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MSc Course

Computational & Software Techniques in Engineering


With options in

Computer Aided Engineering Digital Signal and Image Processing Distributed Computing & e-Science Software Engineering for Technical Computing
Brochure 2012/2013

Cranfield Campus School of Engineering

Computational & Software Techniques in Engineering

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Brochure Contents

Introduction ................................................................................................................ ................... 3 Cranfield University ................................................................................................ ................... 4 Computer Aided Engineering(CAE) .............................................................. ................... 5 Digital Signal and Image Processing(DSIP)) ............................................ ................... 7 Distributed Computing and e-Science(DC&eS) .................................... ................... 9 Software Engineering for Technical Computing(SETC) .................... ................... 11 Employment of Graduates ................................................................................... ................... 12 Module Structure ..................................................................................................... ................... 13 Course Assessment ................................................................................................. ................... 14 Fees and Applications ............................................................................................ ................... 15 Frequently Asked Questions .............................................................................. ................... 16 Option Module List ................................................................................................ ................... 17 Specialist Modules ................................................................................................... ................... 18 Past MSc Thesis Titles .......................................................................................... ................... 48 Computing Facilities ............................................................................................... ................... 54 Academic and Industrial Steering Committee .......................................... ................... 55 Principal Course Lecturers .................................................................................. ................... 56 Contact Details ........................................................................................... .................59

Computational & Software Techniques in Engineering

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MSc Course Brochure

Introduction
Engineering software development is one of the key players in the UK and EU information technology sector. It is a fast moving subject of crucial importance to industry and forms the basis for a wide and ever growing variety of applications. In particular, these include computer aided engineering and digital signal and image processing systems. Such software forms a vital part of many industries including those of oil, automotive, aerospace, defence and health. This Masters course in Computational and Software Techniques in Engineering, with its blend of skills-based and subject-specific material has the fundamental objective of equipping the student with the generic hands-on skills and up-to-date knowledge adaptable to the wide variety of applications that this field addresses. The course exposes the student to the latest advances in engineering software development and its applications as well as providing opportunities to develop broader skills and responsibilities that may be called upon in the workplace.

Features of the Course


The course is modular each module consisting of between 20 and 40 hours of lectures given over a period of one to two weeks, which offers students greater flexibility to tailor the course to their own interests and requirements. The syllabus of the one-year full-time course is detailed under Lecture Courses. All students take four core modules and then the modules from one of the CAE, DSIP, DC&eS or SETC themes. With some background knowledge and experience a number of the modules can be studied remotely. Principal lectures are confined to the first two terms starting late September and students are initially assessed by a combination of examinations and practical assignments. Since the start of the course, the syllabus has been changed and modified in line with the needs of industry and in particular, the expectations that industry has of modern day software engineers. On completion, students will be able to address themselves with confidence and apply their skills in this area.

Core Subjects
To gain a practical understanding of the modern methods used by software engineers it is essential to be fluent in one or more of the current industry standard programming languages. The most heavily used object oriented language, C++, is studied and this language forms the basis for the software modules C++ Programming and Computer Graphics. Numerical and computational techniques for solving systems of linear equations and ODEs are covered in the Computational Methods module. In addition to these software/computational topics, the Cranfield School of Management delivers a core module entitled Management for Technology, focusing on those aspects of management which will enable the student to fulfil a wider role in an organisation more effectively.

Computational & Software Techniques in Engineering

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Cranfield University
Cranfield University is the largest academic centre for postgraduate studies in science and technology in Western Europe. It has an international reputation, which has led to extensive sponsorship of both students and contract research. Around 80% of revenue comes from investment by industrial partners. Because we offer tailored opportunities we always have a very favourable staff-tostudent ratio which means plenty of personal attention during your studies. The Cranfield campus offers an ideal environment for study. It is set in the Bedfordshire countryside close to the local towns of Milton Keynes and Bedford and national and international transport links, within easy reach of London but out of reach of the high costs of living associated with the capital. A large proportion of Cranfield students are studying part-time and combining study with a career. Cranfields range of facilities and support services reflect this; examples include the fact that you can order books from the library via the web and have them delivered in 24 hours to your work/home free of charge. Our on-campus accommodation information and charges can be found at http://www.cranfield.ac.uk/students/life/accommodation/cranfield/page25409.html

School of Engineering
The MSc in Computational and Software Techniques in Engineering is taught by staff across three centres: the Applied Mathematics and Computing Group, the IT Department and the School of Applied Science. The Schools Education programme was assessed as excellent by the Higher Education Funding Council for England. The School also offers a high percentage of technical and support staff reflecting the extensive facilities for high quality experimental and design studies of real engineering problems. The Group has a strong reputation for applied and industrial research and Cranfield earns more support from industry per academic than any other UK university.

Computational & Software Techniques in Engineering

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Computer Aided Engineering (CAE)


The term 'Computer Aided Engineering' (CAE) covers the use of computers in all activities from the design through to the manufacture of a product. It is a fast-moving subject of crucial importance to industry. Its main focus of attention is on the generation of computer understandable product descriptions (which have come to replace the traditional engineering drawing) and their applications in a manufacturing environment. The flexible modular CAE systems of today are capable of dealing with all the separate aspects of design, analysis, manufacture and final inspection in a unified manner, with information flow between the various processes handled automatically by product data management systems. This high degree of integration brings significant benefits in production efficiency. However many problems remain to be solved before complete integration can be achieved, particularly those concerned with interfacing the components of a modular system. The use of component software technology to handle the transition between the diverse types of data needed in different parts of such a system is becoming more and more prevalent. At the heart of any integrated CAE system must lie the means for generating a computer representation of the product to be manufactured. Traditionally, this representation was in the form of drawings and it has been possible for several years to use computers to help in the generation and storage of 2D graphical information of this type. However, drawings are essentially intended for human rather than machine interpretation and do not lend themselves to use as the basis of automation of other processes such as finite element analysis, computational fluid dynamics, lifecycle management and manufacturing. During the past ten to twenty years other, more unified and complete forms of product representations have been developed, including 3D wireframe, surface and solid models. This last type of representation provides a complete and unambiguous description of the geometry of a product and current endeavours are directed towards the development of yet more complete 'product models' containing the wide range of technological data required for automated applications.

Updated KWJ 08-07-10

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CAE: Content, Aims and Objectives


The CAE option was created to provide students with the engineering, mathematical and software development skills that are necessary for research and development in todays industrial environment. Students obtain a broad range of interdisciplinary skills and knowledge in the areas of CAE Applications, Product Modelling, Advanced Engineering Analysis, Computational Engineering and Data Exchange. The principal subject areas of this option are concerned with the software techniques and the engineering applications of CAE. The software, mathematical and computational methods form the basis of the modules: Geometric Modelling & Design, Geometric Modelling & PLM and Advanced Engineering Analysis. These modules cover the application of CAE algorithms for the generation and analysis of product models used to represent the geometry of such complex artefacts as car bodies and aircraft wings. A number of the modules are designed to provide students with the programming techniques required to write core CAE software. This is done by encouraging students to answer problem sheets whose solutions are compounded in the design, coding and testing of various CAE algorithms. In this way, students build their own library which can then be used as a tool for the MSc research thesis undertaken in the second half of the academic year. The material on CAE Applications, CAE Advanced Applications and Computational Engineering covers the utilisation of CAE software for design, analysis, data-exchange and product data management. The industry standard systems IDEAS and Fluent are used extensively for this purpose.

Updated KWJ 08-07-10

Computational & Software Techniques in Engineering

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Digital Signal and Image Processing(DSIP)


Digital Signal and Image Processing (DSIP) is at the forefront of information technology. It forms the basis for a growing variety of applications including medical diagnosis, remote sensing, geophysical prospecting, space exploration, molecular biology, microscopy and computer vision, and is particularly important in the manufacturing and defence/security industries. As a direct result of the substantial reductions in the price of computer hardware, DSIP has moved from being a subject area dominated by electronic engineers and computer scientists with access to powerful mainframe resources to one that involves a wide variety of mathematicians, scientists and engineers using workstations and microcomputers. A useful range of DSIP operations can now be performed on standard PC hardware in real time. Digital signal processing is an interdisciplinary subject, which utilises a wide range of mathematical and computational methods. Many techniques, now classified as 'standard' with general-purpose applications, were originally developed for specific data processing systems. It is therefore important to study DSIP applications and systems in order to fully comprehend the methods and models used for data processing. This aspect is reflected in the current wave of research and development, which is almost exclusively conducted in parallel with mathematical modelling of signal acquisition systems. The modules described here have been designed with the objective of equipping students with the mathematical and computational skills that are necessary for DSIP research and development in today's industrial environment. They aim to teach students about the range and diversity of subject areas in which DSIP technology is playing an increasingly important role and to produce MSc graduates who are proficient in the

software techniques used for DSIP.

Image Processing Research and Development Applications

Updated TPB 08-07-10

Computational & Software Techniques in Engineering

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DSIP: Content, Aims and Objectives


There is an increasing demand for specialists in both the DSIP field and in the broader field of technical software development. This course is designed to provide a supply of software engineers who can address themselves with confidence and apply their skills in this area. This option was created to provide students with the mathematical and programming skills that are necessary for DSIP research and development in todays industrial and academic environment. Students obtain a broad range of interdisciplinary skills and knowledge in the areas of Signal and Image Processing, Image Analysis, Computer Vision and its applications, Machine Learning and Mathematical Modelling. The principal subject areas of the course are concerned with the software techniques and the diverse industrial applications of DSIP. The mathematical and computational methods form the basis of the modules: Signal Analysis, Digital Signal Processing, Image Processing, Image Analysis, Machine Learning. Industrial applications form the basis for the module on Applications of DSP & Computer Vision. These modules cover the theory and application of DSIP algorithms for the analysis, interpretation and processing of data in diverse fields such as vibro-acoustics, computer vision, automotive sensor technology, robotics, surveillance, medical diagnosis, remote sensing and telecommunications. The modules are designed to provide students with the programming techniques and practical skills necessary to write core DSIP software. This is done through student work in practical lab session tasks, applied industrially themed assignments and problem sheets whose solutions are compounded in the design, coding and testing of various DSIP algorithms and techniques. In this way, students build their own personal knowledge library and practial skill base which can then be used as a tool for the MSc research thesis undertaken in the second half of the academic year. Lectures on various aspects of computing and mathematics support all the above modules. Relevant material from numerical analysis is introduced to provide the computational basis for some of the techniques used. Mathematical and visualisation packages are available for to support these aims purpose including MATLAB and Visual Studio (via OpenGL, OpenCV).
Updated TPB 08-07-10

Computational & Software Techniques in Engineering

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Distributed Computing & e-Science (DCeS)

The Distributed Computing & e-Science (DCeS) option equips students with the skills needed to develop, manage, and use Cluster, Grid, and Cloud computing resources. The applications portion of the curriculum covers web portals, workflow management for eEngineering and e-Science, and programming for traditional high performance computing environments, among other topics. This is an active sector, with expansion and investment expected to continue in the future. Demand for expertise comes from a variety of sources, including scientists, engineers, government, the financial industry, and web-presence providers. Though clusters, grids, and clouds all comprise collections of networked computers, they vary in their specifications, origins, capabilities, and intended usage. Clusters are made up of machines with mostly the same hardware specifications, usually connected by a high speed network. Due to their cost-efficiency and flexibility, clusters are the preferred architecture for modern supercomputing systems, and they make up more than 80% of the entries on the top 500 supercomputer index. So-called Exascale computing systems, the next generation of supercomputers expected to arrive by 2018, expand on the same technology. Grid computing environments can contain systems with multiple hardware specifications, and the network links between these systems may be of varying capacity. Many modern grid systems are made up of existing clusters that have been linked together, or federated, in order to enable better sharing of compute and data resources, or instrumentation, between users at disparate geographic locations. Cloud computing is a still more recent development enabled by modern virtualization technology. The primary use of cloud computing today is web service hosting, but there is considerable interest in adapting these environments to better support high-performance scientific and engineering workloads. The private sector has been quick to adopt cloud based IT services for a variety of reasons, including cost, reliability, and efficiency. Today, cloud-based deployment is the standard method for delivering web content to consumers, and a number of companies rely on the cloud for mission-critical applications. Major industrial providers of cloud computing services include household names like Microsoft, Google, Rackspace, and Amazon. Well-known users of cloud-based services include Netflix, which uses Amazon's EC2 to deliver all of its web content, including on-demand video streaming, and the
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Royal Mail. In the public sector, the UK plays a leading role, along with the USA and EU, in the development of cluster, grid, and cloud computing resources. As of July 2010, combined funding by the UK Research Councils and JISC for e-Science infra structure had reached a level of over 170M per annum. NSF funding for XSEDE, the follow-on project to TeraGrid in the USA, has been approved at $121M over the next five years. In the EU, a consortium of leading IT providers and three of the its biggest research centres (CERN, EMBL and ESA) announced in March 2012 a partnership to launch a Helix Cloud, a panEuropean cloud computing platform for e-Science. In response to the challenge of this economic boom, this course option aims to equip students with the skills needed to work within these expanding research and industry sectors, both within the UK and abroad.

DCeS: Content, Aims and Objectives

The UK has experienced significant activity and growth in the areas of cluster, grid, and cloud computing, and the new disciplines of e-Engineering and e-Science enabled by these technologies are expected to have a major impact in nearly every scientific and technical field. The ever increasing demand for cloud computing resources for World Wide Web presence and service hosting is also a major economic driver. This course option aims to equip students with the skills needed to work within these expanding research and industry sectors, both within the UK and abroad. The specialist modules delivered in this option provide the student with the knowledge and skills surrounding the modern computer and network architectures and infrastructures that facilitate cluster, grid, and cloud computing, as well as e-Engineering and e-Science. Lectures on various aspects of computing and mathematics support all option modules. Relevant material from numerical analysis is introduced to provide the computational basis for some of the techniques used. Students are given an opportunity to practice their acquired skills and develop their team work potential in a practical group project.
Updated 23-03-12 MS

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Software Engineering for Technical Computing(SETC) Content, Aims and Objectives

The economies of all developed nations are dependent on software and software engineering expenditure represents an important fraction of GNP in many countries. Although there has been a significant movement of activity in this area towards the rapidly emerging economies of India, China and Russia, the UK continues to be a centre for high quality and innovation in the development of technical/engineering based software products. In general terms software engineering is an engineering discipline which is concerned with all aspects of software production. It is needed to develop high quality software products that can be understood, maintained and adapted over long periods of time by many different people. The software process consists of activities which are involved in developing software products and consist fundamentally of specification, development, validation and evolution. The quality of a design determines the usability, reliability, and maintainability of the resulting software. The quality and the maintainability of the software are also directly affected by the methods and techniques used both to implement the software and to find defects before release. The notion of quality for software is different from the notion of quality for programs that are traditionally built on programming courses. An understanding of what software quality really means is central to understanding what software engineering is all about. This is met through a range of hands-on taught modules covering modern software engineering practice, parallel, high performance, cluster and grid computing technologies. An application based group project is included in which students will have the opportunity to work in a team, develop skills in project management and gain further practical insight into the nature of software in a technical setting.
Updated SB 05-07-10

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Employment of Graduates
Enquiries regarding availability of potential employees are received from many quarters, both in the EU and elsewhere. There is considerable demand for personnel with expertise in engineering software development and for those who have strong technical programming skills in industry standard languages and tools. Graduates of the course, in demand by CAD vendors, commercial engineering software developers, automotive, telecommunications, medical and other industries and research organisations, have been particularly successful in finding long-term employment. Some students may go on to register for PhD degrees, many, on the basis of their MSc research project. Thesis topics are most often supplied by individual companies on incompany problems with a view to employment after graduation - an approach that is being actively encouraged by a growing number of industries. Below is a list consisting of some of the companies that have taken our graduates:

BAe EDS Unigraphics Matra Datavision Sony GKN Technology Flow3D SDRC Ideas Pro-Engineer Cap Gemini Hyperknowledge Logica Excelian Microsoft Nortel Networks Lucent Technologies W Vinten Ltd Altran Technologies Alcatel Telecom Ltd Earth Observation Sciences Ltd Oracle Consulting Services Easams Defence Consultancy DERA Xyratex Glasshouse

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C Programming (Pre-requisite)

Module Structure
Common Modules

C++ Programming

Computational Methods

Computer Graphics

Management for Technology

Computer Aided Engineering

Digital Signal and Image Processing

Distributed Computing & e-Science

Software Engineering for Technical Computing

Geometric Modelling & Design

Signal Analysis

Distributed Computing & Data Management

Advanced Soft Eng for Technical Apps Cloud Computing

Advanced Engineering Analysis

Digital Signal Processing

Cloud Computing Small-Scale Parallel Computing

CAE Applications & PLM

Image Processing

e-Engineering Applications

Computational Engineering (Fluids)

Image Analysis

Computing Infrastructures

Apps in Practical High End Computing High Performance Tech Computing

CAE Advanced Applications

Applications of DSP & Computer Vision

High Performance Tech Computing Cluster Management

Visualisation

Computational Engineering Design Optimisation

Machine Learning Virtualisation Advanced Graphics Advanced Graphics Advanced Graphics Advanced JAVA

Computational Engineering Design Optimisation

Advanced Graphics

Advanced JAVA

KEY:- Half Module 5 Credits Full Module 10 Credits Pre-Requisite 0 Credits

Group Project 10 Credits One and a half Module 15 Credits Additional Modules available for all options

UNIX

XML

Data Exchange

Software Engineering & debugging

Mat Lab

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Course Assessment

The MSc consists of a taught part and a thesis. The taught part of the course comprises modules, which contribute 50% towards the MSc. The thesis accounts for the remaining 50%. Students are required to take the four common modules and one of the four specialist options, these are: Computer Aided Engineering, Signal Image Processing, Advanced Computing Environments and Applications and Software Engineering. These options comprise the Technical Computing modules as presented on the previous page. Pass criteria for the course conform to the School of Engineering pass/fail criteria for MScs: 1. The overall average mark from the modules making up the taught element must be greater than or equal to 50% 2. The mark for the thesis must be greater than or equal to 50% 3. There should be no more than 3 modules with a mark less than 50%

Resit Policy
The policy of the School of Engineering is that no resit examinations shall be allowed, unless there are exceptional circumstances.

Plagiarism
Blackboard provides a tool to check for originality of documents. All assignments, reports and thesis must be run through TurnItIn prior to being handed in.

Module Assessment
Performance is assessed by a combination of assignments and closed book written examinations. The assignments make use of the material taught during the module being assessed and need to be completed by the students within a specified period. Examinations are held during the second week of December, Management for Technology usually in January and the second week of March. Both full and part-time students will be required to attend the University to take relevant module examinations at these times.

MSc Thesis Assessment


Upon submission, all theses will be reviewed by two internal examiners (one being the students supervisor), plus the external examiner. All students receive a viva voce examination in the presence of the External Examiner and members of the Academic staff involved in course delivery.

Student Progress
During the course students will be assessed by means of assignments and written exams. In the case of assignments, students will be informed of their performance by means of receiving their course work duly examined and marked usually within four to six weeks of the handing in date. In the case of examinations the students will be provided with a report of their examination performance listing their provisional grades usually within a month of examination completion. Students seeking detailed feedback in relation to individual modules may of course approach the member of staff responsible for teaching the module, or the Course Director. It should be noted that all marks awarded during the course are provisional and subject to moderation and possible adjustment (upwards or downwards) by the final Board of Examiners for the course.
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Student Consultation
Internal consultation should be an on-going process throughout the academic year. The students elect a representative from the student group. The function of the student representative is to act as a communication link between students and staff and represent the student group on the School MSc Committee. The student representative should report problems associated with course administration, delivery or other issues to the Course Director, thus enabling the prompt resolution of issues. Further formal student consultation is to be carried out in accordance to SoE practice by the distribution of a Student Questionnaire upon completion of each course module.

Fees

Tuition fees for the MSc in Computational and Software Techniques in Engineering are in accordance with all other full and part-time courses in the School of Engineering.

Employer Support
In the first instance most part-time students choose to approach their employer for support in attending the course in time and financial support. In addition to tuition fees, students may have to pay for accommodation Mitchell Hall on campus offers MSc students discounted rates. If you are seeking support from your employer it may help to stress that many of the modules can be studied remotely and that the practical hands-on skills acquired can be put into practice very quickly. The research project is also often of great benefit for employers the research you undertake may well be worth more to your company than the cost of sending you on the course. Project Sponsors It is currently departmental policy to ask companies who take our MSc students for the thesis period to work on their premises, for a contribution towards the cost of the fees scholarship awarded to the student for the MSc. The department will contact companies for this. A sum of this may then given to the student. Alternatively, students may be required to give half of what the company are paying, up to the cost of the MSc fees (i.e. no more than the cost of the fees scholarship to the dept.).

Applying to Join the Course


Admissions Policy and Selection Criteria The normal entry requirement for the MSc course is a good honours degree (2.2 or above) in a numerate subject such as Engineering, Mathematics or the Physical Sciences. In some circumstances combinations of other qualifications and practical experience may be regarded as equivalent. The necessary level of mathematics is covered by most degree courses in the subjects mentioned; specifically, a good grasp is required of linear algebra and numerical analysis.
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Some computing experience is also desirable and knowledge of the C language is a pre-requisite for the course. The object oriented language C++ is taught as part of the course. Above all, prospective students must be capable of the breadth of approach appropriate to the multidisciplinary nature of the course. English Language Requirements if Second Language To get the most out of your study, English language preparation is vital for those for whom English is a second language. Such candidates will need to provide evidence of their English language ability with their application form. Our normal minimum requirement is a TOEFL score of 580 (paper test) or 237 (computer test) or 92 (Internet test) or an IELTS 6.5. or an TOEIC score of 830 or an CAE grade C English language classes are run by The British Council, at language schools throughout various countries, and through Cranfield University. For information on our University classes, please email: enquiries@cranfield.ac.uk or view the Academic English Summer Programme details.

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Frequently Asked Questions (part-time option)


How much time will I need to spend at Cranfield to complete the MSc? The course has been designed with part-time students in mind. To complete the MSc you need to complete the modules and a research project, the research project being undertaken away from the campus. Each module typically lasts for one to two weeks although depending on background experience and familiarity with the subject matter it may only be necessary to attend for at most five days per module. This means that typical part-time students should allow 20-25 days per year away from the workplace. One module (Management for Technology) lasts for 10 days. There are some dependencies amongst modules, there is a fair amount of freedom to choose when you take them. Normally a student will complete the course in 2 or 3 years. What does the research project entail? The research project usually relates to your existing company and its business. But, it is also possible to develop a project unrelated to your current position. Many students find that the research project offers a good selling point for their employer as the benefit the company obtain from the research often outweighs the financial and time commitment to send you onto the course. Students generally begin to consider the research project after completing 3-4 modules it then runs concurrently with the rest of your work. What specific support is available to part-time students? Cranfield offers a range of services to assist part-time students: The library offers web-based services enabling students to access online journals and order books via the Internet these are then delivered free of charge to your home or workplace. The computer centre will issue you with a password and email address to use the Cranfield computer network. The course will be supported by an online system of Electronically Enhanced Learning. The online course companion will enable students to access information (lecture notes, references etc) for each module via a password controlled web site. Mitchell Hall the on-campus accommodation offers MSc students a competitive rate. The School of Engineering Building is a five-minute walk from Mitchell Hall. Can I visit the campus to find out more about the course? Yes, we welcome prospective student visits. Please let us know when you would like to visit and we will arrange for you to tour the facilities and meet with the staff. If you have a question which is not answered here, please email the Course Administrator, AMAC-MScAdmin@cranfield.ac.uk

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Option Module List


Core Modules

Computational Methods C++ Programming Management for Technology Computer Graphics (5 credits) Distributed Computing and Data Management Computing Infrastructure e-Engineering (group project) High Performance Technical Computing Cloud Computing Virtualisation (5 Credits) Cluster Management (5 Credits) Advanced Java (5 Credits)

Module Options in DCeS


Module Options in CAE


Geometric Modelling & Design (15 Credits) CAE Applications & PLM Advanced Engineering Analysis Computational Engineering (Fluids) (group project) Advanced CAE Applications Computational Engineering Design Optimisation (5 Credits) Advanced Graphics(5 Credits) Signal Analysis Digital Signal Processing Image Processing Image Analysis Applications of DSP & Computer Vision (group project) Machine Learning Advanced Graphics(5 Credits)

Module Options in DSIP


Module Options in SETC


Advanced Software Engineering for Technical Applications Small Scale Parallel Computing Applications in High-End Computing (group project) High Performance Technical Computing Computational Engineering Design Optimisation (5 Credits) Cloud Computing Virtualisation (5 Credits) Advanced Java (5 Credits)

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CORE MODULES Computational Methods


Aims The module aims to emphasise the importance of linear systems in engineering situations and to provide a variety of computational methods for solving linear systems of equations and eigenvalue problems. Intended Learning Outcomes On successful completion of this module the student will be able to: Understand and apply matrix algebra, linear dependence and independence. Choose an appropriate method for solving a particular linear system of equations. Demonstrate an awareness of difficulties such as ill-conditioning, and be able to suggest ways of minimising the problems. Understand the concept of eigenvalues and eigenvectors and their importance. Apply several techniques for finding eigenvalues and eigenvectors in practical problems. Use MATLAB to solve some practical problems.

Syllabus

Matrices and types of linear systems Direct elimination methods Solution to tridiagonal systems Conditioning and stability of solutions Iterative methods and convergence criteria Eigenvalue and eigenvector problems Numerical solutions to ODEs

Te a c h i n g M e t h o d Lectures and problem tutorials Assessment Method Exam (100%) Recommended Reading Goult R et al: Computational Methods in Linear Algebra
Reviewed CAA 30-06-10

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C++ Programming
Aims Object oriented programming (OOP) is the standard programming methodology used in nearly all fields of major software construction today. In practice, C++ is the most heavily used OOP language. This module aims to answer the question what is object oriented programming?, and then looks in detail at the C++ language. Hands-on programming and an assignment form an important part of the course. Intended Learning Outcomes On successful completion of this module the student will be able to: Understand the object oriented programming methodology and the concepts of abstraction and encapsulation. Understand and apply the main elements of C++ classes including constructors and destructors, member functions and overloaded operators. Understand and apply the principles of combining classes using inheritance and/or object composition. Build C++ programs of moderate complexity given a specification with exception handling. Use template based class libraries, particularly for I/O and data structures.

Syllabus

The OOP methodology and method Abstraction and encapsulation Classes, constructors and destructors Function and operator overloading Inheritance, polymorphism and virtual functions Stream input and output Templates and template based class libraries Exception handling

Te a c h i n g M e t h o d A mixture of lectures and hands-on practical sessions. Assessment Method Exam (50%) and an assignment (50%) Recommended Reading M Cline, G Lomow, M Girou, C++ FAQs (Second Edition) Addison Wesley ISBN 0-201-30983-1 A Koenig, B E Moo Accelerated C++, Practical Programming by Example Addison Wesley, ISBN 0201-70353-X
Reviewed PAS 07-07-10

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Computer Graphics
Aims The aim of this half module is to provide the student with a hands-on introduction to the programming paradigms, techniques and libraries used in the construction of graphical user interfaces. It covers the model, view, controller (MVC) paradigm and accompanying GUI programming models used in a number of popular user interface libraries. On the practical side it aims to provide the student with skills in GUI construction using Windows Forms under the .NET framework in C++. The module also provides an overview of the mathematical principles behind 2D and 3D visualisation and the viewing pipeline and their practical implementation in the widely used Open-GL graphics library. Some representative GUI based 2D and 3D Open-GL applications using Windows Forms are developed. Intended Learning Outcomes On successful completion of this module the student will be able to: Understand the principal programming paradigms and models underpinning modern user interface libraries. Apply these principles in the development of basic GUI applications using the Windows Forms windowing toolkit. Understand the mathematical principles behind 2D and 3D visualisation and their implementation in Open-GL. Develop basic graphical based applications using Open-GL, either in standalone mode or with Windows Forms.

Syllabus

Programming models for GUI development MVC, event handling and GUI component libraries Windows Forms and .NET Mathematical principles behind 2D and 3D visualisation the viewing pipeline The Open-GL graphics library Development of CG applications using Open-GL and Windows Form

Te a c h i n g M e t h o d A mixture of lectures and hands-on practical sessions. Assessment Method Assignment (100%) Recommended Reading Dave Shreiner: OpenGl programming guide. The Official guide to learning OpenGL, versions 3.0 and 3.1., 7th edition, ISBN: 0321552628
Updated PAS 07-07-10

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Management for Technology


Aims Apart from technical knowledge, an engineer must also acquire management training. The aim of this module is to provide the student with the essential training to manage a project and its financial aspects. This is an intensive two-week short course run by the Cranfield School of Management and aims to equip students with the management learning tools required in a modern industrial environment. Intended Learning Outcomes On successful completion of this module the student will be able to: Demonstrate an awareness of a range management issues Understand the needs and requirements of project management Demonstrate and awareness and understanding of the financial aspects associated with project planning.

Syllabus

Corporate Planning Cash flow forecasting Legal responsibilities Pricing and profit planning Project management Finance and accounting Industrial relations Industrial marketing Management for R & D

Te a c h i n g M e t h o d Lectures and some hands-on practical sessions. Assessment Method Exam (80%) and small group project (20%)

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Computational & Software Techniques in Engineering

DRAFT

MSc Course Brochure

SPECIALIST MODULES Advanced Engineering Analysis


Aims The numerical solutions of partial differential equations are used for simulating physical systems and phenomena and for the investigation of a wide range engineering applications. These numerical solutions may used in engineering design optimisation to explore the implications of design changes. The aim of this course is to provide the student with the mathematical background to the discretisation of partial differential equations using finite element and finite difference approaches, and an insight into methods for their solution along with the vital numerical techniques for the analysis of the solution and numerical errors. Intended Learning Outcomes On successful completion of this module the student will be able to: Understand the mathematical principles of the discretisation methods. Identify problems which are suitable for finite element or finite difference solution. Demonstrate a working knowledge of numerical solution methods. Demonstrate an understanding of stability analysis and numerical errors.

Syllabus

Introduction to Simulation Finite Element Methods Finite Difference Methods Numerical Solution to Partial Differential Equations: Parabolic, Elliptic, Hyperbolic Stability Analysis and Truncation Errors Case Studies

Te a c h i n g M e t h o d Lectures and tutorials. Assessment Method Exam (100%) Recommended Reading Gerald, C.F., Wheatley, P.O., Applied Numerical Analysis, Addison-Wesley, 1999. Morton, K., Mayers, D., Numerical Solution of Partial Differential Equations, CUP, 1994. Quarterioni, A., Sacco, R., Saleri, F., Numerical Mathematics, Springer Verlag, 2004.
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Computational & Software Techniques in Engineering

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MSc Course Brochure

Advanced Graphics
Aims High performance computer graphics are used in many areas of software application development, and are fundamental to games, entertainment, CAD and scientific visualisation. The aim of this module is to introduce students to the advanced techniques used in the generation of computer graphics. Building on the basic methods of the Introductory course, students will learn how to generate more realistic effects, such as the use of lighting and surface details to create realistic representations of computer generated graphical objects and display them to the screen. Intended Learning Outcomes On successful completion of this module the student will be able to: Understand the concepts, underlying principles and operation of a range of advanced computer graphics algorithms and techniques Optimize the graphics pipeline by implementing visible surface algorithms, such as hidden surface removal and z-buffering, leading to real-time performance Understand the models of interaction between light and materials, as well as being able to demonstrate a practical capability of implementing such methods Implement algorithms using the OpenGL graphics library and apply these techniques to solving a specific problem in computer graphics

Syllabus Surfaces and Visibility Geometric and Raster Algorithms Light, Illumination and Shading Computer Animation.

Te a c h i n g M e t h o d Lectures and practical lab sessions Assessment Method Assessment (100%) Recommended Reading
Reviewed SB 18/7/2010

24

Computational & Software Techniques in Engineering

DRAFT

MSc Course Brochure

Advanced Java Programming


Aims This half module aims to provide the student with the necessary skills to develop software using the Java language. The principle elements of the Java programming language and associated libraries are covered and used in case studies. Hands-on programming and an assignment form an important part of the course. Intended Learning Outcomes On successful completion of the module the student will be able to: Demonstrate knowledge and skills in developing object oriented software using Java. Use and critically evaluate the Java language and associated libraries for the development of software applications. Demonstrate an appreciation and practical knowledge of the tools available for Java software development. Understand and apply the principles of combining classes using inheritance and/or object composition. Build Java applets or applications of moderate complexity given a specification with exception handling.

Syllabus

Java principles and structure Inheritance and object composition in Java Foundation class library Developing applets and applications GUI development using Java Swing Advanced Java Libraries

Te a c h i n g M e t h o d A mixture of lectures and hands-on practical sessions. Assessment Method Assignment (100%) Recommended Reading Horstmann & Cornell : Core Java: Fundamentals, Addison-Wesley
Updated PAS 07-07-10

25

Computational & Software Techniques in Engineering

DRAFT

MSc Course Brochure

Advanced Software Engineering for Technical Applications


Aims This course aims to provide a more in-depth look at the software life-cycle phases. Intended Learning Outcomes On successful completion of the module the student will be able to: Demonstrate conceptual knowledge of requirements planning with respect to the software engineering process. Produce the relevant requirement documents for each stage of the software project, having performed the required analysis. Critically appreciate the need for software engineering standards and understand where and when they are applied. Demonstrate a comprehensive understanding of the range of software engineering design techniques. Design and implement software testing strategies, including documentation of testing requirements and outcomes at each stage of the software design and implementation process. Identify the chief factors influencing the evolution of software, including the need for version control, documentation and planned maintenance tasks.

Syllabus Requirements Analysis (user requirements, systems requirement specification, functional & non-functional requirement, software requirements specification, modelling and prototyping, structured analysis, formal specification) Design & Implementation (design fundamentals, design architecture, data design, procedural design, objected oriented design, distributed systems design, component based design, data flow oriented design, data oriented design, real time design, implementation - agile methods: XP, scrum, etc) Verification & Validation (verification and validation planning, software testing techniques & strategies, preparing test cases and test environments, unit testing, integration testing, validation testing, system testing, regression testing, customer acceptance testing, advanced debugging, automated static analysis, test documentation) Evolution & Software Maintenance (version & change control, maintainability & maintenance, re-engineering, refactoring, reverse engineering) Software Engineering Standards (ISO, IEEE)

Te a c h i n g M e t h o d A mixture of lectures and practical work. Assessment Method Exam (40%) and Assignment (60%)

26

Computational & Software Techniques in Engineering

DRAFT

MSc Course Brochure

Applications of DSP & Computer Vision (Group Project)


Aims The low-level and mid-level visual understanding achievable using various digital image processing techniques allow us to tackle the Artificial Intelligence problem of artificial visual sensing computer vision (also termed 'robot vision'). By developing these techniques further we can apply image processing to a number of different visual inspection and understanding tasks within the realm of science and engineering. Here we investigate applied digital image processing in the form of computer vision the automated interpretation and understanding of visual information. The digital signal application area focuses on the use of vibroacoustics for condition monitoring. Intended Learning Outcomes On successful completion of this module the student will be able to: Understand and describe the concept and limitations of computer vision. Understand, describe and implement a computer vision system according to basic application requirements and specifications. Understand and implement the basic concepts of object recognition. Understand and describe a range of computer vision applications Understand, describe and implement Program MATLAB based algorithms for vibroacoustic applications Geometric Object Recognition (industrial) Principle Component Analysis Based Object Recognition (industrial and faces) 3D object recognition and sensing range data and stereo vision Object motion detection, scene change detection and object tracking approaches Robotic Control using Visual Servoing Image Processing for 3D Medical Visualisation Texture Synthesis Approaches (2D and 3D)

Syllabus

DSP vibroacoustic applications Te a c h i n g M e t h o d A mixture of lectures and hands-on practical sessions. Assessment Method Assignment (100%) Recommended Reading Computer Vision A Modern Approach : Forsyth, D. & Ponce, J. (Prentice-Hall 2003) Machine Vision Theory, Applications & Pract. : Davies, E.R. (Morgan Kaufmann 2005) Ballard, D.H., and Brown, C.M: Computer Vision IEEE Transactions on Pattern Analysis and Machine Intelligence Updated
TPB 08-07-10

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Computational & Software Techniques in Engineering

DRAFT

MSc Course Brochure

Applications in Practical High-End Computing: (Group Project)


Aims This module aims to provide the student with skills in the areas of: the software quality and project management; technical/engineering applications and cluster computing so that they can undertake a group project.

Intended Learning Outcomes On successful completion of the module the student will be able to: Demonstrate a systematic understanding of the key management tasks involved in implementing a software project in terms of technical requirements, planning and estimation. Identify and implement the key techniques used in maintaining a software project, such as identification of critical project metrics, comprehensive quality management and risk assessment. Show proficiency in the use of a number of automated tools used to assist the software engineering process, such as project design, documentation and code analysis. Show high-level of competence in the use and management of cluster computing for technical/engineering/scientific applications. Work as part of a team using coordination, negotiation and interfacing skills.

Syllabus

Project Management (risk analysis, estimation models, project planning and scope definition, communication and team working) Software Metrics & Quality Assurance (definition, collection, quality metrics, productivity metrics, the review process, software reliability, using software quality metrics) Automation Using Software Tools (overview of CASE, project management tools, documentation tools, quality assurance tools, analysis and design tools, integration and testing tools, maintenance tools) Methods for coding and validating technical and engineering applications f roundoff and ill-conditioning. Algorithmic stability and performance. Specification and performance of computing clusters. Validation and tuning of applications on medium-scale distributed architectures.

Te a c h i n g M e t h o d A mixture of lectures and seminars. Assessment Method Assignment (group project) (100%)

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Computational & Software Techniques in Engineering

DRAFT

MSc Course Brochure

CAE Applications & PLM


Aims The aim of the CAE Solid Modelling module is to introduce students to key concepts, techniques and applications of a 3D Solid Modelling system. Use is made of structured computer based workshops which employ an industry standard system for 3D Solid Modelling. Introductory lectures are reinforced by the hands-on approach since each student will be set an exercise to build a CAE Solid Model of a specified component on the course. The module also provides an overview of PLM. Intended Learning Outcomes On successful completion of this module the student will be able to: Understand how a modern CAE Solid Modelling tool is used. Generate solid geometrical parts using a variety of basic construction techniques. Apply skills necessary to carry out a variety of basic Solid Modelling tasks. Generate 2D drawings from 3D geometrical parts. Appreciate the role and scope of PLM in product development

Syllabus

Introduction to I-DEAS CAE Solid Modelling Software Some benefits of using solid modelling and the CAE approach Different construction methods for 3D geometrical models Parametric and variational design Production of drafting setup details from 3D geometrical parts Modifying parts and features Product Lifecycle Management

Te a c h i n g M e t h o d Mainly practical hands-on training sessions and workshops, with introductory lectures. Assessment Method Assignment (100%) Recommended Reading SDRC: I-DEAS Student Guide Rooney and Steadman: Open University, Principles of Computer Aided Engineering McMahon, C. and Browne, J: CAD/CAM from Principles to Practice, Addison Wesley
Updated PAS 07-07-10

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Computational & Software Techniques in Engineering

DRAFT

MSc Course Brochure

CAE Advanced Applications


Aims This course covers more advanced aspects of CAE, the aim being to introduce students to key concepts and techniques in the use of CAE application software tools. Use is made of structured computer based workshops which employ industry standard systems for CAD through to Engineering Analysis. This is reinforced by the hands-on approach since each student will be set an exercise to carry out a CAE analysis on a component on the course. Intended Learning Outcomes On successful completion of this module the student will be able to: Demonstrate an understanding of how modern CAE Analysis tools are used. Demonstrate an understanding and be able to use free mesh and mapped mesh generation techniques. Generate finite element analysis models by using either geometry from the I-DEAS solid modeller or an external CAD system. Use the I-DEAS Simulation Analysis module to run linear static analysis modules.

Syllabus

Introduction to I-DEAS CAE Finite Element Analysis (FEA) Simulation software, CAE FEA Pre- and Post-Processing, Free mesh and Mapped mesh techniques, Quality checks on nodes and elements, Finite element and geometry based boundary conditions, Utilising solids based modelling geometry for downstream CAE FEA, CAE linear static analysis using the I-DEAS CAE FEA Simulation software, Case Studies.

Te a c h i n g M e t h o d Mainly practical hands-on training sessions and workshops, with introductory lectures. Assessment Method Assignment (100%) Recommended Reading SDRC: I-DEAS Student Guide Rooney and Steadman: Open University, Principles of Computer Aided Engineering McMahon, C. and Browne, J: CAD/CAM from Principles to Practice
Updated PAS 07-07-10

30

Computational & Software Techniques in Engineering

DRAFT

MSc Course Brochure

Cloud Computing
Aims
The aim of this module is to provide students with the necessary knowledge and understanding of virtualisation technologies and their application to the provision of ondemand computational resources, as well as a wider understanding of how those resources are consumed through Cloud Computing services.

Intended Learning Outcomes On completion of this module the student will be able to: Demonstrate understanding and knowledge of key virtualisation technologies, and their application to Cloud Computing infrastructure Identify the characteristics of the Cloud Computing platform and understand how these differ from existing distributed computing environments Critically assess the characteristics of Cloud Computing technologies, and understand how they affect the implementation of Cloud based software Identify the non-technical challenges that affect the implementation and use of Cloud enabled software Compare and contrast the suitability of different Cloud Computing approaches to different types of computational problem Develop and implement Cloud enabled software to solve a specified computational problem

Syllabus

Virtualisation, Related Internet technologies (tbc), Introduction to Cloud Computing, Topics in Cloud Computing, Cloud Environments and Technologies, Applications of Cloud Computing

Te a c h i n g M e t h o d A mixture of lectures and practical lab sessions. Assessment Method Examination (50%), Assignment (50%) Recommended Reading Articles to be collected by the module lecturers.
Updated SB 10-06-10

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Computational & Software Techniques in Engineering

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MSc Course Brochure

Cluster Management
Aims The remarkable growth in the power of high performance PC based clusters has had dramatic impact on organisations engaged in large scale computations of previously intractable phenomenon. These PC-based cluster systems are becoming more accessible, and as a result, numerous companies and academic departments are turning to them to solve their computational problems in parallel. The aim of this module is to provide a practical understanding of and training in cluster management, configuration and installation to equip students with the specialised technical skill for working within the rapidly expanding high performance cluster sector.

Intended Learning Outcomes On successful completion of the module the student will be able to demonstrate: Specify, set up and configure a balanced PC based cluster in terms of both hardware and software. Demonstrate a systematic application of Linux, Unix, MPI, MPICH, C++ and or Fortran to optimise and debug parallel applications. Carry out performance analysis for the cluster and its applications.

Syllabus

Introduction to PC-based clusters Hardware and software technologies PC based practical build Management and analysis tools Live demos and practicals HPC facility visit

Te a c h i n g M e t h o d A mixture of lectures and hands-on practical sessions. Assessment Method Assignment (100%)
Updated KWJ 08-07-10

32

Computational & Software Techniques in Engineering

DRAFT

MSc Course Brochure

Computational Engineering Design Optimisation


Aims The aim of the CEDO module is to introduce the techniques for modelling, simulating and analysing realistic computational engineering problems in the context of design optimisation. The engineering design optimisation process is introduced along with numerical methods used in optimisation. Intended Learning Outcomes On successful completion of this module the student will be able to: Demonstrate an understanding of the computational engineering process and its applications. Demonstrate an understanding of the design optimisation process. Appreciate design optimisation for industrial applications.

Syllabus

Engineering design optimisation process Optimisation theory deterministic: optimality criteria, search methods stochastic: simulated annealing, genetic algorithms, tabu search Application of design optimisation theory

Te a c h i n g M e t h o d Lectures and tutorial sessions. Assessment Method Assignment (100%) Recommended Reading Papalambros, P.Y., Wilde, D.J., Principals of Optimal Design, CUP, 1988. Siddall, J.N., Optimal Engineering Design, Marcel Dekker, 1982. Schneider, J.J., Kirkpatrick S., Stochastic Algorithms, Springer, 2006.

33

Computational & Software Techniques in Engineering

DRAFT

MSc Course Brochure

Computational Engineering (Fluids)


Aims The power of modern computers and the development of high fidelity computational techniques have seen the emergence of computational engineering as a vital part of the design and development process of complex engineering problems. The aim of this module is to introduce the techniques and tools for modelling, simulating and analysing practical computational engineering fluid problems with practical hands on experience in developing algorithms and using commercial software. . Intended Learning Outcomes On successful completion of the module the student will be able to demonstrate: An understanding of the Computational Engineering Process. Understand the governing equations for fluid systems and how to solve them computationally. Be able to write code to solve problems and undertake practical problems using commercial software Appreciate the wide range of applications using computational engineering for fluids.

Syllabus

Introduction to Computational Engineering Fundamental equations The Computational Engineering Process Fluid Simulation for Computer Graphics Modelling techniques Practical sessions

Te a c h i n g M e t h o d A mixture of lectures and hands-on practical sessions. Assessment Method Assignment (100%) Recommended Reading Massey, B.S: Fluid Mechanics, Taylor-Francis John D Anderson: Computational Fluid Dynamics, McGraw-Hill
Updated KWJ 08-07-1

34

Computational & Software Techniques in Engineering

DRAFT

MSc Course Brochure

Computing Infrastructure
Aims To introduce the techniques and tools for distributed computing, in particular Portal technologies and Grid Computing with practical hands on experience of software packages used in industry to develop and deploy applications based on these methodologies.

Intended Learning Outcomes On successful completion of this module the student will be able to: Have knowledge of distributed application development infrastructure. Have knowledge of different servers to develop portals on. Understand the anatomy of the grid, the Globus middleware and developing client-server applications in grid environments.

Syllabus

Integrated software development environments Introduction to distributed computing Grid Computing and Globus toolkit V5 o Introduction to Grid computing o GT5 Security (GSI, GSI-openssh, Myproxy and putty) o GT5 Data Management (GridFTP) o GT5 Job Scheduling (GRAM) o GT5 Applications Introduction to National Grid Service (NGS) Introduction to development of portals Development and deployment of distributed applications

Te a c h i n g M e t h o d Mainly practical hands-on tutorials and introductory lectures. Assessment Method Examination (40%) Assignment (60%) Recommended Reading
The Grid 2, Second Edition: Blueprint for a New Computing Infrastructure, Ian Foster etc., 2003
Updated SW 13-07-10

35

Computational & Software Techniques in Engineering

DRAFT

MSc Course Brochure

Digital Signal Processing


Aims Digital signal processing, a major technology in almost all modern hi-tech applications and products, is at the heart of mobile phones, communications and vibro-acoustical condition Monitoring. The aim of this course is to provide an industry oriented course covering not only the theoretical aspects of classical and advanced time-frequency DSP but also the solid implementation aspects of the subject for students wishing to pursue a career in such areas as communications, speech recognition, bio-medical engineering, acoustics, vibrations, radar and sonar systems and multimedia. Intended Learning Outcomes On successful completion of this module, the student will be able to understand: The concepts of discrete time signals and systems and correlation of discrete time signals The concept, properties and application of the classical discrete Fourier transform The concepts, properties and application of the non-parametric and parametric estimates of the classical power spectral density The fundamental principles of advanced time-frequency signal processing The concept, properties and application of the advanced time-frequency technique, the short time Fourier transform The concept, properties and application of the advanced time-frequency technique, the wavelet transform The concept, properties and application of the advanced time-frequency technique, the Wigner distribution The concept, properties and application of digital filtering, including adaptive inverse and Kalman filters

Syllabus Discrete-time signals and systems The correlation of discrete-time signals The discrete Fourier transform The power spectral density The short time Fourier transform The wavelet transform The Wigner distribution Classical and adaptive digital filtering Te a c h i n g M e t h o d Lectures, tutorials and hands-on practical sessions dedicated to DSP programming Assessment Method Exam (70%) and an assignment (30%) Recommended Reading J.G. Proakis, D.K. Manolakis, Digital Signal Processing
LG

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Computational & Software Techniques in Engineering

DRAFT

MSc Course Brochure

Distributed Computation and Data Management


Aims To introduce the techniques and tools for distributed computing, in particular Persistent Web Services and portals with practical hands on experience of software packages used in industry to develop and deploy Web Services, including within a Grid environment. In addition, the module will address the principles and practices of advanced data management in a distributed environment. Currently prevalent security mechanisms for distributed computation will also be covered.

Intended Learning Outcomes On successful completion of this module the student will be able to: Know the anatomy of Web Services including o Web Services Description, Deployment and Discovery Know and exploit XML based technologies Know the anatomy of distributed file and data management systems such as SRB and iRODS Know how to use distributed data resources using application programming interfaces Security mechanisms for distributed computing Introduction to XML Using Netbean/Eclipse as software development environments Introduction to Web Services, SOAP, HTTP, HTTPS Web Services tools such as Apache and Glassfish containers Introduction to Storage Resource Broker, iRODS for distributed data management Application Programming Interfaces for distributed data management Using the National Grid Service for deployment.

Syllabus

Te a c h i n g M e t h o d Mainly practical hands-on tutorials with special seminars, workshops and introductory lectures. Assessment Method Examination (60%), Assignment (40%) Recommended Reading http://www.globus.org
Updated LS/SW 12-07-10

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Computational & Software Techniques in Engineering

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MSc Course Brochure

e-Engineering Applications (Group Project)


Aims The aim is to give students an opportunity to practice their acquired skills in a practical project. Researchers often want to aggregate not only data and computing power, but also human expertise. Collaborative problem formulation, data analysis, and the like are important Grid and e-Engineering applications. The project for specialization includes an in-depth study on the different topics, which were educated during the various modules, and to put them into practice. First, there will be a planning and design phase. Then a research of relevant literature. Then, computational methods are developed and implemented. Finally, a report is written and a presentation is given about the work. Each year a number of different topics will be discussed. Intended Learning Outcomes On successful completion of this module the student will be able to: Acquire and use information along with knowledge and skills in a practical project Apply basic Software Engineering principles to carry out a collaborative software development activity Work effectively with others under time pressure in a team situation Communicate clearly in terms of written reports, project meetings and presentations to specialist and non-specialist audiences.

Te a c h i n g M e t h o d A mixture of lectures and seminars. Assessment Method Assignment/Group Project (100%) Recommended Reading Articles to be collected by the module lecturers.
Updated KWJ 08-07-10

38

Computational & Software Techniques in Engineering

DRAFT

MSc Course Brochure

High Performance Technical Computing


Aims The aim of this module is to teach the student the modern computational skills on a key Grid platform. Many interesting scientific problems require analysis of large datasets. For such problems, harnessing distributed computing and storage resources is clearly of great value. Furthermore, the natural parallelism inherent in many data analysis procedures makes it feasible to use distributed resources efficiently. The focus of this module is on parallel algorithms and domain decomposition techniques which are suitable for simulation on High Performance Distributed Computing systems. Emphasis is on algorithms for execution on loosely coupled distributed systems, like Grid-systems. Data-intensive computing algorithms like distributed data mining and data warehousing. Parallel numerical algorithms to solve model applications will be discussed and studied through implementation in the hands-on part of the course. Load-balancing methods and domain decomposition techniques will be introduced. Intended Learning Outcomes On successful completion of this module the student will be able to: Demonstrate knowledge and a critical awareness of the need to carry out scientific computing on the Grid platforms. Understand elements of parallel program design. Understand the challenges and limitations of the parallelisation process including scalability (Amdahl and Gustafson laws) and load-balancing. Apply knowledge of intensive computational parallel/distributed techniques to solve a practical problem in scientific computing on the Grid platforms (including some awareness of debugging methods). Employ techniques to validate, verify and evaluate the performance and efficiency of parallel programs.

Te a c h i n g M e t h o d A mixture of lectures and workshops. Assessment Method Assignment (100%) Recommended Reading G. E. Karniadakis and R.M. Kirby, Parallel Scientific Computing in C++ and MPI: a seamless approach to parallel algorithms and their implementation, Cambridge University Press, 2003, ISBN 0 521 520800

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Computational & Software Techniques in Engineering

DRAFT

MSc Course Brochure

Geometric Modelling Design


Aims The aim of this module is to provide the student with the fundamental algorithms, techniques and software used for the construction of parametric curves, surfaces and solids. The techniques covered here form the basis of free-form modelling as used in CAD/CAM systems and more generally in visualisation and computer graphics. The module also aims to develop an understanding of the basic principles of storing and communicating models of product shape and associated information. Hands-on programming exercises and a modelling assignment form part of the course. Intended Learning Outcomes On successful completion of this module the student will be able to: Understand the definition and benefits of use of spline and B-spline functions. Demonstrate knowledge of the main methods of free-form curve and surface construction used in CAD/CAM. Develop computer programs to implement free-form curve and surface construction techniques. Demonstrate a working knowledge of the methods used for computer representations of engineering product. Understand the mathematical and computer science techniques deployed in the creation of practical 3D geometric modelling software. Demonstrate a critical awareness of the issues governing the use of 3D geometric modelling in engineering applications software.

Syllabus Polynomial and spline interpolation B-spline curve fitting and construction techniques B-spline surface fitting and construction techniques Solid model representation schemes Boundary representation models 3D modelling APIs

Te a c h i n g M e t h o d A mixture of lectures and hands-on practical sessions. Assessment Method Exam (50%) and an assignment (50%) Recommended Reading Farin, G: Curves and Surfaces for Computer Aided Design Rooney and Steadman: Open University, Principles of Computer Aided Engineering Bower, A. and Woodwark, J.R: Introduction to Computing with Geometry, Information Geometers
Updated PAS 07-07-10

40

Computational & Software Techniques in Engineering

DRAFT

MSc Course Brochure

Image Analysis
Aims Digital Image Processing allows us to process visual information in computer systems. By processing visual information we can develop automated visual interpretation and understanding artificial vision, itself a large part of wider field of the Artificial Intelligence. In order to achieve this we must be able to extract high-level visual information such as edges and regions from images and additionally allow for the efficient storage of large amounts of visual data. Here we concentrate on mid-level visual interpretation and image compression. Intended Learning Outcomes On successful completion of this module, the student will be able to: Understand and describe the effects and impact of image compression. Understand and describe methods for image restoration (deblurring). Understand, describe and implement edge and region based feature extraction. Understand, describe and implement feature post-processing approaches.

Understand, describe and implement basic feature-based image classification.

Syllabus

Image Restoration Image Compression Image Feature Extraction and Processing Image Segmentation Basic Feature-based Classification Approaches

Te a c h i n g M e t h o d A mixture of lectures and hands-on practical sessions. Assessment Method Assignment (100%) Recommended Reading Digital Image Processing Gonzalez, R. & Woods R. (Prentice Hall, 2002) Image Processing & Computer Vision : Morris, T. (Palgrave Macmillan, 2004) Learning OpenCV : Bradski, G. & Kaehler, A. (O'Reilly, 2008)

Updated TPB 08-07-10

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Computational & Software Techniques in Engineering

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MSc Course Brochure

Image Processing
Aims The most powerful method of sensing available to humans is vision. In computing visual information is represented as a digital image. In order to process visual information in computer systems we need to know about processing digital images. Here we focus upon the task of low-level visual processing. Intended Learning Outcomes On successful completion of this module, the student will be able to: Understand, describe and manipulate common digital image representations. Understand, describe and implement a range of local and global image transforms. Understand, describe and implement image processing in the frequency domain. Implement basic image feature extraction for simple image comparison tasks. Understand, describe and apply techniques to counter noise in digital images.

Syllabus

Image Applications Image Representation Image Capture Hardware Image Sampling & Noise Image Geometry & Locality Processing Operations Upon Images Camera Projection / Convolution Model Image Transformation Image Enhancement

Te a c h i n g M e t h o d A mixture of lectures and hands-on lab practical sessions. Assessment Method Exam (70%) and an assignment (30%) Recommended Reading Digital Image Processing Gonzalez, R. & Woods R. (Prentice Hall, 2002) Image Processing & Computer Vision : Morris, T. (Palgrave Macmillan, 2004) Learning OpenCV : Bradski, G. & Kaehler, A. (O'Reilly, 2008)
Updated TPB 08-07-10

42

Computational & Software Techniques in Engineering

DRAFT

MSc Course Brochure

Machine Learning
Aims The aim of this module is to provide students with the necessary knowledge and understanding for the application of machine learning techniques to real world industrial problems within the domain of digital signal and image processing and beyond. Intended Learning Outcomes On successful completion of this module, the student will be able to: Apply a range of machine learning techniques to solve industrial problems within the domain of digital signal and image processing. Describe the application of machine learning approaches to a wider set of data mining and classification type problems. Using a provided implementation, perform machine learning analysis on suitable forms of digital signal and image processing data. Understand the concepts and operation of a range of machine learning algorithms in order to facilitate re-implementation in a software programming environment with which they are already familiar. Compare and contrast the suitability of different machine learning approaches to given problems both within the domain of digital signal and image processing and within a wider set of data mining and classification type problems. State the key principles of operation, advantages/disadvantages and limitations of the machine learning approaches covered in course syllabus. Describe the key principles of machine learning theory and best practice methodology for training machine learning approaches.

Syllabus Machine Learning Theory & Methodology Decision Tree Classifiers Instance Based Learning Bayesian Classification Genetic Algorithms Ant Colony Optimisation Neural Networks Support Vector Machines EM Algorithm Te a c h i n g M e t h o d A mixture of lectures and hands-on practical sessions. Assessment Method Exam (80%), Assignment (20%)

Updated SB 15-07-10

43

Computational & Software Techniques in Engineering

DRAFT

MSc Course Brochure

Signal Analysis
Aims The aim of this module is to provide students with the necessary mathematical basis and skills for the study of Digital Signal and Image Processing. Intended Learning Outcomes On successful completion of this module the student will : Be confident in the use of complex algebra Understand the concept of generalised functions, in particular the Dirac Delta function, and the Sampling property as the means for identifying their behaviour. Understand the concept of Fourier analysis and be able to calculate the Fourier series representing a periodic function. Know how to calculate the Fourier transform of a continuous function. Understand the ideas of Convolution and Correlation and the associated theorems. Be able to apply the Z transform for causal functions. Be familiar with the basic elements of probability and statistics, as necessary for the analysis of signals and images.

Syllabus

Revision of complex algebra Important generalised functions Series representation of period signals Fourier analysis and the Fourier transforms Convolution and correlation The Sampling theorem The Z transform Probability and statistics: discrete, continuous and special distributions, sampling and estimation , significant tests.

Te a c h i n g M e t h o d Lectures and problem tutorials Assessment Method Exam (100%) Recommended Reading James, G: Advanced Modern Engineering Mathematics
Updated KT/MG

44

Computational & Software Techniques in Engineering

DRAFT

MSc Course Brochure

Small-Scale Parallel Programming


Aims The advent of multi-core processors in the commodity desktop computer market has shifted the emphasis from traditional single threaded computing models to more advanced methods in order to take advantage of the additional processing power that is now available. This has implications for both the traditional high performance computing sector and the workstation market. This course aims to explore the different parallel processing techniques now available on small scale computer systems, such as multi-core desktop computers and GPU devices. Intended Learning Outcomes On successful completion of the module the student will be able to demonstrate: a systematic application of the techniques employed in multi-threaded processing, and identification of the most common difficulties associated with parallel programming, An understanding of race conditions and blocking, and application of synchronisation techniques as a method of tackling these difficulties. An ability to implement solutions using CPU and GPU technologies.. Use and critical evaluation of automated tools for the design of source code and debugging of multi-threaded programs

Syllabus

Introduction to Parallel and Multi-Threaded Programming Safety and Liveness: Synchronisation Techniques OpenMP concepts, structures and usage. Using CUDA to solve general purpose problems on the GPU Software Tools (debugging and optimisation)

Te a c h i n g M e t h o d A mixture of lectures and hands-on practical sessions. Assessment Method Exam (70%) and Assignment (30%)

45

Computational & Software Techniques in Engineering

DRAFT

MSc Course Brochure

Virtualisation
Aims Advances in CPU technology have led to a dramatic improvement in computational performance, to the point where the raw power now exists to run multiple, virtual simulations of entire computer systems on a single processor. Multiple virtual computers (or virtual machines) can execute simultaneously on a single physical platform without any knowledge of each other, allowing new virtual computers to be created and executed without the need for new physical hardware. This technology form the basis of many types of computer system, from the implementation of HPC server farms to Cloud computing. The aim of this module is to introduce the student to the technologies involved in virtualisation and to give them hands-on experience of implementing and managing a virtualised system. Intended Learning Outcomes On successful completion of this module the student will be able to: Understand the concepts of virtualisation and state the key principles of operation of a virtualised system, Identify the key software and hardware components in a virtualised system, and understand their contribution in the management of virtual machines, Describe the relationship between virtualised systems and the underlying physical hardware resources, and the resulting limitations on computational performance, Implement a virtualised Cloud computing environment using common middleware and demonstrate an ability to manage the system,

Syllabus Introduction to virtualisation, Hypervisors and VMs Hardware technologies memory, IO and CPU virtualisation Virtualisation performance Applications of Virtualisation Cloud middleware technologies (Eucalyptus and Nimbus)

Te a c h i n g M e t h o d Lectures and practical lab sessions Assessment Method Assessment (100%) Recommended Reading
Reviewed SB 15/7/2010

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MSc Course Brochure

Visualisation
Aims To introduce the techniques and tools for advanced visualisation, including distributed high performance, high resolution visualisation. This module builds on the Graphics and GUI one, introducing higher level visualisation techniques and toolkits for scientific and information visualisation and virtual reality.

Intended Learning Outcomes On successful completion of this module the student will be able to: Know the state of the art tools and techniques and tools for data visualisation. Use visualisation toolkits for effectively for data visualisation Know the middleware and their use for remote visualisation

Syllabus

Introduction to visualisation techniques Introduction to a visualisation toolkits such as VTK and VRJuggler Introduction to remote visualisation middleware such as VirtualGL for remote visualisation

Te a c h i n g M e t h o d Mainly practical hands-on tutorials and introductory lectures. Assessment Method Assignment (100%) Recommended Reading
Updated LS 29-06-10

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Computational & Software Techniques in Engineering

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MSc Course Brochure

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Computational & Software Techniques in Engineering

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MSc Course Brochure

MSc Thesis Titles and Student Work


A list of some of the MSc thesis titles published over the past four years is given below. This is followed by some posters illustrating examples of student work. Thesis topics range over a wide area and involve the application or extension of material covered in the course to a practical problem in CAE, DSIP, GCEE or SETC (a new option). Many are based upon active industrial contract work carried out in the group and all involve some form of software development.

2005-2006
CAE option:

Modelling the Dispersion of Gases using CFD Cellular Decomposition for Point-Snap on Mesh Mesh Surface Flattening for Geodesic Curve Construction IGES/STEP Feature Extraction/Conversion to STEP NC Type File

DSIP option:

Terrain Modelling using Digital Elevation Maps & Fractal Noise Site Security using High Resolution Radar Road-marking Detection Active Contour Models for Image Feature Extraction General Image Processing Software A New Transform for Non-stationary Signals with Nonlinear Variation of Instantaneous Frequency Fatigue Crack Detection by Short Time Cross-Covariance between Spectral Components A New Generic Adaptive Time-frequency Transform and New Higher Order Spectrum Technique Novel Bicoherence based on the Chirp-Fourier Transform Novel use of Wavelets for Transient Signals: Chirp Detection by Wavelets and Crack Detection by Novel Wavelet Bicoherence Multi-camera Video and Still Image Capture for Image Processing High Scan Rate Telemetry Thermocouple Calibration Receiver Software/Hardware Simulator

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MSc Course Brochure

DC&eS option:

Automatic Deployment of Grid Services Storage Service Development using Globus Toolkit Data-Mining on the Grid A Grid-Services Based Architecture for Online Persistent Applications

2006-2007
CAE option:

Development of an Unconstrained Geometry Modelling Tool for 3D Multielement Airfoil Configurations Development of a Computational Design System for the multi-objective Aerodynamic Design Optimisation of 2D Airfoils - Analysis Development of a Computational Design System for the multi-objective Aerodynamic Design Optimisation of 2D Airfoils - Geometry Analytic Solution of Poisseuille Equation CFD Modelling of an Oxidation Ditch Numerical Study of Hydraulic Jump Equations

DSIP option:

Development of Image Analysis Algorithms for Partial Discharge Pattern Recognition Visual Surveillance Scene Flow Analysis Vision Systems for Real-time Driver Assistance Considering Video as a Volume Adding Cartoon Annotations to Live Video Development of the New Transform for Analysing any Nonlinear Frequency Variation of Signal in Time with Doppler Effect Applications Visual Surveillance Scene Inventories Visualisation of Multi-dimensional Geometrical Design Spaces in Parallel Coordinates Development of Novel Time-frequency Signal Processing Technique, ChirpWigner Transform for Processing Transient Signals Image Retrieval for On-line Art Selection

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MSc Course Brochure

DC&eS option:

Development of a Grid Scheduler by using Ant Colony Optimisation MHE Error Report: Reporting Errors on Warehouse Equipment FKI Logistex Manipulating a CMS Parameterised Images Visualising 3D Grid Data Resource Location in Large-Scale Grid Environments Re-implementing C-Miner to Mine File Correlations to Speed up Data Storage System Data Caching Benchmarking Efficiency and Scalability of the Distributive Conjugate Gradient Method X11 Grid Service C Implementation of Geometric Shape Fitting Recurrent Neural Networks for CFD based Optimisation Integrating the OGSA-DAI to the P-Grade Grid Portal The Application of Spatial Data based on GridFTP Visualisation American Option Pricing on ClearSpeed Intelligent Load Balancing

2007-2008
CAE option:

Design Optimisation of Helical Gear Pair in Helicopter Transmission Systems Design Optimisation of Aircraft Turbo Cooler System Geometric Fitting of Airfoil Geometries for Design Optimisation Feature Recognition in CAD Software using a Medial Object Approach Porous Aerostatic Bearing Modelling

DSIP option:

Gas Turbine Condition Monitoring using Wigner Bi-spectrum Intelligent Real-time Fusion Processing Video as a Volume Virtual Musician Air Drum Kit

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MSc Course Brochure

A C++/MFC Based Image Processing Application A Java Tool for Integrated Capture of Medical Imagery Thermal/Optical Image Learning Automatic Number Plate Recognition Adding Cartoon Annotations to Live Video

Grid option:

Grid Based Alumni Grid Based Service for Wireless AMBER Alerts for Missing Kids DIP Teaching Demonstrator Access and Sharing of Distributed Spatial Databases in the Grid Environment with OGSA-DAI The Distributed Spatial Data Discovery Strategy based on Grid Technology Grid Based Visualisation of Distributed Data Sets Lifetime Personal Data Management Adaptive SLA Brokerage Performance Management and Analysis of Enterprise Grids A Service Oriented Architecture for Heterogeneous Data Access Personal Grid: Infinite Personal Data Storage using Free Online Data Space

2008-2009
CAE option:

IVHM Finite Element Modelling of Rivet Failure Simulation of Bird, Hailstone or Projectile Impact on Aircraft Structures Design Bird Strike Resistant Fan Blades Shaped Displacement Shading Finite Element Modelling of a Wind Turbine Finite Element Modelling of a Rivet Joint Virtual Reality Interface Development for the Digital Factory Project

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MSc Course Brochure

SETC option:

GPU N-BODU SGCIB Visualisation of Source Code CUDA Implementation for Training a Harr-like Feature Detector Implementation of an object detection algorithm using Histograms of Oriented Gradients in CUDA technology Automated Design Optimisation

DSIP option:

Facebook Based Face Recognition Volumetric Video Editing SatNav Position Correction from Road Features Salient Object Detection in VAV Footage Crack Detection in Aircraft Engine Blades using Higher Order Spectral Analysis Vibro-acoustical Damage Detection in Turomachinery Novel Signal Processing Techniques for Non-stationary Signals Visual Control and Precision Visual Surveillance Human Contour Tracking using Level Sets

Grid option:

Studies in Parallel Equation Solvers Grid Based Visualisation and Control of Fundamental Applications Ganga, Simplifying the use of the Grid Grid Based CFD Optimisation Parallel Algorithms Flowshop Problem The Dataflow Paradigm Grid Based CFD Application Remote administration of a UAV platform using mobile networks Discovering Human Relationships in Social Networks through Grid Computing Data Mining in Bioinformatics through grid computing environments
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MSc Course Brochure

Image recognition as a grid resource Porting image processing/analysis algorithms on GPUs

2009-2010
ACE option:

A Distributed GIS System Based on OGSA-DAI Grid Resource Discovery inspired by Ant Colonies Encryption with Gestures

CAE option:

Analysis of Aircraft Control Surface Visualisation Modelling using Fractals and CAD Finite Element Modelling of Modelling Rivet Failure

DSIP option:

New digital signal processing techniques for detection of impacts Real time video mosaicing based on SURF Advanced Image Retrieval for on-line Art Selection

SETC option:

Using functional language F# to Solve Numerical Problems Develop parallel code for EMAPS Automating Code Coverage Analysis using Path Instrumentation

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MSc Course Brochure

Computing Facilities
Most of the computing is undertaken in conjunction with Cranfield IT Department, which operates a distributed network system of dual-boot PCs running both Linux and Windows XP. A wide range of industry standard software is available including the major CAE and analysis packages and Visual Studio for software development. Students use this equipment for their computing in the first two terms and for their MSc thesis projects in the second half of the year. Cranfield is linked to the inter-university computer centre network SuperJANET, which gives access to a wide range of application programs at various remote sites. Like most universities in the UK, Cranfield is connected to the Internet via SuperJANET. Cranfield has strong activities in Grid Computing and e-Science/e-Engineering which are led by the Cambridge-Cranfield High Performance Computing Facilities (CCHPCF) and the Centre for Grid Computing (CGC) flagship, which comprises: * A 5-node server cluster * Local Gigabit Ethernet * 25 networked PCs * Grid-oriented storage subsystem to be developed by EPSRC/DTI GOS project * Globus platform * UK e-Science platform * Condor platform * Sun Grid Engine * MPI/PVM

Microsoft Academic Alliance


The university has signed up to the Microsoft Academic Alliance allowing students studying at the institution free access to download a range of full-version Microsoft software products for study use. Microsoft Academic Alliance UK Home Page: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-gb/academic/ To register send an email containing you name, cranfield user ID and MSc course name and school/department details to software@cranfield.ac.uk requesting access to the Microsoft Academic Alliance. You will then be sent details of how to login and download the currently available set of Microsoft Academic Alliance software titles." "Please note that the use of this software is purely for academic purposes. Access to MSDNAA will expire when you have finished your course at Cranfield, however the software you have downloaded will not expire as it is a perpetual license agreement granted by Microsoft to MSDNAA student users."

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MSc Course Brochure

Academic/Industrial Steering Committee


The Steering Committee meets twice a year and acts in an advisory role, assessing the content of the course and its relevance to present industrial needs. A number of members also attend the annual student thesis presentations which take place at the end of July, a month or so before the end of the course. Prof Chris Thompson, Head, AMAC. Mr Ed Lambourne, Delcam International. Prof Chris Greenough, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory Mr Tony Lawrence, Cranfield Computer Centre. Mrs Kath Tipping, AMAC, Cranfield. Dr Adam Vile, Excelian Mr Ray Goult, LMR Systems Mr Nigel Sedgwick, Cambridge Algorithmica. Dr Peter Sherar, AMAC, Cranfield. Dr Nigel Knowles, Consultant formerly Director Technology WS Atkins Ltd. Mr Paul Mulvanny, EnterprisingIT Sanjiv Sharma, Airbus Operations Ltd UK Dr Toby Breckon, AMAC, Cranfield. Dr Stuart Barnes, AMAC, Cranfield. Dr Carol Armitage, AMAC, Cranfield. Dr Karl Jenkins, AMAC, Cranfield. Professor Leonid Gelman, , AMAC, Cranfield. Dr Mark Stillwell, AMAC, Cranfield.

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MSc Course Brochure

Principal Course Lecturers


Professor Chris Thompson, FIMA
Chris Thompson is head of the Applied Mathematics and Computing Group at Cranfield. He is director of research and the PhD programmes run by the Group. After leaving Oxford University with a BA in Mathematics and an MSc in Numerical Analysis, he joined the Applied Maths Group at AEA Technology, Harwell. He has also worked at the Advanced Computer Research Facility, Argonne National Laboratory, Chicago and at Bergen Scientific Centre, IBM. He holds a DPhil from the University of Bergen. Current Research Interests include: the application of CFD to industrial processes such as separation and heat exchange; the development of fast adaptive algorithms for CFD problems; and the application of parallel computers and the development of software tools for large scale problems. He has written over 60 papers in these areas.

D r To b y B r e c k o n
Toby Breckon is primarily responsible for delivery of elements of the Digital Signal and Image Processing option of the MSc in Computational and Software Techniques in Engineering in addition to ongoing research interests into computer vision, image processing, visualisation and robotic sensing. He holds a PhD in Artificial Intelligence from the University of Edinburgh, is a Chartered Engineer (CEng) and an Accredited Imaging Scientist (AIS) of the Royal Photographic Society. Before joining Cranfield in 2006, he held a lecturing post at the University of Edinburgh and has prior experience as a mobile robotics researcher with the UK MoD and QinetiQ.Personal homepage: http://www.cranfield.ac.uk/~toby.breckon/

To n y L a w r e n c e
Tony Lawrence is a Senior CAE Software Consultant at Cranfield Computer Centre. He joined Cranfield in 1978 after working as a Scientific Officer for the UK Atomic Energy Authority and as a Senior Engineering Analyst in the Applied Computing and Mathematics Department at a large multi-national company's Research and Development Centre. At Cranfield, his main interests are CAE and Engineering Analysis with particular emphasis on Finite Element Modelling techniques. Tony is responsible for a substantial CAE teaching programme on campus and for a number of long courses. He also lectures on aspects of CAE and Engineering Analysis to short courses for industry and carries out consultancy work for companies

Dr Stuart Barnes
Stuart Barnes is a Research Fellow in the Applied Mathematics and Computing Group at Cranfield. He received his BSc and MSc degrees in Physics from the University of Kent, and subsequently obtained his PhD degree from Cranfield University for his work on high resolution image registration techniques for measuring material surface strain. Joining Cranfield University as a member of the research staff in 2005, he is currently teaching in the fields of software engineering, parallel programming and computing architectures. His research interests include the use of parallel computational architectures to solve problems in machine vision and numerical computing, and the use of model based methods for software application development.

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MSc Course Brochure

Dr Peter Sherar
Peter Sherar is a lecturer and MSc course director in the Applied Mathematics and Computing Group at Cranfield. He holds degrees in Mathematics from the Universities of London, Warwick and Cranfield. His principal research interest is computational geometry with applications to curve and surface modelling and geometric and solid modelling. He joined Cranfield as a research officer in 1987 and has worked with a number of companies on the implementation of algorithms for geometric design and engineering data transfer.

Professor Leonid Gelman


Leonid Gelman, PhD, Dr. of Sciences (habilitation) is a Professor and Chair of VibroAcoustic Monitoring in the Applied Mathematics & Computing Group (AMAC). He has 34 years experience in vibro-acoustic monitoring of complex mechanical systems (e.g. rotating, reciprocating machinery, etc.) both in industry and academia and leads this direction in AMAC. He has been Principal Investigator on numerous contracts and grants, including grants from the USA National Academy of Sciences, USA National Research Council, USA International Science Foundation, USA Civilian Research and Development Foundation (twice), USA MacArthur Foundation, Lady Davis, Israel, Centro Volta, Italy. Since 2002, he has obtained funding from the EPSRC, DTI, Royal Society and Rolls Royce. His group currently includes 5 Research Fellows. He has held Visiting Professor positions at Milan University-Enitecnologie (Italy), University of South Carolina (USA), Auburn University (USA) and Technion (Israel). He is a Fellow of British Institute of NDT and Institution of Diagnostic Engineers and Chairman of the Condition Monitoring and Diagnostic Technology Committee of the British Institute of NDT. He has published 2 book chapters, 65 journal papers, 17 patents and 70 Conference papers, including 7 keynote and 5 invited papers and given 49 invited lectures in the USA, UK, France and Italy. He is editor-in-chief of the book series Condition monitoring (Coxmoor, UK). He has participated in the scientific boards of numerous international conferences and chaired numerous structured sessions.

Dr K ar l Jenkins
Karl Jenkins is a senior lecturer in the Applied Mathematics and Computing Group at Cranfield. After leaving Manchester University with a PhD in numerical and experimental fluid flows, he joined the Computational Fluid Dynamics Laboratory at Cambridge University. He has also worked for Allott and Lomax consulting engineers and Davy Distington Ltd working with various commercial CFD codes such as FLOW3D (Los Alamos). Dr Jenkins is currently a consultant for Cambridge Flow Solutions Ltd (CFS). He has developed parallel codes for various fluid applications from academic to blue chip industrial companies, such as Rolls Royce plc. Current research interests are in the areas of computational fluid dynamics (CFD), numerical simulation of turbulent combustion and fluid flows, high performance computing (HPC) for fluid dynamics, numerical modelling of industrial problems, eScience grid technology for CFD .

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MSc Course Brochure

Dr Carol Armitage
Carol Armitage is a lecturer and research fellow in the Applied Mathematics and Computing Group of the Department of Process and Systems Engineering. Carol was awarded a PhD from the University of Manchester Institute of Science and Technology for her thesis on turbulence modelling for buoyancy-affected flows. She moved from there to a post-doctoral position in the Department of Engineering at Cambridge University where she studied turbulent combustion in premixed flames using unsteady RANS algorithms. She gained particular experience in extracting flame transfer functions from turbulent combustion CFD calculations. Carol has also developed a novel formulation for investigating primary break up using DNS. Throughout her academic career Dr Armitage has worked in collaboration with industrial clients including British Gas plc., Rolls Royce plc., and Mitsubishi Heavy Industries. Carol has also worked as consultant to Cambridge Flow Solutions Ltd.

Kathryn Tipping
Kath Tipping is a mathematics graduate from Bristol University, and also holds a PGCE and a Masters degree in mathematics from the Open University. She has taught mathematics in various schools and colleges, and joined the Cranfield Mathematics Department as a part-time lecturer in 1981. She became Course Director of the Preliminary Year Course in Mechanical engineering in 1990.

Dr Mark Stillwell
Mark Stillwell is a Lecturer in the Applied Mathematics and Computing Group of the School of Engineering at Cranfield University. Prior to joining Cranfield University, he was an INRIA (Institut National de Recherche en Informatique et en Automatique) postdoctoral researcher in the Laboratoire de l'Informatique du Paralllisme at the cole Normale Suprieure de Lyon located in Lyon, France. He obtained his Ph.D. from the University of Hawai`i at Manoa in Honolulu, Hawaii, and holds Masters degrees in mathematics and computer science from the University of Florida in Gainesville, Florida. He is the originator and a core developer of the open source Simgrid SMPI sub-project. SMPI consists of a set of compiler front-ends and compatibility libraries for running real MPI applications in a simulated network environment provided by Simgrid with no or little modification to existing code.

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MSc Course Brochure

Contact Details
Applications for the MSc can be submitted online at: http://www.cranfield.ac.uk/soe/amac/apply.html OR obtained from: Admissions Cranfield University Cranfield, Beds MK43 0AL Tel: +44 1234 758540 Email: admissions@cranfield.ac.uk AMAC Web pages: www.cranfield.ac.uk/soe

If you have questions concerning the course please contact the Course Administrator at the following email address: AMAC-MScAdmin@cranfield.ac.uk, tel: 01234 750111 ext 4746.

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