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Form No.

811c

College Course Syllabus


SUBJECT (3 Units): COURSE TITLE: ITC 38 Network Management

Course Description & Objectives The course discusses the basic theories of communication, telecommunication and governing data communication systems. Lecture topics include data transmission fundamentals, asynchronous and synchronous communication techniques, error handling technologies, communication standards, and common PC communication interfaces. The course also covers the concepts needed in the design, implementation, and management of computer networks. Basic Electronics and the study of different electronic test instruments are included in the course to facilitate Networking. The course also covers topics like Wide area and Local area networking, peer-to-peer and wireless applications networking, network topologies, network standards and protocols, and software and hardware management of network. At the end of this course, the student is expected to: a. Apply fundamental data communications concepts, networking technology and basic electronic principles in actual networking practice. b. Install, configure and administer hardware and software to establish a local area network. c. Express knowledge of data communication fundamentals and how those fundamentals relate to open-based and proprietary software-based networks. d. Understand the concept of basic electronics, computer communications and networking technologies. e. Use the currently available data communications services, Internet and its applications. f. Understand common barriers to network security and the major issues involved in implementing proper security measures. g. Recognize internal and external security threats to an organization. h. Understand the concept behind open source computing. i. Develop patience and dedication in accomplishing assigned tasks. I. Course Classification Required for a Degree in BSIT Required for a Major in ________ Elective Pre-Requisite: ITC 39

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Form No. 811c

Course Outline TIME TOPICS ALLOTMENT PRELIM 1. Introduction WEEK 1 1.1. Introduction to Basic Communication Systems 1.1.1. Fundamentals of Data Communication 1.1.2. Elements of communications 1.1.3. Components of communication systems 1.1.4. Communication System Types 1.2. Basic Networking Technology 1.2.1. Local Area Networks 1.2.2. Metropolitan Area Networks 1.2.3. Wide Area Networks 1.2.4. Wireless Networks 1.2.5. Home Networks 1.2.6. Internetwork WEEK 2 1.3. Network Software 1.3.1. Protocol Hierarchies 1.3.2. Design Issues for the Layers 1.3.3. Connection-Oriented and Connectionless Services 1.3.4. Service Primitives 1.3.5. The Relationship of Services to Protocols 1.4. Reference Models 1.4.1. The OSI Reference Models 1.4.2. The TCP/IP Reference Models 1.5. Example Networks 1.5.1. The Internet 1.5.2. Connection-Oriented Networks 1.5.3. Ethernet 1.5.4. Wireless LANs: 802.11 WEEK 4 2. The Physical Layer 2.1. The Theoretical Basis for Data Communication 2.1.1. Fourier Analysis 2.1.2. Bandwidth-Limited Signals 2.1.3. The Maximum Data Rate of a Channel 2.2. Guided Transmission Media 2.2.1. Magnetic Media 2.2.2. Twisted Pair 2.2.3. Coaxial Cable 2.2.4. Fiber Optics WEEK 5 2.3. Wireless Transmission

REFERENCES Forouzan pp 3

Foruzan pp8 Tannenbaum pp14-25

WEEK 3

Forouzan pp15 Tanenbaum pp85-177

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Form No. 811c

2.3.1. 2.3.2. 2.3.3. 2.3.4. 2.3.5. WEEK 6

The Electromagnetic Spectrum Radio Transmission Microwave Transmission Infrared and Millimeter Waves Lightwave Transmission Tanenbaum pp183-237

2.4. Communication Satellites 2.4.1. Geostationary Satellites 2.4.2. Medium-Earth Orbit Satellites 2.4.3. Low-Earth Orbit Satellites 2.4.4. Satellites vs. Fiber 2.5. The Public Switched Telephone Network 2.5.1. Structure of the Telephone System 2.5.2. The Politics of Telephones 2.5.3. The Local Loop 2.5.4. Trunks and Multiplexing 2.5.5. Switching

MIDTERM WEEK 7

2.6. The Mobile Telephone System 2.6.1. First-Generation Mobile Phones 2.6.2. Second-Generation Mobile Phones 2.6.3. Third-Generation Mobile Phones 2.7. Cable Television 2.7.1. Community Antenna Television 2.7.2. Internet Over Cable 2.7.3. Spectrum Allocation 2.7.4. Cable Modems 2.7.5. ADSL vs. Cable 3. The Data Link Layer 3.1. Data Link Layer Design Issues 3.1.1. Services Provided to the Network Layer 3.1.2. Framing 3.1.3. Error Control 3.1.4. Flow Control 3.2. Error Detection and Correction 3.2.1. Error-Correcting Codes 3.2.2. Error-Detecting Codes

Tanenbaum pp343-464

WEEK 8

3.3. Elementary Data Link Protocols 3.3.1. An Unrestricted Simplex Protocol 3.3.2. A Simplex Stop-and-Wait Protocol 3.3.3. A Simplex Protocol for a Noisy Channel 3.4. Sliding Window Protocols 3.4.1. A One-Bit Sliding Window Protocol 3.4.2. A Protocol Using Go Back to N
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3.4.3. A Protocol Using Selective Repeat 3.5. Protocol Verification 3.5.1. Finite State Machine Model 3.5.2. Petri Nets Model 3.6. Example Data Link Protocols 3.6.1. HDLC -- High-Level Data Link Control 3.6.2. The Data Link Layer in the Internet WEEK 9 4. The Network Layer 4.1. Network Layer Design Issues 4.1.1. Store-and-Forward Packet Switching 4.1.2. Services Provided to the Transport Layer 4.1.3. Implementation of Connectionless Service 4.1.4. Implementation of Connection-Oriented Service 4.1.5. Comparison of Virtual-Circuit and Datagram Subnets 4.2. Routing Algorithms 4.2.1. The Optimality Principle 4.2.2. Shortest Path Routing 4.2.3. Flooding 4.2.4. Distance Vector Routing 4.2.5. Link State Routing 4.2.6. Hierarchical Routing 4.2.7. Broadcast Routing 4.2.8. Multicast Routing 4.2.9. Routing for Mobile Host 4.2.10. Routing in Ad Hoc Networks 4.2.11. Node Lookup in Peer-to-Peer Networks WEEK 10 4.3. Congestion Control Algorithms 4.3.1. General Principles of Congestion Control 4.3.2. Congestion Prevention Policies 4.3.3. Congestion Control in Virtual-Circuit Subnets 4.3.4. Congestion Control in Datagram Subnets 4.3.5. Load Shedding 4.3.6. Jitter Control 4.4. Quality of Service 4.4.1. Requirements 4.4.2. Techniques for Achieving Good Quality of Service 4.4.3. Integrated Services 4.4.4. Differentiated Services 4.4.5. Label Switching and MPLS
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Tanenbaum pp 481-569

Form No. 811c

WEEK 11

4.5. Internetworking 4.5.1. How Networks Differ 4.5.2. How Networks Can Be Connected 4.5.3. Concatenated Virtual Circuits 4.5.4. Connectionless Internetworking 4.5.5. Tunneling 4.5.6. Internetwork Routing 4.5.7. Fragmentation 4.6. The Network Layer in the Internet 4.6.1. The IP Protocol 4.6.2. IP Addresses 4.6.3. Internet Control Protocols 4.6.4. OSPF The Interior Gateway Routing Protocol 4.6.5. BGP The Exterior Gateway Routing Protocol 4.6.6. Internet Multicasting 4.6.7. Mobile IP4.6.8 IPv6 Tanenbaum pp 721-826

WEEK 12

FINAL WEEK 13

WEEK 14

5. The Transport Layer 5.1. The Transport Service 5.1.1. Services Provided to the Upper Layers 5.1.2. Transport Service Primitives 5.1.3. Berkeley Sockets 5.1.4. An Example of Socket Programming 5.2. Elements of Transport Protocols 5.2.1. Addressing 5.2.2. Connection Establishment 5.2.3. Connection Release 5.2.4. Flow Control and Buffering 5.2.5. Multiplexing 5.2.6. Crash Recovery 5.3. A Simple Transport Protocol 5.3.1. The Example Service Primitives 5.3.2. The Example Transport Entity 5.3.3. The Example as a Finite State Machine 5.4. The Internet Transport Protocols: UDP 5.4.1. Introduction to UDP 5.4.2. Remote Procedure Call 5.4.3. The Real-Time Transport Protocol 5.5. The Internet Transport Protocols: TCP 5.5.1. Introduction to TCP 5.5.2. The TCP Service Model 5.5.3. The TCP Protocol 5.5.4. The TCP Segment Header 5.5.5. TCP Connection Establishment 5.5.6. TCP Connection Release 5.5.7. Modeling TCP Connection Management 5.5.8. TCP Transmission Policy
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Form No. 811c

WEEK 15

5.5.9. TCP Congestion Control 5.5.10. TCP Timer Management 5.5.11. Wireless TCP and UDP 5.5.12. Transactional TCP 5.6. Performance Issues 5.6.1. Performance Problems in Computer Networks 5.6.2. Network Performance Measurement 5.6.3. System Design for Better Performance 5.6.4. Fast TPDU Processing 5.6.5. Protocols for Gigabit Networks 5.7. Multimedia 5.7.1. Introduction to Digital Audio 5.7.2. Audio Compression 5.7.3. Streaming Audio 5.7.4. Internet Radio 5.7.5. Voice over IP 5.7.6. Introduction to Video 5.7.7. Video Compression 5.7.8. Video on Demand 5.7.9. The Mbone The Multicast Backbone

WEEK 16

WEEK 17-18

6. Network Security 6.1. Cryptography 6.2. Introduction to Cryptography 6.3. Substitution Cyphers 6.4. Transportation Cypher 6.5. One-Time Pad 6.6. Two Fundamental Cryptographic Principles 6.7. Symmetric-Key Algorithms 6.7.1. DES The Data Encryption Standard 6.7.2. AES The Advance Encryption Standard 6.8. Cipher Modes 6.9. Other Ciphers 6.10. Cryptanalysis 6.10.1. Public-Key Algorithms 6.3.1 RSA 6.3.2 Other Public-Key Algorithms 6.11. Digital Signatures 6.12. Symmetric-Key Signatures 6.13. Public Key Signatures 6.14. Message Digests 6.15. Management of Public Keys 6.15.1. Certificates 6.15.2. X.509 6.15.3. Public Key Infrastructures 6.16. Communication Security
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6.16.1. IPsec 6.16.2. Firewalls 6.16.3. Virtual Private Networks 6.16.4. Wireless Security 6.17. Authentication Protocols 6.17.1. Authentication Based on a Shared Secret Key 6.17.2. Establishing a Shared Key 6.17.3. Authentication Using a Key Distribution Center 6.17.4. Authentication Using Kerberos 6.17.5. Authentication Using Public-Key Cryptography 6.18. E-Mail Security 6.18.1. PGP Pretty Good Privacy 6.18.2. PEM Privacy Enhanced Mail 6.18.3. S/MIME 6.19. Web Security 6.19.1. Threats 6.19.2. Secure Naming 6.19.3. SSL The Secure Socket Layer 6.19.4. Mobile Code Security 6.20. Social Issues 6.20.1. Privacy 6.20.2. Freedom of Speech 6.20.3. Copyright PROJECT PRESENTATION IV. Class Activities 1. Research Works 2. Laboratory Cases 3. Project Presentation V. Course Examinations and Grading Examination (Prelim, Midterm, Finals) Class Standing Quizzes Laboratory Exercises Recitation/Seatwork Assignment (25%) (20%) (10%) (5%) ____ 100% 40% 60%

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Form No. 811c

VI. Textbook Adopted Forouzan, Data Communications & Networking, McGraw Hill, c2004 Date Adopted: June 2011 VII. References
1. Tomsko, Greg. Guide to Networking Essentials, c2007 2. Rowe, Stanford. Computer Networking, c2005 (86527) 3. Dye, Mark, Network Fundamentals CCNA Exploration, c2008 4. Blundell, Barry. Computer Systems & Networks, Thomson, c2007 (100356) 5. Dovliqay C. Networks Security: Current Status and Future, McGraw Hill, c2007

VIII.

Grading System First Prelim Grade (FPG) Class Standing First Prelim Exam Second Prelim Grade (SPG) Class Standing Second Prelim Exam Final Term Grade (FTG) Class Standing Second Prelim Exam Final Grade (FG) 60% 40% 100% 60% 40% 25% 60% 40% 25% 25%

Class Standing Includes: Quizzes Assignments Written Reports Laboratory Exercises

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Form No. 811c

Prepared by: Noted by: Date:

Arlene Mae C. Valderama Department Chair, Computer Science/IT Milani M. Austria Dean, Technological Studies June 6, 2011

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