U N T E R NE HM E N S BE RE I C H O PTI K

G ES CHÄF T SBER EICH OP T IK

P OCK ET CATAL OG U E

Optical Glass
Description of properties

U N T E R NE HM E N S BE RE I C H O PTI K

G ES CHÄF T SBER EICH OP T IK

P OCK ET CATAL OG U E

Optical Glass
Description of properties

Table of Contents
Foreword . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1. 1.1. 1.2. 1.3. 1.4. 1.5. 2. 2.1. 2.2. 2.3. Optical Properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Refractive Index, Abbe Value, Dispersions, Glass Designations Tolerances for Refractive Index and Abbe Value . . . . . . . . . . Test Certificates for Refractive Indices and Dispersions . . . . . Refractive Index Homogeneity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Internal Transmittance, Color Code . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Internal Properties . . Striae . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bubbles and Inclusions Stress Birefringence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 6.4 Alkali Resistance; Phosphate Resistance. . . . . . . . . . . 6.5 Identification of Visible Surface Changes . . . . . . . . . 6.6 Addendum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7. Mechanical Properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 33 33 34 34 34 35 36 37 37 37 38

. 6 . 6 . 7 . 8 . 10 . 11 . . . . 13 13 14 16

7.1 Knoop Hardness . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7.2 Grindability with Diamond Particles According to ISO 12844 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7.3 Viscosity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7.4 Coefficient of Linear Thermal Expansion . . . . . . . . . . 8. Thermal Properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

3. Delivery Performance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.1 Standard Delivery Performance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.2 Increased Delivery Performance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 4. 4.1 4.2 4.3 5. 6. 6.1 6.2 6.3 Forms of Supply and Tolerances Raw Glass . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fabricated Glass . . . . . . . . . . . . . Pressings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 21 21 26

8.1 Thermal Conductivity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8.2 Specific Thermal Capacity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9. Collection of Formulas and Wavelength Table . . .

10. Explanation of the Designations in the Data Section 43 11. Logistics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11.1 Preferred Glasses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11.2 Inquiry Glasses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11.3 Article Definition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11.4 Preferred and Inquiry Articles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11.5 Preferred Product Line . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11.6 Comparison Table of Optical Glasses . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 44 44 44 44 45 45

Optical Properties, Theoretical Explanations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Chemical Properties Climatic Resistance . . Stain Resistance . . . . Acid Resistance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 28 29 30

4

FOREWORD

Foreword
We present herewith a completely reworked edition of our pocket catalog of optical glasses. This pocket catalog provides an excerpt of the important properties of the optical glasses from our main catalog, which will only be published on CD* or on the internet. The focal point of our product line is 112 glass types, of which we are providing data for 105 types in this first edition. The additional 7 glasses will follow over the next several months. Increased efforts in environmental protection, along with close cooperation with our customers have led to the new development of 84 lead- and arsenicfree glasses. To round out the product line, we will offer a number of glass types in both lead-containing and lead-free versions. We improved the actualized edition in many places; for example, we have added information on the grindability of optical glasses. New too is the nine-digit glass code that, in addition to the 6 positions for nd and nd, also includes an additional 3 positions for density to distinguish between lead-containing and lead-free glasses.

* CD Catalog, Version 1.1, 06/2000

5

1. Optical Properties
1.1 Refractive Index, Abbe Value, Dispersions, Glass Designations The most common identifying features for characterizing an optical glass are the refractive index nd in the middle range of the visible spectrum and the Abbe value nd = (nd –1)/(nF –nC ) as a measure for dispersion. The difference nF –nC is called the principal dispersion. In specifying optical components the units based on the e-line ne and ne = (ne–1)/(nF' –nC') are usually used.
Glass Type N-SF6 SF6 nd 1.80518 1.80518 nd 25.36 25.43 Density 3.37 5.18 Glass Code 805254.337 lead-arsenic free glass 805254.518 classical lead silicate glass

The glasses in the product line are summarized as families in the nd/nd diagram. The designation of each glass type is composed of the abbreviated family designation and a number. The glass families are arranged by decreasing Abbe value in the data section. One other common designation method for the optical glasses is the listing of a numerical code. SCHOTT uses a nine-digit code. The first six places correspond to the common international glass code. They indicate the optical position of the individual glass. The first three digits reflect the refractive index nd, the second three digits the Abbe value nd. The additional three digits indicate the density of the glass.

Table 1.1: Glass Code Example. 6

pressings can also be supplied in groups with limited refractive index scattering.2. All parts of a group meet the following tolerances for the refractive index and Abbe value based on the nominal values in the data sheets. Step Step Step Step 4 3 2 1 nd – ± 0. The groups are arranged based on refractive index scattering from glass unit to glass unit and are identified by a melt number and a group number.0002 nd ± 0.83 for all nd steps. OPTICAL PROPERTIES 1. If requested.2: Tolerances for refractive index and Abbe value.2 Tolerances for Refractive Index and Abbe Value The tolerances for the refractive index and Abbe value are listed in Table 1. See Table 1.5% ± 0.3 for the tolerances.3% ± 0.0003 ± 0. All deliveries of fine annealed block glass and fabricated glass are from partial lots from melts that we designate as groups. The normal delivery quality is Step 3 for nd and Step 4 for nd.8% ± 0.0005 ± 0. If you need tighter tolerances. please inquire.1. 7 . We will supply material in the tighter steps upon demand. The tolerance is doubled for high index glasses with nd > 1.2% Table 1.

which is identified by its melt number and group number.1 Standard Test Certificates We provide standard test certificates for all deliveries of fine annealed optical glass.Pressings Refractive Index Scattering Normal Quality SN S0 S1 ± 1 x 10-4 ± 5 x 10-5 ± 2 x 10-5 All Scattering Tolerances for Pressings Upon Request Only Normal Quality LN LH 1 LH 2 Refractive Index Scattering ± 2 x 10-4 ± 1 x 10-4 ± 5 x 10-5 Table 1. nd ne nd ne nF – nC nd – nC nF – nd nF – ne nF' – nC' nF' – ne ng – nF Table 1.4: Refractive index and dispersion information in standard test certificates. The information they contain refers to the average position of the optical values of a group.3. The value of the individual parts may deviate by the scattering tolerance of the information. 1. 8 The measurements are done using a procedure that has a tolerance of ± 3 x 10-5 for refractive index and ± 2 x 10-5 for dispersion. The numerical data are listed to 5 decimal places.3 Test Certificates for Refractive Indices and Dispersions 1. .3: Tolerances for the refractive index scattering within a group and within a pressings group.

UV – IR and Super Precision Test Certificates VIS These test certificates are issued upon request. 1. With an increased sample and measurement cost the refractive indices can be determined to an accuracy of ± 5 x 10-6 and the dispersion to ± 2 x 10-6 if there is sufficient transmittance in the spectral range between 0.656 µm.2 Precision Test Certificates VIS. In the infrared range above 2 µm it is ± 2 x 10-5. The constants of the Sellmeier dispersion formula are also listed for the applicable spectral range from a complete measurement series.1. but the dispersion data are given to 6 decimal places. The measurement is done on a prism goniometer. The precision test certificates VIS for the visible spectral range contain the same data as the test certificates for standard accuracy. The measurement results are listed on a test certificate with super precision accuracy.405 µm and 0. OPTICAL PROPERTIES Test certificates with higher accuracy can be prepared for individual glass parts upon request (± 2 x 10-5 for refractive index and ± 1 x 10-5 for dispersion).3. 9 .10133 x 106 Pa. The accuracy of the refractive indices is better than ± 1 x 10-5. They generally refer to individual glass parts. The accuracy is ± 1 x 10-5 for refractive index and ± 3 x 10-6 for dispersion. which spans a maximum range of 248 nm to 2325 nm. The values apply for an air pressure of 0. The precision test certificates UV – IR contain additional refractive index data for an expanded spectral range.

Homogeneity Class H2 H3 Maximum Deviation of Refractive Index ± 5 x 10-6 ± 2 x 10-6 Applicability. please refer to the scattering tolerances in section 1. not for all glass types H4 ± 1 x 10-6 H5 ± 5 x 10-7 Table 1. not in all dimensions. With special efforts in melting and fine annealing it is possible to produce pieces of glass having high homogeneity.5). not for all glass types For individual pieces of fabricated glass.5: Homogeneity of optical glasses. Deliverability For individual pieces of fabricated glass For individual pieces of fabricated glass. not in all dimensions. not in all dimensions For individual pieces of fabricated glass.4 Refractive Index Homogeneity The refractive index homogeneity is used to designate deviations of refractive index within individual pieces of glass. For classes 0 and 1 of the standard. The availability of glasses with increased requirements for refractive index homogeneity comprises 4 classes in accordance with ISO Standard 10110 Part 4 (see Table 1. 10 .2.1. The refractive index homogeneity achievable for a given glass type depends on the volume and the form of the individual glass pieces.

e. the classical glasses that remain in the product line may be used.1. Color Code The internal transmittance. Upon special request minimum values for internal transmittance can be maintained.5 Internal Transmittance. The information in the data section comprises average values from several melts of a glass type. slight deviations in the purity of the raw materials must be taken into account. Prior clarification of the delivery situation is required. In the case of high requirements for internal transmittance in the violet and ultraviolet spectral range. The internal transmittance of lead. in which lead has been replaced by other chemical elements. Using the purest raw materials and costly melting technology it is possible to approach the dispersion limits for internal transmittance in the short wave spectral range.and arsenic-free glasses. however. The internal transmittance at 400 nm for a sample thickness of 25 mm is listed in the data section. is markedly less than in the lead-containing predecessor glasses. SCHOTT seeks to achieve the best possible internal transmittance. SCHOTT maintains a minimum standard for the related deviations in internal transmittance of the glasses melted. OPTICAL PROPERTIES 1. the light transmission excluding reflection losses. Due to the laws of economics. 11 . is closely related to the optical position of the glass type according to general dispersion theory. i.

80 and 0. at which the transmission (including reflection losses) is 0. shift closer to the visible spectral range. for example l80 = 330 nm and l5 = 300 nm. The color code lists the wavelengths l80 and l5. with increasing refractive index. 12 . The values are rounded to 10 nm and are noted by eliminating the one position. Color code 33/30 means.The limit of the transmission ranges of optical glasses towards the UV area is of special interest in high index glasses because.05 at 10 mm thickness. A simple description of the position and slope of the UV absorption curve is described by the color code.

but directs the user to make arrangements with the glass manufacturer. They resemble bands in which the refractive index deviates with a typical period of tenths to several millimeters. The high sensitivity of the method is sufficient to characterize the glass. The tested glass thickness is normally much larger than that of the finished optical components. Glass in this step contains no striae determinable with the shadow method. Internal Properties The fifth class identifies glass with extreme freedom from striae.2. The recently released standard ISO 10110 Part 4 contains a classification with reference to striae. Quality step VS1. It also includes striae below 30 nm wavefront distortion.1 Striae Deviations of the refractive index in glass of short range are called striae. increased striae selection. The production formats of all optical glasses from SCHOTT meet the requirements of classes 1 – 4 of ISO 10110 Part 4. . In so doing. INTERNAL PROPERTIES 2. it only considers striae that deform an even wavefront by more than 30 nm. identifies glass with especially high requirements. Since it refers to finished optical components. SCHOTT generally uses the shadow graph method to test all optical glasses. it is only conditionally applicable to optical glass in its usual forms of supply. It evaluates the striae into classes 1 – 4 according to their area based on the optically effective total surface of the component. even for the most stringent requirements. For prism appli13 2. however. The effective striae quality in the optical system is therefore much better.

The characterization of the bubble content of a glass is done by reporting the total cross section in mm2 of a glass volume of 100 cm3. Bubbles in glass cannot. Such glass parts meet the requirements of step VS1 in two directions perpendicular to one another.2 Bubbles and Inclusions The optical glasses exhibit remarkable freedom from bubbles. however. bubbles may be distributed.cations SCHOTT offers quality step VS2.03 mm. be completely avoided due to the often complicated glass compositions and manufacturing processes. a larger quantity of bubbles of smaller dimensions is allowable. 2. calculated from the sum of the detected cross section of bubbles. Inclusions in glass. In the increased quality steps VB (increased bubble selection) and EVB (extra increased bubble selection) the glasses can only be supplied as fabricated pieces of glass. Instead of a bubble with a given dimension.1. In accordance with ISO 10110 Part 3. such as stones or crystals are treated like bubbles of the same cross section. 14 The bubble classes and the maximum allowable quantities and diameters of bubbles and inclusions are listed in Table 2. . The evaluation considers all bubbles and inclusions ³ 0.

15 .03 10 0. INTERNAL PROPERTIES Special applications.15 0.30 0.15 0.006 2 0.15 0.10 0.40 0.10 0. in Color Cubes or as streak imaging cameras and high pitch gratings.55 0.15 0.10 – – – 1) Note: In the strip and block forms of supply from which much smaller finished parts are usually produced. We can offer glasses that meet these requirements upon request.10 0.20 – – 0.15 0. Bubble Class According to Catalog Data Sheet of the Concerned Glass Type Quality Step B0 VB B0 EVB B0 B1 VB B1 EVB B1 Maximum allowable cross section of all bubbles and inclusions in mm2 per 100 cm3 of glass volume 0. Table 2.1: Tolerances for bubbles and inclusions in optical glasses.2.10 – – – 0.1 30 0. occasional.15 0.40 0.10 0.80 0. allow only glasses that have a low quantity of very small bubbles/inclusions.10 0.10 0.01 4 0.25 – – 0. isolated bubbles with larger diameters are allowed if the limit values for the total cross section and quantity per volume are maintained.03 Maximum allowable quantity per 100 cm3 Maximum allowable diameter of bubbles or inclusions in mm1) 50 100 200 300 500 800 10 0. such as in high energy lasers.20 0.60 0.20 0.25 0.02 4 0.20 0.

Pieces of glass to be delivered generally have a symmetrical stress distribution. and the dimensions. With our annealing methods we are able to achieve both good optical homogeneity and very low stress birefringence values. For rectangular plates the measurement is performed in the center of the longer side at a distance of 5% of the plate width. annealing speed and temperature distribution around the object being annealed). the glass type. Its accuracy is 3 – 5 nm for simple geometric test sample forms. Stress birefringence is measured as a path difference using the de Sénarmont and Friedel Method and is listed in nm/cm based on the test thickness. In these cases we have methods that we can use to measure an order of magnitude more accurately.2. The de Sénarmont and Friedel Method is insufficient for measurements of low stress birefringence and low thickness. 16 . A detailed description of the method can be found in ISO Standard 11455. The stresses cause birefringence that is dependent upon the glass type. The measurement is done on round discs at a distance of 5% of the diameter from the edge.3 Stress Birefringence The size and distribution of permanent inherent stresses in glasses depends on the annealing conditions (for example. The limit values for stress birefringence in parts larger than 600 mm are available upon request. The glass surface is usually in compression.

INTERNAL PROPERTIES Higher stresses are permitted in glass to be hot processed. but they may not limit mechanical processing.2: Limit values of stress birefringence in processed glasses for various dimensions. Stress Birefringence Dimensions Ø ² 300 mm d ² 60 mm Ø > 300 – 600 mm d > 60 – 80 mm Fine Annealing Special Annealing Precision Annealing [nm/cm] (SK) [nm/cm] (SSK) [nm/cm] ² 10 ² 12 ²6 ²6 ²4 ²4 Table 2.2. 17 .

The glass is tested for bubbles and inclusions. and stress birefringence. the glass will be delivered in refractive index/Abbe value step 3/4 with a standard test certificate. The standard test certificate refers to a refractive index group that is identified by its melt number and group number. The refractive indices of all parts belonging to a group will not deviate by more than ± 1 x 10-4 (± 2 x 10-4 for pressings.2 Increased Delivery Performance The entire range of increased quality steps cannot be offered for all forms of supply. 18 . Delivery Performance 3. For information on this.3. if requested). 3. refer to the following table. striae.1 Standard Delivery Performance If no special quality steps are requested.

SSK VS1. EVB Striae and homogeneity measured in the same direction Refractive index scattering Homogeneity Stress birefringence Striae Bubbles/inclusions Remarks S0. VS2 VB At least one surface is worked LH1. 19 . DELIVERY PERFORMANCE Strip Glass for Hot Processing Refractive index – Abbe value steps Test certificates Measurement accuracy. VS2 VB. LH2 – SK – VB Table 12: Possible increased quality steps for various forms of supply. S1 H2 – H5 SK. measurement ranges Suitable for 2-1 3-1 Annealing procedure With data on the annealing rates for the achievable refractive index – Abbe value steps after fine annealing Block Glass 2-1 3-1 Standard (S) Standard with increased accuracy (SE) Pressings 2-1 3-1 Standard (S) If a scattering tolerance is requested Processed Glass 2-1 3-1 Standard (S) Standard with increased accuracy (SE) Precision (PZ) Super precision (SPZ) Precision UV – IR (PZUI) dn/dT (DNDT) S0.3. S1 – – – – S0. S1 – SK VS1.

Please inquire about availability. melts suitable for various combinations are not always available. However. Requirements that exceed the mentioned quality steps may also be met.The quality steps listed within a form of supply can be combined with one another. 20 . We recommend that you check availability with us as soon as possible.

Forms of Supply and Tolerances 4. thickness 21 .1. At least one surface is worked as a rule. width. The edges are rounded.1 Raw Glass 4. All six sides are worked.2 Fabricated Glass 4. width. as-cast surfaces.1. thickness 4. FORMS OF SUPPLY AND TOLERANCES 4. Described by: length. width.2 Strips Strips have unworked surfaces and broken or cut ends. the edges have protective bevels.2. Described by: length.1 Blocks Blocks have five unworked. Described by: length.1 Plates Plates are quadrilateral.4. Strips are coarse annealed and therefore are only suitable for hot working. thickness 4. fabricated parts. Blocks are fine annealed and therefore suitable for cold working.

45 ± 0. Table 13: Dimensional tolerances and minimum dimensions for plates.75 ± 0.8 ± 0.3 ± 1.0 Inquire For thickness Standard [mm] ± 0.4 ± 0.2 ± 1.9 ± 1.25 ± 0.2 ± 0.8 ± 0.4 ± 0.3 ± 0.4 ± 0.8 Inquire VAT2) ± 0.5 ± 0.Greatest Edge Length [mm] Allowable Tolerances For edge length Standard [mm] VAT2) ± 0.4 Inquire Minimum Thickness1) [mm] > 3–80 > 80–120 > 120–250 > 250–315 > 315–400 > 400–500 > 500–630 > 630–800 > 800–1000 > 1) 2) ± 0.5 ± 1.6 ± 0.0 Inquire 2 4 6 8 8 20 20 20 20 1000 Lower thicknesses than listed are possible.3 ± 0. 22 .65 ± 0. Please inquire. VAT = closer dimensional tolerances.5 ± 0.25 ± 0.8 ± 0.25 ± 0.4 ± 0.15 ± 0.1 ± 0.5 ± 0.4 ± 0.15 ± 0.8 ± 0.9 ± 1.8 ± 0.8 ± 2.

3 ± 0. Please inquire.5 ± 0.8 ± 0.15 ± 0. FORMS OF SUPPLY AND TOLERANCES We achieve surface roughness of Rt = 20 – 25 µm with standard processing.25 ± 0.5 Inquire 2) Minimum Thickness1) [mm] For thickness Standard [mm] ± 0.15 ± 0. cylindrical parts the diameter of which is larger than the thickness. Described by: diameter.5 ± 0.4 Inquire 2 4 6 20 20 40 > > > > > > > 1) 3–80 80–120 120–250 250–500 500–800 800–1250 1250 ± 0.8 ± 0.8 Inquire VAT2) [mm] ± 0.25 ± 0.8 ± 1.4. VAT = closer dimensional tolerances.4 ± 0.3 ± 0.25 ± 0.15 ± 0.4 ± 0.2. 23 .2 Round Plates Round plates are completely worked.4 ± 0. 4. thickness Diameter [mm] Allowable Tolerances For diameter Standard [mm] VAT2) [mm] ± 0.2 ± 0.1 ± 0. Table 14: Dimensional tolerances and minimum dimensions for round plates. Plates having much closer dimensional tolerances and finer surfaces are possible upon request.0 Inquire Lower thicknesses than listed are possible.5 ± 0.3 ± 0.

3 h11 h11 h11 h11 h11 Tolerances. drilled and rounded per DIN ISO 286 [mm] +0/–0.062 +0/–0. 130 130 130 130 Tolerance for length [%] ± ± ± ± 2 2 2 2 Diameter [mm] 6 10 18 30 50 – – – – – 10 18 30 50 80 Standard tolerance [mm] ± ± ± ± ± 0.2 0. 4.160 +0/–0.120 h9 h9 h9 h9 h9 [mm] +0/–0.3 Rods.100 +0/–0.190 h10 h10 h10 h10 h10 [mm] +0/–0.027 +0/–0. max. 24 .2 0.2 0.058 +0/–0.022 +0/–0. length Length range [mm] max. Described by: diameter. max.130 +0/–0.052 +0/–0.090 +0/–0. max.070 +0/–0.043 +0/–0. Worked Worked rods are cylindrical parts that are worked on all sides the length of which is greater than the diameter. Round plates having much closer dimensional tolerances and finer surfaces are possible upon request.074 h8 h8 h8 h8 [mm] +0/–0.We achieve surface roughness of Rt = 20 – 25 µm with standard processing.2.036 +0/–0.039 > > > > Table 15: Dimensions and tolerances for worked rods in the 6 – 80 mm diameter range.2 0.084 +0/–0.110 +0/–0.033 +0/–0.

4. FORMS OF SUPPLY AND TOLERANCES 4.4 Milled Blanks Milled blanks are lens blanks produced by milling having at least one spherical surface. Using different fabrication technologies. radius 1. triple prisms …). 25 . Described by: drawing Maximum Edge Length [mm] < 50 50 – 100 >100 Tolerances For dimensions For width [mm] [mm] + 1. penta-. radius 2.5/– 0 + 2. Described by: diameter.0/– 0 + 1.2.0 ± 1.0 Table 16: Dimensions and tolerances for cut prisms. equilateral and non-equilateral prisms can be produced in various forms (ridge-. center thickness.5 ± 1. 4.0/– 0 ± 0.5 Cut Prisms Cut prisms are prisms produced by cutting and possibly grinding on all sides. bevels The dimensional tolerances correspond to at least the tolerances of pressings with surface roughness of Rt = 20 – 25 µm.2.

4 0.5 0. Part 2. center thickness. Described by: drawing Table 4.9 –1.3 0.45 0.3 0. diverse) are possible upon request.3 –0.3 Pressings Pressings are hot-formed parts with mostly round cross section.3 0.1: Dimensions and tolerances for pressings according to DIN 58 926.6 Minimum center thickness [mm] 2 3 5 6 7 8 8 10 10 Minimum edge thickness [mm] 1 1.3 0.6 –0.4. bevels Diameter [mm] Tolerances For diameter [mm] 5–18 > 18–30 > 30–60 > 60–90 > 90–120 > 120–140 > 140–180 > 180–250 > 250–320 +0 +0 +0 +0 +0 +0 +0 +0 +0 / / / / / / / / / –0. prismatic.3 0.5 0.15 –1.3 * * * * * * * * * Ø Ø Ø Ø Ø Ø Ø Ø Ø Other forms (angled.3 0.4 0.3.7 –0.4 0. Described by: Diameter. with defined radii and bevels. 26 .5 For thickness [mm] ± ± ± ± ± ± ± ± ± 0.25 –0.3 0.4 0. radius 1.4 –0. radius 2.5 3 4 5 5 6 8 8 Maximum edge thickness [mm] 0.5 0.18 –0.6 0.

For this information we refer you to our catalog on CD-ROM that contains detailed information on the subject. THEORETICAL EXPLANATIONS 5. We will discuss specifications upon request.5. 27 . OPTICAL PROPERTIES. Theoretical Explanations Depending on the quantity and dimensions of the part. Optical Properties. Chapter 9 of this pocket catalog contains a selection of useful formulas. production of direct pressings may make economic sense.

1 Climatic Resistance (ISO/WD 13384). An accelerated procedure is used to test the climatic resistance of the glasses. On the other hand.6. The classifications are done based on the increase in transmission haze DH after a 30-hour test period. In normal humidity conditions during the fabrication and storing of optical glasses in class CR 1. The measurements are conducted using a spherical hazemeter. uncoated glass plates are subjected to a water vapor saturated atmosphere. The glasses in class CR 1 display no visible attack after being subjected to 30 hours of climatic change. Distribution into Climatic Resistance Classes CR 1 – 4 Climatic resistance describes the behavior of optical glasses at high relative humidity and high temperatures. the temperature of which is alternated between 40 °C and 50 °C. In sensitive glasses a cloudy film can appear that generally cannot be wiped off. This produces a periodical change from moist condensation on the glass surface and subsequent drying. 28 . The difference DH between the haze before and after testing is used as a measure of the resulting surface change. no surface attack should be expected. Chemical Properties After an exposure time of 30 hours the glasses are removed from the climatic chamber. 6. the fabrication and storing of optical glasses in class CR 4 should be done with The five test methods described below are used to assess the chemical behavior of polished glass surfaces. in which polished.

0% ³ 2. 0.2 Stain Resistance. CHEMICAL PROPERTIES Climatic Resistance Classes CR Increase in Transmission Haze DH 1 2 3 4 6.0% Table 6. acidic condensates) without vaporization.1: Distribution of the optical glasses into climatic resistance classes CR 1 – 4. For storage of optically polished elements we recommend the application of protective coatings and/or assuring that the relative humidity be kept as low as possible. The stain resistance class is determined according to the following procedure: The plane polished glass sample to be tested is pressed onto a test cuvette.3% ³ 1. 29 .0% < 2.6. < 0.0% < 1. caution because these glasses are very sensitive to climatic influences. Distribution into Stain Resistance Classes FR 0 – 5 The test procedure gives information on possible changes in the glass surface (stain formation) under the influence of lightly acidic water (for example perspiration.3% ³ 0. which has a spherical depression of max.25 mm depth containing a few drops of a test solution.

carbonated water. etc.6 Sodium Acetate Buffer pH = 5. Distribution into Acid Resistance Classes SR 1 – 4.2: Distribution of optical glasses into stain resistance classes FR 0 – 5.3 Acid Resistance (ISO 8424: 1987).Test solution I: Test solution II: Standard acetate pH = 4. even after 100 hours of exposure to test solution I. 30 . 6. Glasses in classification FR 5 must be handled with particular care during processing. laminating substances. This change in color indicates a chemical change in the previously defined surface layer of 0. perspiration. Stain resistance class FR 0 contains all glasses that exhibit virtually no interference colors. 51 – 53 Acid resistance classifies the behavior of optical glasses that come in contact with large quantities of acidic solutions (from a practical standpoint for example.).6 Interference color stains develop as a result of decomposition of the surface of the glass by the test solution. The measure for classifying the glasses is the time that elapses before the first brown-blue stain occurs at a temperature of 25 °C.1 µm thickness insofar as the glass can form layers at all. 5.2 yes Table 6. Stain resistance classes FR Test solution Time (h) Color change 0 I 100 no 1 I 100 yes 2 I 6 yes 3 I 1 yes 4 II 1 yes 5 II 0.

1-1 <0. For glasses with less acid resistance. Two aggressive solutions are used in determining acid resistance.6 4.6 >10 51 52 53 0.1-1 <0. CHEMICAL PROPERTIES Acid resistance is denoted by a 2 or 3 digit number. Included in it are glasses for which the time for removal of a layer thickness of 0.3 0. Class SR 5 forms the transition point between the two groups. also at 25 °C.3 0.1 h and at a pH value of 4.3: Distribution of the optical glasses into acid resistance classes SR 1 – 53.6 is greater than 10 hours.5).3 >100 10-100 1-10 0. c = 0.1 µm at a pH value of 0. 31 .3 is less than 0.6.6 (standard acetate) is used.3 0.1 Table 6. The time t required to dissolve a layer with a thickness of 0.3) at 25 °C is used for the more resistant glass types.6 4. The last digit (separated by a period tells the change in the surface visible to the unaided eye that occurs through exposure (see 6. a weakly acidic solution with a pH value of 4.5 mol/l.6 1-10 0.1 µm serves as a measure of acid resistance. A strong acid (nitric acid. pH 0.1 4.3 0. Acid Resistance Class SR pH value Time (h) 1 2 3 4 5 4. The first or the first two digits indicate the acid resistance class SR.

01 mol/l. c = 0.6. alkaline liquids. The phosphate resistance describes the behavior of optical glasses during cleaning with phosphate containing washing solutions (detergents). The alkali resistance class AR is based on the time required to remove a layer thickness of glass of 0. Distribution into Alkali Resistance Classes AR 1–4 Phosphate Resistance (ISO 9689). 32 and the decimal indicates the surface changes visible to the unaided eye that occur through exposure. The first digit lists the alkali resistance class AR or the phosphate resistance class PR. . The phosphate resistance class PR is based on the time required to remove a layer thickness of glass of 0. pH = 12) at a temperature of 50 °C.1 mm in an alkaline phosphate containing solution (pentasodium triphosphate Na5P3O10.1 µm in an alkaline solution (sodium hydroxide.4 Alkali Resistance (ISO 10629). pH = 10) at a temperature of 50 °C. c = 0.01 mol/l. The alkali and phosphate resistance is denoted using two digits separated by a decimal point. such as cooling liquids in grinding and polishing processes. Distribution into Phosphate Resistance Classes PR 1–4 Both test methods serve to show the resistance to aqueous alkaline solution in excess and use the same classification scheme. The alkali resistance indicates the sensitivity of optical glasses in contact with warm.

6. insoluble reaction products on the surface (this can be a projecting and/or flaking crust or a projecting surface. Negligible inherent radioactivity can be present in many everyday substances as a result of the natural radioactivity of raw materials. thicker layers.25 Table 6.0 .4: Distribution of the optical glasses in alkali resistance classes AR 1 – 4 and phosphate resistance classes PR 1 – 4.1 .3 no visible changes clear. Alkali Resistance Classes AR Phosphate Resistance Classes PR Time (h) 1 2 3 4 . alkali. cloudy surface) .4 loosely adhering. but irregular surface interference colors (light. 6. CHEMICAL PROPERTIES The layer thickness is calculated from the weight loss per surface area and the density of the glass. strong attack) >4 1–4 0.6.05 weight percent thorium oxide or other radioactive material.6 Addendum Our glasses contain no more than 0.5 Identification of Visible Surface Changes Meaning of the digits behind the classification for acid.2 .25–1 < 0. selective leaching) firmly adhered thin white layer (stronger. selective leaching. and phosphate resistance: 33 . for example.

1 Knoop Hardness The Knoop hardness of a material is a measure for residual surface changes after the application of pressure with a test diamond.2 Grindability with Diamond Particles According to ISO DFIS 12844 The grindability according to ISO 12844 allows the comparison of the grinding process of different glasses to one another.9807 N (corresponds to 0. Then the samples are compared by weighing the samples and considering the density of the removed volume of the glass with that of a reference glass. the values for Knoop hardness HK are listed in the data sheets for a test force of 0. In accordance with this standard. 34 .1 kp) and an effective test period of 20 s. Twenty samples of the glass to be classified are ground for 30 seconds in a standardized diamond pellet tool under predetermined conditions. 7. The data for hardness values are rounded to 10 HK 0. The test was performed on polished glass surfaces at room temperature. The standard ISO 9385 describes the measurement procedure for glasses.1/20. N-SK 16.7. The microhardness is a function of the magnitude of the test force and decreases with increasing test force. Mechanical Properties 7.

15 minutes. .3 Viscosity Glasses run through three viscosity ranges between the melting temperature and room temperature: the melting range. This is the temperature at which glass exhibits a viscosity of 107. It is very important in the annealing of glasses. The viscosity of glass constantly increases during the cooling of the melt (100 – 104 dPa·s). The temperature at which the viscosity of glass is 1013 dPa·s is called the upper annealing point T1013. the supercooled melt range. 35 Table 7. The glass structure can be described as solidified or “frozen” above 1013 dPa·s. According to this scheme.7. MECHANICAL PROPERTIES The classification occurs according to the following scheme. the removal in the lower classifications is less and is higher in the upper classifications than the reference glass N-SK 16. Grindability Class HG 1 HG 2 HG 3 HG 4 HG 5 HG 6 The grindability of N-SK 16 is Grindability ² 30 > 30 ² 60 > 60 ² 90 > 90 ² 120 > 120 ² 150 > 150 defined as 100.6 identifies the plastic range in which glass parts rapidly deform under their own weight.1: Grindability according to ISO 12844. A transition from liquid to plastic state can be observed between 104 and 1013 dPa·s. The so-called softening point EW T107. and the solidification range.6 dPa·s. 7. At this viscosity the internal stresses in glass equalized in ca.

this can be used to determine the so-called transformation temperature Tg.4 Coefficient of Linear Thermal Expansion The typical curve of the linear thermal expansion of glasses at an absolute zero point begins with an obvious increase in slope to approximately room temperature. +70 °C) as the relevant information for room temperature (listed in the data sheets) a(20 °C. Precision optical surfaces may deform and refractive indices may change if a temperature of T1013 – 200 K is exceeded during any thermal treatment. structural movement in the glass. Then a nearly linear increase to the beginning of the noticeable plastic behavior follows. It generally lies right at T1013. In accordance with ISO 7884-8.Another possibility for identifying the transformation range is the change in the rate of relative linear thermal expansion. two average linear thermal expansion coefficients a are usually given for the following temperature ranges: a(–30 °C. Above this range the expansion again exhibits a nearly linear increase. +300 °C) as the standard international value for comparison purposes and for orientation during melting processes and temperature change loading (see the data sheet in the CD-ROM catalog). 7. but with a noticeably greater rate of increase. Due to the dependence of the coefficient of linear thermal expansion a on temperature. The transformation range is distinguished by a distinct bending of the expansion curve that results from the increasing 36 .

8.84 J/(g·K).9 and 1.38 W/(m·K) (pure quartz glass) to about 0.8.2 W/(m·K).1 Thermal Conductivity The range of values for thermal conductivity for glasses at room temperature extends from 1. The range of values for cr (20 °C. 100 °C) and also for the true thermal capacity cr (20 °C) for silicate glasses is between 0. 37 . The most commonly used silicate glasses have values between 0. 100 °C) is listed for a portion of the glasses as measured from the heat transfer of a hot glass at 100 °C in a liquid calorimeter at 20 °C.42 and 0. the degree of accuracy is ± 5%. The thermal conductivities shown in the data sheets apply for a glass temperature of 90 °C. The data on thermal properties are contained in the CD-ROM catalog.5 W/(m·K) (high lead containing glasses).2 Specific Thermal Capacity The mean isobaric specific heat capacity cr (20 °C. Thermal Properties 8. THERMAL PROPERTIES 8.

1) (9.000526 · nd) DPg.9.004743 · nd) DPC. y for the wavelengths x and y based on the blue F and red C hydrogen line Px.8) (9.4884 – 0.001682 · nd) DPi. y = (nx – ny) / (nF – nC) or based on the blue F’ and red C’ cadmium line P‘x.7241 – 0.4029 + 0.3) (9.6) (9. y » axy + bxy · nd Deviation DP from the “normal lines” Px. s = (nC – ns) / (nF – nC) – (0. g = (ni – ng) / (nF – nC) – (1. 38 (9.7) (9.9) .008382 · nd) The position of the normal lines was determined based on value pairs of glass types K 7 and F 2.4) (9. t = (nC – nt) / (nF – nC) – (0. e = (nF – ne) / (nF – nC) – (0.2) (9. F = (ng – nF) / (nF – nC) – (0.5) (9.002331 · nd) DPF.5450 + 0. y DPC. Collection of Formulas and Wavelength Table Relative Partial Dispersion Px. y = axy + bxy · nd + DPx.6438 – 0. y = (nx – ny) / (nF‘ – nC‘) Linear relationship between the Abbe value and the relative partial dispersion for “normal glasses” Px.

11) (9. depending on the glass type Annealing coefficient for the principal dispersion. dependent on the glass type (9.10) (9.13) nC Measurement Accuracy of the Abbe Value snd » s (nF – nC ) · nd / (nF – nC ) (9.9.14) 39 .12) (9. COLLECTION OF FORMULAS AND WAVELENGTH TABLE Sellmeier Dispersion Formula n2 (l)–1 = B1l2 / (l2–C1) + B2l2 / (l2–C2) + B3l2 / (l2–C3) Change in Refractive Index and Abbe Value during Annealing at Different Annealing Rates nd (hx) = nd (h0) + mnd · log (hx/h0) nd (hx) = nd (h0) + mnd · log (hx/h0) mnd = (mnd – nd (h0) · mnF – nC) / ((nF – nC) + 2 · mnF – nC · log (hx/h0)) h0 hx mnd mnd mnF – Beginning annealing rate New annealing rate Annealing coefficient for the refractive index. depending on the glass type Annealing coefficient for the Abbe value.

15) (9.16) (9.17) (9. independent of polarization R = ((n – 1) / (n + 1))2 Reflection Factor Considering Multiple Reflections P = (1 – R)2 / (1 – R2) = 2n / (n2 + 1) n Refractive index for the wavelength l.20) .19) (9.18) (9.Spectral Internal Transmittance til = Fel / Fil Spectral Transmission tl = til · Pl Pl Reflection factor Fresnel Reflectivity for a light beam perpendicularly striking the surface. ti1 Internal transmittances at the thicknesses d1 and d2 40 (9. Converting of Internal Transmittance to Another Layer Thickness log ti1 / log ti2 = d1 / d2 or ti2 = ti1(d2 / d1) ti2.

SCHOTT can assume no responsibility for errors resulting from their use. dependent on the glass type in 10-6 mm2/N Length of light path in the sample in cm Mechanical stress (positive for tensile stress) in N/mm2 (= Mpa) (9.9.21) Homogeneity from Interferometrically Measured Wave Front Deviations Dn = DW / (2 · d) = DW [l] · 633 · 10-6 / (2 · d [mm]) when listing the wave front deformation in units of the wavelength and a test wavelength of 633 nm (He-Ne laser) (9. COLLECTION OF FORMULAS AND WAVELENGTH TABLE Stress Birefringence.22) DW d Wave front deformation with double beam passage (interferometric testing) Thickness of test piece Note: The formulas have been carefully chosen and listed. However. 41 . change in optical path Ds = 10 · K · d · s in nm K d s Stress optical constant.

Wavelength [nm] 2325.4 248.42 1970.1327 479.1: Wavelengths for a selection of frequently used spectral lines.0 1013. 42 .5618 546.0146 334.0740 486.8 589.2725 643.8343 404.2938 587.1478 312.11 706.3 Designation Spectral Line Used Infrared mercury line Infrared mercury line Infrared mercury line Neodymium glass laser Infrared mercury line Infrared cesium line Red helium line Red hydrogen line Red cadmium line Helium-neon gas laser Yellow sodium line (center of the double line) Yellow helium line Green mercury line Blue hydrogen line Blue cadmium line Blue mercury line Violet mercury line Ultraviolet mercury line Ultraviolet mercury line Ultraviolet mercury line Ultraviolet mercury line Ultraviolet mercury line Ultraviolet mercury line Element Hg Hg Hg Nd Hg Cs He H Cd He-Ne Na He Hg H Cd Hg Hg Hg Hg Hg Hg Hg Hg t S R C C’ D D E F F’ g H i Table 9.6561 365.9914 435.5188 656.582 1060.98 852.7278 280.09 1529.8469 632.5663 296.

glass thickness: 25 mm Wavelengths for transmission 0. Abbe value.10. nx.05.6 dPa s Density in g/cm3 Knoop hardness (ISO 9385) Grindability Class (ISO 12844) Bubble class Internal transmittance at 400 nm. nx – ny CR FR SR AR PR a Tg T107. and dispersion at various wavelengths Climatic resistance class (ISO/WD 13384) Stain resistance class Acid resistance class (ISO 8424) Alkali resistance class (ISO 10629) Phosphate resistance class (ISO 9689) Coefficient of linear thermal expansion a (–30 °C.6 r HK HG B ti Color Code – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – International glass code of refractive index nd and Abbe value nd with density Refractive index. Explanation of the Designations in the Data Section Glass Code nx. glass thickness 10 mm (JOGIS) 43 .80 and 0. EXPLANATION OF THE DESIGNATIONS IN THE DATA SECTION 10. +70 °C) in 10-6/K Transformation temperature in °C (ISO 7884-8) Temperature of the glass at a viscosity of T107.

3 Article Definition SCHOTT defines an article by glass type. form of supply. Delivery from stock is generally guaranteed. When ordering.4 Preferred and Inquiry Articles All preferred optical glasses in the current product line are represented by at least one preferred article.11. They are produced upon specific customer demand. Logistics 11. dimensions. 44 .2 Inquiry Glasses A stock of inquiry glasses is not maintained. 11. Preferred articles are considered in sales planning from available data and are therefore normally always available. 11. 11. The minimum melting quantity primarily depends upon the melting method and the glass type. and quality.1 Preferred Glasses The glass types listed in the current product line are preferred glasses. a complete melt must be taken. Delivery times and specifications are individually determined upon receipt of an order.

or quality from preferred articles and are considered inquiry articles.5 Preferred Product Line Information on the current preferred product line is contained in the CD-ROM. These customer-specific articles deviate in form of supply.6 Comparison Table of Optical Glasses The following comparison table gives an overview of the preferred glasses from Schott. They are made for specific customer orders. Inquiry articles are usually not stocked.11. Special articles can be produced from the preferred articles by fabrication. 11. 11. The glass types are listed in order of increasing refractive index. and Ohara. or quality testing. LOGISTICS The minimum order quantity for preferred articles is 1 block or strips. depending on the order quantity. which can be shipped within one week. Hoya. 45 . dimensions. selection.

Schott Code 434950 Glass type N-FK56 Code Hoya Glass type Code 439950 456903 487702 497816 Ohara Glass type S-FPL53 S-FPL52 S-FSL5 S-FPL51 487704 487845 497816 498670 501564 508612 511604 N-FK5 N-FK51 N-PK52 N-BK10 K10 N-ZK7 K7 487704 497816 FC5 FCD1 517642 N-BK7 517522 517524 517642 518590 CF6 E-CF6 BSC7 E-C3 517524 516641 517696 518590 521526 522598 S-NSL36 S-BSL7 S-APL1 S-NSL3 SSL5 S-NSL5 SSL2 522595 523515 N-K5 N-KF9 529517 46 .

11.6 COMPARISON TABLE OF OPTICAL GLASSES Schott Code 529770 532488 540597 Glass type N-PK51 N-LLF6 N-BAK2 532488 532489 541472 541472 547536 548458 548458 552635 558542 564608 569561 569713 N-BALF5 LLF1 N-LLF1 N-PSK3 N-KZFS2 N-SK11 N-BAK4 N-PSK58 564607 567428 569563 548458 548458 551496 Code Hoya Glass type FEL6 E-FEL6 E-FEL2 FEL2 FEL1 E-FEL1 SbF1 Code Ohara Glass type 532489 540595 541472 S-TIL6 S-BAL12 S-TIL2 548458 S-TIL1 E-BaCD11 FL6 BaC4 560612 564607 567428 569563 571508 571530 573578 S-BAL50 S-BAL41 PBL26 S-BAL14 S-BAL2 S-BAL3 S-BAL11 47 573576 N-BAK1 .

Schott Code 580537 581409 581409 583465 589613 592683 Glass type N-BALF4 N-LF5 LF5 N-BAF3 N-SK5 N-PSK57 Code Hoya Glass type Code 575415 581407 581409 583594 589613 E-FL5 FL5 BaCD12 BaCD5 581407 583464 583594 589612 593353 594355 596392 596392 603380 FF5 E-F8 F8 E-F5 BaCD14 596392 603380 603380 603607 603655 606437 607568 613370 Ohara Glass type S-TIL27 S-TIL25 BAM3 S-BAL42 S-BAL35 S-FTM16 S-TIM8 S-TIM5 F5 S-BSM14 S-PHM53 S-BAM4 S-BSM2 PBM3 603380 603606 606439 607567 609464 F5 N-SK14 N-BAF4 N-SK2 N-BAF52 603606 607568 613370 BaCD2 F3 48 .

11.6 COMPARISON TABLE OF OPTICAL GLASSES Schott Code 613443 613445 613586 617366 618498 620364 620364 620603 620635 621603 622532 623569 623580 Glass type KZFSN4 N-KZFS4 N-SK4 F4 N-SSK8 N-F2 F2 N-SK16 N-PSK53 618634 620363 620364 620603 620622 Code 613443 613587 Hoya Glass type ADF10 BaCD4 Code 613443 613587 614550 617628 618498 618634 620363 620603 Ohara Glass type BPM51 S-BSM4 BSM9 S-PHM51 S-BSM28 S-PHM52 S-TIM2 S-BSM16 PCD4 E-F2 F2 BaCD16 ADC1 621359 SK51 622532 N-SSK2 N-SK10 N-SK15 623570 623582 624470 E-BaCD10 BaCD15 BaF8 623570 623582 TIM11 BSM22 S-BSM10 S-BSM15 49 .

Schott Code Glass type Code 626357 626357 639421 639554 640601 N-KZFS11 N-SK18 N-LAK21 639554 640345 640601 Hoya Glass type F1 E-F1 Code 626357 639449 639554 640345 640601 641569 643584 648338 649530 651562 652585 654397 658509 658573 Ohara Glass type S-TIM1 S-BAM12 S-BSM18 S-TIM27 S-BSM81 S-BSM93 S-BSM36 S-TIM22 S-BSM71 S-LAL54 S-LAL7 BPH5 S-BSM25 S-LAL11 BaCD18 E-FD7 LaCL60 648339 SF2 648339 648338 649530 651562 FD2 E-FD2 E-BaCED20 LaCL2 LaC7 ADF50 BaCED5 651559 652449 652585 654396 658509 664360 50 N-LAK22 N-BAF51 N-LAK7 KZFSN5 N-SSK5 N-BASF2 652585 654396 658509 .

11.6 COMPARISON TABLE OF OPTICAL GLASSES Schott Code Glass type Code 667484 670471 N-BAF10 670473 673322 673322 678549 678552 689312 691547 694533 N-SF5 SF5 LAKL12 N-LAK12 N-SF8 N-LAK9 LAKN13 673321 673322 678507 678553 689311 689312 691548 694508 694532 697485 697555 Hoya Glass type BaF11 Code 667330 667483 670393 670473 670573 673321 678507 678553 689311 691548 694508 694532 695422 697485 697555 697565 Ohara Glass type S-TIM39 S-BAH11 BAH32 S-BAH10 S-LAL52 S-TIM25 S-LAL56 S-LAL12 S-TIM28 S-LAL9 LAL58 S-LAL13 S-BAH54 LAM59 S-LAL14 S-LAL64 51 BaF10 E-FD5 FD5 LaCL9 LaC12 E-FD8 FD8 LaC9 LaCL5 LaC13 LaFL2 LaC14 697554 N-LAK14 .

Schott Code 699301 699301 Glass type N-SF15 SF15 Code 699301 699301 702412 704394 706303 713538 717295 717295 717480 N-BASF64 N-SF64 N-LAK8 N-SF1 SF1 N-LAF3 Hoya Glass type E-FD15 FD15 BaFD7 Code 699301 700481 702412 Ohara Glass type S-TIM35 S-LAM51 S-BAH27 713539 717295 717295 717480 LaC8 E-FD1 FD1 LaF3 713539 717295 717479 720347 720420 720437 720460 720502 722292 723380 726536 S-LAL8 PBH1 S-LAM3 BPH8 LAM58 S-LAM52 LAM61 S-LAL10 S-TIH18 S-BAH28 S-LAL60 720506 724381 724381 728284 52 N-LAK10 N-BASF51 BASF51 SF10 720504 LaC10 724381 728284 BaFD8 FD10 .

6 COMPARISON TABLE OF OPTICAL GLASSES Schott Code 728285 729547 Glass type N-SF10 N-LAK34 Code 728285 729547 734515 741276 741278 741527 743493 744447 750353 755523 755275 755276 757478 762265 762266 772496 Hoya Glass type E-FD10 TaC8 TaC4 FD13 E-FD13 TaC2 NbF1 LaF2 LaF7 TaC6 E-FD4 FD4 NbF2 FD140 FD14 TaF1 Code 728285 729547 734515 740283 740283 741278 741527 743493 744448 750353 755523 755275 756251 757478 762265 762401 772496 Ohara Glass type S-TIH10 S-LAL18 S-LAL59 PBH3W PBH3 S-TIH13 S-LAL61 S-LAM60 S-LAM2 LAM7 S-YGH51 S-TIH4 TPH55 S-LAM54 S-TIH14 S-LAM55 S-LAH66 53 743492 744447 750350 750350 754524 755276 755276 N-LAF35 N-LAF2 LaFN7 N-LAF7 N-LAK33 N-SF4 SF4 762265 762265 772496 N-SF14 SF14 N-LAF34 .11.

Schott Code 785258 785261 785261 786441 788475 794454 800423 801350 804466 805254 805254 Glass type SF11 SF56A N-SF56 N-LAF33 N-LAF21 N-LAF32 N-LAF36 N-LASF45 N-LASF44 N-SF6 SF6 Code 785258 785258 785261 786439 788475 800423 Hoya Glass type FD11 FD110 FDS30 NBFD11 TAF4 NBFD12 Code 785257 785263 786442 787500 788474 795453 800422 801350 804396 804466 805254 Ohara Glass type S-TIH11 S-TIH23 S-LAH51 S-YGH52 S-LAH64 S-LAH67 S-LAH52 S-LAM66 S-LAH63 S-LAH65 S-TIH6 806407 N-LASF43 804465 805254 805254 805396 806333 806407 816445 816466 TAF3 FD60 FD6 NBFD3 NBFD15 NBFD13 TAFD10 TAF5 806409 808228 816444 816466 S-LAH53 S-NPH1 S-LAH54 S-LAH59 54 .

6: Comparison table of preferred glasses 55 . 11.6 COMPARISON TABLE OF OPTICAL GLASSES Schott Code 834374 835430 847238 847236 847238 850322 881410 901315 923209 Glass type N-LASF40 N-LASF41 N-SF57 SFL57 SF57 LASFN9 N-LASF31 883408 N-LASF46 SF66 923209 Code 834373 835430 847238 847238 Hoya Glass type NBFD10 TAFD5 FDS90 FDS9 Code 834372 835427 847238 847238 874353 TAFD30 E-FDS1 923213 1003283 883408 901315 Ohara Glass type S-LAH60 S-LAH55 S-TIH53 TIH53 S-LAH75 S-LAH58 LAH78 PBH71 S-LAH79 1022291 N-LASF35 Tab.11.

19 98 e-mail: opt. Box 24 80 D-55014 Mainz Hattenbergstrasse 10 D-55122 Mainz Germany Optics Division Phone: +49 (0) 61 31 / 66 .16 78 Fax: +49 (0) 61 31 / 66 .schott.de/optik version 1.glas@schott. O.de www.SCHOTT GLAS P.2 0 9 / 20 0 0 .

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