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Health, Education, Social Protection News & Notes 06/2013

A bi-weekly newsletter supported by GIZ (Deutsche Gesellschaft fr Internationale Zusammenarbeit)


17 March 2013
You can download back issues (2005 - 2013) of this newsletter at: http://german-practice-collection.org/en/links/newsletters/hesp-news-and-notes or search all issues there with:

Table of Contents: BOOKS ................................................................................ 4


Human Development Report 2013 - The Rise of the South: Human Progress in a Diverse World ....................................................................................................................................... 4 Promoting Microinsurance in Ghana....................................................................................... 4 The European health report 2012: charting the way to well-being.......................................... 4 Global Status Report on Road Safety 2013: Supporting a Decade of Action......................... 5

ONLINE PUBLICATIONS .................................................... 5


Global Health.............................................................................................................. 5
Medicine for global health: can "simple interventions" improve the worldwide burden of disease? .................................................................................................................................. 5 Governance Challenges in Global Health ............................................................................... 5 The Global Burden of Disease: Generating Evidence, Guiding Policy ................................... 6 The Moral Imperative toward Cost-Effectiveness in Global Health......................................... 6

HIV - AIDS - STI ......................................................................................................... 6


Mortality in well controlled HIV in the continuous antiretroviral therapy arms of the SMART and ESPRIT trials compared with the general population ...................................................... 6 Impact of an Innovative Approach to Prevent Mother-to-Child Transmission of HIV - Malawi, July 2011 - September 2012 ................................................................................................... 7 Big prevention blow as women reject one-a-day ARV: Understanding the Results of VOICE ................................................................................................................................................. 7 The Cost and Impact of Scaling Up Pre-exposure Prophylaxis for HIV Prevention: A Systematic Review of Cost-Effectiveness Modelling Studies ................................................. 7 Global Estimates of Syphilis in Pregnancy and Associated Adverse Outcomes: Analysis of Multinational Antenatal Surveillance Data............................................................................... 8

Sexual & Reproductive Health .................................................................................... 8


Colonizing African Values: How the U.S. Christian Right is Transforming Sexual Politics in Africa ....................................................................................................................................... 8 WHO Guidelines on Preventing Early Pregnancy and Poor Reproductive Outcomes Among Adolescents in Developing Countries ..................................................................................... 8 Burkina Faso as a leader in the elimination of female genital mutilation ................................ 9 The night is another country: Impunity and violence against transgender women human rights defenders in Latin America............................................................................................ 9 Mobile for Reproductive Health (m4RH) ................................................................................. 9 Informing family planning research priorities: a perspective from the front line in Asia ........ 10

Maternal & Child Health............................................................................................ 10


Delivering at home or in a health facility? Health-seeking behaviour of women and the role of traditional birth attendants in Tanzania ............................................................................. 10 Why do women prefer home births in Ethiopia? ................................................................... 10 Results-Based Financing of Maternal and Newborn Health Care ........................................ 11 Obstetric fistula in Southern Sudan: situational analysis and Key Informant Method to estimate prevalence .............................................................................................................. 12

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Local health workers perceptions of substandard care in the management of obstetric hemorrhage in rural Malawi................................................................................................... 12

Malaria ..................................................................................................................... 12
Design, implementation and evaluation of a national campaign to deliver 18 million free long-lasting insecticidal nets to uncovered sleeping spaces in Tanzania............................. 12 Experience and challenges from clinical trials with malaria vaccines in Africa..................... 13 Malaria Indicator Survey: Basic Documentation for Survey Design and Implementation..... 13 Increasing Incidence of Plasmodium knowlesi Malaria following Control of P. falciparum and P. vivax Malaria in Sabah, Malaysia ..................................................................................... 13 Tackling the malaria problem in the South-East Asia Region: Need for a change in policy? ............................................................................................................................................... 14

Tuberculosis ............................................................................................................. 14
Community-Based Tuberculosis Prevention and Care: Why and how to get involved......... 14

Other Infectious Diseases......................................................................................... 14


How Effective Is School-Based Deworming for the Community-Wide Control of SoilTransmitted Helminths? ........................................................................................................ 14 Evolution of a pandemic - A(H1N1) 2009.............................................................................. 15

Non-communicable Diseases ................................................................................... 15


Addressing the Gaps in Global Policy and Research for Non-Communicable Diseases ..... 15 Chronic Non-Communicable Disease as a New Epidemic in Africa: Focus on The Gambia15

Food & Nutrition........................................................................................................ 16


2012 Global Hunger Index .................................................................................................... 16 2012 Global Food Policy Report ........................................................................................... 16 Ready-to-use food-allocation policy to reduce the effects of childhood undernutrition in developing countries ............................................................................................................. 16 Womens rights and the right to food .................................................................................... 17

Essential Medicines .................................................................................................. 17


The World Medicines Situation 2011: Access to Controlled Medicines ................................ 17 The story of artesunate-mefloquine (ASMQ), innovative partnerships in drug development: case study ............................................................................................................................. 17

Social Protection....................................................................................................... 18
Improving health and education through conditional cash transfers (CCTs) ........................ 18 Social protection systems in Latin America and the Caribbean: Cuba ................................. 18 Social security coverage extension in the BRICS ................................................................. 18

Water, Sanitation & Hygiene..................................................................................... 19


Practical Guidance for Measuring Handwashing Behavior: 2013 Update ............................ 19

Health Systems & Research ..................................................................................... 19


Equity Watch: Assessing progress towards equity in health Tanzania................................. 19 An exploratory study of the policy process and early implementation of the free NHIS coverage for pregnant women in Ghana............................................................................... 19 Commercial Sector Performance-based Financing Offers Lessons for Public Health Supply Chains in Developing Countries ............................................................................................ 20 Twelve myths about systematic reviews for health system policymaking rebutted .............. 20 Patient-centred access to health care: conceptualising access at the interface of health systems and populations....................................................................................................... 20 Developing a New Understanding of Enabling Health and Wellbeing in Europe.................. 21 Determining quantitative targets for public funding of tuberculosis research and development .......................................................................................................................... 21 Performance Assessment in Primary Health Care: A Systematic Literature Review ........... 21

Information & Communication Technology ............................................................... 22


mHealth for Midwives: A Call to Action ................................................................................. 22 Mobile-izing Health Workers in Rural India ........................................................................... 22 How Can ICTs Help Address Health Challenges in Low and Middle-income Countries? .... 22 A Reality Checkpoint for Mobile Health: Three Challenges to Overcome ............................ 23 Survey on ICT for HIV/AIDS Preventive Education: Are the teenagers forgotten in developing countries? ........................................................................................................... 23 Identifying Measures Used for Assessing Quality of YouTube Videos with Patient Health Information: A Review of Current Literature.......................................................................... 23 m-Enabled Inclusive Business Models: Applications for Health ........................................... 24

Education ................................................................................................................. 24
Broadband for schools? ........................................................................................................ 24

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A Monitoring and Evaluation Scheme for an ICT-Supported Education Program in Schools ............................................................................................................................................... 24 Aid and Universal Primary Education.................................................................................... 25

Harm Reduction & Drug Use .................................................................................... 25


National Drug Use Survey Maldives - 2011/2012 ................................................................. 25

Millennium Development Goals ................................................................................ 25


Now you too can vote on post-2015 goals ............................................................................ 25 Bringing evidence to policy to achieve health-related MDGs for all: justification and design of the EPI-4 project in China, India, Indonesia, and Vietnam ................................................... 26

Development Assistance .......................................................................................... 26


The Impact of Official Development Aid on Maternal and Reproductive Health Outcomes: A Systematic Review ................................................................................................................ 26 The Allocation of German Aid: Self-interest and Government Ideology ............................... 26 Why Donors of Foreign Aid Do Not Coordinate: The Role of Competition for Export Markets and Political Support ............................................................................................................. 27 Ca$h On Dliver: A new approach to foreign aid................................................................ 27 Implementing a Results-Based Approach to Strengthen IDA Support for Fragile States..... 27

Others ...................................................................................................................... 28
Venomous Snakes of Nepal: A photographic guide ............................................................. 28 Report of the Special Rapporteur on torture and other cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment ....................................................................................................... 28 Sun Exposure Behavior and Protection: Recommendations for Travelers........................... 29

ELECTRONIC RESOURCES ............................................ 29


Global Burden of Disease (GBD) Visualizations ................................................................... 29 Southern African Journal of HIV Medicine - Vol. 14 No. 1 .................................................... 29

INTERESTING WEB SITES .............................................. 30


Open Development Technology Alliance .............................................................................. 30 Bangladesh Health Population and Nutrition Development Partner Consortium.................. 30

TRAINING OPPORTUNITIES............................................ 30
2 Blended E-learning course Pension Systems in Southeast Asia.................................. 30 Clinic on the Meaningful Modelling of Epidemiological Data ................................................ 31 st 31 Annual Graduate Summer Institute of Epidemiology and Biostatistics .......................... 31
nd

CONFERENCES................................................................ 32
Workshop Report: Community-Based Rehabilitation (CBR) & Persons with Intellectual Disabilities ............................................................................................................................. 32

CARTOON ......................................................................... 32 TIPS & TRICKS ................................................................. 32


Quick deletion of whole words in MS WORD........................................................................ 32 4 Shortcuts to Find Things Fast with Firefox......................................................................... 33

Fair Use: This Newsletter is produced under the principles of 'fair use'. We source relevant news articles, resources and research documents and strive to attribute sources by providing reference and/or direct links to authors and websites. Disclaimer: The views expressed in this newsletter, do not necessarily represent those of GIZ or the editor of HESP-News & Notes. While we make every effort to ensure that all facts and figures quoted by authors are accurate, GIZ and the editor of the Newsletter cannot be held responsible for any inaccuracies contained in any articles. Please contact dneuvians@gmx.de if you believe that errors are contained in any article and we will investigate and provide feedback.

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BOOKS
Human Development Report 2013 - The Rise of the South: Human Progress in a Diverse World
by Khalid Malik, Maurice Kugler, Milorad Kovacevic et al. United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), March 2013 216 pp. 5.7. MB: http://hdr.undp.org/en/media/HDR_2013_EN_complete.pdf The 2013 Human Development Report examines the profound shift in global dynamics driven by the fast-rising new powers of the developing world and its long-term implications for human development. It identifies more than 40 countries in the developing world that have done better than had been expected in human development terms in r ecent decades, with their progress accelerating markedly over the past ten years. The Report analyzes the causes and consequences of these countries achievements and the challenges that they face today and in the coming decades. ***

Promoting Microinsurance in Ghana


Microinsurance as a Means of Insurance Sector Development by Jan Meissner, Rob Gruijters, Teresa Wyndham-Smith National Insurance Commission (NIC), Ghana and Deutsche Gesellschaft fr Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ), November 2012 243 pp. 3.0 MB:
http://promigh.com/docs/Promoting%20Microinsurance%20in%20Ghana_Full%20Book.pdf

The book provides a broad overview of inclusive insurance market development in Ghana. It seeks to identify best practices and offers concrete recommendations on the way forward for the development of (micro)insurance. The authors employ a holistic a pproach that strives to address challenges to successful microinsurance implementation at all levels of the insurance sector: from government policy through to the end customer. ***

The European health report 2012: charting the way to well-being


by Claudia Stein, Ritu Sadana, Enrique Loyola et al. World Health Organization, 2013 175 pp. 11.5 MB: http://www.euro.who.int/__data/assets/pdf_file/0003/184161/TheEuropean-Health-Report-2012,-FULL-REPORT-w-cover.pdf By describing health in Europe, this report provides policy-makers and public health professionals with the epidemiological evidence base that underpins Health 2020 and its six overarching targets. In addition, it sets out the agreed approach to monitoring pr ogress towards Health 2020, outlines the collaborative agenda to address the challenges ahead and makes the case for measuring well-being as a marker of progress in health. HESP-News & Notes - 06/2013 - page 4

Global Status Report on Road Safety 2013: Supporting a Decade of Action


by Tami Toroyan, Kacem Iaych, Margie Peden et al. World Health Organization, 2013 318 pp. 15.5 MB(!):
http://www.who.int/iris/bitstream/10665/78256/1/9789241564564_eng.pdf

Road traffic injuries are the eighth leading cause of death globally, and the leading cause of death for young people aged 15-29. Strategies exist that are proven to reduce road traffic injuries and a number of countries have successfully used these strategies to reduce their road traffic deaths. The report shows that there has been no overall reduction in the number of people killed on the worlds roads, however, this plateau should be considered in the context of a corresponding 15% global increase in the number of registered vehicles.

ONLINE PUBLICATIONS
Global Health Medicine for global health: can "simple interventions" improve the worldwide burden of disease?
by Gretchen Birbeck BMC Medicine 2013, 11:72 (14 March 2013) 5 pp. 101 kB: http://www.biomedcentral.com/content/pdf/1741-7015-11-72.pdf Improvements to medical practice and delivery of treatment has been the focus of many international collaborations aiming to address the delivery of appropriate health care in low- and middle-income countries. However, this is compounded by various social, cultural as well as resource allocation issues. This Editorial marks the launch of an article collection on Medicine for Global Health, and here, guest editor Gretchen Birbeck discusses the challenges, importance and increasing relevance of global health. ***

Governance Challenges in Global Health


by Julio Frenk, and Suerie Moon N Engl J Med 2013; 368:936-942; March 7, 2013 7 pp. 480 kB: http://www.nejm.org/doi/pdf/10.1056/NEJMra1109339 Global health is at the threshold of a new era. Few times in history has the world faced challenges as complex as those now posed by a trio of threats: first, the unfinished agenda of infections, undernutrition, and reproductive health problems; second, the rising global burden of non-communicable diseases and their associated risk factors, such as smoking and obesity; and third, the challenges arising from globalization itself, such as the health effects of climate change and trade policies, which demand engagement outside the traditional health sector. A robust response to this complex picture requires HESP-News & Notes - 06/2013 - page 5

improved governance of health systems - certainly at the national level but also at a worldwide level in what could be thought of as the global health system. ***

The Global Burden of Disease: Generating Evidence, Guiding Policy


Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME), University of Washington, 2013 51 pp. 7.3 MB:
http://www.healthmetricsandevaluation.org/sites/default/files/policy_report/2 011/GBD_Generating%20Evidence_Guiding%20Policy%20FINAL.pdf

The publication provides an overview of the reasons why the Global Burden of Disease (GBD) is an essential tool for evidence-based health policymaking and summarizes the main findings of the Global Burden of Diseases, Injuries, and Risk Factors Study 2010 (GBD 2010). The study also estimated 67 potentially preventable causes of ill health, or risk factors, such as smoking, high blood pressure, and household air pollution. ***

The Moral Imperative toward Cost-Effectiveness in Global Health


by Toby Ord Center for Global Development, March 2013 12 pp. 296 kB: http://www.cgdev.org/files/1427016_file_moral_imperative_cost_effectiveness.pdf Getting good value for the money with scarce resources is a substantial moral issue for global health. In this essay the author explores the moral relevance of costeffectiveness, a major tool for capturing the relationship between resources and outcomes, by illustrating what is lost in moral terms for global health when costeffectiveness is ignored. He suggests to create an active process of reviewing and analyzing global health interventions to deliver the bulk of global health funds to the very best.

HIV - AIDS - STI Mortality in well controlled HIV in the continuous antiretroviral therapy arms of the SMART and ESPRIT trials compared with the general population
by Alison J. Rodger, Rebecca Lodwick, Mauro Schechter et al. AIDS 2013, 27, Issue 6:973-979 7 pp. 226 kB: http://journals.lww.com/aidsonline/documents/mortality_in_well_c ontrolled_HIV_QAD_27_6.pdf Life expectancy for people living with HIV has been steadily rising - approaching, but not quite achieving, that of the uninfected population in most studies. This analysis compared the rate of death among HIV-infected patients with relatively preserved or reconHESP-News & Notes - 06/2013 - page 6

stituted immune function with that of the general population. It found that, for those with a CD4+ cell count >500/mm3, there was no excess mortality. The finding of increased risk of mortality at counts below 500/mm3 adds further support for early initiation of HIV therapy. ***

Impact of an Innovative Approach to Prevent Mother-to-Child Transmission of HIV - Malawi, July 2011 - September 2012
Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR), March 1, 2013; 62(08);148-151 16 pp. 680 kB: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/pdf/wk/mm6208.pdf In 2011 the Malawi Ministry of Health (MOH) implemented an innovative approach (called Option B+), in which all HIV-infected pregnant and breastfeeding women are eligible for lifelong antiretroviral therapy (ART) regardless of CD4 count. The number of pregnant and breastfeeding women started on ART per quarter increased by 748%, from 1,257 in the second quarter of 2011 (before Option B+ implementation) to 10,663 in the third quarter of 2012 (1 year after implementation). Option B+ is an important innovation that could accelerate progress in Malawi and other countries toward the goal of eliminating mother-to-child transmission of HIV worldwide. ***

Big prevention blow as women reject one-a-day ARV: Understanding the Results of VOICE
Microbicide Trials Network (MTN), 3 March 2013 5 pp. 245 kB: http://www.health-e.org.za/documents/ecc8d02b3c9922ccab13845f83a3c642.pdf VOICE Vaginal and Oral Interventions to Control the Epidemic was a major HIV prevention trial that tested whether antiretroviral (ARV) medicines commonly used to treat people with HIV are safe and effective in preventing sexual transmission of HIV in women. One of the lead investigators of the University of Washington in Seattle, confirmed that their results showed that daily use of the pills or microbicide was neither effective nor acceptable to the more than 5,000 African women who were predominantly young, unmarried and known to be at high risk of HIV. ***

The Cost and Impact of Scaling Up Pre-exposure Prophylaxis for HIV Prevention: A Systematic Review of Cost-Effectiveness Modelling Studies
by Gabriela B. Gomez, Annick Borquez, Kelsey K. Case et al. PLoS Med 10(3): e1001401 (12 March 2013) 16 pp. 347 kB:
http://www.plosmedicine.org/article/fetchObjectAttachment.action;jsessionid=265CB33C3BCC036B E64C5FC90FD03673?uri=info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pmed.1001401&representation=PDF

The findings of this study suggest that Pre-exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP) could be a cost-effective tool to reduce new HIV infections in some settings. However, the costHESP-News & Notes - 06/2013 - page 7

effectiveness of PrEP is dependent upon cost, the epidemic context, program coverage and prioritization strategies, participants adherence to the drug regimen, and PrEP efficacy estimates. These findings will aid decision makers quantify and compare the r eductions in HIV incidence that could be achieved by implementing a PrEP program. ***

Global Estimates of Syphilis in Pregnancy and Associated Adverse Outcomes: Analysis of Multinational Antenatal Surveillance Data
by Lori Newman, Mary Kamb, Sarah Hawkes, Gabriela Gomez et al. PLoS Med 10(2): e1001396 (26 February 2013) 10 pp. 1.6 MB:
http://www.plosmedicine.org/article/fetchObjectAttachment.action;jsessionid=06201549069AF78E7 31B1F4A3AAE6650?uri=info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pmed.1001396&representation=PDF

Syphilis continues to affect large numbers of pregnant women, causing substantial perinatal morbidity and mortality that could be prevented by early testing and treatment. In this analysis, most adverse outcomes occurred among women who attended antenatal care (ANC) but were not tested or treated for syphilis, highlighting the need to improve the quality of ANC as well as ANC coverage. In addition, improved ANC data on syphilis testing coverage, positivity, and treatment are needed.

Sexual & Reproductive Health Colonizing African Values: How the U.S. Christian Right is Transforming Sexual Politics in Africa
by Kapya John Kaoma Political Research Associates, 2012 68 pp. 3.2 MB: http://www.sxpolitics.org/wpcontent/uploads/2012/08/colonizingafricanvaluespra.pdf This paper reports on the impact of Christian conservatism from United States on human rights policies in Africa. A number of churches are reported in this paper to be working in Africa to promote US family values, campaigning against condom use to prevent HIV transmission, claiming that family planning is a Western conspiracy to r educe African development, and supporting campaigns to pursue the death penalty for gays and lesbians. The author argues that government and civil society should confront the myths of human rights advocacy being western neo-colonialism, noting indigenous African human rights agendas and support African advocacy to respect human rights for all. ***

WHO Guidelines on Preventing Early Pregnancy and Poor Reproductive Outcomes Among Adolescents in Developing Countries
by Alma Virginia Camacho, Venkatraman Chandra-Mouli, Ahmet Metin Gulmezoglu et al. World Health Organization, 2011

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208 pp. 1.4 MB: http://whqlibdoc.who.int/publications/2011/9789241502214_eng.pdf This document provides what the World Health Organization (WHO) considers a robust evidence base to help develop or reshape national policies and strategies. The guidelines help to ensure that available resources are spent on optimal approaches to pr event early pregnancies among adolescents, and on reducing morbidity and mortality associated with pregnancy and childbirth. ***

Burkina Faso as a leader in the elimination of female genital mutilation


by Jessica Colombo Consultancy Africa Intelligence (Pty) Ltd., 04 March 2013 Read online at:
http://www.consultancyafrica.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=1243 :burkina-faso-as-a-leader-in-the-elimination-of-female-genital-mutilation&catid=59:gender-issues-discussion-papers&Itemid=267

This paper presents Burkina Fasos 20-year engagement in the fight against female genital mutilation (FGM). Starting with an overview of the international and regional legislation that protects women and girls from this harmful practice, and outlining the background to FGM in the country, the paper highlights the successful interventions that Burkina Faso has implemented so far - interventions which countries worldwide could also adopt in their struggle to put an end to FGM. ***

The night is another country: Impunity and violence against transgender women human rights defenders in Latin America
Compiled by the Red Latinoamericana y del Caribe de Personas Trans (REDLACTRANS), Latin American and Caribbean Transgender Network, and the International HIV/ AIDS Alliance, 2013 44 pp. 404 kB: http://www.aidsalliance.org/includes/Publication/Violencia-e-impunidadEnglish.-%20Ver1.1.pdf This report analyzes the violence to which transgender women human rights defenders are subjected in Latin American countries and the impunity enjoyed by the perpetrators of such violence. By describing individual cases, the document details the main human rights violations suffered by transgender women defenders and shows the direct responsibility that States have when it comes to respecting, protecting and promoting those rights. The final section contains recommendations drawn up jointly with repr esentatives of transgender women human rights defenders from Honduras and Guatemala. ***

Mobile for Reproductive Health (m4RH)


FHI 360 PROGRESS (Program Research for Strengthening Services), 2011 16 pp. 2.7 MB:
http://m4rh.fhi360.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/10/m4RH-Booklet1.pdf

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This booklet provides the steps, processes and lessons learned in developing, implementing and evaluating an opt-in SMS-based health communication program called Mobile for Reproductive Health (m4RH). While this program focuses on disseminating information about family planning (FP), the process and lessons learned are transferable to SMS-based programs within reproductive health or other areas of international public health and development. This booklet is intended for health programmers and researchers. ***

Informing family planning research priorities: a perspective from the front line in Asia
by Eliana Jimenez-Soto, Zoe Dettrick, Sonja Firth et al. Tropical Medicine & International Health - Article first published online: 13 March 2013 4 pp. 48 kB: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/tmi.12094/pdf The authors collated the data necessary to inform local decision-making on scaling up family planning services. Their work highlighted major evidence gaps that have the potential to undermine efforts to plan and invest in family planning and interfere with mon itoring progress. The seven leading knowledge gaps identified are outlined in this paper and provide an essential front-line perspective to inform research priorities for effective scaling-up of family planning.

Maternal & Child Health Delivering at home or in a health facility? Health-seeking behaviour of women and the role of traditional birth attendants in Tanzania
by Constanze Pfeiffer and Rosemarie Mwaipopo BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth 2013, 13:55 (28 February 2013) 20 pp. 171 kB: http://www.biomedcentral.com/content/pdf/1471-2393-13-55.pdf Traditional birth attendants retain an important role in reproductive and maternal health in Tanzania. The Tanzanian Government promotes TBAs in order to provide maternal and neonatal health counselling and initiating timely referral, however, their role officially does not include delivery attendance. Yet, experience illustrates that most TBAs still often handle complicated deliveries. The authors conclude that instead of focusing on the traditional sector more attention should be paid towards improving access to as well as strengthening the health system to guarantee delivery by skilled health personnel. ***

Why do women prefer home births in Ethiopia?


by Solomon Shiferaw, Mark Spigt, Merijn Godefrooij et al. BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth 2013, 13:5 (16 January 2013)

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10 pp. 288 kB: http://www.biomedcentral.com/content/pdf/1471-2393-13-5.pdf The study reports findings from a region where key challenges related to transportation and availability of obstetric services were addressed by an ongoing project, giving a unique opportunity to understand why women might continue to prefer home delivery even when facility based delivery is available at minimal cost. The study indicated the crucial role of proper health care provider-client communication and providing a more client centered and culturally sensitive care if utilization of existing health facilities is to be maximized. ***

Results-Based Financing of Maternal and Newborn Health Care


The following three papers were commissioned and funded by the German Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development (BMZ) through the sector project Programme to Foster Innovation, Learning and Evidence in Health Programmes of the German Development Cooperation (PROFILE) at GIZ Deutsche Gesellschaft fr Internationale Zusammenarbeit. The papers were written for experts working for development cooperation agencies, their national partners and all other actors contemplating starting Results-Based Financing (RBF) operations in low and lower-middle income countries. They are meant to help them decide whether to start an RBF scheme and which type of RBF scheme (or combination of RBF schemes) to choose for their specific challenges and contexts. 1. Evidence Review: Results-Based Financing of Maternal and Newborn Health Care in Low- and Lower-Middle-Income Countries by Anna C. Gorter, Por Ir and Bruno Meessen Sector Project Programme to Foster Innovation, Learning and Evidence in HIV and Health Programmes of German Development Cooperation (PROFILE), February 2013 92 pp. 1.9 MB: http://german-practice-collection.org/en/download-centre/doc_download/1104 2. Peer Review: Results-Based Financing of Maternal and Newborn Health Care in Low and Lower-Middle-Income Countries by Jahn, A., Paul, F. and Beiersmann, C. evaplan GmbH at Universittsklinikum Heidelberg, March 2013 22 pp. 447 kB: http://german-practice-collection.org/en/download-centre/doc_download/1105 3. Evidence Brief: Does Results-Based Financing Improve Maternal and Newborn Health? Sector Project Programme to Foster Innovation, Learning and Evidence in HIV and Health Programmes of German Development Cooperation (PROFILE), March 2013 15 pp. 2.5 MB: http://german-practice-collection.org/en/download-centre/doc_download/1106 *** HESP-News & Notes - 06/2013 - page 11

Obstetric fistula in Southern Sudan: situational analysis and Key Informant Method to estimate prevalence
by Alma J Adler, Samantha Fox, Oona M Campbell et al. BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth 2013, 13:64 (12 March 2013) 16 pp. 180 kB: http://www.biomedcentral.com/content/pdf/1471-2393-13-64.pdf This project was conducted to carry out a situational analysis of fistula services in South Sudan and to pilot test the Key Informant Method (KIM) to estimate the prevalence of fistula in a region of South Sudan. The authors conclude that routine fistula repair services available do not meet the populations needs. Data on fistula are generally poor; the KIM methodology used in South Sudan yielded a lower fistula prevalence than est imates reported previously in the region. ***

Local health workers perceptions of substandard care in the management of obstetric hemorrhage in rural Malawi
by Jogchum Jan Beltman, Thomas van den Akker, Dieudonn Bwirire et al. BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth 2013, 13:39 (15 February 2013) 5 pp. 168 kB: http://www.biomedcentral.com/content/pdf/1471-2393-13-39.pdf In many areas of the world, safe delivery for all women remains an illusion. This study highlights provider/service-related health care deficiencies such as lack of privacy, neglect and improper attitude towards patients. These deficiencies impact on care seeking behaviour of patients and their analysis adds importantly to the concept of substandard care. The authors therefore think that including the observations of health care workers can be of added value.

Malaria Design, implementation and evaluation of a national campaign to deliver 18 million free long-lasting insecticidal nets to uncovered sleeping spaces in Tanzania
by Sabine Renggli, Renata Mandike, Karen Kramer et al. Malaria Journal 2013, 12:85 (4 March 2013) 31 pp. 2.6 MB: http://www.malariajournal.com/content/pdf/1475-2875-12-85.pdf From 2008 to 2010, a mass distribution campaign delivered nine million long-lasting insecticidal nets (LLINs) free-of-charge to children under-five years of age in Tanzania mainland. In 2010 and 2011, a Universal Coverage Campaign (UCC) led by the Ministry of Health and Social Welfare (MoHSW) was implemented to cover all sleeping spaces not yet reached through previous initiatives. Close collaboration among the MoHSW, donors, contracted partners, local government authorities and volunteers made it poss ible to carry out one of the largest LLIN distribution campaigns conducted in Africa to date that will likely result in further decline in child mortality rates in Tanzania, helping to achieve Millennium Development Goals 4 and 6. HESP-News & Notes - 06/2013 - page 12

Experience and challenges from clinical trials with malaria vaccines in Africa
by Grace Mwangoka, Bernhards Ogutu, Beverly Msambichaka Malaria Journal 2013, 12:86 (4 March 2013) 18 pp. 166 kB: http://www.malariajournal.com/content/pdf/1475-2875-12-86.pdf Malaria vaccines are considered amongst the most important modalities for potential elimination of malaria disease and transmission. Research and development in this field has been an area of intense effort by many groups over the last few decades. Despite this, there is currently no licensed malaria vaccine. Researchers, clinical trialists and vaccine developers have been working on many approached to make malaria vaccine available but in the sub-Saharan region the capacity to undertake more clinical trials remains small in comparison to the actual need. ***

Malaria Indicator Survey: Basic Documentation for Survey Design and Implementation
MEASURE DHS, MEASURE Evaluation, Presidents Malaria Initiative, Roll Back Malaria, UNICEF, February 2013 http://malariasurveys.org/toolkit.cfm The Malaria Indicator Survey (MIS) package contains a series of guidelines, questionnaires, recommended tabulations, and relevant manuals to assist those conducting household-level malaria surveys. It contains additional recommendations for issues, such as measuring coverage of indoor residual spraying (IRS), anemia and malaria testing in survey field conditions, as well as guidance on integrating geocoding into survey sampling and data collection, as well as recommendations for presentation of survey r esults. ***

Increasing Incidence of Plasmodium knowlesi Malaria following Control of P. falciparum and P. vivax Malaria in Sabah, Malaysia
by Timothy William, Hasan A. Rahman, Jenarun Jelip et al. PLoS Negl Trop Dis 7(1): e2026 (24 January 2013) 9 pp. 1.1 MB: http://www.plosntds.org/article/fetchObjectAttachment.action;jsessionid=9E2E491 38431A3FC66FB57212E776B45?uri=info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pntd.0002026 &representation=PDF The authors report an increase in malaria cases in Borneo caused by the Plasmodium knowlesi parasite, threatening the regions hopes for malaria elimination. P. knowlesi is a strand of parasite found in macaques, which are native to the forests of Sabah, in northern Borneo. The parasite causes severe malaria in humans. It is transmitted via the forest-dwelling Anopheles leucosphyrus mosquito. ***

HESP-News & Notes - 06/2013 - page 13

Tackling the malaria problem in the South-East Asia Region: Need for a change in policy?
by Kaushik Bharati & N.K. Ganguly Indian J Med Res 137, January 2013, pp 36-47 12 pp. 587 kB: http://icmr.nic.in/ijmr/2013/january/4.pdf Malaria is largely neglected in the South-East Asia Region (SEAR), although it has the highest number of people susceptible to the disease. Malaria in the SEAR exhibits special epidemiological characteristics such as forest malaria and malaria due to migration across international borders. The Greater Mekong Subregion has been a focal-point for the emergence of drug resistant malaria. A holistic and sustained approach to malaria control by integrated vector management is suggested, in which all the stakeholder countries work collaboratively as a consortium. This approach will address the malaria problem in a collective manner so that malaria control can be sustained over time.

Tuberculosis Community-Based Tuberculosis Prevention and Care: Why and how to get involved
An International Handbook for Nongovernmental Organizations and Civil Society Organizations by Devasena Gnanashanmugam, Ann Hendrix-Jenkins, Derek Ambrosino et al. CORE Group TB Working Group, January 2013 59 pp. 1.1 MB: http://www.coregroup.org/storage/TB/Community-Based_TB.pdf This document is designed to serve as a handbook, or primer, for NGOs and CSOs that are considering joining the fight against TB. It provides information on TB and how it is prevented, diagnosed, and treated, how TB programs work on the ground, how communities and CSOs can get involved, and special populations that need extra attention. Step-by-step guidance on getting started in addressing TB, pitfalls to avoid, and a list of useful resources are included.

Other Infectious Diseases How Effective Is School-Based Deworming for the Community-Wide Control of Soil-Transmitted Helminths?
by Roy M. Anderson, James E. Truscott, Rachel L. Pullan et al. PLoS Negl Trop Dis 7(2): e2027 (28 February 2013) 15 pp. 1.2 MB:
http://www.plosntds.org/article/fetchObjectAttachment.action;jsessionid=D4308AE414A503A3A0F3 6897C723C6AC?uri=info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pntd.0002027&representation=PDF

Deworming for soil-transmitted helminths (STHs) is often targeted at school children because they are at greatest risk of morbidity and because it is remarkably cost-effective. HESP-News & Notes - 06/2013 - page 14

However, the impact of school-based deworming on transmission in the wider community remains unclear. The study suggests that, whilst school-based programmes have many important benefits, the proportion of infective stages targeted by school-based deworming may be limited, particularly where hookworm predominates. ***

Evolution of a pandemic - A(H1N1) 2009


April 2009 - August 2010; 2nd edition Edited by Adrienne Rashford World Health Organization, Global Influenza Programme, 2013 48 pp. 2.0 MB: http://apps.who.int/iris/bitstream/10665/78414/1/9789241503051_eng.pdf A public health emergency of international concern is an event which is determined to constitute a public health risk to other states through international spread of disease and to potentially require an international response On Saturday, 25 April 2009, upon the advice of the Emergency Committee called under the rules of the International Health Regulations, the Director-General of WHO declared 20 laboratory confirmed human cases of swine influenza A/H1N1 a Public Health Emergency of International Concern.

Non-communicable Diseases Addressing the Gaps in Global Policy and Research for Non-Communicable Diseases
Policy Briefs from the NCD Working Group Editors: Louis Galambos & Jeffrey L. Sturchio The Institute for Applied Economics, Global Health and the Study of Business Enterprise at the Johns Hopkins University, October 2012 28 pp. 1.3 MB: http://rabinmartin.com/pdf/NCD_Policy_Briefs.pdf Non-communicable diseases (NCDs) - including cardiovascular disease, diabetes, asthma and chronic respiratory infections and cancers - are a leading cause of death worldwide and 80% of these fatalities occur in low- and middle-income countries. It is now acknowledged that NCDs contribute greatly to rising health care costs and the loss of economic productivity. A range of programs and interventions have been considered and some innovative efforts are underway, but positive outcomes have often been diff icult to secure. ***

Chronic Non-Communicable Disease as a New Epidemic in Africa: Focus on The Gambia


by Semeeh A Omoleke The Pan African Medical Journal, 2013;14:87, 5 March 2013 Read online at: http://www.panafrican-med-journal.com/content/article/14/87/full/

HESP-News & Notes - 06/2013 - page 15

Recent epidemiological data suggest increasing burden of Non-Communicable Diseases (NCDs) in many African countries but these diseases have not been given adequate attention due to the overwhelming burden of infectious diseases. There are no recent reports on NCDs in The Gambia, consequently, this report intends to stimulate further epidemiological studies and also policy initiatives to forestall an epidemic.

Food & Nutrition 2012 Global Hunger Index


The Challenge of Hunger: Ensuring Sustainable Food Security under Land, Water, and Energy Stresses by Klaus von Grebmer, Claudia Ringler, Mark W. Rosegrant et al. International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI), October 2012 72 pp. 4.3 MB: http://www.ifpri.org/sites/default/files/publications/ghi12.pdf In this report, IFPRI describes the evidence on land, water, and energy scarcity in developing countries and offers two visions of a future global food system - an unsustainable scenario in which current trends in resource use continue, and a sustainable scenario in which access to food, modern energy, and clean water improves significantly and ecosystem degradation is halted or reversed. ***

2012 Global Food Policy Report


by Shenggen Fan, Rajul Pandya-Lorch, Gwendolyn Stansbury et al. International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI), 2013 142 pp. 5.0 MB: http://www.ifpri.org/sites/default/files/publications/gfpr2012.pdf IFPRIs 2012 Global Food Policy Report, the second in an annual series, reviews food policy developments and trends with chapter-by-chapter discussions of major food policy developments, high-quality research, and perspectives of farmers from around the world. ***

Ready-to-use food-allocation policy to reduce the effects of childhood undernutrition in developing countries
by Yan Yang, Jan Van den Broeck, and Lawrence M. Wein Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) March 4, 2013 - Published online before print 6 pp. 206 kB:
http://www.pnas.org/content/early/2013/02/27/1216075110.full.pdf+html

International development agencies may be able to save the lives of a greater number of undernourished children by changing how they allocate food aid in developing countries. Instead of allocating food based solely on weight-for-height measurements, as is currently recommended, making use of additional height-for-age data reduced the effects of malnutrition by nine per cent in the study. HESP-News & Notes - 06/2013 - page 16

Womens rights and the right to food


by Olivier De Schutter United Nations Human Rights Council, December 2012 20 pp. 588 kB: http://www.srfood.org/images/stories/pdf/officialreports/20130304_gender_en.pdf The Special Rapporteur on the right to food discusses the threats to womens right to food, identifying the areas that demand the most urgent attention. The report examines successively the obstacles women face in access to employment, social protection and the productive resources needed for food production, food processing and value chain development. It ends with a recommendation to States to effectively respond to women and girls needs and priorities in their food security strategies and to relieve womens unpaid work burden in the household.

Essential Medicines The World Medicines Situation 2011: Access to Controlled Medicines
by Barbara Milani and Willem Scholten Department of Essential Medicines and Pharmaceutical Policies, World Health Organization, 2011 22 pp. 1.0 MB: http://apps.who.int/iris/bitstream/10665/78334/1/WHO_EMP_MIE_ 2011.2.4_eng.pdf Controlled medicines are medicines that are listed under the international conventions on narcotic and psychotropic drugs and their precursors. Concern about abuse and dependence is a major factor in limiting access to opioids and other controlled medicines that are used in treating important health conditions. Barriers to access to controlled medicines include lack of medical knowledge, national policies and regulations that are more stringent than is required by the international conventions, and obstacles in the supply of this category of medicines. ***

The story of artesunate-mefloquine (ASMQ), innovative partnerships in drug development: case study
by Susan Wells, Graciela Diap and Jean-Ren Kiechel Malaria Journal 2013, 12:68 (21 February 2013) 20 pp. 271 kB: http://www.malariajournal.com/content/pdf/1475-2875-12-68.pdf The Drugs for Neglected Diseases initiative (DNDi) undertook the development of a fixed-dose combination of artesunate with mefloquine. Partnerships were formed across five continents, addressing formulation, control and production through to clinical trials and product registration, resulting in a safe and efficacious fixed dose combination treatment which is now available to treat patients in resource-poor settings. This collaborative approach to drug development involving international partnerships and independent funding mechanisms is a powerful new way to develop drugs for tropical diseases. HESP-News & Notes - 06/2013 - page 17

Social Protection Improving health and education through conditional cash transfers (CCTs)
Evidence and Lessons from Latin America (ELLA) 5 pp. 583 kB: http://www.dfid.gov.uk/r4d/pdf/outputs/ELLA/111109 _ECO_ConCasTra_BRIEF1.pdf One of the worst characteristics of poverty is its tendency to self-perpetuate, with poor families often being forced to underinvest in their childrens health and education. This brief describes how Latin America countries have used cash transfers (CCTs) to improve health and education, the results achieved, and lessons learned for improving health and education in other settings. ***

Social protection systems in Latin America and the Caribbean: Cuba


by Carmelo Mesa-Lago Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean (ECLAC), and Deutsche Gesellschaft fr Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ), 2013 49 pp. 1.5 MB: http://www.cepal.org/publicaciones/xml/2/49342/2013-94W.510_Social_protection_systems_CUBA_web.pdf This report is part of a series of national case studies aimed at disseminating knowledge on the current status of social protection systems in Latin American and Caribbean countries, and at discussing their main challenges in terms of realizing of the economic and social rights of the population and achieving key development goals, such as combating poverty and hunger. For other LAC country reports see: http://dds.cepal.org/socialprotection/social-protection-systems/ ***

Social security coverage extension in the BRICS


A comparative study on the extension of coverage in Brazil, the Russian Federation, India, China and South Africa International Social Security Association (ISSA), 2013 172 pp. 1.2 MB:
http://www.socialsecurityextension.org/gimi/gess/RessFileDownload.do;jsessionid=b08ebebafeb49b990287573 e5817258b38dcaf3fb192018ce200e14baaf4e361.e3aTbhuLbNmSe38PahqTc3aObi0?ressourceId=36249

This comparative study presents the diverse approaches of the BRICS for the extension of social security coverage. It shows how responses take into account the local realities and environment in each country, with a focus on innovations that measurably extend and improve coverage. The findings of this study are intended to provide an important input into an ISSA series of handbooks on extension of coverage to difficult-to-cover groups. It highlights common barriers to increasing coverage and offers pragmatic and HESP-News & Notes - 06/2013 - page 18

innovative policies and administrative responses to address those barriers.

Water, Sanitation & Hygiene Practical Guidance for Measuring Handwashing Behavior: 2013 Update
by Pavani Ram Water and Sanitation Program: Working Paper, February 2013 36 pp. 364 kB: http://www.wsp.org/sites/wsp.org/files/publications/WSP-PracticalGuidance-Measuring-Handwashing-Behavior-2013-Update.pdf In low- and middle-income settings, accurate measures of handwashing behavior are critical to understanding households health environment. But it can be challenging to measure handwashing. This document discusses a set of handwashing indicators and recommendations prepared to support the Water and Sanitation Programs Global Sca ling Up Handwashing project carried out in four countries. Descriptions of these measures, and the recommendations for their use should be of interest to a broad audience.

Health Systems & Research Equity Watch: Assessing progress towards equity in health Tanzania
by Rene Loewenson, Marie Masotya, Yahya Ipuge et al. Ifakara Health Institute, Ministry of Health and Social Welfare, Training and Research Support Centre, December 2012 76 pp. 1.7 MB:
http://www.equinetafrica.org/bibl/docs/Tanzania%20EW%20January2013.pdf

An Equity Watch is a means of monitoring progress on health equity by gathering, organising, analysing, reporting and reviewing evidence on equity in health. This report provides an array of evidence on the responsiveness of Tanzanias health system in promoting and attaining equity in health and health care, using the Equity Watch framework. The report introduces the context and the evidence within four major areas: equity in health, household access to the resources for health, equitable health systems and global justice. ***

An exploratory study of the policy process and early implementation of the free NHIS coverage for pregnant women in Ghana
by Sophie Witter, Bertha Garshong and Valry Ridde International Journal for Equity in Health 2013, 12:16 (27 February 2013) 11 pp. 284 kB: http://www.equityhealthj.com/content/pdf/1475-9276-12-16.pdf Pregnant women were offered free access to health care through National Health Insurance (NHIS) membership in Ghana in 2008, in the latest phase of policy reforms to ensure universal access to maternal health care. During the same year, free membership HESP-News & Notes - 06/2013 - page 19

was made available to all children (under-18). This article presents an exploratory qualitative analysis of how the policy of free maternal membership was developed and how it is being implemented. ***

Commercial Sector Performance-based Financing Offers Lessons for Public Health Supply Chains in Developing Countries
by Brian Serumaga and James E. Rosen USAID - DELIVER PROJECT, January 2013 6 pp. 715 kB: http://deliver.jsi.com/dlvr_content/resources/allpubs/guidelines/PBFComSec.pdf Health supply chains in developing nations may benefit from new models of performance improvement that link rewards with results. By looking at examples of performance-based financing (PBF) in the commercial sector, the authors have outlined four of the essential components for creating a successful PBF program. You can find these lessons learned in this new technical brief. ***

Twelve myths about systematic reviews for health system policymaking rebutted
by Kaelan A Moat, John N Lavis, Mike G Wilson et al. J Health Serv Res Policy, January 2013, Vol. 18, No. 1, pp. 44-50 7 pp. 124 kB: http://german-practice-collection.org/en/downloadcentre/doc_download/1103 Systematic reviews are increasingly being viewed as important sources of information for policymakers who need to make decisions on different aspects of the health system, often under tight time constraints and with many factors competing for their attention. Unfortunately, a number of misconceptions, or myths, stand in the way of promoting their use. This paper uses evidence drawn mainly from Health Systems Evidence to counter these common myths, with the aim of changing the constraining beliefs assoc iated with them, while improving the prospects for the use of systematic reviews in health system policymaking. ***

Patient-centred access to health care: conceptualising access at the interface of health systems and populations
by Jean-Frederic Levesque, Mark Harris and Grant Russell International Journal for Equity in Health, 12:18, (11 March 2013) 17 pp. 438 kB: http://www.equityhealthj.com/content/pdf/1475-9276-12-18.pdf Access is central to the performance of health care systems around the world. However, access to health care remains a complex notion as exemplified in the variety of interpretations of the concept across authors. The aim of this paper is to suggest a conceptualisation of access to health care describing broad dimensions and determinants that integrates demand and supply-side-factors and enabling the operationalisation of access to HESP-News & Notes - 06/2013 - page 20

health care all along the process of obtaining care and benefiting from the services. ***

Developing a New Understanding of Enabling Health and Wellbeing in Europe


Harmonising Health and Social Care Delivery and Informatics Support to Ensure Holistic Care by Michael Rigby, Sabine Koch, Debbie Keeling et al. Standing Committee for the Social Sciences (SCSS), Science Position Paper, 2013 56 pp. 4.9 MB: http://www.esf.org/index.php?eID=tx_ccdamdl_file&p[file]=42594&p[dl]=1&p[pid]= 3728&p[site]=European%20Science%20Foundation&p[t]=1363779197&hash=dbfb7362 96038754d1926f5f00b5e957&l=en Research on social care informatics is a good example of how the link between social science knowledge production and the application of this knowledge can be strengt hened, and how to crucially improve the feedback between research and practice. This position paper aims at presenting the vision of a new paradigm of integrated care su pport for citizens health through linked social and health care. It seeks to set a common ground between relevant consumer, professional and governmental bodies. ***

Determining quantitative targets for public funding of tuberculosis research and development
by David R Walwyn Health Research Policy and Systems 2013, 11:10 (8 March 2013) 21 pp. 324 kB: http://www.health-policy-systems.com/content/pdf/1478-4505-11-10.pdf Using two separate estimation methods (global justice and return on investment), the author concludes that most countries, including South Africa, are under-investing in TB Research & Development (R&D). Specific investment targets for a range of countries, particularly in areas of applied research, are developed. This work supports the outcome of the World Health Organizations Consultative Expert Working Group on Research and Development: Financing and Coordination, which has called for a process leading to the negotiation of a binding agreement on R&D relevant to the health needs of developing countries. ***

Performance Assessment in Primary Health Care: A Systematic Literature Review


by Olena Kalinichenko, Carla A. F. Amado, Srgio P. Santos University of Algarve Faculty of Economics and CEFAGE-UE Working Paper 2013/03 18 pp. 717 kB:
http://www.cefage.uevora.pt/en/content/download/3466/45683/version/1/file/2013_03.pdf

The aim of this research is to carry out a systematic literature review of the studies deHESP-News & Notes - 06/2013 - page 21

voted to the performance assessment of primary health care providers. The authors reviewed existing approaches presented in the relevant papers to compare performance of primary care providers. Different aspects of the performance assessment process were examined in order to provide an integral picture of the main developments in the referred domain and to draw a research agenda for the future. In what follows, the major results of their analysis are discussed.

Information & Communication Technology mHealth for Midwives: A Call to Action


by Anna Maria Speciale and Maria Freytsis Journal of Midwifery & Womens Health, Vol. 58, Issue 1, pp. 76-82, January/February 2013 7 pp. 172 kB:
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1542-2011.2012.00243.x/pdf

The exponential growth of mobile communications is connecting people in a way previously not imagined and creating opportunities to make unique health impacts. Integrating the strengths of midwifery care and mHealth technology into the strategy for achieving the critical Millennium Development Goals related to maternal and child health is a powerful way forward. Midwifery involvement in the mHealth revolution, particularly at this critical point in its development, could benefit midwifery education and access to midwifery care, creating the shift needed to make real strides in decreasing maternal mortality globally. ***

Mobile-izing Health Workers in Rural India


by Divya Ramachandran, John Canny, Prabhu Dutta Das et al. CHI 2010, April 10-15, 2010, Atlanta, Georgia, USA 10 pp. 1.6 MB: http://research.microsoft.com/en-us/um/people/cutrell/CHI2010RamachandranEtal-Mobile-izingHealth.pdf Researchers have long been interested in the potential of ICTs to enable positive change in developing regions communities. In these environments, ICT interventions often fail because political, social and cultural forces work against the changes ICTs entail. The authors argue that familiar uses of ICTs for information services in these contexts are less potent than their use for persuasion and motivation in order to facilitate change. They focus on Indias rural maternal health system where health workers are employed in villages to persuade pregnant women to utilize health services. ***

How Can ICTs Help Address Health Challenges in Low and Middle-income Countries?
International Development Research Centre (IDRC) eHealth Evaluation Summary, 2011

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16 pp. 3.3 MB: http://www.idrc.ca/EN/Programs/Global_Health_Policy/Governance_for_Equity_in _Health_Systems/Documents/eHealth_summary_english.pdf The use of information and communication technologies (ICTs) within health systems is often referred to as electronic health - or simply eHealth. IDRCs dual focus on strengthening capacity and influencing policy has shaped the variety of eHealth research supported for over a decade. These projects explore if, how, and in what contexts ICTs can be used to address health challenges in low- and middle- income countries. ***

A Reality Checkpoint for Mobile Health: Three Challenges to Overcome


by Virginia Barbour, Jocalyn Clark, Laureen Connell et al. PLoS Med 10(2): e1001395 (February 26, 2013) 2 pp. 118 kB:
http://www.plosmedicine.org/article/fetchObjectAttachment.action;jsessionid=30012832C038498C8 ABD96F8DA551FC0?uri=info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pmed.1001395&representation=PDF

The use of mobile electronic devices to support medical or public health practice, or mhealth, is currently a hot topic. It has been predicted that by 2017 there will be more mobile phones than people on the planet, and currently three-quarters of the world's population have access to a mobile phone. The authors set out three key challenges that advocates will need to overcome to fulfil the promise of m-Health. They conclude that given the challenges for m-Health, cooperation and coordination between very different stakeholders will be necessary to deliver on its potential. ***

Survey on ICT for HIV/AIDS Preventive Education: Are the teenagers forgotten in developing countries?
by Bada Joseph Kizito and Jarkko Suhonen Journal of Emerging Trends in Computing and Information Sciences, Vol. 2, No.6, June 2011 13 pp. 182 kB:
http://www.cisjournal.org/journalofcomputing/archive/vol2no6/vol2no6_3.pdf

In this study, the authors performed a literature review in order to identify the uses of ICT for HIV/AIDS preventive education in developing countries with a specific focus on teenagers. They noticed in their survey that contemporary ICT technologies, such as web2.0 tools and computer games, have not been extensively applied in HIV/AIDS pr eventive education in the context of developing countries. The authors conclude that there is a need to carry out more extensive research and development work in order to harness the potential of contemporary ICT solutions for targeting teenagers in developing countries. ***

Identifying Measures Used for Assessing Quality of YouTube Videos with Patient Health Information: A Review of Current Literature
by Elia Gabarron, Luis Fernandez-Luque, Manuel Armayones et al. Interact J Med Res 2013;2(1):e6 (28 February 2013) HESP-News & Notes - 06/2013 - page 23

9 pp. 902 kB: http://www.i-jmr.org/article/viewFile/ijmr_v2i1e6/2 Recent publications on YouTube have advocated its potential for patient education. However, a reliable description of what could be considered quality information for patient education on YouTube is missing. The review confirms that the current topics linked to quality of information for patient education on YouTube are unclear and not standardized. Although expertdriven, popularity-driven, or heuristic-driven measures are used as proxies to estimate the quality of video information, caution should be applied when using YouTube for health promotion and patient educational material. ***

m-Enabled Inclusive Business Models: Applications for Health


by Ansulie Cooper and Michael Kubzansky Strengthening Health Outcomes through the Private Sector (SHOPS) Project, February 2013 32 pp. 4.1 MB:
http://www.shopsproject.org/sites/default/files/resources/m-Enabled-Primer.pdf

The SHOPS project funded a 14-month study that identified mhealth (mobile applications for health) business models enabling enterprises to successfully engage with the poor in Africa, primarily in Ghana, Kenya, Senegal, South Africa, and Tanzania. This primer aims to (1) highlight key practices that will assist m-enabled enterprises in reaching commercial viability in the near term, and (2) assist funders interested in business model principles that enable sustainable impact. The primer shows that inclusive businesses in all sectors are still in their infancy and that much can be learned about how they work, why many struggle, and why only a few succeed.

Education Broadband for schools?


by Michael Trucano EduTech - A World Bank Blog on ICT use in Education, February 2013 Read online at: http://blogs.worldbank.org/edutech/broadband Most people would probably agree that, in 2013, all schools should have broadband connections to the Internet. This is, in fact, a common theme in many of the national policies related to ICT use in education one encounters around the world, especially in the more 'advanced' (OECD) countries, and increasingly in middle income countries as well. Reasonable people may (and do!) disagree about the extent to which school connectivity should be prioritized compared with other pressing needs in the education sector. ***

A Monitoring and Evaluation Scheme for an ICT-Supported Education Program in Schools


by Patricio Rodrguez, Miguel Nussbaum, Ximena Lpez et al. Educational Technology & Society, 13 (2), 166179 HESP-News & Notes - 06/2013 - page 24

14 pp. 608 kB: http://zunia.org/sites/default/files/media/node-files/12/451998_128352564-amonitoring-and-evaluation-scheme-for-an-ict-supported-education-program-in-schoolshttp-dcc-puc-cl.pdf More than 20 years after ICTs were introduced in schools, solid evidence of their impact on student attainment is still lacking. In this paper the authors present a monitoring and evaluation (M&E) scheme for a specific ICT4E program that supports teaching and learning using mobile computer supported collaborative learning (MCSCL). Using the information provided by the scheme, they analyze the programs impact on student a ttainment in terms of teacher adoption of innovation. ***

Aid and Universal Primary Education


by Rohen dAiglepierre and Laurent Wagner Centre dEtudes et de Recherches sur le Dveloppement International, ClermontFerrand, France, June 2010 30 pp. 6.6 MB: http://halshs.archives-ouvertes.fr/docs/00/55/22/41/PDF/2010.22.pdf Universal Primary Education (UPE) is one of the main objectives of development aid. However, very little empirical evidence of its effectiveness actually exists. Until very r ecently, the quality of available data was not sufficient to obtain robust results regarding the relationship between international aid and educational achievements. In this article, the latest, more disaggregated and more reliable data is used to study the relationship between aid to education and educational achievements.

Harm Reduction & Drug Use National Drug Use Survey Maldives - 2011/2012
United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC), 2013 95 pp. 3.6 MB: http://www.unodc.org/documents/southasia//reports/National_Drug _Use_Survey_-_Report.pdf Over the last few years, consumption of illicit drugs has significantly increased in the Maldives. Thus, this study was conducted to estimate the number of drug users and hence, the drug use prevalence in the Maldives. Secondary objectives include identifying patterns and extent of drug use across the country; assess behavioural characteristics associated with drug use; community knowledge, attitudes and perceptions towards drug problem.

Millennium Development Goals Now you too can vote on post-2015 goals
The United Nations has amped up its efforts to shape a post-Millennium DevelHESP-News & Notes - 06/2013 - page 25

opment Goals framework by this week launching the My World survey. Offered in 10 languages, the survey asks citizens from all over the world to share their thoughts on what priorities to include in the global development agenda beyond 2015. For your vote go to: http://www.myworld2015.org/ According to the United Nations, preliminary results reveal that education is the top priority among respondents, followed by an honest and responsive government, health care, water, sanitation, and job and food security. ***

Bringing evidence to policy to achieve health-related MDGs for all: justification and design of the EPI-4 project in China, India, Indonesia, and Vietnam
by Sarah Thomsen, Nawi Ng, Xu Biao et al. Glob Health Action 2013, 6: 19650 (13 March 2013) 10 pp. 546 kB: http://www.globalhealthaction.net/index.php/gha/article/view/19650/pdf_1 The Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) are monitored using national-level statistics, which have shown substantial improvements in many countries. These statistics may be misleading, however, and may divert resources from disadvantaged populations within the same countries that are showing progress. The purpose of this article is to set out the relevance and design of the Evidence for Policy and Implementation project (EPI-4). EPI-4 aims to contribute to the reduction of inequities in the achievement of health-related MDGs in China, India, Indonesia and Vietnam through the promotion of research informed policymaking.

Development Assistance The Impact of Official Development Aid on Maternal and Reproductive Health Outcomes: A Systematic Review
by Emma Michelle Taylor, Rachel Hayman, Fay Crawford et al. PLoS ONE 8(2): e56271 (22 February 2013) 18 pp. 1.1 MB: http://www.plosone.org/article/fetchObjectAttachment.action?uri=info%3Adoi%2F 10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0056271&representation=PDF This review presents the first systematic review of the impact of official development aid delivered according to the Paris principles and aid delivered outside this framework on MDG 5 outcomes. Its findings point to major gaps in the evidence base and should be used to inform new approaches and methodologies aimed at measuring the impact of official development aid. ***

The Allocation of German Aid: Self-interest and Government Ideology


by Axel Dreher, Peter Nunnenkamp, Maya Schmaljohann Kiel Institute for the World Economy, January 2013 HESP-News & Notes - 06/2013 - page 26

34 pp. 288 kB: http://www.ifw-members.ifw-kiel.de/publications/the-allocation-ofgerman-aid-self-interest-and-government-ideology/KWP_1817.pdf The authors investigate the importance of geo-strategic and commercial motives for the allocation of German aid to 138 countries over the 19732010 period. It was found that geo-strategic and - less robustly - commercial motives matter. When geo-strategic and commercial motives are related to the political colour of the German government in general, and the Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development and the Federal Foreign Office in particular, it was found that their importance increase under socialist leadership. Socialist leadership also decreases the amount of aid commitments, controlled for other factors. ***

Why Donors of Foreign Aid Do Not Coordinate: The Role of Competition for Export Markets and Political Support
by Andreas Fuchs, Peter Nunnenkamp, Hannes hler Kiel Institute for the World Economy, February 2013 39 pp. 817 kB:
http://www.ifw-members.ifw-kiel.de/publications/why-donors-of-foreign-aid-do-notcoordinate-the-role-of-competition-for-export-markets-and-political-support/KWP_1825.pdf

Development assistance has been criticized for a lack of coordination between aid donors. This paper argues that competition for export markets and political support prevents donor countries from closer coordination of aid activities. The empirical results reveal that export competition between donors is a major impediment to aid coordination. Tough less conclusive, some evidence is also found that donors competition over polit ical support prevents them from coordinating aid activities more closely. ***

Ca$h On Dliver: A new approach to foreign aid


by Nancy Birdsall, William D. Savedoff, Ayah Mahgoub et al. Second edition 2011 - Center for Global Development 152 pp. 1.1 MB: http://www.cgdev.org/files/1423949_file_CODAid_SECOND_web.pdf Foreign aid has no shortage of critics. Some argue that it undermines development and inherently does more harm than good; others insist that aid must be seriously reformed to work properly. Cash on Delivery (COD) Aid proposes serious reform to make aid work well by forcing accountability, aligning the objectives of funders and recipients, and sharing information about what works. ***

Implementing a Results-Based Approach to Strengthen IDA Support for Fragile States


by Alan Gelb Center for Global Development, 3 March 2013

HESP-News & Notes - 06/2013 - page 27

6 pp. 599 kB: http://www.cgdev.org/files/1427015_file_implementing_results_ba sed_approach_to_strengthen_ida.pdf Fragile and conflict-affected countries (FCCs) pose a great challenge to the development community as a whole and to the International Development Association (IDA, the concessional lending arm of the World Bank), in particular. How much financing should IDA provide to these countries? How can it strengthen incentives for development results? This brief outlines how to implement a results-based approach in a way consistent with the banks recent experience with results-based disbursement, including its approval of the new Program for Results (PforR) instrument.

Others Venomous Snakes of Nepal: A photographic guide


by S.K. Sharma, D.P. Pandey, K.B. Shah et al. Published by B.P. Koirala Institute of Health Sciences, Dharan, Nepal First edition, February 2013 English edition (86 pp. 4.0 MB):
http://www.bik-f.de/files/publications/kuch_venomous_snakes_of_nepal_-_english_edition.pdf

Nepali edition (84 pp. 4.0 Mb):


http://www.bik-f.de/files/publications/kuch_venomous_snakes_of_nepal_-_nepali_edition.pdf

Snakebite envenoming is one of the most neglected diseases of the 21st century and affects several million people every year. As part of Swiss and German cooperation with Nepal, a team of biologists and physicians from the three countries has prepared a book on the venomous snakes of Nepal that is the first to help identify these dangerous re ptiles based on photographs and text in separate Nepali and English editions. The book also contains information on snakebite first aid and treatment. This information is country-specific and reflects the present state of scientific evidence on this topic in the Nepali context. ***

Report of the Special Rapporteur on torture and other cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment
by UN Special Rapporteur on Torture Juan E. Mndez Human Rights Council, Twenty-second session, 1 February 2013 23 pp. 650 kB: http://www.ohchr.org/Documents/HRBodies/HRCouncil/RegularSession/Session2 2/A.HRC.22.53_English.pdf The report focuses on certain forms of abuses in health-care settings that may cross a threshold of mistreatment that is tantamount to torture or cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment. It identifies the policies that promote these practices and existing protection gaps. The Special Rapporteurs report is the first systematic examination of torture and ill-treatment committed in health care contexts. The report says that abuse cannot be justified by claims of medical necessity, and it underscores the fundamental need for free, full, and informed consent by patients to any and all medical procedures.

HESP-News & Notes - 06/2013 - page 28

Sun Exposure Behavior and Protection: Recommendations for Travelers


by James H. Diaz and Lee T. Nesbitt Jr Journal of Travel Medicine, Vol. 20, Issue 2, pp. 108-118, March/April 2013 11 pp. 712 kB: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.17088305.2012.00667.x/pdf Although there have been recent advances in the development of photoprotective clothing and broad-spectrum sunscreens, few peer-reviewed publications have focused on photoprotection recommendations for travelers. Recommended photoprotection strategies for travelers should include avoiding intense sunlight, wearing photoprotective clothing, wearing sunglasses, and selecting the right sunscreen for their skin type. Travel medicine practitioners should counsel travelers about photoprotection and encourage travelers to take advantage of recent advances in the development of more effective broad-spectrum sunscreens and photoprotective clothing for themselves and their children.

ELECTRONIC RESOURCES
Global Burden of Disease (GBD) Visualizations
Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME) http://www.healthmetricsandevaluation.org/gbd/visualizations/country The Global Burden of Disease (GBD) study represented a major step in quantifying global and regional effects of diseases, injuries, and risk factors on population health. It also stimulated numerous national studies of burden of disease. The results have been used by governments and non-governmental organizations to inform priorities for research, development, policies, and funding. GBD Compare is new to IHMEs lineup of visualizations and has countless options for exploring health data. ***

Southern African Journal of HIV Medicine - Vol. 14 No. 1


The first 2013 issue of the Southern African Journal of HIV Medicine has been published online (open access) at: http://www.sajhivmed.org.za The SAJHIVMED is a quarterly medical journal focused on HIV/AIDS treatment, prevention and related topics relevant to clinical and public health practice. The purpose of the journal is to disseminate original research results and to support high level learning related to HIV Medicine. In this issue: Gender inequality: Bad for mens health WHO guidelines should not change CD4 threshold for ART Transitioning behaviourally HIV-infected youths into adult care HIV and concurrency of sexual partnerships in SA language groups Overview of HIV-related lipodystrophy

HESP-News & Notes - 06/2013 - page 29

INTERESTING WEB SITES


Open Development Technology Alliance
http://odta.net/node/2982 ODTA.net is a knowledge platform aiming to give voice to citizens and improve accountability by offering ways to provide feedback on public services. It provides knowledge products, links experts with projects and facilitates the development of and dissemination of information and communications technology (ICT) tools. This will help to make governments more accountable for the public services they provide. ***

Bangladesh Health Population and Nutrition Development Partner Consortium


http://www.hpnconsortium.org The Government of Bangladesh has been conducting a sector-wide approach programme coordinated with bilateral and multilateral donors to strengthen the health se ctor; it is called the Health, Population, and Nutrition Sector Development Programme (HPNSDP). It is the largest sector-wide approach in the world. The Health, Population and Nutrition website features all essential information about the HPNSDP development partner consortium. It aims to promote the sharing and applic ation of knowledge on health development in Bangladesh and to serve as an information resource for those interested to know more about the HPNSDP.

TRAINING OPPORTUNITIES
2nd Blended E-learning course Pension Systems in Southeast Asia
21 May - 30 November 2013 Regional GIZ Programme Social Security in Southeast Asia in cooperation with evaplan GmbH, Public Health Consult of the University of Heidelberg This online course will provide hands-on and case-oriented expertise in the areas of social protection for the old age population and pension reforms in the South-East Asian context. The target group are professionals from pension insurances, labour and social protection ministries as well as research institutions and civil society organizations working in the field of old age protection. The introductory (face-to-face) workshop will take place from 21-23 May on Bali, Indonesia, and will be prepared in cooperation with our colleagues from the bilateral Social Protection Programme in Indonesia. For more information and registration to the course see: https://shop.gc21-eacademy.org/Sustainable-Economics/Pension-Systems-for-AgeingPopulation-oxid.html Deadline for registration is 5 April 2013 (it will possibly be extended for one week). There are a limited amount of scholarships available which can be applied for on the HESP-News & Notes - 06/2013 - page 30

course homepage. For further information please dont hesitate to contact: Mr Cormac Ebken Planning Officer/Senior Project Manager, Social Protection Section Deutsche Gesellschaft fr Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ) GmbH Koethener Str. 2 10963 Berlin, Germany Tel: +49-30-408190-371 Mobile: +49-151-6282-2781 Fax: +49-30-43996260 Email: cormac.ebken@giz.de Skype: cormac.ebken1 ***

Clinic on the Meaningful Modelling of Epidemiological Data


June 3 - 14, 2013 African Institute for Mathematical Sciences, Muizenberg, South Africa The South African Centre for Epidemiological Modelling (SACEMA) invites applications to the fourth annual Clinic on the Meaningful Modelling of Epidemiological Data. This two-week modelling clinic will emphasize the use of data in understanding infectious disease dynamics. The Clinic will bring together graduate students, post-doctoral students and researchers from Africa and North America, with the goal of engaging the participants in epidemiological modelling projects that use real data to grapple with practical questions in a meaningful way. The full announcement and online application form can be accessed at: http://www.sacema.com/node/mmed-2013 The deadline for receipt of applications is 31 March 2013. Enquiries may be directed to: Lynnemore Scheepers scheepersl@sun.ac.za ***

31st Annual Graduate Summer Institute of Epidemiology and Biostatistics


June 10-28, 2013 Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health Baltimore MD, USA The Graduate Summer Institute of Epidemiology and Biostatistics offers short, intensive courses in epidemiology and biostatistics intended to develop an understanding of the principles, methodologic strategies and practical aspects of epidemiological research. The Summer Institute schedule offers courses that meet for three weeks, two weeks or one week as well as a weekend course. For more information see their web site: http://www.jhsph.edu/departments/epidemiology/continuing-education/graduatesummer-institute-of-epidemiology-and-biostatistics/ HESP-News & Notes - 06/2013 - page 31

CONFERENCES
Workshop Report: Community-Based Rehabilitation (CBR) & Persons with Intellectual Disabilities
Agra (India), 24-25 November 2012 Published by Italian Association Amici di Raoul Follereau (AIFO), Bologna, Italy, 2013 34 pp. 943 kB: http://www.aifo.it/english/disability/documents/cbr_id_workshop/Report_Internatio nal_Workshop_ID.pdf Persons with intellectual disabilities often face barriers in accessing Community-Based Rehabilitation (CBR) programmes. The aim of the workshop was to discuss the key issues facing persons with intellectual disabilities at community level and the ways in which CBR programmes can work together with them, their families and communities to promote inclusion and participation. For further information see: http://www.aifo.it/english/disability/documents/cbr_id_workshop/index.htm

CARTOON

TIPS & TRICKS


Quick deletion of whole words in MS WORD
To delete a word in a MS WORD text most users repeatedly press Backspace or Delete. But there are two possibilities to quickly delete a word: press CRTL+Backspace to delete the word left of your cursor or CTRL+Del to remove the word right of your cursor. If your cursor is inside a word CRTL+Backspace will delete all letters from the cursor to the beginning of the word, CTRL+Del all letters from your cursor to the end of the word. *** HESP-News & Notes - 06/2013 - page 32

4 Shortcuts to Find Things Fast with Firefox


The location bar, also called the URL bar or address bar, displays a sites web address (URL). It is also called the Awesome Bar because it remembers those websites you have visited before, guesses where you are trying to go and displays a list of suggested sites you can choose from. And the more you use it, the better it gets. 1. CTRL + L (Command on the Mac) pops your cursor right into the Awesome Bars search field. You dont even have to reach for your mouse or touchpad. 2. There are some pretty common searches that are performed by many, so there are search command shortcuts built into the Awesome Bar. To find the meaning of a word you dont have to navigate to a dictionary site, fill in the word, hit return, etc. Head to the address field in the Awesome Bar and type dict followed by the word youd like to look up. Example: dict nonprofit to see what Mozilla Firefox means when it says it is proudly nonprofit. 3. Looking for something within a Web page? You can always use Ctrl (Cmd for Mac) + F to open the search box. 4. Looking for a link? You can search for phrases that occur in those links by using Quick Find. It is a simple keyboard shortcut, just type (the single quote character) to bring up the Quick Find bar (links only). Best regards, Dieter Neuvians MD ---------------------------To subscribe for free to the newsletter send an e-mail to:

Majordomo@mailserv.gtz.de
leave the Subject line empty with the following commands in the body of the message:

subscribe hpn-news-notes end (If you have problems subscribing, send me a note (dneuvians@gmx.de) that you would like to receive the newsletter).

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HESP-News & Notes - 06/2013 - page 33