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DNA Tribes Digest September 1, 2012

All contents 2006-2012 DNA Tribes. DNA Tribes. DNA Tribes patent pending analysis is available exclusively from DNA Tribes. All rights reserved. DNA Tribes Digest September 1, 2012 Copyright 2012 DNA Tribes. All rights reserved. To request an email subscription to DNA Tribes Digest, email digest@dnatribes.com with the subject heading Subscribe. To unsubscribe from DNA Tribes Digest, email digest@dnatribes.com with the subject heading Unsubscribe. Previous issues of DNA Tribes Digest are available online at http://dnatribes.com/library.html.

Table of Contents:

Introduction ..................................................................................................................................... 1 Genetic Links in the East Mediterranean (STR and SNP) .............................................................. 2 Historical Background: Canaan in the Copper and Bronze Age Periods ............................... 2 STR Analysis of the East Mediterranean ................................................................................ 5 SNP Analysis of East Mediterranean Populations .................................................................. 7 Conclusion .............................................................................................................................. 9 SNP Update and Back to School SNP Sale .................................................................................. 10

Introduction
Hello, and welcome to the September 2012 issue of DNA Tribes Digest. This months article includes genetic analysis of the East Mediterranean (Levant) based on autosomal STR and SNP data. The historical background highlights two early periods: the Copper Age and the Bronze Age, when semi-migratory traders and pastoralists carried new ideas along trade networks linking the Southern Levant and North Euphrates. Migrations during these periods shaped the Bronze Age populations of Canaan, which became the common ancestors of later Phoenicians, Israelites, and other cultures of the East Mediterranean. We are also pleased to announce a new update for DNA Tribes SNP analysis, including several new features. For a limited time, we are offering special Back to School Sale pricing for new SNP Analysis orders (Sale Price $39.99) and SNP Updates (Sale Price $19.99), available at http://dnatribes.com/snp.html. Best regards, Lucas Martin DNA Tribes

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Genet Links in the East Me tic s editerran nean (ST and S TR SNP)
Historic Backg cal ground: Ca anaan in the Coppe and Bro t er onze Age Periods
The East Med T diterranean (L Levant) is located where trade and migratio routes w on have conn nected the ci ivilizations of Europe, o Asia, and Africa sinc early per d ce riods (see Figure 1). In ancient times, this land was t known to the Akka adians as Eber-Nari, E meaning Beyond the [Euphrates] River. R This area has long been a key hub T for the di iffusion of new ideas and cultures n d since at least the Neo l olithic period. Because Figure 1: The East Mediterra F anean and neig ghboring landm marks. of its loca ation near major river sys stems and seas, trav velers coming through this area have played a key role in link g y king world cu ultures throu ughout history. This article wi focus on East Mediterra T ill E anean geogra aphical links during two periods: the C Copper Age netw works involve in early sm ed melting innov vations; and the multi-eth hnic Bronze A network that Age ks linked the Nile Valley, Mesopotami and Aegea worlds. e ia, an During the Cop g pper Age, new tec chniques of furnace based smelting were ed use in a netw work of early sites that em merged be etween the S Southern Lev vant and Nor rthern Eu uphrates and later involv ved the Cau ucasus ountains and Anatolia (se Figure 2).1 This Mo ee ad dvancement is most vividly expressed i two s y in cac ches of me etalwork: the Nahal Mis e shmar C Cave of the T Treasure (in t Judean D the Desert) an the Mayk nd kop Treasur (in the North re Ca aucasus). res were possibly These two treasur rs de eposited by e early traveler along a n northsou trade ne uth etwork that involved mu ultiple civ vilization cen nters and lan nguages. The two e sit tes date nea the emer ar rgence of se everal cu ultures not usu ually thought of as relate To t ed. the north, these included th Maykop culture e e he of the North Ca f aucasus (4,00 00-3,000 BCE that E) inf fluenced meta allurgy throug ghout Eurasia 2 a. To the south, the G Ghassulian Culture of the Souther Levant (4 f rn 4,300-3,300 BCE) Figure 2: The early sprea of furnace smelting. T ad s tra aded with distant loca ations as fa as ar
1 2

See From Metallurgy to Bronze Age Civilizations: The Synthetic Theory at htt m t tp://www.ajaon nline.org/articl le/300. http://dna atribes.com/dna atribes-digest-2 2012-05-01.pd http://tp.revi df; istas.csic.es/index.php/tp/arti icle/view/149/1 150. Page 2 of 12

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Armenia, Elam, Upper Egypt, and Crete. The Ghassulians integrated tra d G aditions of pa astoralism (m mainly sheet and goat herding with olive cultivation, laying the fo d g) oundations fo the early E Mediterr or East ranean (Canaanit civilization 3 te) n. Early ethnic gr E roups involve in this Cop ed pper Age trad network (w de which later ex xpanded to co onnect vast areas of Asia, Eur s rope, and Afri are unknown. Howeve their geog ica) er, graphical loca ations suggest links t with Afro o-Asiatic languages in the Levant and Egypt; Hattian languages ne Anatolia; Elamite lang L n ear guages in West Asia; and Alar A rodian (Hurria related) an Indo-Europ an nd pean language near the Ca es aucasus.4 During the sub D bsequent Bron Age, semi-nomadic pa nze astoralists and merchants p d played an important role linkin East Medit ng terranean sett tlements with civilization c h centers of Me esopotamia an the Nile V nd Valley. Archaeolo ogists have described an im mportant wav of Middle Bronze Age migrations t Canaan bet ve e to tween approximately 1800 and 1500 BC Early text describe s a CE. ts several expan nsions in this period, vari s iously described as Hyksos, Kassites, and Apiru (migrat K A tory peoples) . The cultural or T rigins of these semi-nomad are unknow However early texts r ds wn. r, record an infl of flux 5 several new language (possibly related to Hu es r urrian and ot ther languag of West Asia ) along with ges g religious and technical vocabulary from more distant Indic c l d cultures of Central Asia o India.6 Alth or hough written ce enturies later, narratives of the Hebrew Patriarchs describe sim o w milar journeys involving d s distant lands bey yond the Euph hrates River, such as Har and Ur K ran Kasdim (whos exact locat se tions are deb bated). This sugg gests a key role for early traders and pastoralists in shaping th East Med r y he diterranean cu ultural landscape by transmitt e, ting concepts between dist Bronze A civilizatio centers. tant Age on

Figure 3: Br ronze Age trade networks in the East Medit t terranean. For m more informati ion, see Biblical Peop and Ethnic by Ann E. Killebrew. ples city
3 4

See Arch haeology of the Land of the Bible by Amiha Mazar, pp. 59 B ai 9-89. Gimbutas noted several archaeological similarities between Bron Age culture of Canaan, the North Cau s nze es ucasus, and early Balkan and Sic B cilian sites. See The Kurgan Culture and the Indo-Europea e C e anization of Eu urope pp. 107-1 109. 5 See http:/ //dnatribes.com m/dnatribes-dig gest-2011-12-0 01.pdf. 6 See http:/ //dnatribes.com m/dnatribes-dig gest-2012-04-0 02.pdf. It shoul be emphasiz that no inta Indic langu ld zed act uage is attested in Mitanni or Ca anaan; what do appear is a sprinkling of Indic vocabul oes f lary for deities horse trainin and s, ng, personal names in Kassit Hittite, and Hurrian conte te, d exts. This sugg gests migratory West Asian c y cultures had ad dopted some cultu concepts fr ural rom Indic spea aking populatio (possibly ne BMAC or Harappan relat trade routes). ons ear ted DNA Trib bes Digest Se eptember 1, 20 012 Page 3 of 12

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By the Late Bronze Age (the 1300s BCE), a distinctively Canaanite civilization had emerged in the East Mediterranean, attested in early Semitic writings such as the Amarna Letters and Ras Shamra texts. Early Canaanites participated in two important trade networks: one linking coastal Anatolia (highlighted blue in Figure 3), and another connected to the Nile Valley (highlighted red in Figure 3). Cyprus played a key role in these trade relationships, bringing the East Mediterranean in contact with the adjacent Aegean (Mycenaean) civilization.7 Hints of Middle Bronze Age links with more distant cultures still lingered in the form of Hurrian and Indic personal names, such as Suwardata and Abdi-Heba. However, the migratory waves of the Middle Bronze Age were by this time integrated in a local Canaanite culture whose local rulers were subject to New Kingdom Egypt. In the subsequent Iron Age (c. 1200 BCE), these Egyptianized settlements of lowland Canaan were displaced by two cultural groups: (1) Local semi-pastoralist cultures of the Canaanite highlands and Transjordan (sometimes identified as Shasu or Proto-Israelites); (2) An influx of Aegean (Philistine) cultures, possibly originating as Sea Peoples from Cyprus or Coastal Anatolia.8
MaterialCulture PossibleOrigin Lowland Canaanites Highland Canaanites CulturalLinks MentionsinWrittenSources

Local Egyptian(NewKingdom) AmarnaLetters;Ugariticlanguage (Autochthonous). Administrators. texts(EpicofAqhat,etc.). Local EmergentProtoIsraelites; Apiru;Shashu. (Autochthonous). Transjordan. CyprusorCoastal Philistines Aegean(Mycenaean)Settlers. SeaPeoples. Anatolia. Table 1: The three cultural groups that emerged in Canaan in the Iron Age (after 1200 BCE).

Interactions among these three groups of cultures (summarized in Table 1) were later described in the Hebrew Bible, which emphasized Israelite links with the semi-nomadic patriarchs of Canaan. For instance, the Israelite leader Joshua was described as erecting a circle of twelve stones (symbolizing the twelve tribes of ancient Israel) near the Jordan River, similar to Bronze Age monuments such as the Rujm el-Hiri (Gilgal Rephaim) near the Sea of Galilee. Similarly, archaeologists have emphasized the continuity of local Canaanite material cultures from the Bronze Age to the Iron Age Israelite and Phoenician cultures (with no archaeological evidence of major migrations since the Middle Bronze Age). That is, despite apparent differences in time period and cultural practices,9 the figures of both the Amarna Letters (Suwardata, Abdi-Hebta, et.al.) and the Hebrew Bible (Joshua, et. al.) probably shared ancestral origins in local populations resident in Canaan since the Bronze Age. Given this continuity of local Canaanite material cultures, the following analysis will assess the genetic components of East Mediterranean populations with reference to trade and migration links dating to the Bronze Age, as well as Aegean settlements during the early Iron Age. This will include genetic components shared with neighboring regions of West Asia, as well as more distant regions of Europe, Africa, and South Asia.
For more information about these trade networks, see Biblical Peoples and Ethnicity by Ann E. Killebrew. Ibid. See also Archaeology of the Land of the Bible by Amihai Mazar. 9 For instance, pig bones (abundant in Philistine settlements) are absent in the highland settlements of Iron Age Canaan. This might express religious practices, as well as practical adaptations to semi-nomadic lifeways (for instance, also typical of the Andronovo culture; see E. E. Kuzmina, The Prehistory of the Silk Road p. 60).
8 7

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STR Analysis of the East Mediterranean


Genetic contributions to East Mediterranean populations (including Druze, Greek Cypriot, Jordanian, Northern Arab, Palestinian, and Syrian samples) were identified using autosomal STR data.10 Results are summarized in Table 2 and illustrated in Figure 4. Region Mesopotamian Arabian Greek Basque NorthAfrican Other RelatedPopulations Adyghe;AnatolianTurkish;Armenian; GeneralTurkish;Georgian;Iranian;and Kurdish. ArabianPeninsula;Iraq;GulfArabs. Greeks(notincludingCypriots);Sicilians. Basques. BerbersandotherNorthwestAfricans. EstimatedContribution (%) 39.8% 25.3% 15.1% 9.7% 7.0% 3.1%

Table 2: STR based genetic contributions to East Mediterranean populations (including Druze, Greek Cypriot, Jordanian, Northern Arab, Palestinian, and Syrian samples). This analysis excluded contributions from the local Levantine region.

Discussion: Results in Table 2 indicate genetic links with several neighboring world regions. The largest genetic link (39.8%) is with the Mesopotamian STR region (which includes populations from Adyghe, Anatolian Turkish, Armenian, General Turkish, Georgian, Iranian, and Kurdish populations). This genetic link might express ancient patterns of migration and trade contacts between the Canaan and highland West Asia. The northern orientation of these genetic links suggests an important role for early semi-nomadic pastoralists and traders, similar to the Apiru and Shasu described in Bronze Age texts and the Hebrew patriarchs described in Biblical narratives. In particular, this might suggest an early role for Anatolian and Caucasus Mountains related cultures (such as Kura-Araxes) in helping shape the genetic landscape of the East Mediterranean. Results also indicate genetic links with the Arabian region (25.3%) that includes the Arabian Peninsula and Gulf Arabs. This might in part express genetic links with early city-states along the Tigris and Euphrates Rivers, as well as contacts with early semi-nomadic populations near the Arabian Desert. Other southern links include North African (7.0%), which might express contacts via both the Mediterranean Sea and Egypt. In addition, results identify Greek (15.1%) and Basque (9.7%) genetic links. These links suggest maritime contacts between the Levant and populations of the Aegean and Iberian Peninsula. These genetic relationships might reflect the Late Bronze Age trade links with Mycenaean cultures of the Aegean and Crete, as well as the Iron Age Sea Peoples linked Philistine settlements.
10

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Figure 4: STR based ge enetic contribu utions to East Mediterranean populations (including Dr n ruze, Greek Cy ypriot, Jordanian, Northern Ara Palestinian, and Syrian samples). This analysis excl ab, , s s luded contribu utions from the local e Levantine region.

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SNP Analysis of East Mediterranean Populations


Regional components of East Mediterranean populations and several Jewish communities were identified based on autosomal SNP data (excluding local East Mediterranean and Egyptian admixture components).11 Results are summarized in Tables 3-4 and illustrated in Figure 5.
Population Armenian Assyrian Cyprus Druze Egypt(Sample1) Egypt(Sample2) Jordan Lebanon Palestinian Samaritan Syria Turkey Average(East Mediterranean) AshkenaziJewish JewishAzerbaijan JewishGeorgia JewishIran JewishIraq JewishMorocco JewishYemen Iberian North North NW Hornof West Persian Arabian Balochi Other Caucasus African Eur. Africa Afr. 19.5% 37.3% 33.3% 9.3% 0.6% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 16.1% 35.6% 23.7% 14.4% 14.8% 14.9% 23.7% 17.6% 13.1% 21.8% 19.1% 19.5% 38.3% 16.7% 12.6% 8.2% 17.8% 41.9% 16.5% 27.6% 28.0% 19.8% 6.1% 4.3% 16.8% 16.2% 13.7% 17.6% 22.8% 34.1% 20.4% 18.4% 38.5% 36.8% 29.2% 20.4% 10.2% 1.8% 12.3% 42.2% 12.0% 14.1% 13.8% 25.8% 18.4% 16.7% 22.2% 20.6% 17.6% 24.4% 18.9% 25.2% 13.4% 24.5% 20.4% 34.1% 16.1% 24.2% 17.4% 37.0% 4.9% 2.1% 8.5% 10.1% 21.8% 26.7% 15.7% 10.8% 15.1% 19.0% 8.3% 1.4% 11.7% 8.4% 2.6% 8.9% 3.7% 6.3% 19.5% 10.4% 10.6% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 2.2% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 2.6% 1.7% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.4% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.6% 0.4% 0.0% 0.2% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 2.7% 0.3% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%

0.0% 15.6% 0.0% 13.9% 3.8% 5.1% 1.0% 0.0% 2.3% 0.8% 1.3% 5.6% 5.5% 7.7% 0.0% 3.2% 0.0% 4.3% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 7.8% 0.0%

26.8% 15.4% 11.5% 10.6% 23.6% 14.2% 20.9% 19.2% 31.8% 20.2% 30.5% 18.3% 16.5% 11.4% 24.8% 38.6% 17.1% 13.7%

12.7% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.4% 0.0% 5.4% 4.4% 1.5% 6.8% 6.7% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%

SephardicJewishBulgaria 40.9%

SephardicJewishTurkey 41.6% 16.4% 14.4% 13.4% 13.8% 0.0% 0.0% 0.4% 0.0% 0.0% Average(Jewish 26.0% 20.5% 21.2% 17.7% 9.4% 2.1% 2.2% 0.9% 0.0% 0.0% Communities) Table 3: Genetic components of individual East Mediterranean populations and several Jewish communities tracing descent from ancient Israel (excluding local East Mediterranean and Egyptian admixture components).
11

The analysis in this article is based on regional components of whole populations (not individuals). For more information including analysis of average individuals in these populations not excluding local components, see http://dnatribes.com/dnatribes-snp-admixture-2012-08-01.pdf. Page 7 of 12

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All contents 2006-2012 DNA Tribes. DNA Tribes. DNA Tribes patent pending analysis is available exclusively from DNA Tribes. All rights reserved. Population Iberian North Caucasus Persian Arabian North African NW Eur. Balochi Hornof Africa 4.3% 0.9% West Afr. 0.4% 0.0% Other 0.3% 0.0%

Average(East 19.5% 20.4% 26.8% 15.4% 11.7% 0.0% 1.3% Mediterranean) Average(Jewish 26.0% 20.5% 21.2% 17.7% 9.4% 2.1% 2.2% Communities) Table 4: Averages of the genetic components of East Mediterranean and Jewish populations.

Discussion: Results in Tables 3 and 4 indicate several genetic components for general East Mediterranean populations: These included genetic links with the Iberian region (average 19.5%) that includes populations of present day Spain and Portugal, as well as Basques, Northern Italy, Sardinia, and to some extent France and the Balkan Peninsula. These Iberian genetic links suggest contacts with West Mediterranean populations. For instance, early Mediterranean links might have included Iron Age Sea Peoples (Philistine) related settlers from Cyprus and coastal Anatolia. North Caucasus links (average 20.4%) were found in ethnic groups throughout the East Mediterranean, possibly expressing genetic traces of ancient trade networks and migrations via the Transcaucasus (attested since the Copper Age). Similarly, Persian components related to Kurdish, Turkmen, and Iranian populations (average 26.8%) might express links with the West Asian highlands that also date to early periods. Genetic links with southerly populations include Arabian (average 15.4%), North African (11.7%), and Horn of Africa (average 4.3%). These components are largest for the Egyptian samples, suggesting that Nile Valley populations might have mediated contacts between East Mediterranean (Canaanite) populations and southerly regions of Africa and the Arabian Peninsula. Notably, results also identify a small Balochi component (average 1.3%) for some East Mediterranean populations, such as Lebanon (5.1%), Jordan (3.8%), and Druze (2.2%). This suggests the possibility of some links with South Asian populations, possibly reflecting early trade contacts between the city-states of Mesopotamia and the Harappan civilization. Cultural traces of these contacts might have included the use of Indic personal names in Canaan during the Bronze Age, possibly transmitted by Hurrian related Apiru (migratory populations). Comparison of general East Mediterraneans and Jewish Diasporic communities: Most of the genetic components identified for general East Mediterraneans (including Iberian, North Caucasus, Persian, Arabian, North African, and Balochi components) are also identified Jewish Diasporic communities (see comparison in Table 4). These shared genetic components might in part express common ancestry from ancient Canaanite populations of the Late Bronze Age, which later diverged to become early Israelites, Phoenicians, Moabites, Ammonites, and other ethnic groups during the Iron Age. Further, these results are consistent with traditional accounts describing early migrations of the Hebrew patriarchs near the Northern Euphrates, as well as archaeological evidence for similar migrations during the Copper Age and Middle Bronze Age. In contrast, a Horn of Africa regional component is identified for some East Mediterranean populations (Egypt, Jordan, Lebanon, Palestinians, and Syria) but not identified for most Jewish populations (except for Yemeni Jewish) or some East Mediterraneans (such as Armenians, Assyrians, Cyprus, Druze, Samaritans, or Turkey). This suggests that Horn of Africa components might not have been present in all ancestral populations of ancient Canaan.
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Figure 5: Genetic components of individual East Mediter c rranean popula ations (exclud ding local Eas st Medi iterranean and Egyptian adm mixture compo onents). For m more informatio about DNA Tribes SNP on A P analy ysis, see http://d dnatribes.com/ /snp.html.

Conclu usion
In summary, both STR and SNP analyses identified genetic link between E n b d d ks East Mediterr ranean population and neighb ns boring parts of highland West Asia: th included M o W his Mesopotamian (STR) and N n North Caucasus and Persian (SNP) contributions. Thes links migh in part refle the ancien trade route that se ht ect nt es brought migratory Ca m anaanite popu ulations in contact with settlements o Anatolia and the Cau c of ucasus Mountain during the Copper Age and Bronze Age. ns C a A Both STR and SNP analyse identified genetic links with popula B d es s ations of Med diterranean Eu urope. These inc cluded Greek and Basque (STR) and Iberian (SNP links. This might expre early mar k P) s ess ritime contacts (possibly via Cyprus and Anatolia), such as Aegean ( C A h (Philistine) se ettlements of the Iron Age. . STR and SNP analyses also identified ge o enetic links w southerly regions, incl with y luding Arabia and an North Afr rican (STR an SNP). In particular, SN analysis i nd NP indicated that these compo t onents were larger near Egyp suggesting the Nile Valley as a conte for some o these south pt, g ext of hern contacts. . SN results in NP ndicated that these links were shared between gen neral East M Mediterranean and ns Jewish Di iaspora comm munities tracin their ancestry to ancien Israel. This might expre shared anc ng nt s ess cestry from popu ulations of an ncient Canaan which later differentiated during the I n, d Iron Age.
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SNP Update and Bac to Sch U a ck hool SNP Sale


We are pl leased to anno ounce a new update for DN Tribes S u NA SNP analysis, including sev veral new fea atures. 9.99) and SN Updates (S Price $1 For a limi time, new SNP Analy orders (S Price $39 ited w ysis Sale NP Sale 19.99) are available at http://d dnatribes.com m/snp.html. New Popu ulations: Sev veral new pop pulations have been added to our SNP d e database: E opulations: New European po Andalusia Spain Germany and Austria a Greek Mix xed Italy Gene eral Netherland ds Portugal Russia Gen neral Serbia and Croatia d Southern Italy and Sicil I ly New Mid ddle Eastern populations: p : Assyrian New East Asia p w populations: Tibet t

New Pop pulation Mix xture Analy ysis (Native and Diaspo oric): Each persons rep port now inc cludes population admixture comparisons to our SN database. This include (1) Nativ and (2) G n s NP es ve Global Population admixture analysis (inclu a uding commu unities that ha migrated or mixed in r ave recent history) ). Population admixture does not iden d ntify percentag of ethnici or nationa ges ity ality, but inste identifies more ead specific geographical signals that ca express mo ancient lin between p s an ore nks populations. F instance: For
Popul lation Jewish hMorocco Spain Palest tinianIsrael Ashke enaziJewishEu urope Jordan Sardin nia SaudiArabia Egypt2 Berga amoItaly Slovenia KshatriyaUttarPrad deshIndia Pe ercentage 19.7% 10.1% 9.5% 7.0% 6.4% 5.8% 4.5% 3.7% 3.5% 3.3% 2.9% SephardicJew wishTurkey Syria DarginUrkarahDagestan OrkneyIslands sScotland Lebanon BasqueSpain GeorgiaCauca asus Hungary ArainPunjabP Pakistan Ukraine MalaAndhraP PradeshIndia Yemen 2.8% 2.4% 2.3% 2.2% 2.1% 1.8% 1.6% 1.4% 1.1% 1.0% 0.9% 0.9% Page 10 of 12 0

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New Personalized MDS (Multi-Dimensional Scaling) Plot: To expand on admixture results, each persons report now includes MDS plots that visualize your genetic relationships to: (1) Continents; (2) World Regions; (3) Native Populations; and (4) Global Populations.

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All con ntents 2006-2012 DNA Tri ibes. DNA Tri ibes. DNA Tribes p patent pending analysis is ava g ailable ex xclusively from DNA Tribes. All rights res m . served.

Enhanced World Region Analy d R ysis: Our updated regio u onal admixtu ure and MD analysis now DS distinguis shes a total of 24 world reg f gions, includin several new and more d ng w detailed regio ons: North Caucasu N us East Mediterra E anean Egyptian E Persian North Ind dia Balochi West Siberian Tibetan

Enhanced Calculato Effect Re d or emoved: As of our August 2012 update total simila o t e, arity and adm mixture results wi now be dir ill rectly compar rable for all samples, rega ardless of wh hether you ha submitted your ave d genotype to be included in our analy ysis. stomers with a family me ember includ in a nativ population in our data ded ve n abase will st be till Note: Cus affected by the calcula effect. These customer can obtain higher total s b ator rs similarity sco ores and admixture percentag for that population and related world region . For best r ges p a w results, update your pare or ent grandpare (instead of descendants). Custom ent mers who do not have a relative inc cluded in a n native population will not be affected by th Calculator Effect. he r Updated on Website World Admix o W xture Tables Comprehen s: nsive admixtu tables listing the contin ure nental and reg gional comp ponents of world populations in our d f p database ar re available at e http://www.dnatribes.c com/dnatribes s-snp-admixtu ure-2012-08-0 01.pdf. Updated on Website Sample Repo o S orts: Updated DNA Tribes SNP report for several world popula d s ts ations are availa able at http://d dnatribes.com m/snp.html. New SNP anal N lysis orders (S Sale Price $3 39.99) and up pdates to your pe ersonal DNA Tribes SNP report (Sale Price $19.99) can also be ordered at thi link. P ) is

DNA Trib bes Digest Se eptember 1, 20 012

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