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16.00 Aerodynamics Lecture Prof. Annalisa L. Weigel 10 February 2004

16.00 Aerodynamics Lecture

Prof. Annalisa L. Weigel 10 February 2004

Lecture outline q Motivation q Lift • Balloons – buoyancy and Archimedes • Airplanes –

Lecture outline

q

Motivation

q

Lift

Balloons – buoyancy and Archimedes

• Airplanes – airfoils and Bernoulli

q

Drag

 

• Profile drag

Induced drag

q

Effects of airfoil geometry on lift and drag

What is Aerodynamics? q “A branch of dynamics that deals with the motion of air

What is Aerodynamics?

q “A branch of dynamics that deals with the motion of air and other gaseous fluids, and with the forces acting on bodies in motion relative to such fluids” Webster’s Dictionary

Let’s discuss … q What does “ aerodynamic ” mean to you? q In what

Let’s discuss

q What does aerodynamicmean to you?

q In what other areas or products besides airplanes does aerodynamics matter?

Aerodynamics matters Source: Lexus Source: Land and Water Fund of the Source: Boeing Source: lancearmstrong.com

Aerodynamics matters

Source: Lexus Source: Land and Water Fund of the Source: Boeing Source: lancearmstrong.com Rockies
Source: Lexus
Source:
Land and
Water Fund
of the
Source: Boeing
Source: lancearmstrong.com
Rockies
Source: Japan-Guide.com Source: Gold Racing
Source: Japan-Guide.com
Source: Gold Racing
Rockies Source: Japan-Guide.com Source: Gold Racing Source: Personalizedgolfballs. com 10 February 2004 16.00

Source:

Personalizedgolfballs.

com

Lift and Balloons q Buoyancy is easiest way of generating lift q Archimedes principle •

Lift and Balloons

q Buoyancy is easiest way of generating lift q Archimedes principle

Difference in pressure on surface of a body = volume displaced

Weight of fluid displaced = buoyant force

q

Net force

F net = rgV

q

Static equilibrium

m payload = (r r int )V

Ballooning on Mars? q We want to design a balloon to carry a 2- kg

Ballooning on Mars?

q We want to design a balloon to carry a 2- kg payload on Mars. What gas should we use in the balloon, and how big does the balloon have to be? q Helpful links:

http://www.members.axion.net/~enrique/densi

ty.html

http://www.flyers.org/simulators/atmospheric.h

tm

Airfoil terminology Source: Newman, Dava J., Interactive Aerospace Engineering and Design 10 February 2004 16.00

Airfoil terminology

Airfoil terminology Source: Newman, Dava J., Interactive Aerospace Engineering and Design 10 February 2004 16.00

Source: Newman, Dava J., Interactive Aerospace Engineering and Design

Aspect ratio q Aspect ratio = b 2 / S, where b is span; S

Aspect ratio

q Aspect ratio = b 2 / S, where b is span; S is wing area

For rectangular wing, AR = b/c

q For a table of aspects ratios for different vehicles, check out

http://www.aerodyn.org/Wings/ar-

tables.html

Comparing aspect ratios Source: NASA Source: http://www.geocities.com/CapeCana veral/8629/f14.htm Source: Boeing

Comparing aspect ratios

Source: NASA Source: http://www.geocities.com/CapeCana veral/8629/f14.htm Source: Boeing Source: HowStuffWorks.com
Source: NASA
Source:
http://www.geocities.com/CapeCana
veral/8629/f14.htm
Source: Boeing
Source: HowStuffWorks.com
Source: Concordesst.com
FoilSim q NASA software you will use in your homework assignment q http://www.lerc.nasa.gov/WWW/K-

FoilSim

q

NASA software you will use in your homework assignment

q

http://www.lerc.nasa.gov/WWW/K-

12/airplane/foil2.html

Lift and drag on airplanes q Lift and drag are mechanical forces generated on the

Lift and drag on airplanes

q Lift and drag are mechanical forces generated on the surface of an object as it interacts with a fluid

on the surface of an object as it interacts with a fluid Source: Newman, Dava J.,

Source: Newman, Dava J., Interactive Aerospace Engineering and Design

What is lift? q q Lift is the force that holds an aircraft in the

What is lift?

q

q

Lift is the force that holds an aircraft in the air

L = (P l – P u )S

Coefficient of lift: empirical nondimensional parameter for easier evaluation of lift

C L = L / (1/2 rn 2 S)

q = dynamic pressure = 1/2 rn 2

• Substituting in q, L = qSC L

Bernoulli and pitot tubes q q Simple form of Bernoulli ’s equation • P +

Bernoulli and pitot tubes

q

q

Simple form of Bernoulli’s equation

• P + 1/2 rn 2 = P 0

Basis of pitot tube, which measures airplane velocity

P 0 Basis of pitot tube, which measures airplane velocity • v = √ 2(( P

v = 2((P 0 – P)/r)

Source: Newman, Dava J., Interactive Aerospace Engineering and Design

What do pitot tubes look like? 10 February 2004 16.00 Aerodynamics Lecture 15

What do pitot tubes look like?

What do pitot tubes look like? 10 February 2004 16.00 Aerodynamics Lecture 15
What do pitot tubes look like? 10 February 2004 16.00 Aerodynamics Lecture 15
What is drag? q Aerodynamic force that opposes an aircraft’ s motion through the air,

What is drag?

q

Aerodynamic force that opposes an aircraft’s motion through the air, caused by interaction and contact of a solid body with a fluid

q

Aerodynamic friction

q Aerodynamic resistance to motion q Depends on wing shape, angle of attack, effects of air viscosity and compressibility

Profile drag q Related to viscous effects of flow over lifting surface q Also called

Profile drag

q Related to viscous effects of flow over lifting surface q Also called form drag” due to separation of boundary layer around the objects form

separation of boundary layer around the object ’ s form Source: Newman, Dava J., Interactive Aerospace

Source: Newman, Dava J., Interactive Aerospace Engineering and Design

Profile drag (cont.) q Dimples = greater skin friction drag = greater distance to separation

Profile drag (cont.)

q Dimples = greater skin friction drag = greater distance to separation of flow = lower profile drag

distance to separation of flow = lower profile drag Source: Newman, Dava J., Interactive Aerospace Engineering

Source: Newman, Dava J., Interactive Aerospace Engineering and Design

Induced drag q Arises from 3-dimensional effects of a wing caused by downwash velocity near

Induced drag

q Arises from 3-dimensional effects of a wing caused by downwash velocity near wing tip

q Vortices create a downward velocity component at the wing q Non-dimensional coefficient of induced drag:

C D I = C L 2 / eAR

Induced drag Source: Newman, Dava J., Interactive Aerospace Engineering and Design 10 February 2004 16.00

Induced drag

Induced drag Source: Newman, Dava J., Interactive Aerospace Engineering and Design 10 February 2004 16.00 Aerodynamics

Source: Newman, Dava J., Interactive Aerospace Engineering and Design

Total drag q Total drag = profile drag + induced drag q Coefficient of total

Total drag

q

Total drag = profile drag + induced drag

q

Coefficient of total drag

C D TOTAL = C D 0 + C L 2 / eAR

Class exercise q You and your partner are Senior Aerodynamics Consultants at BlueSky Enterprises. Your

Class exercise

q You and your partner are Senior Aerodynamics Consultants at BlueSky Enterprises. Your clients have challenged you to apply your extensive aerodynamics expertise to design an innovation for an existing product or service of your choosing.

q They want your answer in 10 minutes. q Prepare a 1-minute pitch on your product innovation to present to the clients.

q Caveat: You can’t pick any of the aerodynamics application areas we discussed earlier! Be creative.

Effects of camber L i f t C u r v e Drag Polar Curve

Effects of camber

Lift Curve

Effects of camber L i f t C u r v e Drag Polar Curve Source:

Drag Polar Curve

of camber L i f t C u r v e Drag Polar Curve Source: Newman,

Source: Newman, Dava J., Interactive Aerospace Engineering and Design

Effect of skin friction drag Lift Curve Drag Curve Source: Newman, Dava J., Interactive Aerospace

Effect of skin friction drag

Lift Curve

Effect of skin friction drag Lift Curve Drag Curve Source: Newman, Dava J., Interactive Aerospace Engineering

Drag Curve

Effect of skin friction drag Lift Curve Drag Curve Source: Newman, Dava J., Interactive Aerospace Engineering

Source: Newman, Dava J., Interactive Aerospace Engineering and Design