Telecommunications has made all reasonable efforts to ensure that the instructions contained in the document are adequate and free of material errors and omissions. Nokia Telecommunications will, if necessary, explain issues which may not be covered by the document.

Nokia Telecommunications' liability for any errors in the document is limited to the documentary correction of errors. Nokia Telecommunications WILL NOT BE RESPONSIBLE IN ANY EVENT FOR ERRORS IN THIS DOCUMENT OR FOR ANY DAMAGES, INCIDENTAL OR CONSEQUENTIAL (INCLUDING MONETARY LOSSES), that might arise from the use of this document or the information in it.

This document and the product it describes are considered protected by copyright according to the applicable laws.

NOKIA logo is a registered trademark of Nokia Corporation.

Other product names mentioned in this document may be trademarks of their respective companies, and they are mentioned for identification purposes only.

Copyright © Nokia Telecommunications Oy 1998. All rights reserved.

No. of

Edited by

Author

Approved by

Previous issue

pages

(1) approved

77/EIH

E Hartikainen 20 May 1998

M Nurminen 22 Jan 1998

J Pulkkinen 20 May 1998

Copyright © Nokia Telecommunications Oy 1997. All rights reserved.

Document number/Issue

NTC TAN 0704/1.1 en

Copyright © Nokia Telecommunications Oy

2

TABLE OF CONTENTS 1 ABOUT THIS MANUAL 5 1.1 Contents of this Manual   .

TABLE OF CONTENTS

1 ABOUT THIS MANUAL

5

1.1 Contents of this Manual

 

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

5

1.2 Where to Find Information on Fault Management

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

6

1.3 Typographic Conventions

 

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

10

2 FAULT MANAGEMENT

 

11

2.1 Fault Management Concepts

 

11

2.2 Network Management Concepts

 

13

3 INTRODUCTION TO NOKIA’S FAULT MANAGEMENT

 

16

3.1 Nokia FM Tools Overview

 

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

16

3.1.1 Top-level User Interface

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

17

3.1.2 Monitor .

Alarm

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

18

Alarm

3.1.3 Viewer.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

19

3.1.4 Alarm Manual

 

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

20

3.1.5 Alarm History

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

21

3.1.6 Alarm Forwarder

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

22

3.1.7 Alarm Filtering and Reclassification

 

23

3.1.8 Alarm Correlation

 

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

24

3.1.8.1

Correlation

Types.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

25

3.1.9 Alarm Statistics in PC

 

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

25

3.1.10 Tools for Collecting Alarms from Third-party Elements

 

26

3.2 Life Cycle of an Alarm in the

 

27

3.3 Alarm Number

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

29

3.3.1 DX Equipment Alarms 0-5999

 

29

3.3.2 BTS Alarms 7000-8999

 

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

30

3.3.3 Workstation Alarms

 

30

4 STRATEGIES FOR REDUCING THE ALARM FLOW

 

31

4.1 Methods

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

31

4.2 Filtering

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

33

4.2.1 Why Filter Alarms?

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

33

4.2.2 What

to

Filter .

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

34

4.2.3 Filtering Options

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

34

4.2.4 Implementation of Alarm Filtering

 

36

4.3 Correlation

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

37

4.3.1 Correlation

 

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

38

4.3.1.1 Suppression

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

38

4.3.1.2 Count

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

41

4.3.1.3 Compression

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

43

4.3.2 Relation Checking

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

44

4.3.2.1 The

Basic

Rule.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

45

4.3.2.2 Example of Situation in which Correlation Does Not Take

 

Place.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

47

Document number/Issue

Copyright © Nokia Telecommunications Oy

 

3

NTC TAN 0704/1.1 en

4.3.2.3 Example of Situation in which Correlation Does Take   Place.   . . .

4.3.2.3 Example of Situation in which Correlation Does Take

 

Place.

 

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

53

 

4.3.3

 

Implementation of Alarm Correlation

 

55

4.4 Informing

Delay .

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

56

4.5 Reclassification

 

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

56

 

4.5.1

 

Implementation of Alarm Reclassification

 

57

5 OFFLINE ANALYSIS OF

 

58

5.1 Alarm Statistics in PC

 

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

58

5.2 Working with Templates in Alarm Statistics in PC

 

59

5.3 Generating Reports with Alarm Statistics in PC

 

60

 

5.3.1 Using ready-made templates for routine reports

 

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

60

5.3.2 Using ReportWizard for ad hoc reports

 

61

5.3.3 Automatic

 

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

61

5.4 Example of Report

 

62

6 ALARM COLLECTION FROM THIRD-PARTY NETWORK

 

ELEMENTS.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

64

6.1

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

65

6.2

ASCII

 

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

66

6.3

RPC

 

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

67

APPENDIX A.

 

MAPPING OF DIFFERENT ALARM FORMATS

 

68

INDEX.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

75

Document number/Issue

NTC TAN 0704/1.1 en

Copyright © Nokia Telecommunications Oy

4

About this Manual

About this Manual

1

ABOUT THIS MANUAL

This manual gives an overall picture of the Nokia NMS tools which are used for Fault Management in your network. It describes each of the tools, gives you all the background information you may need when using the tools, and gives some pointers on using the NMS applications to achieve maximum efficiency in network monitoring.

This manual does not give you basic instructions in using the software user interfaces. Those instructions are given in the individual Helps of the different applications.

1.1

Contents of this Manual

The information given in this manual includes chapters on:

• Chapter 2, Fault Management Principles, contains background information on alarms and the Nokia NMS solution for working with network alarms.

• Chapter 3, Introduction to Nokia’s Fault Management, briefly introduces each of the NMS graphical applications used in fault monitoring.

• Chapter 4, Strategies for Reducing the Alarm Flow, gives a thorough explanation of the principles governing alarm filtering, auto- acknowledgement, reclassification, and correlation techniques, as well as in-depth information on Nokia’s filtering and correlation applications.

• Chapter 5, Offline Analysis of Alarms, contains a description of the NMS application Alarm Statistics in PC. The chapter introduces the basic functions of the application along with an example of usage.

• Chapter 6, Alarm Collection from Third-party Network Elements, briefly outlines Nokia’s solutions for multivendor environments.

• Appendix A, Mapping of Different Alarm Formats, contains information on the differences between the alarm formats of DX and BTS elements and the Nokia NMS alarm format. This is useful if you use both MMLs and NMS applications to view alarms.

Document number/Issue

NTC TAN 0704/1.1 en

Copyright © Nokia Telecommunications Oy

5

About this Manual

About this Manual

1.2 Where to Find Information on Fault Management

The information you need for network monitoring, making filtering and correlation rules, and analysing alarm situations is contained in the alarm handling applications’ Helps and in this manual. The Helps concentrate on instructions for using the alarm handling applications, while this manual covers all other information necessary for developing an effective fault management strategy.

The Helps and this manual are both important and should be used together if you want to achieve the best results. In addition there are other library reference manuals which contain information on FM applications and processes.

Information on Troubleticketing, FM databases, and FM processes and configuration files can be found in other user guides and reference guides in the NMS Library.

Information on the NMS alarm pipe, the alarms database, and cleaning the database, are contained in system administrator’s guides.

For more information on integration third-party network elements to the NMS to collect alarms from them, see your Nokia representative.

The following pictures give a map of FM information in Nokia NMS documentation.

Document number/Issue

NTC TAN 0704/1.1 en

Copyright © Nokia Telecommunications Oy

6

About this Manual

About this Manual

Figure 1. Information in Helps about Using FM Software

Document number/Issue

NTC TAN 0704/1.1 en

Copyright © Nokia Telecommunications Oy

7

About this Manual

About this Manual

About this Manual Figure 2. FM Information in NMS Online Library Document number/Issue NTC TAN 0704/1.1

Figure 2. FM Information in NMS Online Library

Document number/Issue

NTC TAN 0704/1.1 en

Copyright © Nokia Telecommunications Oy

8

About this Manual

About this Manual

 

Figure 3. FM Information in System Administrator’s Guides

Document number/Issue

NTC TAN 0704/1.1 en

Copyright © Nokia Telecommunications Oy

9

About this Manual

About this Manual

1.3 Typographic Conventions

The Nokia NMS manuals use the following typographic conventions.

Style

Explanation

Initial Upper-Case Lettering

• Application names

• Hardware components

 

• Names of windows and dialogs

Italicised text

• Emphasis

• State, status or mode

Courier

• File and directory names

• Names of database tables

• Parameters

• User names

• System output

• User input

UPPER-CASE

• Keys on the keyboard (ALT, TAB, CTRL etc.)

LETTERING

Bold text

• Graphical user interface components

Initial Upper-Case Lettering in Italics

• Referenced documents

• Referenced sections and chapters within a document

<bracketed text>

• Variable user input

Shaded box

• Further information about command line parameters

Table 1. Text styles in this document

Document number/Issue

NTC TAN 0704/1.1 en

Copyright © Nokia Telecommunications Oy

10

Fault Management Principles

Fault Management Principles

2

FAULT MANAGEMENT PRINCIPLES

There are a number of terms used throughout this document and in network fault monitoring in general. The list which follows gives the definitions of several basic terms as they are used in this manual.

2.1

Fault Management Concepts

Alarm

A message which notifies the management system of an abnormal condition in the managed system. The message carries quite a bit of information on the origins, time, and possible reasons for the abnormal condition. In the NMS, this information is broken down into different fields. The fields are put together to make the alarms which are shown in the alarm handling applications.

All alarms have an alarm number which identifies the possible reason for the alarm. For example, alarm 9224, entitled SUPERVISION PROGRAM FAILED, indicates that one of the programs used to supervise the NMS system failed for some reason.

Alarms are placed into a class which indicates their severity. There are three classes of alarms, plus the warning class, used in the NMS: critical, major, minor, and warning. Each operator has their own requirements for handling each class. Nokia recommends the following:

Alarm class

Required actions

Critical (***)

This type of alarm is likely to cause disturbances in traffic. Action must be taken on alarm within one hour

Major (**)

Action must be taken within working hours

Minor (*)

Does not require attention unless it occurs repeatedly

Warning (W)

No actions required

Cancel

A message which clears an alarm when a fault is over. In managing a telecommunications network, it is extremely important that the end of an alarm situation is very clearly indicated in the NMS alarm handling applications. If alarms are not cancelled, then it is impossible to have a clear picture of the real situation in the network.

Alarm Number (or Probable Cause)

Every alarm has an alarm number which identifies it. The values of alarm number may range between 1 and 99 999. For more information on alarm number ranges and which equipment they are assigned to, see Alarm Number Ranges in Chapter 3 of this manual.

Document number/Issue

NTC TAN 0704/1.1 en

Copyright © Nokia Telecommunications Oy

11

Fault Management Principles

Fault Management Principles

Alarm Text

The alarm text gives a brief description of the alarm.

Alarm Class

The alarm class represents the severity of the alarm. The alarm classes used in the Nokia NMS are critical, major, minor, and warning.

Notification Identifier (or Notification ID)

The Notification ID is a running number which is assigned to each and every incoming alarm as its unique identifier. This is necessary so that alarms and cancels can be matched together correctly. An alarm is identified by its notification ID, alarm number, and distinguished name. Because alarms can have the same alarm number and distinguished name, the notification ID is needed to identify each instance.

Only one active alarm with the same notification identifier, alarm number and distinguished name is stored into the Nokia NMS database. In case two occurrences of the same alarm (with the same alarm number and distinguished name) are sent to the NMS, the latter one is considered a duplicate and causes an error log entry.

Correlated Notification

The correlated notification is used in cancels. If the alarm is cancelled, the value of the correlated notification is the same as the notification ID of the alarm to be cancelled.

Event Type

The event type gives you more information on what kind of problem caused the alarm. There are five different event types used in the NMS:

communication

An alarm that is associated with the procedures and/ or processes required to convey information from one point to another (e.g. loss of frame, call establishment error).

environmental

An alarm principally associated with a condition relating to an enclosure in which the equipment resides (e.g. door open, electricity failure).

equipment

An alarm concerning an equipment fault (e.g. power problem, receiver failure, I/O device error).

event processing Alarm type principally associated with a software or data processing fault (e.g. storage capacity problem, version mismatch, corrupt data, file error, out of memory).

Document number/Issue

NTC TAN 0704/1.1 en

Copyright © Nokia Telecommunications Oy

12

Fault Management Principles

Fault Management Principles

quality of service

Alarm Lifting

An alarm that is associated with a certain degradation in the quality of service (e.g. response time too long, resource limits near, congestion).

Alarm Lifting is a feature that re-targets the alarms of one object class - the source object - to another object class - the target object. The alarms of the original object class are shown as alarms of the new object class. The original object’s name is, however, given in the alarm information attached to the re- targeted alarm.

For more information on this, talk to your system administrator or see System Management Basic Operating Principles and Procedures.

Alarm Upload

With the alarm upload the current alarm status in the external system is transmitted to the Nokia NMS. After that the alarm database in the Nokia NMS is synchronised with that of the external system. This is necessary in the following cases:

• After a network element is connected to the NMS for the first time

• After the connection between the NMS and the NE has been broken for some reason (and alarms and cancels are not buffered), and then restored

• On a regular basis at certain intervals

NE Reset

When a network element is reset, it sends a specific alarm to the NMS, which causes certain active alarms in that managed object and in its child objects to be cancelled. These alarms are defined in the FX_RULE database. After these are cancelled, the element sends a report on its current alarm situation to the NMS.

2.2 Network Management Concepts

Managed Object

A managed object represents a physical or logical network element or a piece of

equipment belonging to the network. This element is in some way connected to the NMS, so that the NMS can be used to manage it by gathering information, such as information on alarms, from it.

Maintenance Region

A

maintenance region is a logical managed object in the NMS object model. It

is

a collection of managed objects which are grouped together, normally to

represent some geographical part of the network. Maintenance regions are defined by the system administrator.

Document number/Issue

NTC TAN 0704/1.1 en

Copyright © Nokia Telecommunications Oy

13

Fault Management Principles

Fault Management Principles

Site Object

A site is a place where one or more of the elements of the network are situated.

One site could contain more than one managed object. If there are multiple

elements on one site, then the site object represents the element which is highest

in the hierarchy on that site. For example, a site may contain an OMC as well as

one of its workstations. In this case, the OMC is the site object.

Managed Object Class

All managed objects of the same type are grouped together to form a class. This makes it easier for the NMS to represent the elements in the network in a sensible way.

In NMS software, each class is represented by its own symbol. These symbols

can be used in the Top-level User Interface to make graphical views of the network. These views are very effective in helping NMS users visualise the network as a whole.

Managed Object Instance

As a managed object class represents a type of network element, a managed object instance represents one unique element. For example, Workstation is an object class. One workstation sitting on the table is an instance of the class of workstations.

In practice, the term managed object or just object is often used to refer to a

managed object instance.

Parent and Child Objects

Managed objects are often hierarchical, with certain objects controlling and/or containing others. This hierarchy is shown in the NMS object model as well. The parent object controls or contains a child object.

Relative Distinguished Name

This name is used to help identify an object instance. It contains the managed object class + a string which identifies the instance of that class, for example, WS-1. The relative distinguished name must be unique within the parent object.

Distinguished Name

This is an even more effective identifier of a particular managed object instance. It contains the relative distinguished name of the object instance in question, plus the relative distinguished names of all of its parent objects. These are shown as a path of elements arranged in hierarchical order and separated by a slash (/). For example:

ClassName-InstanceValue/ClassName-InstanceValue/ClassName-

InstanceValue

Document number/Issue

NTC TAN 0704/1.1 en

Copyright © Nokia Telecommunications Oy

14

Fault Management Principles

Fault Management Principles

or:

PLMN-1/OMC-2/WS-4

ClassName is an abbreviation for a managed object class name and consists of numbers or capital letters. Its maximum length is four characters. The maximum length of InstanceValue is ten characters, and the value should contain printable characters. These are often numbers, but do not have to be.

Topology

The topology of a network is the picture of the actual physical elements of the network, where they are situated, and how they are related to each other.

It is important that this picture of the network is kept as consistent as possible with the actual physical network. It will then be an accurate representation of that network.

View

The Top-level User Interface uses views to picture a network or a part of it. The managed objects of the network are shown using symbols, and their relationships to each other are shown in the view using connecting lines. These views are very effective in helping NMS users visualise the network as a whole.

Document number/Issue

NTC TAN 0704/1.1 en

Copyright © Nokia Telecommunications Oy

15

Introduction to Nokia’s Fault Management

Introduction to Nokia’s Fault Management

3

INTRODUCTION TO NOKIA’S FAULT MANAGEMENT

3.1

Nokia FM Tools Overview

The Nokia NMS offers you a comprehensive set of tools for collecting and managing network alarms. The function of the tools can be broken down into the following areas:

Area of Fault Monitoring

NMS Tools

Online monitoring and investigating alarms

• Top-level User Interface

• Alarm Monitor

 

• Alarm Viewer

• Alarm Manual

• Alarm History

• Alarm Forwarder

• Alarm Database Upload

Alarm reduction

• Alarm Filtering and Reclassification

• Alarm Correlation

Offline analysis of alarms

• Alarm Statistics in PC

Alarm collection from third- party elements

• SNMP Integration Toolkit

• ASCII Integration Toolkit

 

• RPC Integration Toolkit

• Alarm Collection from SNMP, ASCII, and RPC

The following sections give you a more thorough explanation of each of these tools.

Document number/Issue

NTC TAN 0704/1.1 en

Copyright © Nokia Telecommunications Oy

16

Introduction to Nokia’s Fault Management

Introduction to Nokia’s Fault Management

3.1.1 Top-level User Interface

to Nokia’s Fault Management 3.1.1 Top-level User Interface Figure 4. Top-level User Interface The Top-level User

Figure 4. Top-level User Interface

The Top-level User Interface contains graphical views of the network, in which network elements are represented with symbols. The views are meant to represent as closely as possible the actual elements belonging to the network. With these graphical views, the user has a quick but very comprehensive view of the network at all times.

One of the main functions of the Top-level User Interface in network monitoring is to show the alarm situation in all managed objects. The objects symbols are used to do this, changing colours to reflect the most severe alarm which is currently active in the object. The default colours and their meanings are:

Colour

Meaning

Red

At least one critical (***) alarm is active in managed object

Orange

At least one major (**) alarm is active in object

Yellow

At least one minor (*) alarm is active in object

Green

No active alarms in object

White

No alarms received yet from object

Blinking is another way used in the Top-level User Interface to indicate the alarm situation. When a symbol blinks, it means that there is at least one unacknowledged alarm in that managed object.

Document number/Issue

NTC TAN 0704/1.1 en

Copyright © Nokia Telecommunications Oy

17

Introduction to Nokia’s Fault Management

Introduction to Nokia’s Fault Management

The Top-level User Interface is very effective for presenting this overall view of the network fault situation, but other applications are needed to examine the alarms more closely.

3.1.2 Alarm Monitor
3.1.2 Alarm Monitor
to examine the alarms more closely. 3.1.2 Alarm Monitor Figure 5. Alarm Monitor and Explanation Dialog

Figure 5. Alarm Monitor and Explanation Dialog for Correlated Alarms

Alarm Monitor is your key tool in monitoring the network fault situation, as it gives you a real-time view of network alarms. Alarms are forwarded to Alarm Monitor as they come in to the NMS, so you have constant access to the most recent alarm information. Unacknowledged alarms are indicated by the blinking of the object symbol, and users can acknowledge and cancel alarms directly in the main window.

You can set up monitoring criteria, which narrows the focus of the monitoring to cover only the network areas or alarm numbers that you need. This makes it possible to divide the network into regions and monitor each region separately.

The Monitor shows each alarm with the most basic information on it, including the symbol of the managed object where the alarm occurred, the alarm number and text, the object's name, ID and address, and the maintenance region to which the object belongs. You have quick access to more comprehensive information on the alarm through the Alarm Dialog and the Alarm Manual, both of which can be opened directly from any of the alarms shown in Alarm Monitor.

To make it easier to pinpoint the most urgent alarms, the main window can be divided into three panes. Each pane shows all alarms of one class, which are sorted in the order they come in to the NMS.

Another function which helps you to be aware of the network situation is the Audio Alarms feature, which allows you to assign a sound to different alarm classes. When an alarm of a certain class comes in, the sound is given off. This

Document number/Issue

NTC TAN 0704/1.1 en

Copyright © Nokia Telecommunications Oy

18

Introduction to Nokia’s Fault Management

Introduction to Nokia’s Fault Management

means that alarms can be monitored even when no one is sitting at the NMS workstation.

As the most important application for following the network fault situation, Alarm Monitor also gives you other information on alarms, such as which alarms are correlated and which have a Trouble Ticket attached to them. For correlated alarms you can open the Explanation dialog, which contains information on the alarms which were correlated and the rule which caused the correlation. The Trouble Ticket Application can be opened directly from Alarm Monitor.

Alarm Monitor allows you to acknowledge alarms and cancel those which require manual cancelling. It indicates unacknowledged alarms by the blinking of the object symbol.

3.1.3 Alarm Viewer

by the blinking of the object symbol. 3.1.3 Alarm Viewer Figure 6. Alarm Viewer All alarms,

Figure 6. Alarm Viewer

All alarms, warnings, and cancels are shown in Alarm Viewer as they come in to the NMS. It is a good tool for monitoring, for example, alarm/cancel pairs to get an idea of how quickly the alarms are getting cancelled.

You can narrow the focus of the Alarm Viewer to include only certain regions, making it possible to divide the network into areas and monitor each separately. You can also choose to see only alarms, only warnings, or both.

The Audio Alarms function is also present in Alarm Viewer. You can make different sounds be generated for certain alarm classes, so that when an alarm of that class comes in, you are notified of it immediately even if you are not sitting at the NMS workstation.

You can use Alarm Viewer to direct incoming alarms to a printer for a record of alarms on paper.

Document number/Issue

NTC TAN 0704/1.1 en

Copyright © Nokia Telecommunications Oy

19

Introduction to Nokia’s Fault Management

Introduction to Nokia’s Fault Management

3.1.4 Alarm Manual

Introduction to Nokia’s Fault Management 3.1.4 Alarm Manual Figure 7. Alarm Manual Application The Modifiable Alarm

Figure 7. Alarm Manual Application

The Modifiable Alarm Manual contains in-depth information on each alarm. There is a manual page for each alarm which describes the alarm and its meaning, gives an interpretation of any information given in the supplementary information fields, gives instructions on how to overcome the problem, and tells you whether the alarm is cancelled automatically or if it requires manual cancelling.

At the bottom of each manual page is a separate pane where instructions can be added. This makes it possible to attach your own instructions to an alarm for all other NMS users in your network.

The Alarm Manual is a handy tool because it can be accessed directly from an alarm in several of the NMS alarm handling applications, such as Alarm Monitor and Alarm History.

Document number/Issue

NTC TAN 0704/1.1 en